Sample records for ky kentucky nh

  1. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. Supplement I. [Additional information on 38 items requested by KY/DNREP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Jr., John F.

    1981-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a letter from KY/DNREP, January 19, 1981, ICRC and DOE have prepared the enclosed supplement to the Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Permit Application for Air Contaminant Source for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Each of the 38 comments contained in the letter has been addressed in accordance with the discussions held in Frankfort on January 28, 1981, among representatives of KY/DNREP, EPA Region IV, US DOE, and ICRC. The questions raised involve requests for detailed information on the performance and reliability of proprietary equipment, back-up methods, monitoring plans for various pollutants, composition of wastes to flares, emissions estimates from particular operations, origin of baseline information, mathematical models, storage tanks, dusts, etc. (LTN)

  2. DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Technical College, 4810 Alben Barkley Dr, Paducah, KY 42001 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl Contact Regional Co-Coordinator - Buz Smith, DOE Public Affairs 270-441-6821...

  3. ?? / Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, T?go

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    question when considering science and technology in Japanese?? /Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science Tsukahara T?go Translationto incorporate and develop science and technology from the

  4. Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Keith; Andrew, Kevin A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing data available from the Kentucky Geonet (KYGeonet.ky.gov) the fossil fuel mining locations created by the Kentucky Geological Survey geo-locating oil and gas wells are mapped using ESRI ArcGIS in Kentucky single plain 1602 ft projection. This data was then exported into a spreadsheet showing latitude and longitude for each point to be used for modeling at different scales to determine the fractal dimension of the set. Following the porosity and diffusivity studies of Tarafdar and Roy1 we extract fractal dimensions of the fossil fuel mining locations and search for evidence of scaling laws for the set of deposits. The Levy index is used to determine a match to a statistical mechanically motivated generalized probability function for the wells. This probability distribution corresponds to a solution of a dynamical anomalous diffusion equation of fractional order that describes the Levy paths which can be solved in the diffusion limit by the Fox H function ansatz.

  5. Kentucky Department of Agriculture

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer & Environmental Protection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture) described Biofuel Quality Testing in Kentucky.

  6. Microenterprise Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In partnership with Community Ventures Corporation, a non-profit community based lender, the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development has expanded the Kentucky Micro-Enterprise Loan (KMEL) program...

  7. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  8. Kentucky DOE EPSCoR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grulke, Eric; Stencel, John [no longer with UK

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The KY DOE EPSCoR Program supports two research clusters. The Materials Cluster uses unique equipment and computational methods that involve research expertise at the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville. This team determines the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of nanostructured materials and examines the dominant mechanisms involved in the formation of new self-assembled nanostructures. State-of-the-art parallel computational methods and algorithms are used to overcome current limitations of processing that otherwise are restricted to small system sizes and short times. The team also focuses on developing and applying advanced microtechnology fabrication techniques and the application of microelectrornechanical systems (MEMS) for creating new materials, novel microdevices, and integrated microsensors. The second research cluster concentrates on High Energy and Nuclear Physics. lt connects research and educational activities at the University of Kentucky, Eastern Kentucky University and national DOE research laboratories. Its vision is to establish world-class research status dedicated to experimental and theoretical investigations in strong interaction physics. The research provides a forum, facilities, and support for scientists to interact and collaborate in subatomic physics research. The program enables increased student involvement in fundamental physics research through the establishment of graduate fellowships and collaborative work.

  9. Research results from the Ashland Exploration, Inc., Ford Motor Company 80 (COOP 2) well, Pike County, KY. Topical report, October 1991-November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, J.H.; Lancaster, D.E.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the work performed on the Ashland Exploration, Inc. (AEI) Ford Motor Company 80 (COOP 2) well in Pike County, KY. The COOP 2 was the second well in a three-well research project being conducted by GRI in eastern Kentucky targeting both the Devonian Shales and the Berea Sand; the FMC 80 focused on the Berea. The primary objective of the research was to use and transfer technologies developed in GRI`s Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales programs to evaluate the Berea in Pike Co., KY.

  10. Kentucky Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) focuses on the development of areas with high unemployment and poverty levels. The program provides an income tax credit of up to 100% of the...

  11. Recovery Act State Memos Kentucky

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * KENTUCKY RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)...

  12. Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Title 405 chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18 and 20 establish the laws governing coal mining in the state.

  13. Forestry Policies (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky's forests are managed by the State Energy and Environment Cabinet, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry. In 2010 the Division completed its Statewide Assessment of Forest...

  14. Rural Innovation Fund (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fund provides capital to early-stage technology companies located in rural areas of Kentucky. Companies may apply for a $30,000 grant or an investment up to $100,000.

  15. OHIO RIVER SHORELINE, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, (PADUCAH, KENTUCKY LFPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 OHIO RIVER SHORELINE, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, (PADUCAH, KENTUCKY LFPP) RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT 22 June and private infrastructure to Paducah, Kentucky, from flooding by the Ohio River through reconstruction of an existing Corps of Engineers floodwall and levee system. The city of Paducah is the non-Federal sponsor

  16. Columbia Gas of Kentucky- Home Savings Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Kentucky offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient appliances and equipment. Water heaters, furnaces and space heating equipment...

  17. Kentucky Save Energy Now Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet contains details regarding a Save Energy Now industrial energy efficiency project that the U.S. Department of Energy funded in Kentucky.

  18. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  19. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energys (DOEs) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentuckys most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealths economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentuckys electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  20. Environmental investigations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, McCracken County, Kentucky: Volume 1 -- Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of four studies into environmental and cultural resources on and near the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) located in Western Kentucky in McCracken County, approximately 10 miles west of Paducah, KY. The area investigated includes the PGDP facility proper, additional area owned by DOE under use permit to the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), area owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky that is administered by the WKWMA, area owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Metropolis Lake State Nature preserve and some privately held land. DOE requested the assistance and support of the US Army Engineer District, Nashville (CEORN) in conducting various environmental investigations of the area. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) provided technical support to the CEORN for environmental investigations of (1) wetland resources, (2) threatened or endangered species and habitats, and (3) cultural resources. A floodplain investigation was conducted by CEORN.

  1. EIS-0318: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project, Trapp, Kentucky (Clark County)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide cost-shared financial support for The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project, an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky.

  2. albany shale kentucky: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bakken, Dobson, Patrick 2014-01-01 9 Kentucky Annual Economic Report Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: 2014 Kentucky Annual Economic Report...

  3. South Kentucky RECC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation (RECC) provides service to more than 60,000 customers in southeastern Kentucky. To promote energy efficiency to residential customers, South...

  4. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Kentucky as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  5. State Energy Program: Kentucky Implementation Model Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are resources associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office State Energy Program Kentucky Implementation Model.

  6. Chapter 63 General Standards of Performance (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 63, entitled Air Quality: General Standards of Performance, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and...

  7. A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    can be advanced--among patients, health care providers, and the community at large. This workA PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress

  8. Kentucky DOE-EPSCoR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.M.; Ochsenbein, M.P.

    2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The KY DOE EPSCoR Program included efforts to impact positively the pipeline of science and engineering students and to establish research, education and business infrastructure, sustainable beyond DOE EPSCoR funding.

  9. West KY Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell DirectorThe& FederalPleasePhotoWest KY Regional

  10. Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinets Department...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    production facilities in Kentucky, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  12. Kentucky WRI Pilot Test Universal ID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    screening deployment experience Significant cost savings to FMCSA Enabling technology already deployedKentucky WRI Pilot Test Universal ID Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 #12;Utilizes existing automated screening system Uses assorted

  13. Kentucky Power- Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Power's High Efficiency Heat Pump Program offers a $400 rebate to residential customers living in existing (site-built) homes who upgrade electric resistance heating systems with a new,...

  14. Kentucky

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has|Issues inU

  15. Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky: An Implementation Model for States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky.

  16. Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 -...NH,,3 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 - ...­NH,,3 - ... with analytical long range Liesbeth, Poland Received 16 September 2009; accepted 7 November 2009; published online 10 December 2009; publisher error corrected 15 December 2009 We present four-dimensional ab initio potential energy surfaces

  17. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

  18. Coal rank trends in eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of coal rank (by vitrinite maximum reflectance) for eastern Kentucky coals has revealed several regional trends. Coal rank varies from high volatile C (0.5% R/sub max/) to medium volatile bituminous (1.1% R/sub max/), and generally increases to the southeast. One east-west-trending rank high and at least four north-south-trending rank highs interrupt the regional increase. The east-west-trending rank high is associated with the Kentucky River faults in northeastern Kentucky. It is the only rank high clearly associated with a fault zone. The four north-south-trending rank highs are parallel with portions of major tectonic features such as the Eastern Kentucky syncline. Overall, though, the association of north-south-trending rank highs with tectonic expression is not as marked as that with the anomaly associated with the Kentucky River faults. It is possible that the rank trends are related to basement features with subdued surface expression. Rank generally increases with depth, and regional trends observed in one coal are also seen in overlying and underlying coals. The cause of the regional southeastward increase in rank is likely to be the combined influence of greater depth of burial and proximity to late Paleozoic orogenic activity. The anomalous trends could be due to increased depth of burial, but are more likely to have resulted from tectonic activity along faults and basement discontinuities. The thermal disturbances necessary to increase the coal rank need not have been great, perhaps on the order of 10-20/sup 0/C (18-36/sup 0/F) above the metamorphic temperatures of the lower rank coals.

  19. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part VI. The nature of pseudovitrinites in Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinkle, E.J.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overall average pseudovitrinite content for 1055 eastern Kentucky coal samples is nearly 9% while average percentage of pseudovitrinite for 551 western Kentucky coals is approximately 4%. Examination of variation in pseudovitrinite content relative to rank changes shows uniformity in pseudovitrinite percentages within the 4 to 7 V-type interval for eastern Kentucky coals but a gradual increase in pseudovitrinite content for western Kentucky coals over the same rank interval. Coals from both coal fields show similar, distinct increases in pseudovitrinite percentage in the highest V-type categories. However, it is suggested here that these supposed increases in pseudovitrinite percentages are not real but rather, indicate distinct increase in the brightness of nitrinite resulting from increased alteration of vitrinite beginning at this stage of coalification and continuing into the higher rank stages. This conclusion is reached when it is found that differences between pseudovitrinite and vitrinite reflectance are least in coals at these high rank intervals of Kentucky and, also, when vitrinite particles are often visually observed having brightness equal to that of pseudovitrinite particles. Relation of pseudovitrinite to other sulfur forms and total sulfur in general shows no significant trends, although the relatively high pyritic sulfur content in western Kentucky coals, coupled with relatively low inert percentages suggest the existence of predominantly reducing, or at least non-oxidizing conditions in the Pennsylvanian peat swamps of western Kentucky. Initial work involving Vicker's microhardness testing of coals indicates that microhardness values for pseudovitrinite are higher than those for vitrinite within the same sample regardless of coal rank or coal field from which the sample was collected. 15 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

  20. A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Rick

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The accompanying report, manual and assimilated data represent the initial preparation for submission of an Application for Primacy under the Class II Underground Injection Control (UIC) program on behalf of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to identify deficiencies in Kentucky law and regulation that would prevent the Kentucky Division of Oil and Gas from receiving approval of primacy of the UIC program, currently under control of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Atlanta, Georgia.

  1. Chapter 52 Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 52, entitled Air Quality: Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the...

  2. Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Credit (Kentucky) Policy Category Financial Incentive Policy Type Corporate Tax Incentive Affected Technologies BiomassBiogas Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector StateProvince...

  3. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is...

  4. Research results from the Ashland Exploration, Inc. Ford Motor Company 78 (ed) well, Pike County, Kentucky. Topical report, April 1992-December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, C.W.; Frantz, J.H.; Lancaster, D.E.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed on the Ashland Exploration, Inc. Ford Motor Company 78 (Experimental Development (ED)) Well, in Pike County, KY. The ED well was the third well drilled in a research project conducted by GRI in eastern Kentucky targeting both the Devonian Shales and Berea Sandstone. Both the Shales and Berea were completed and tested in the ED well. The primary objective of the ED well was to apply what was learned from studying the Shalers in COOP 1 (first well drilled) and the Berea in COOP 2 (second well drilled) to both the Shales and the Berea in the ED well. Additionally, the ED well was used to evaluate the impact of different stimulation treatments on Shales production. Research in the ED well brings to a close GRI`s extensive field-based research program in the Appalachian Basin over the last ten years.

  5. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.

    1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the petrography of Kentucky coals sponsored by the US Department of Energy currently involves three projects as described below: semi-inert macerals, spectral fluorescence of liptinites, and pyrite size/form/microlithotype distribution. Progress to date has varied due to requirements for training personnel and due to equipment problems. With the two-year continuation of the grant further study will apply results from the above projects to stratigraphic problems.

  6. Fluidic Optics George M. Whitesides* and Sindy K.Y. Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Fluidic Optics George M. Whitesides* and Sindy K.Y. Tang Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 ABSTRACT Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic

  7. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development for pH, nutrients, and pathogens in several Kentucky streams, 2) Evaluation of the impacts of Environmental Health (NIEH), and east Kentucky PRIDE (Personal Responsibility in a Desirable Environment): 1) Environmental Protection Scholarship (NREPC), 2) Technical support for the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site

  8. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of environmental assessment and cleanup activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Six student research involving radiation and other contaminants at the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The Kentucky River Authority supported watershed management services in the Kentucky River

  9. High-resolution energy-selected study of the reaction NH3+ -> NH2 ++H: Accurate thermo chemistry for the NH2/NH2+ and NH3/NH3 + systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Y.; Qian, X.M.; Lau, K.C.; Ng, C.Y.; Liu, J.B.; Chen, W.W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing the newly developed high-resolution pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE)-photoion coincidence (PFI-PEPICO) technique, we have examined the dissociation of energy-selected NH{sub 3}{sup +} to form NH{sub 2}{sup +} + H near its threshold. The breakdown curves for NH{sub 2}{sup +} and NH{sub 3}{sup +} thus obtained yield a value of 15.765 {+-} 0.001 eV for the 0 K dissociation threshold or appearance energy (AE) for NH{sub 2}{sup +} from NH{sub 3}. This value, together with the known ionization energy (IE=10.1864 {+-} 0.0001 eV) and 0 K bond dissociation energy (D{sub 0} = 4.6017 {+-} 0.0025 eV) for NH{sub 3}, allows the determination of the D{sub 0}(NH{sub 2}{sup +}-H) and IE(NH{sub 2}), which are 5.5786 {+-} 0.0010 and 11.1633 {+-} 0.0025 eV, respectively. Using the known 0 K heats of formation ({Delta}H{sup 0}{sub f0}) for NH{sub 3} and H and the AE(NH{sub 2}{sup +}), we obtain the {Delta}H{sup o}{sub f0}(NH{sub 2}{sup +}) = 302.60 {+-} 0.08 kcal/mol. The PFI-PE spectrum for NH{sub 3} exhibits a step-like feature at the 0 K AE(NH{sub 2}{sup +}), indicating that the dissociation of excited NH{sub 3} in high-n (n {ge} 100) Rydberg states at energies slightly above the dissociation threshold occurs on a time scale {le}10{sup -7} s. This step confirms the AE(NH{sub 2}{sup +}) value derived from the PFI-PEPICO measurements. Highly accurate energetic data with well-founded error limits, such as those obtained in the present and other studies using the PFI techniques, are expected to play an important role for the development of the next generation of ab initio quantum computation procedures. This experiment has stimulated a state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemical calculation (Dixon et al., J. Chem. Phys., accepted). The comparison between theoretical predictions and the best experimental results for the NH{sub 2}/NH{sub 2}{sup +} and NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 3}{sup +} systems indicates that the accuracy of the computational scheme used is {le}0.4 kcal/mol.

  10. 5, 1133111375, 2005 NH total ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ACPD 5, 1133111375, 2005 NH total ozone increase S. Dhomse et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction On the possible causes of recent increases in NH total ozone from a statistical analysis of satellite data from License. 11331 #12;ACPD 5, 1133111375, 2005 NH total ozone increase S. Dhomse et al. Title Page Abstract

  11. Energy Incentive Programs, Kentucky | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFactIowa Energy IncentiveKentucky

  12. Adairville, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara, CaliforniaI Jump to:Adairville, Kentucky:

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Kentucky | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments EnergyFebruary3 CategoricalIdaho CategoricalKentucky Categorical

  14. Kentucky Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Kentucky

  15. Hickman, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hi-GtelTennessee: EnergyKentucky:

  16. Hopkinsville, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania: EnergyHopkinsville, Kentucky: Energy Resources

  17. Kentucky Utilities Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistec Srl Jump to:Kentucky Utilities

  18. Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistec Srl Jump to:Kentucky

  19. Columbia, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:Governor s EnergyColquittWashington:RiverKentucky:

  20. Finding the largest low-rank clusters with Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan Vinh Doan

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 24, 2014 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the Ky Fan 2-k-norm and l1-norm to fi nd k largest approximately rank-one...

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site, Paducah, KY, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision document presents the selected interim action for the North-South Diversion Ditch (NSDD) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action is to initiate control of the source of continued contaminant releases into the NSDD and mitigate the spread of contamination from the NSDD.

  2. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  3. Agriculture and Natural Resources Family and Consumer Sciences 4-H Youth Development Community and Economic Development COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, LEXINGTON, KY, 40546

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    prevalent for use in diesel engines. Biodiesel commonly is made from oil feedstock, such as soybean or other that at least 9 percent of the U.S. gasoline and diesel fuel supplies in 2012 will be from renew- ablesources

  4. Agriculture and Natural Resources Family and Consumer Sciences 4-H Youth Development Community and Economic Development COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, LEXINGTON, KY, 40546

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    petroleum or from biomass feedstocks. Butanol can be made from biomass through fermentation using organisms

  5. SEP Success Story: Kentucky Launches State-Wide School Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    In what could potentially be the first program of its scale, Kentucky has hired a new green team of 35 energy managers. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Energy efficiency...

  6. EECBG Success Story: Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kentucky invested 140,000 of a 2.7 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) to purchase EnergyCAP software. The energy management software will allow the...

  7. Kentucky Utilities Company- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

  8. Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fuel, and we're very proud of that. Also, Kentucky has the largest fleet of hybrid electric school buses in the nation and that's given our coalition a lot of credibility....

  9. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  10. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant), the Kentucky Deparmtnet of Military Affairs (Technical Support and cleanup at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant over the next several years. Five research projects were

  11. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminants at the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site and at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant). The Kentucky at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Seven student research enhancement projects were selected for support

  12. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), and the Kentucky River Authority (KRA): 1) Technical Support for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (CHS) 2 capability of wetland soils and paleowetland sediments in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  13. Publisher's Note: "Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 -...-NH,,3 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publisher's Note: "Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 - ...-NH,,3 - ... with analytical of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-006 Katowice, Poland Received 21 December 2009; published

  14. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. Appendix D. Impact assessment. [Demonstration plant at Newman, KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In appendix D, the air quality condition for various pollutants in the areas surrounding the proposed demonstration plant site is given with respect to attainment or non-attainment of US EPA regulations. The minimum pollutant emission rates for these regulated and for several other pollutants are given. Then the estimated emission rates from the proposed plant are given for a dozen pollutants which exceed these limits and therefore require an ambient air quality analysis. This involves taking into account the estimated emission of these pollutants from the proposed plant and from other sources in the surrounding area. Finally, background data from the surrounding area including meteorological data and sampling of regulated pollutants are given. (LTN)

  15. Geotechnical/Environmental Engineering Intern Manchester, NH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    Geotechnical/Environmental Engineering Intern Manchester, NH POSITION DESCRIPTION The candidate will provide support for site characterization geotechnical investigations, site development, remediation include, but are not limited to: Interpreting, and presenting, environmental data; performing engineering

  16. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminants at the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant). The Kentucky Diffusion Plant. Over 20 technical projects supported through the consortium presented results during 2007 with efforts supporting a variety of environmental assessment and cleanup activities at the Paducah Gasous

  17. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on environmental assessment and cleanup evaluation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant over the next several for Health Services (Technical Support for the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Federal Facilities Agreement and Agreement in Principle), the Kentucky Department

  18. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flats Disposal Site (CHS) 2) Technical support for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (CHS) 3 soils and paleowetland sediments in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to bind Attenuation of a Trichloroethene-Contaminated Aquifer System, Paducah, Kentucky, MS Thesis, Department

  19. American Vernacular: Popular Culture, Performance, and the Question of National History, 1871-1915

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milner, Gabriel Farren

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Guide with Values. Paducah, KY: Collector Books, 1998.s Guide with Values (Paducah, Kentucky: Collector Books,s Guide with Values (Paducah, KY: Collector Books, 1998).

  20. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, March 1982-May 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set.

  1. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, June 1982-August 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project Petrographic Characterization of Kentucky Coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set.

  2. Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

  3. Petrography of the Herrin (No. 11) coal in western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Wild, G.D.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Herrin (No.11) coal in western Kentucky is in the upper part of the Pennsylvanian (Des Moinesian) Carbondale Formation. Samples were obtained from 13 mines in Kentucky and one mine in Illinois in three equal benches from two to three channels for a total of 93 samples. The rank of the coal (as vitrinite reflectance) is high volatile C bituminous in the Moorman Syncline and high volatile A bituminous in the Webster Syncline. Reflectance does not vary between mines in the Moorman Syncline. The percentage of total vitrinite macerals for each mine is over 85% and the percentage of total vitrinite plus liptinite macerals is over 89% (average over 90%) (both on dry, mineral-free basis). 37 refs.

  4. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  5. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    042009-043012 Kentucky KY Rev2 - Kentucky Farm Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Partnership Financial incentives to farmers to encourage new technologies, renovate...

  6. Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu...

  7. 276 Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    276 Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin Drug-Free Policy Policy Statement as a Drug-Free Institution The University of Kentucky is committed to providing a healthy and safe to the unlawful possession, use, dispensa- tion, distribution or manufacture of alcohol or illicit drugs. Conduct

  8. Good Start Out of the Gate: Tobacco Industry Political Influence and Tobacco Policymaking in Kentucky 1936-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington, Michelle D.; Barnes, Richard L.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harlan Daily Enterprise (Ashland, KY) August 20, 2009; 4.president of First Stop, an Ashland shop that sold tobaccoWorkplaces Eastern Ashland City Commission Western Henderson

  9. Characterization of an Eastern Kentucky Devonian Shales well using a naturally fractured, layered reservoir description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochen, John Edward

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressure transient data for a single gas well completed in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in Pike Co. , KY. This well was part of a three-well research program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to study the Devonian Shales.... , KY). From the tests conducted on the Preece No. 1, Hopkins et al. concluded that large Devonian Shales intervals which were treated jointly in a single wellbore often were not stimulated effectively, because small intervals accepted a...

  10. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, March-May 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals; properties of semi-inert macerals; and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Techniques developed in the first three areas were used in additional research on Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky. Some of the findings are: percent variations (pseudovitrinite-vitrinite/vitrinite X100) indicate greater dispersions in Vicker's microhardness values, MH(v), of vitrinite and pseudovitrinite from eastern Kentucky coals than those of western Kentucky coals; reflectance data confirm a previously suspected rank increase from eastern Knott and Magoffin Counties to eastern Pike County; microhardness investigation of Upper Elkhorn 2 coal in eastern Kentucky indicates that pseudovitrinite is consistently harder than vitrinite; and of the western coals studied, Dunbar and Lead Creek, there appears to be some correlations between vitrinite, ash, sulfur, and thickness. 6 tables.

  11. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (USDOE) Operable Unit 5, Paducah, KY, August 10, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the final remedial action decisions selected for soils and sediments in each of the solid waste management units (SWMUs) of Waste Area Groups (WAGs) 1 and 7 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. Waste Area Group 1 consists of SWMUs 100 and 136. Waste Area Group 7 consists of SWMUs 8 and 130 through 134. By mutual consent among the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection (KDEP), the United States Department of Defense (DOD), the United States Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and the DOE, it was agreed that the evaluation and implementation of any remedial actions required for the Kentucky Ordnance Works (KOW) SWMUs (SWMU 94 (KOW Sewage Treatment Plant), SWMU 95 (KOW Burn Area), and SWMU 157 (KOW Toluene Spill Site)), formerly included in WAGs 1 and 7, would be the responsibility of the DOD and conducted on behalf of the DOD by the COE. Due to the agreements reached among these entities, remedial technologies for the KOW SWMUs are not discussed further in this ROD and will be evaluated as part of the WAG 10 investigation by the COE. Additionally, by written mutual consent, the EPA, the DKEP, and the DOE agreed that an evaluation of remedial alternatives for SWMU 38, the C-615 Sewage Treatment Plant, would be deferred until the unit ceases operation. Consequently, no remedial actions are discussed for these SWMUs in this ROD.

  12. Lawrence County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy DevelopmentLaurentianIllinois: EnergyKentucky:

  13. Leslie County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:New York:New York:Leslie County, Kentucky:

  14. Lincoln County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control DesignKentucky: Energy Resources Jump to:

  15. Franklin County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,datasetWind FarmKentucky: Energy

  16. Adair County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara, California Sector:NewKentucky: Energy

  17. Butler County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda,Burke County,InformationBushyhead,Iowa:Kentucky:

  18. Campbell County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits Manual Jump to:(RECP)Point,Kentucky: Energy

  19. Christian County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International NewOklahoma: EnergyChowanKentucky: Energy

  20. Scott County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformation Evaluation,SchmidNorth Carolina:94934°,Iowa:Kentucky:

  1. Jackson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar EnergyEnergyKansas: Energy Resources Jump to:Kentucky:

  2. Knox County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermalKnowlton, Wisconsin:Kentucky:

  3. Kentucky DNR Oil and Gas Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,Kas Farms WindKemp,KenstonKentucky DNR

  4. Kentucky's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,Kas Farms WindKemp,KenstonKentucky

  5. Hart County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio: EnergyWestOhio:RhodeKentucky:

  6. Henderson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|InformationInformation Station -Yinge IndustrialKentucky:

  7. Pendleton County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian,Parle BiscuitsPemery Corporation JumpKentucky: Energy

  8. Pike County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy ResourcesPicket Lake,Hampshire:Illinois: EnergyKentucky:

  9. City of Fulton, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCity ofCity of Fulton, Kentucky

  10. City of Princeton, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer, IdahoCity of Princeton, Kentucky

  11. Grant County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas:InformationIndiana:Kentucky:

  12. Marion County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez PuebloManteca,Marana,MariesWave)Georgia:Iowa:Kentucky:

  13. Marshall County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri: EnergyMarlboro, New9972934°,Iowa:Kentucky:

  14. Martin County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri:Marshfield Hills,Kentucky: Energy Resources

  15. McLean County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°, -88.864698° Show Map Loading map...Kentucky:

  16. Mercer County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: EnergyKentucky: Energy Resources Jump

  17. Crittenden County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCp Holdings LlcCrenshawCrete,Crisp County,Kentucky:

  18. TVA - Solar Solutions Initiative (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 -TEEMP Jump to:TIAX LLCTSNergy JumpKentucky)

  19. Taylor County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0InformationBP SolarKentucky: Energy

  20. Kentucky Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionalsResearchIdahoKansas Regions NationalKentucky

  1. Monroe County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast Asia | OpenMonona1851445°,Kentucky: Energy

  2. Montgomery County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County, California: Energy879°,Kentucky: Energy

  3. Bath County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIMBarnard,BarrowBastrop County, Texas:Missouri:Kentucky:

  4. Bell County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBay County,SouthCityStrategy | OpenCounty, Kentucky: Energy

  5. Pulaski County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Russell County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont:Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to:

  7. Fort Knox, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAddDevens,Knox, Kentucky:

  8. Kentucky National Guard Radiation Specialist Course | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6, 1945: Trinity TestKarenKentucky National Guard

  9. Kentucky - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15BOEJim Turnure,FieldsKentucky

  10. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion testing of western Kentucky limestones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Holcomb, R.S.; Guymon, R.H.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is studying and testing the burning of coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) as a means of generating electricity and/or process heat in an environmentally acceptable manner. The abundant, high-sulfur coal resources in this country can be utilized effectively in such a system. The ORNL test program supporting the 20-MW(e) AFBC pilot plant planned for operation by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1982 is described. During the test program 625 hours of coal combustion were accumulated in a 25-cm-diam bench scale AFBC. The fuel was Kentucky No. 9 coal with about 4% sulfur. Five different limestones from the Western Kentucky area were tested for their ability to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions. The bench scale combustor was operated under a variety of conditions including changes in bed temperature, bed height and superficial velocity. At a superficial velocity of 1.2 m/s, four of the five limestones achieved 90% sulfur retention with weight ratios of limestone feed to coal feed near 0.40:1 under no recycle (once through) operation. Carbon utilization (based on carbon loss data) averaged 84% for these tests. Two of the more promising stones were tested by recycling the material elutriated from the combustor. The amount of fresh limestone required for 90% sulfur retention was reduced by up to 50%. Carbon utilization approaching 98% was obtained under these conditions.

  11. ,"Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pittsburg, NH...

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Northwest Plume, Paducah, KY, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Northwest Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action is to initiate a first phase remedial action, as an interim action to initiate control of the source and mitigate the spread of contamination in the Northwest plume. This operable unit addresses a portion of the contaminated ground water. Additional interim actions associated with this integrator operable unit are being considered, as well as for other areas of contaminated ground water.

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (USDOE), Operable Unit 15, Paducah, KY, August 10, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the remedial action for the Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 91 of the Waste Area Group (WAG) 27 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this remedial action is to reduce the level of TCE-contaminated soil thereby reducing the potential future concentrations in ground water that could pose a threat to human health and the environment at the POE (i.e., the DOE property boundary). The potential for migration of the contamination from the soil of the off-site aquifer is the concern associated with the SWMU.

  14. Testing Kentucky Coal to Set Design Criteria for a Lurgi Gasification Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roeger, A., III; Jones, J. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tri-State Synfuels Company, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, undertook a comprehensive coal testing program to support the development of an indirect coal liquefaction project. One of the major elements of the program was a...

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Kentucky.

  16. Building on Success: Educational Diversity and Equity in Kentucky Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Civil Rights Project/ Proyecto Derechos Civiles

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    moving toward graduation. A pilot project will begin thisGraduation Rate Crisis, Cambridge: Harvard Education Press, 2004. The Civil Rights ProjectProjects in Education Research Center, the research arm of Education Week. Kentucky reported a graduation

  17. Testing of Western Kentucky No. 9 coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report deals with the characterization of a western Kentucky No. 9 coal as an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) feedstock. It is the first of a series of four reports, each dealing with a different Kentucky coal. All of the coal tests were conducted using an Oregon dolomite from the central Kentucky region. The tests were conducted in a 2 ft. 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in. atmospheric fluidized bed combustor. The Western Kentucky No. 9 coal tested had a heating value of 12200 Btu/lb. The Oregon dolomite used contained 61% CaCO3 and 31% MgCO3. Detailed feedstock analyses are presented in Appendix E. Seven steady-state test runs were conducted over a two-week period. The runs were at one of 100%, 85%, or 70% loads. The air flowrate, bed temperature, and stack sulfur dioxide emissions rate were kept approximately constant during these tests to facilitate comparison.

  18. Restructuring the urban neighborhood : the dialogue between image and ideology in Phoenix Hill, Louisville, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Mark Andrew

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problems of restructuring the urban neighborhood as specifically applied to the Phoenix Hill community in Louisville, Kentucky. Theory and concepts are briefly presented as a basis for design ...

  19. Testing Kentucky Coal to Set Design Criteria for a Lurgi Gasification Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roeger, A., III; Jones, J. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's subcontractors, the Commonwealth of Kentucky or any agency thereof, or the United States Government or any agency thereof. INTRODUCTION Tri-State Synfuels Project Tri-State Synfuels Company, a partnershi of Texas Eastern Corporation and Texas Gas Transmis...Eion Corporat ion affiliates, proposes to produce li~Uid transportation fuels and substitute natural gas rom coal using the indirect liquefaction appr ach (Reference 1). The proj ect is sited in Hende son County, Kentucky and will, if built, use COIer...

  20. Kentucky, Tennessee: corniferous potential may be worth exploring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, M.T.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The driller's term, corniferous, refers to all carbonate and clastic strata, regardless of geologic age, underlying the regional unconformity below the late Devonian-early Mississippian New Albany shale and overlying the middle Silurian Clinton shale in the study area. From oldest to youngest, the formations that constitute the corniferous are the middle Silurian Keefer formation, the middle Silurian Lockport dolomite, the upper Silurian Salina formation, the lower Devonian Helderberg limestone, the lower Devonian Oriskanysandstone, the lower Devonian Onondaga limestone, and in the extreme western portion of the study area, the middle Devonian Boyle dolomite. The overlying New Albany shale also is termed Ohio shale or Chattanooga shale in the Appalachian Basin. To drillers, it is known simply as the black shale. The study area is located in E. Kentucky on the western flank of the Appalachian Basin and covers all or parts of 32 counties.

  1. Studies of Rotational Energy Transfer (RET) in long-range NH3-NH3 collisions in the gas phase (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-477 Studies of Rotational Energy Transfer (RET) in long-range NH3-NH3 collisions in the gas phase-780 Pozna0144, Poland (Refu le 2 mars 1982, accepte le 14 mai 1982) Rsum. 2014 Le champ du diple- polarizability, only). From the dispersional part of the total interaction energy, we extract the RET

  2. EPR and IR studies of [Ru(NH?)?]+-Y and [Ru(NH?)?N?]+-Y type zeolites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leubner, Raymond Leon

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH ) ] -Y 3 6 AND [Ru(NE ) N ] -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia1 fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Chemistry EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH3) ] -Y 3+ AND [Ru(NH3) N ) -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ 3&2 A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ (Head of Department) (Memb...

  3. Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

  4. 5""reuniondu GroupeMarocaindu Permien et du Trias El Jadida,26-29Avril2006. Maroc The first 200 ky of the Early Jurassic in eastern North America and Morocco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Paul E.

    5""?reuniondu GroupeMarocaindu Permien et du Trias El Jadida,26-29Avril2006. Maroc The first 200 ky, 26-29 Avril2006, Maroc likewise of low taxonomic diversity at the family level consisting almost

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): USDOE Paducah Gas Diffusion Plant, Northeast Plume Operable Unit, Paducah, KY, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for the Northeast Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of the interim remedial action is to implement a first-phase remedial action as an interim action to initiate hydraulic control of the high concentration area within the Northeast Plume that extends outside the plant security fence.

  6. Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in orthorhombic ammonia borane. Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in...

  7. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, 11077, Bowling Green KY 42101 (United States)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  8. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, December 1982 to February 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set. Due to the discrete nature of the projects, the final reports will be submitted in several parts. The first report on spectral fluorescence is in development and should be submitted prior to the end of the project. The other reports will be submitted shortly after the end of the project.

  9. Petrography and chemistry of high-carbon fly ash from the Shawnee Power Station, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Thomas, G.A.; Robertson, J.D.; Wong, A.S. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Clifford, D.S.; Eady, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shawnee power station in western Kentucky consists of ten 150-MW units, eight of which burn low-sulfur (< 1 wt %) eastern Kentucky and central West Virginia coal. The other units burn medium- and high-sulfur (> 1 wt %) coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion unit and in a research unit. The eight low-sulfur coal units were sampled in a 1992 survey of Kentucky utilities. Little between-unit variation is seen in the ash-basis major oxide and minor element chemistry. The carbon content of the fly ashes varies from 5 to 25 wt %. Similarly, the isotropic and anisotropic coke in the fly ash varies from 6% to 42% (volume basis). Much of the anisotropic coke is a thin-walled macroporous variety, but there is a portion that is a thick-walled variety similar to a petroleum coke.

  10. Petrography and chemistry of fly ash from the Shawnee Power Station, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Thomas, G.A.; Wild, G.D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Clifford, D.S.; Eady, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shawnee Power Station in western Kentucky consists of ten 150 MW units, eight of which burn low-sulfur eastern Kentucky and central West Virginia coal. The other units bum medium and high-sulfur coal in an AFBC unit and in a research unit. The eight low-sulfur coal units were sampled in a 1992 survey of Kentucky utilities. Little between-unit variation is seen in the ash-basis major oxide and minor element chemistry. The carbon content of the fly ashes varies from 5 to 25%. Similarly, the isotropic and anisotropic coke in the fly ash varies from 6 to 42% (volume basis). Much of the anisotropic coke is a thin-walled macroporous variety but there is a portion which is a thick-walled variety similar to a petroleum coke.

  11. Testing of Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first in a series of six limestone reports, and describes the results of testing of an Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky (1/8 in. x 0, 63% CaCO/sub 3/, 31% MgCO/sub 3/) in a 2 ft/ 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in., 0.75-MW AFBC. All six limestones (or dolomites) were tested using the same coal, a washed Western Kentucky No. 9 coal (1/4 in. x 0, 3.1% sulfur, 9% ash, 13230 Btu/lb.). Operating problems encountered are described. On the basis of numbers, it was concluded that an economic re-evaluation of low-superficial-velocity fluidized beds is warranted, and that it is feasible to burn high-sulfur coals efficiently in an AFBC when Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky is used as the sulfur sorbent.

  12. Late-Middle to Late Devonian (Givetian-Famennian) tectonic and stratigraphic history of central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Barnett, S.F. (Bryan Coll., Dayton, TN (United States)); Norby, R.D. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earliest Givetian deposition in central Kentucky is represented in upper parts of the Boyle and Sellersburg formations and reflects marginal-marine to shallow-marine carbonate deposition at the end of the second tectophase of the Acadian orogeny. Inception of the third tectophase of the Acadian orogeny in the area is reflected by a disconformity or angular unconformity between the Boyle and New Albany formations, by reactivation of faults on the Kentucky river and related fault zones, and by concurrent graben formation. Succeeding late Givetian deposition is represented by the equivalent Portwood and Blocher members of the New Albany. The Portwood represents localized deposition of dolomitic breccias and black shales in grabens and half grabens, paleogeographically manifest as a series of restricted coastal lagoons and estuaries in central and east-central Kentucky. In contrast, dolomitic, Blocher black shales in west-central kentucky, beyond the effects of faulting, reflect more open, platform-lagoonal conditions. Both units are carbonate rick, contain a sparse benthic fauna, and had local sources of sediment. By latest Givetian or earliest Frasnian, local basins were largely filed, and when local sediment sources were inundated by transgression, sediment starvation, represented by a major lag zone or bone bed, ensued throughout central Kentucky, while black- and gray-shale deposition continued in deeper parts of the Illinois and Appalachian basins. During the Frasnian and early Famennian, as subsidence and transgression continued, deeper water gray- and black-shale units from the Appalachian and Illinois basins slowly onlapped the Cincinnati Arch area of central Kentucky; black shales in these units are fissile and lack both carbonates and benthic fauna. At the Devonian-Mississippian transition, however, a locally developed unconformity and structurally related erosion probably reflect inception of the fourth and final tectophase of the Acadian orogeny.

  13. Proton transfer dynamics of the reaction H3O ,,NH3 ,H2O...NH4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, James M.

    , Rochester, New York 14627 Received 29 September 2003; accepted 8 October 2003 The proton transfer reaction of H3O and NH3 was studied using the crossed molecular beam technique at relative energies of 0.41, 0.81, and 1.27 eV. At all three energies, the center-of-mass flux distribution of the product ion NH4 exhibits

  14. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part V. Pyrite size/form/microlithotype distribution in western Kentucky prepared coals and in channel samples from western Kentucky and western Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankle, K.A.; Hower, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite and marcasite distribution has been characterized in several western Kentucky coals, western Pennsylvania coals, and coals from western Kentucky preparation plants using three parameters of size, morphology, and microlithotype association. A classification system was developed to provide a consistent method for recording different pyrite/marcasite types. Sulfides were microscopically measured and placed in one of six size divisions (<5, 5 to 10, 10 to 40, 40 to 75, 75 to 100, or >150..mu..m) rather than absolute size. Five categories (euhedral, framboidal, dendritic, massive, or cleat) describe pyrite/marcasite morphology. The third parameter identifies the microlithotype (vitrite, clarite, inertite, liptite, durite, vitrinertite, trimacerite, or carbominerite) in which the pyrite occurs (not including the measured sulfide). Carbominerite is a mineral/organic association dominated by mineral matter. The percentage of each variable represents the total number of counts per sample and not the volume of pyrite. Throughout the studies, both sulfides are collectively referred to as pyrite unless otherwise specified. This paper describes the different studies which were undertaken to test the usefulness of this pyrite classification system. Systematic trends in pyrite variability were determined for the Springfield coal and Herrin of western Kentucky. Pyrite characterization of the Lower Kittanning coal from western Pennsylvania shows that certain pyrite morphologies can be an expression of the environments deposition of coal bodies. Studies of western Kentucky prepared coals demonstrate that pyrite characterization apparently can provide a method for predicting pyrite behavior and the extent of pyrite removal for specific coals. 77 references, 15 figures, 19 tables.

  15. High-sulfur coals in the eastern Kentucky coal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M. (Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)); Eble, C.F. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Kentucky coal field is notable for relatively low-sulfur, [open quotes]compliance[close quotes] coals. Virtually all of the major coals in this area do have regions in which higher sulfur lithotypes are common, if not dominant, within the lithologic profile. Three Middle Pennsylvanian coals, each representing a major resource, exemplify this. The Clintwood coal bed is the stratigraphically lowest coal bed mined throughout the coal field. In Whitley County, the sulfur content increase from 0.6% at the base to nearly 12% in the top lithotype. Pyrite in the high-sulfur lithotype is a complex mixture of sub- to few-micron syngenetic forms and massive epigenetic growths. The stratigraphically higher Pond Creek coal bed is extensively mined in portions of the coal field. Although generally low in sulfur, in northern Pike and southern Martin counties the top one-third can have up to 6% sulfur. Uniformly low-sulfur profiles can occur within a few hundred meters of high-sulfur coal. Pyrite occurs as 10-50 [mu]m euhedra and coarser massive forms. In this case, sulfur distribution may have been controlled by sandstone channels in the overlying sediments. High-sulfur zones in the lower bench of the Fire Clay coal bed, the stratigraphically highest coal bed considered here, are more problematical. The lower bench, which is of highly variable thickness and quality, generally is overlain by a kaolinitic flint clay, the consequence of a volcanic ash fall into the peat swamp. In southern Perry and Letcher counties, a black, illite-chlorite clay directly overlies the lower bench. General lack of lateral continuity of lithotypes in the lower bench suggests that the precursor swamp consisted of discontinuous peat-forming environments that were spatially variable and regularly inundated by sediments. Some of the peat-forming areas may have been marshlike in character.

  16. EIS-0073: Solvent Refined Coal-I Demonstration Project, Daviess County, Kentucky

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental, economic and social impacts associated with construction and operation of a 6,000 tons per stream day capacity coal liquefaction facility in Newman, Kentucky, and the potential impacts of a future expansion of the proposed facility to an approximately 30,000 tons per stream day capacity.

  17. Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Go Solar Ready Solar Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Go Solar Ready Map provides general information about the estimated annual solar energy potential on building rooftops in the OKI region. The intention of this tool is to provide the user a general understanding of the solar energy available on rooftops in the OKI tristate region.

  18. Reservoir characterization using oil-production-induced microseismicity, Clinton County, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- Reservoir characterization using oil-production-induced microseismicity, Clinton County;-2- Abstract Microseismic monitoring tests were conducted from 1993 to 1995 in the Seventy-Six oil field, Clinton County, Kentucky. Oil is produced from low-porosity, fractured carbonate rocks at

  19. Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2012-2013 Undergraduate Bulletin 304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2012-2013 Undergraduate Bulletin 304 Policy Statement as a Drug-Free Institution TheUniversityofKentuckyiscommittedtoprovidingahealthyandsafe environment for its, dispensation, distribu- tion or manufacture of alcohol or illicit drugs. Conduct which is violative

  20. Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Drug-FreePolicy University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 318 Policy Statement as a Drug-Free Institution TheUniversityofKentuckyiscommittedtoprovidingahealthyandsafe environment for its, dispensation, distribu- tion or manufacture of alcohol or illicit drugs. Conduct which is violative

  1. Comparisons of pyrite variability from selected western Kentucky and western Pennsylvania coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankie, K.A.; Hower, J.C.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite (and marcasite) variation in the lower Kittanning coal of western Pennsylvania has been petrographically characterized using three parameters of size (categories rather than absolute size), morphology (framboidal, euhedral, dendritic, massive, and cleat), and microlithotype (organic) association. The purpose of this study is to evaluate what influence paleo-environments have on the nature of variation of pyrite in coal. Comparison of coals has been done using the percentages of pyrite in the microlithotypes vitrite and clarite. In the lower Kittanning coal, framboidal pyrite is generally less abundant and dendritic pyrite was not observed at all. Euhedral pyrite exhibited no clear variation between the two environments. Massive pyrite was more abundant in the set of samples from the mine with the highest average pyritic sulfur but otherwise exhibited no variation. In contrast, a larger percentage of pyrite in the western Kentucky coals examined is framboidal and dendritic. Mines examined in the Moorman syncline of western Kentucky do have a framboidal pyrite percentage comparable to the lower Kittanning samples, but the percentage of dendritic pyrite (particularly in the Western Kentucky No. 9 coal) is significantly higher for the western Kentucky coals. Bulk petrography of the coals is similar with all having greater than 80% total vitrinite. The association of the pyritic sulfur does, however, change significantly between the various coals studied and particularly between the coals of western Kentucky and among the marine lower Kittanning samples and the fresh water lower Kittanning samples. Among the pyrite in the fresh water coals, massive (perhaps epigenetic) pyrite dominates the associations.

  2. KY_50mwind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WPC DistributionInformation: ResourceDescription: Downloadable Data StandardOrderProcess: DigitalForm: DigitalTransferInformation: TransferSize: 0.395...

  3. On rotational dynamics of an NH4+ ion in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tsun-Mei (University of Wisconsin-Parkside); Dang, Liem X. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We used molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the rotational dynamics of the NH4+ ion in liquid water. The polarizable potential models were to describe the ion-water and water-water interactions. This study complements the work of Karim and Haymet (J. Chem. Phys., 93, 5961, 1990), who employed effective pir potential models. The computed rotational diffusion coefficients of the NH4+ ion in water, which were determined from the angular momentum autocorrelation function and the angular mean-square displacement, are 0.093 x 1012 rad2/s and 0.067 x 1012 rad2/s, repectively. These results are in good agreement with the 0.075 x 1012 rad2/s value determined from the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies of Perrin and Gipe (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 108, 1088, 1986; Science, 238, 1393, 1987).

  4. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction. Abstract: Multiple catalytic functions...

  5. Compositional characteristics of the Fire Clay coal bed in a portion of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Andrews, W.M. Jr.; Rimmer, S.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)); Eble, C.F. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fire Clay (Hazard No. 4) coal bed (Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation) is one of the most extensively mined coal in eastern Kentucky. The coal is used for metallurgical and steam end uses and, with its low sulfur content, should continue to be a prime steam coal. This study focuses on the petrology, mineralogy, ash geochemistry, and palynology of the coal in an eight 7.5-min quadrangle area of Leslie, Perry, Knott, and Letcher counties.

  6. Influence of penecontemporaneous tectonism on development of Breathitt Formation coals, eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Pollock, J.D.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation coals beds in the central portion of the Eastern Kentucky coal field exhibit changes in lithology, petrology, and chemistry that can be attributed to temporal continuity in the depositional systems. The study interval within northern Perry and Knott Counties includes coals from the Taylor coal bed at the base of the Magoffin marine member upward through the Hazard No. 8 (Francis) coal bed.

  7. Testing of Eastern Kentucky Amburgy coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of four coal reports, and describes the results of testing of an Eastern Kentucky Amburgy coal (1/4 in. x 0, 3.3% sulfur, 11% ash, 12920 Btu/lb.) in a 2 ft. 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in., 0.75-MW AFBC. All 4 coal tests were conducted using Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky (1/8 in. x 0, 62% CaCO/sub 3/, 31% MgCO/sub 3/) as the sulfur sorbent. Results obtained from eight steady-state test runs at three different loads at a constant superficial velocity of 5.4 ft./s are presented. Operating problems encountered are described. On the basis of numbers, it was concluded that an economic re-evaluation of low-superficial-velocity fluidized beds is warranted, and that it is feasible to burn eastern Kentucky Amburgy coal efficiently in an AFBC while keeping emissions below EPA limits.

  8. Testing of Western Kentucky No. 11 coal in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second of a series of four coal reports, and describes the results of testing of a Western Kentucky No. 11 coal (1/4 in. x 0, 3.8% sulfur, 33% ash, 83/50 Btu/lb.) in a 2 ft. 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in., 0.75-MW AFBC. All four coal tests were conducted using Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky (1/8 in. x 0, 62% CaCO/sub 3/, 31% MgCO/sub 3/) as the sulfur sorbent. Results obtained from eight steady-state test runs at three different loads at a constant superficial velocity of 5 ft./s are presented. Operating problems encountered are described, and include problems with large variations in coal ash and Btu contents, cyclone downleg blockage, moisture in feed material, and fouling of heat-transfer surfaces caused by high carryover rates. On the basis of numbers, it was concluded that an economic re-evaluation of low-superficial-velocity fluidized beds is warranted, and that it is feasible to burn Western Kentucky No. 11 coal efficiently in an AFBC provided that the boiler control system is designed to handle large variations in coal ash and Btu contents.

  9. Testing of Eastern Kentucky Hazard coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the fourth in a series of four coal reports, and describes the results of testing of an Eastern Kentucky Hazard No. 9 coal (1/4 in. x 0, 3.4% sulfur, 11% ash, 12640 Btu/lb.) in a 2 ft. 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in., 0.75-MW AFBC. All four coal tests were conducted using Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky (1/8 in. x 0, 62% C-CO/sub 2/, 31% MgCO/sub 2/) as the sulfur sorbent. Results obtained from eight steady-state test runs at three different loads at a constant superficial velocity of 5.4 ft./s are presented. Operating problems encountered are described. On the basis of numbers, it was concluded that an economic re-evaluation of low-superficial velocity fluidized beds is warranted, and that it is feasible to burn Eastern Kentucky Hazard No. 9 coal efficiently in an AFBC while keeping emissions below EPA limits.

  10. Data:Cf35204f-eb87-47c2-b1db-5c43822bf849 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cooperative and one of EIUPC's member distribution systems for the purchase of electric power by East Kentucky Power Coopera Source or reference: http:psc.ky.govtariffs...

  11. advanced fischer-tropsch technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarterly Report Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: 40308 University of Kentucky Research Foundation 201 Kinkead Hall Lexington, KY 40506 University of Chemical Engineering...

  12. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Kentucky FE 315 10 Donald Krastman 5110 -10112 Lexington, Fayette County, KY CAVITATION PRETREATMENT OF A FLOTATION FEEDSTOCK FOR ENHANCED COAL RECOVERY A test program is...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Kentucky Corn Growers' Association (KyCGA) offers grants of 5,000 per pump to retailers installing new E85 dispensers in Kentucky. For more...

  14. Characterization of the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/ addition has been studied in a lean-burning oil-fired laboratory combustion tunnel as a function of equivalence ratio, NH/sub 3/ injection temperature, concentration of NH/sub 3/ added, and the source of NO. Ammonia breakthrough was found to depend strongly on the NH/sub 3/ addition temperature. The total concentration of nitrogen containing species other N/sub 2/, NO, and NH/sub 3/ was measured with a variety of techniques and was found to be less than 5 ppM over the range of conditions studied.

  15. The role of the N*(1535) resonance and the pi^- p --> KY amplitudes in the OZI forbidden pi N --> phi N reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dring; E. Oset; B. S. Zou

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the pi N --> phi N reaction close to the phi N threshold within the chiral unitary approach, by combining the pi^- p --> K^+ Sigma^-, pi^- p --> K^0 Sigma^0 and pi^- p --> K^0 Lambda amplitudes with the coupling of the phi to the K components of the final states of these reactions via quantum loops. We obtain a good agreement with experiment when the dominant pi^- p --> K^0 Lambda amplitude is constrained with its experimental cross section. We also evaluate the coupling of the N*(1535) to phi N and find a moderate coupling as a consequence of partial cancellation of the large KY components of the N*(1535). We also show that the N*(1535) pole approximation is too small to reproduce the measured cross section for the pi N --> phi N reaction.

  16. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coal. Final report. Part III. Petrographic characterization of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raione, R.P.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the study of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone in the Big Sandy Reserve District and the surrounding area of eastern Kentucky. The seams were analyzed using megascopic and microscopic petrography and chemical methods. The Upper Elkhorn No. 2 consists predominantly of clarain. A fair degree of correlation of fusain bands and clay partings between data sites is apparent. Microscopically, the vitrinite group of macerals are dominant. A rank increase from high volatile B to high volatile A bituminous to the southwest was noted. Pseudovitrinite is associated negatively with vitrinite and has a higher reflectance and microhardness than vitrinite. Both factors may indicate source material and/or environmental differences in the respective origins of the maceral. High inertinite and lipinite areas, low ash and sulfur contents, and the distribution of thin coals may be indicative of paleotopographic highs. 62 references, 26 figures, 8 tables.

  17. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  18. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  19. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  20. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  1. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, September-November 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project Petrographic Characterization of Kentucky Coals consists of research in three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington (No. 4, also known as Mining City and Lewisport) coal will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Certain suits of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the samples. Preliminary results are reported.

  2. Air Force program tests production of aviation turbine fuels from Utah and Kentucky bitumens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashland Petroleum Company and Sun Refining and Marketing participated in a US Air Force program to determine the costs, yields, physical characteristics, and chemical properties of aviation turbine fuels, Grades JP-4 and JP-8, produced from Kentucky and Utah bitumens. The processes used by both are summarized; Ashland used a different approach for each bitumen; Sun's processing was the same for both, but different from Ashland's. Chemical and physical properties are tabulated for the two raw bitumens. Properties of the eight fuels produced are compared with specification for similar type aviation turbine fuels.

  3. Fire protection review revisit No. 2, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.H.; Keller, D.R.; Treece, S.D.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fire protection survey was conducted for the Department of Energy at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, from October 30--November 4, November 6--10, and December 4--8, 1989. The purpose of the survey was to review the facility fire protection program and to make recommendations. Surveys of other facilities resulted in a classification system for buildings which provide an indication of the importance of the building to the fulfillment of the mission of the facility. Recommendations in this report reflect to some degree the relative importance of the facility and the time to restore it to useful condition in the event a loss were to occur.

  4. Array-type NH.sub.3 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, David Lawrence; Montgomery, Frederick Charles; Armstrong, Timothy R; Warmack, Robert J

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An array-type sensor that senses NH.sub.3 includes non-Nernstian sensing elements constructed from metal and/or metal-oxide electrodes on an O.sub.2 ion conducting substrate. In one example sensor, one electrode may be made of platinum, another electrode may be made of manganese (III) oxide (Mn.sub.2O.sub.3), and another electrode may be made of tungsten trioxide (WO.sub.3). Some sensing elements may further include an electrode made of La.sub.0.6Sr.sub.0.4Co.sub.0.2Fe.sub0.8O.sub.3 and another electrode made of LaCr.sub.0.95.Mg.sub.0.05O.sub.3.

  5. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling NH3 and...

  6. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, December 1981-February 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals; properties of semi-inert macerals; and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability for the project which involves the determination of coal rank through the use of fluorescence measurements on sporinite, all samples have been studied and data analysis is still incomplete. Interpretation of results will be presented in future reports. The actual developments of pseudovitrinites are being investigated. Two possible mechanisms for the origin of pseudovitrinites have been suggested. The first mechanism is differential coalification of similar materials. The second factor for influencing the development of pseudovitrinite is an actual difference in original plant composition. Pyrite analysis of western Kentucky coals has been completed, however data reduction is still incomplete. Changes in the petrography of western coals may be related to depositional environments of the coal.

  7. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  8. College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University of Kentucky 2011-2012 Undergraduate Bulletin 90

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University of Kentucky 2011-2012 Undergraduate Bulletin 90 M. Scott Smith, Ph.D., is Dean and Director of the College of Agriculture; Nancy M,teaching,extension,andregula- tory functions of the College of Agriculture are combined into a coordinated, mutually support

  9. 85College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    85College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences University of Kentucky 2008-2009 Undergraduate Bulletin M. Scott Smith, Ph.D., is Dean and Director of the College of Agriculture; Nancy M. Cox of Agriculture are combined into a coordinated, mutually supporting program of undergraduate

  10. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    until 1981 when it was closed due to declining boat traffic. Since the failure of Green River Dam 4 by the dams and the impacts if the pool were to be lost, either by demolition or failure of the lock andGreen River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16

  11. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  12. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  14. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  15. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, andor CaH2) Composite Systems. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal...

  17. Summary of Carbon Storage Project Public Information Meeting and Open House, Hawesville, Kentucky, October 28, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Harris; David Williams; J. Richard Bowersox; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) completed a second phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection and seismic imaging in the Knox Group, a Cambrian?Ordovician dolomite and sandstone sequence in September 2010. This work completed 2 years of activity at the KGS No. 1 Marvin Blan well in Hancock County, Kentucky. The well was drilled in 2009 by a consortium of State and industry partners (Kentucky Consortium for Carbon Storage). An initial phase of CO{sub 2} injection occurred immediately after completion of the well in 2009. The second phase of injection and seismic work was completed in September 2010 as part of a U.S. DOE??funded project, after which the Blan well was plugged and abandoned. Following completion of research at the Blan well, a final public meeting and open house was held in Hancock County on October 28, 2010. This meeting followed one public meeting held prior to drilling of the well, and two on?site visits during drilling (one for news media, and one for school teachers). The goal of the final public meeting was to present the results of the project to the public, answer questions, and address any concerns. Despite diligent efforts to publicize the final meeting, it was poorly attended by the general public. Several local county officials and members of the news media attended, but only one person from the general public showed up. We attribute the lack of interest in the results of the project to several factors. First, the project went as planned, with no problems or incidents that affected the local residents. The fact that KGS fulfilled the promises it made at the beginning of the project satisfied residents, and they felt no need to attend the meeting. Second, Hancock County is largely rural, and the technical details of carbon sequestration were not of interest to many people. The county officials attending were an exception; they clearly realized the importance of the project in future economic development for the county.

  18. Petrographic investigation of River Gem Coal, Whitley County, eastern Kentucky Coal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, J.D.; Hower, J.C.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The River Gem coal of the Breathitt Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) was studied at three sites in a surface mine in the Holly Hill quadrangle, Whitley County, Kentucky. The River Gem coal is correlative with the Lily and Manchester coals in neighboring Knox, Laurel, and Clay Counties, Kentucky, and the Clintwood coal in Pike County, Kentucky. At the northern site, a 14-cm rider is separated from the 92.5-cm seam by 22 cm of shale. At the two southern sites, the rider is missing. At the latter sites, the 10 cm thick top bench of the seam is separated from the lower 63 cm of the seam by a 14-cm bony lithotype not found at the northern site. The lower 63 cm of the seam in the south and the main seam in the north are characterized by moderate ash and sulfur percentages (4.4-6.8% ash, 1.4-2.3% total sulfur, 0.6-1.1% pyritic sulfur, 74-81% vitrinite, 23-32% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 2.3-4.5% CaO). In contrast, the upper bench in the south and the rider have 18.7-27.0% ash, 8.8-11.4% total sulfur, 5.1-6.4% pyritic sulfur, 92.3-93.6% vitrinite, 45.7-57.8% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 0.13-0.20% CaO. The bone has over 26% ash, 5.5% total sulfur, 3.2% pyritic sulfur, and 93.1% vitrinite. The overall similarity of the seam and rider characteristics between the north and south suggests that the southern bone is the lateral equivalent of the northern shale. The sulfide in the upper bench or rider and in the bone consists of fine (generally less than 10 ..mu..m), euhedral and framboidal pyrite with common massive pyrite. Massive pyrite appears as an overgrowth of fine pyrite in some places. Massive forms of marcasite, less abundant than pyrite, exhibit some evidence of developing later than the massive pyrite. A variety of < 2-..mu..m pyrite occurs as abundant, but isolated, unidimensional to tabular grains within corpocollinite, some of which is transitional to resinite.

  19. Characterization of feed coal and coal combustion products from power plants in Indiana and Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; O'Connor, J.T.; Brownfield, I.K.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey, Kentucky Geological Survey, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with Indiana and Kentucky utilities to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCP) from three coal-fired power plants. These three plants are designated as Units K1, K2, and I1 and burn high-, moderate-, and low-sulfur coals, respectively. Over 200 samples of feed coal and CCP were analyzed by various chemical and mineralogical methods to determine mode of occurrence and distribution of trace elements in the CCP. Generally, feed coals from all 3 Units contain mostly well-crystallized kaolinite and quartz. Comparatively, Unit K1 feed coals have higher amounts of carbonates, pyrite and sphalerite. Unit K2 feed coals contain higher kaolinite and illite/muscovite when compared to Unit K1 coals. Unit I1 feed coals contain beta-form quartz and alumino-phosphates with minor amounts of calcite, micas, anatase, and zircon when compared to K1 and K2 feed coals. Mineralogy of feed coals indicate that the coal sources for Units K1 and K2 are highly variable, with Unit K1 displaying the greatest mineralogic variability; Unit I1 feed coal however, displayed little mineralogic variation supporting a single source. Similarly, element contents of Units K1 and K2 feed coals show more variability than those of Unit I1. Fly ash samples from Units K1 and K2 consist mostly of glass, mullite, quartz, and spines group minerals. Minor amounts of illite/muscovite, sulfates, hematite, and corundum are also present. Spinel group minerals identified include magnetite, franklinite, magnesioferrite, trevorite, jacobisite, and zincochromite. Scanning Electron Microscope analysis reveals that most of the spinel minerals are dendritic intergrowths within aluminum silicate glass. Unit I1 fly ash samples contain glass, quartz, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, and apatite with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, carbonates, pyroxenes, and spinels. The abundant Ca mineral phases in the Unit I1 fly ashes are attributed to the presence of carbonate, clay and phosphate minerals in the coal.

  20. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals: relationship between sporinite spectral fluorescence and coal rank of selected western Kentucky coals. Final report, Part I. [Vitrinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poe, S.H.; Hower, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 43 coal samples were analyzed - the majority from western Kentucky, with a few from Pennsylvania for comparative purposes - using quantitative fluorescence microscopy of sporinite to determine if coal rank as determined by vitrinite maximum reflectance could be predicted by data gathered from selected fluorescence parameters. All eight parameters (wavelength of highest intensity, area under curve to the left of the peak, area in the blue wavelengths (400 to 500 nm), green (500 to 570 nm), yellow (570 to 630 nm), blue-red ratio, and red-green ratio were found to statistically predict coal rank. The general research hypothesis, which included all the variables, had a R/sup 2/ = 0.354. The results of the step-wise regression yielded red and yellow (collective R/sup 2/ = 0.341) as the best predictor variables of coal rank. The individual parameters of area of red wavelength and blue-red ratio accounted for the greatest variance in predicting coal rank, while the parameter yellow area was the least predictive of coal rank. 31 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Pond Creek coal seam in eastern Kentucky - new look at an old resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Pollock, J.D.; Klapheke, J.G.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Middle Pennsylvania/Westphalian B Pond Creek Coal is an important low-sulfur resource in Pike and Martin Counties, Kentucky. The Breathitt Formation seam, also known as the lower Elkhorn coal, accounted for nearly 40% of Pike County's 1983 production of 22 million tons. Although the coal is nearly mined out through central Pike County, substantial reserves still exist in the northern part of the county. Past studies of the seam by the US Bureau of Mines concentrated on the utility of the seam as a coking blend, with additional consideration of the megascopic and microscopic coal petrology. The authors research has focused on the regional variations in the Pond Creek seam, with emphasis on the petrographic variations.

  2. Coal metamorphism in the upper portion of the Pennsylvanian Sturgis Formation in Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coals from the Pennsylvanian upper Sturgis Formation (Mississippian and Virginian) were sampled from a borehole in Union County, western Kentucky. The coals exhibited two discrete levels of metamorphism. The lower rank coals of high-volatile C bituminous rank were assumed to represent the normal level of metamorphism. A second set of coals of high-volatile A bituminous rank was found to be associated with sphalerite, chlorite, and twinned calcite. The latter mineral assemblages indicate that hydrothermal metamorphism was responsible for the anomalous high rank. Consideration of the sphalerite fluid-inclusion temperatures from nearby ores and coals and the time - temperature aspects of the coal metamorphism suggests that the hydrothermal metamorphic event was in the 150 to 200 C range for a brief time (10/sup 5/-10/sup 5/and yr), as opposed to the longer term (25-50m yr) 60 to 75 C ambient metamorphism.

  3. Petrographic and geochemical anatomy of lithotypes from the Blue Gem coal bed, Southeastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Taulbee, D.N.; Morrell, L.G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the association of major, minor, and trace elements with coal has been the subject of intensive research by coal scientists (Swaine; and references cited therein). Density gradient centrifugation (DGC) offers a technique with which ultrafine coal particles can be partitioned into a density spectrum, portions of which represent nearly pure monomaceral concentrates. DGC has been typically conducted on demineralized coals assuring, particularly at lower specific gravities, that the resulting DGC fractions would have very low ash contents. In order to determine trends in elemental composition, particularly with a view towards maceral vs. mineral association, it is necessary to avoid demineralization. To this end the low-ash, low-sulfur Blue Gem coal bed (Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation) from Knox County, Kentucky, was selected for study. The objective of this study was to determine the petrography and chemistry, with particular emphasis on the ash geochemistry, of DGC separates of lithotypes of the Blue Gem coal bed.

  4. Stress, seismicity and structure of shallow oil reservoirs of Clinton County, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton-Smith, T. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1993 and 1995 geophysicists of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in a project funded by the US Department of Energy, conducted extensive microseismic monitoring of oil production in the recently discovered High Bridge pools of Clinton County and were able to acquire abundant, high-quality data in the northern of the two pools. This investigation provided both three-dimensional spatial and kinetic data relating to the High Bridge fracture system that previously had not been available. Funded in part by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kentucky Geological Survey committed to develop a geological interpretation of these geophysical results, that would be of practical benefit to future oils exploration. This publication is a summary of the results of that project. Contents include the following: introduction; discovery and development; regional geology; fractured reservoir geology; oil migration and entrapment; subsurface stress; induced seismicity; structural geology; references; and appendices.

  5. Palynologic and petrographic cycles in the McLeansboro Group, Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research); Helfrich, C.T. (Eastern Kentucky Univ., Richmond, KY (United States)); Williams, D.A. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Henderson, KY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The McLeansboro Group in the Western Kentucky coal field spans the upper Desmoinesian and the Missourian and Virgilian series. Extensive drilling has demonstrated the lateral continuity of major and minor beds in the group, making it possible to study vertical and lateral changes in palynology and petrology. The Desmoinesian (Westphalian D) Baker (No. 13) and Wheatcroft (No. 13a) coal beds were included in the study but the primary emphasis is on the Missourian and Virgilian (Stephanian) coals. Patoka fm (lower Missourian) coals are dominated by tree fern spores with lesser sphenopsids, ferns, and cordaites. This is in marked contrast to the arborescent lycopod-dominated Desmoinesian coals. Only the No. 15 coal bed exceeds 80% vitrinite with the No. 16 coal bed vitrinite content of < 72% being the lowest of any Western Kentucky humic coal. The Bond Fm. (upper Missourian) represents a distinct floristic cycle with a greater diversity of plant groups including herbaceous lycopods, relatively minor contributors to the Patoka coals. The coals generally exceed 80% vitrinite. The Mattoon Fm. (Virgilian) coals have a variety of polynomorph assemblages. The low-sulfur Geiger Lake coal bed is dominated by tree ferns with important contributions from ferns and sphenopsids. Similar to the underlying tree fern interval, vitrinite contents are <80%. The uppermost Mattoon coals are dominated by ferns and are notable in being the only >1 m thick coals in the Stephanian portion of the section, with the top coal being 4.3 m thick. The uppermost coals are generally > 80% vitrinite. The palynologic/petrographic cycles appear to represent fluctuating dry (low vitrinite) and wet intervals within the Missourian/Virgilian which itself was drier than the Desmoinesian.

  6. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NH{sub 3} AND NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} AMORPHOUS ICES IN THE NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Rodrguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Glvez, scar; Herrero, Vctor J.; Escribano, Rafael; Mat, Beln, E-mail: belen.mate@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia ice has been detected on different astrophysical media ranging from interstellar medium (ISM) particles to the surface of various icy bodies of our solar system, where nitrogen is also present. We have carried out a detailed study of amorphous NH{sub 3} ice and NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} ice mixtures, based on infrared (IR) spectra in the mid-IR (MIR) and near-IR (NIR) regions, supported by theoretical quantum chemical calculations. Spectra of varying ice thicknesses were obtained and optical constants were calculated for amorphous NH{sub 3} at 15 K and 30 K and for a NH{sub 3}:N{sub 2} mixture at 15 K over a 500-7000 cm{sup 1} spectral range. These spectra have improved accuracy over previous data, where available. Moreover, we also obtained absolute values for the band strengths of the more prominent IR features in both spectral regions. Our results indicate that the estimated NH{sub 3} concentration in ISM ices should be scaled upward by ?30%.

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of reactions of neutral vanadium and tantalum oxide clusters with NO and NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    molecules on the respective clusters. A gas mixture of NO:NH3 9:1 is also added into the fast flow reactor oxide clusters with NO, NH3, and an NO/NH3 mixture in a fast flow reactor are investigated by time, a complete elucidation of the reaction mechanism has not been achieved, and very few, if any, gas phase

  8. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  9. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  10. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  11. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  12. Characterization of Cu-SSZ-13 NH3 SCR Catalysts: an in situ FTIR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Cu-SSZ-13 NH3 SCR Catalysts: an in situ FTIR Study. Abstract: The adsorption of CO and NO over Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite catalysts, highly active in the selective...

  13. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment Investigation of a series of transition metal oxides and precious metal based catalysts for ammonia selective oxidation at...

  14. Fe/SSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics andFTIR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMssbauer Spectroscopic Study."Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental 164:407-419. doi:10.1016j.apcatb.2014.09.031 Authors:...

  15. Low Temperature Milling of the LiNH2 + LiH Hydrogen Storage System...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hu, JH Kwak, and Z Yang.2009."Low Temperature Milling of the LiNH2 + LiH Hydrogen Storage System."International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 34(10):4331-4339. doi:10.1016...

  16. Structures of the Kplus and NH4 Forms of Linde J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Broach; R Kirchner

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aluminosilicate zeolite Linde J has a unique topology. The structures of the K{sup +} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} forms of Linde J ([X{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)][Si{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 8}] where X = K or NH{sub 4}) are identical except for slight cell size and positional differences due to NH{sub 4}{sup +} being larger than K{sup +} cations. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Cell dimensions are: K{sup +} Linde J, a = 9.4577(2) {angstrom}, b = 9.5573(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.9429(2) {angstrom}; NH{sub 4}{sup +} Linde J, a = 9.6324(4) {angstrom}, b = 9.6423(3) {angstrom}, c = 10.0230(3) {angstrom}. Zigzag 8-ring channels intersect giving a 2-D pore system.

  17. Structures of the K[superscript +] and NH[subscript 4 superscript +] forms of Linde J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broach, Robert W.; Kirchner, Richard M. (UOP); (Manhattan C)

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The aluminosilicate zeolite Linde J has a unique topology. The structures of the K{sup +} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} forms of Linde J ([X{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)][Si{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 8}] where X = K or NH{sub 4}) are identical except for slight cell size and positional differences due to NH{sub 4}{sup +} being larger than K{sup +} cations. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Cell dimensions are: K{sup +} Linde J, a = 9.4577(2) {angstrom}, b = 9.5573(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.9429(2) {angstrom}; NH{sub 4}{sup +} Linde J, a = 9.6324(4) {angstrom}, b = 9.6423(3) {angstrom}, c = 10.0230(3) {angstrom}. Zigzag 8-ring channels intersect giving a 2-D pore system.

  18. EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOEs proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

  19. Rare Earth ? N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl N* = 4 x 1011 fs = 0.2 fGHZ = 0.1 fp = 0.8 nH = 2 fl = 1.0 N = 1.3 x 1010 #12;The Goldilocks Effect Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be Tectonically-active Retain

  20. Breath gating of cardiac PET using 13N-NH3: An optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was carried out using 13 N-NH3 on two dierent PET/CT scanners: a Siemens Biograph 64 and a Siemens mCT PET. In this project the breath-motion was estimated using an ane transformation on the obtained images, from which- jekt er udført ved brug af 13 N-NH3 på to skannere, henholdsvis en Siemens Biograph 64 og en Siemens m

  1. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  2. Direct measurement of the reactivity of NH and OH on a silicon nitride surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fisher, E.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand and successfully model the plasma processing used in device fabrication, it is important to determine the role played by plasma-generated radicals. The authors have used the IRIS technique (Imaging of Radicals Interacting Surfaces) to obtain the reactivity of NH (X{sup 3}S{sup {minus}}) and OH (X{sup 2}P) at a silicon nitride film surface while the film is exposed to a plasma-type environment. The reactivity of NH was found to be zero both during exposure of the surface to an NH{sub 3} plasma and during active deposition of silicon nitride from a SiH{sub 4}/NH{sub 3} plasma. No NH surface reaction was detectable for any rotational states of NH and over a surface temperature range of 300--700 K. OH radicals generated in an H{sub 2}O plasma were found to have a reactivity of 0.57 on a room temperature oxidized silicon nitride surface. The OH reactivity falls to zero as the temperature of the substrate is raised.

  3. Geologic controls on sulfur content of the Blue Gem coal seam, southeastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimmer, S.M.; Moore, T.A.; Esterle, J.S.; Hower, J.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed petrographic and lithologic data on the Blue Gem coal seam for a local area in Knox County, Kentucky, suggest that a relationship may exist between overlying roof lithology, petrographic composition of the coal, and sulfur content. In the western part of the area, where thick (20-40 feet) shale sequences overlie the coal, sulfur contents are low (less than 1%). In isolated areas where discontinuous sandstones occur within 6 feet of the coal, sulfur contents range from 1% to over 3%. In the east, a sandstone body usually overlies and frequently scours out the coal, yet sulfur content varies independently of roof lithology. Towards the east, there is an increase in abundance, thickness and variability of fusain bands within the coal and an increase in pyrite and siderite either as cell fillings in fusinite or as masses within vitrinite; early emplacement of these minerals is indicated by compaction features. Data suggest the importance of depositional environment of the peat and overlying sediments as a control on sulfur occurrence. High sulfur contents in the west are related to sandstone bodies which may have allowed sulfate-bearing waters to permeate into the peat. In the east, where increases in pyrite, siderite and fusain content of the coal and coarsening of the overlying sediments suggest a change in environment, the presence or absence of pyrite-containing fusain bands may account for sulfur variability. Siderite occurrence may reflect local fluctuations in sulfate supply to the peat swamp.

  4. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) and surrounding area in Paducah, Kentucky, was conducted during May 15--25, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the PGDP and surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) along a series of parallel lines 107 meters (350 feet) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 62 square kilometers (24 square miles), bordered on the north by the Ohio River. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 5 to 12 microroentgens per hour ([mu]R/h). Protactinium-234m, a radioisotope indicative of uranium-238, was detected at several facilities at the PGDR. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within [plus minus]15%.

  6. New industrial heat pump applications to a synthetic rubber production, Louisville, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The site selected for this study is the American Synthetic Rubber Corporation's polybutadiene plant in Louisville, Kentucky. The objective of this study is to further identify the energy savings potential through advanced heat pumps and other energy conservation methods developed in the context of pinch technology. The process studied involves a solution polymerization of butadiene monomer in the presence of toluene, which acts as a solvent. The results indicate that there is an excellent prospect for heat integration and heat pump application. The heat integration option requires an investment of about 8900 sq. ft. in additional area, to save about one third of the present steam consumption. Two process streams were identified for potential heat pump application. One of them is the combined overhead vapor stream from the stripping section, composed of steam and toluene mixture. The other stream is the overhead vapor from the concentration section, composed mainly of toluene. Economic analysis were performed, both for closed cycle and semi open cycle heat pumps. The potential for semi-open cycle (MVR) hear pumps looks extremely good. 15 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Nineteen. Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Kentucky governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  8. Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA-88-377-2120, Armco Coke Oven, Ashland Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinnes, G.M.; Fleeger, A.K.; Baron, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union, a study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ARMCO Coke Oven (SIC-3312), Ashland, Kentucky. The facility produces about 1,000,000 tons of coke annually. Of the approximately 400 total employees at the coke oven site, 55 work in the by products area. Air quality sampling results indicated overexposure to both benzene (71432) and coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs). Airborne levels of benzene ranged as high as 117 parts per million (ppm) with three of 17 samples being above the OSHA limit of 1ppm. Airborne concentrations of CTPVs ranged as high as 0.38mg/cu m with two of six readings being above OSHA limit of 0.2mg/cu m. Several polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were also detected. The authors conclude that by products area workers are potentially overexposed to carcinogens, including benzene, CTPVs, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. An epidemiologic study is considered unlikely to yield meaningful information at this time, due to the small number of workers and the short follow up period. The authors recommend specific measures for reducing potential employee exposures, including an environmental sampling program, a preventive maintenance program, improved housekeeping procedures, and reducing exposure in operators' booths.

  9. Evaluation of the Berea sandstone formation in eastern Pike County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Luffel, D. (ResTech Houston, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Kubik, W. (K A Energy Consultants, Tulsa, OK (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been sponsoring a cooperative well program with Ashland Exploration, Inc., (AEI) during the past two years targeting the Devonian Shale and Berea sandstone formations in Pike County of eastern Kentucky. Operators typically complete both the shales and Berea in one well bore in this area. This presentation summarizes the research results of the Berea cooperative well, the COOP 2 (Ashland FMC 80). The specific objectives of the Berea evaluation in the COOP 2 were to develop an integrated reservoir description for stimulation design and predicting long-term well performance, identify geologic production controls, determine the in-situ stress profile, and develop Berea log interpretation models for gas porosity and stress. To satisfy these objectives, data were collected and analyzed from 146 ft of whole core, open-hole geophysical logs, including formation microscanner and digital sonic, in-situ stress measurements, and prefracture production and pressure transient tests. In addition, data from a minifracture, a fracture stimulation treatment, and postfracture performance tests were analyzed. The authors determined the integrated reservoir/hydraulic fracture descriptions from analyzing the data collected in the open- and cased-hole, in addition to the log interpretation models developed to accurately predict gas porosity and stress profiles. Results can be applied by operators to better understand the Berea reservoir in the study area, predict well performance, and design completion procedures and stimulation treatments. The methodology can also be applied to other tight-gas sand formations.

  10. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah.

  11. Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

  12. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the, ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah.

  13. A Complete Survey of the Central Molecular Zone in NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takumi Nagayama; Toshihiro Omodaka; Toshihiro Handa; Hayati Bebe Hajra Iahak; Tsuyoshi Sawada; Takeshi Miyaji; Yasuhiro Koyama

    2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a map of the major part of the central molecular zone (CMZ) of simultaneous observations in the NH3 (J,K) = (1,1) and (2,2) lines using the Kagoshima 6-m telescope. The mapped area is -1.000 80 K contain 75% and 25% of the total NH3 flux, respectively. These temperatures indicate that the dense molecular gas in the CMZ is dominated by gas that is warmer than the majority of the dust present there. A comparison with the CO survey by Sawada et al. (2001) shows that the NH3 emitting region is surrounded by a high pressure region on the l-v plane. Although NH3 emission traces dense gas, it is not extended into a high pressure region. Therefore, the high pressure region is less dense and has to be hotter. This indicates that the molecular cloud complex in the Galactic center region has a ``core'' of dense and warm clouds which are traced by the NH3 emission, and an ``envelope'' of less dense and hotter gas clouds. Besides heating by ambipolar diffusion, the hot plasma gas emitting the X-ray emission may heat the hot ``envelope''.

  14. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

  15. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  16. Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doll, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phillips, B.E. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

  17. Relative risk site evaluation for buildings 7740 and 7741 Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Gilmore, T.J.; Bronson, F.J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings 7740 and 7741 are a part of a former nuclear weapon`s storage and maintenance facility located in the southeastern portion of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This underground tunnel complex was originally used as a classified storage area beginning in 1949 and continuing until 1969. Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently completed a detailed Relative Risk Site Evaluation of the facility. This evaluation included (1) obtaining engineering drawings of the facility and associated structures, (2) conducting detailed radiological surveys, (3) air sampling, (4) sampling drainage systems, and (5) sampling the underground wastewater storage tank. Ten samples were submitted for laboratory analysis of radionuclides and priority pollutant metals, and two samples submitted for analysis of volatile organic compounds. No volatile organic contaminants were detected using field instruments or laboratory analyses. However, several radionuclides and metals were detected in water and/or soil/sediment samples collected from this facility. Of the radionuclides detected, only {sup 226}Ra may have come from facility operations; however, its concentration is at least one order of magnitude below the relative-risk comparison value. Several metals (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and antimony) were found to exceed the relative-risk comparison values for water, while only arsenic, cadmium, and lead were found to exceed the relative risk comparison values for soil. Of these constituents, it is believed that only arsenic, beryllium, mercury, and lead may have come from facility operations. Other significant hazards posed by the tunnel complex include radon exposure and potentially low oxygen concentrations (<19.5% in atmosphere) if the tunnel complex is not allowed to vent to the outside air. Asbestos-wrapped pipes, lead-based paint, rat poison, and possibly a selenium rectifier are also present within the tunnel complex.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Weck, Dr. Phil F [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu/SAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of CuSAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR 2: Solid-state Ion Exchange and One-pot Synthesis."Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental 162:501-514. doi:10.1016j.apcatb.2014.07.029 Authors:...

  20. Data report: Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, K A; Cook, J R; Fay, W M

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio. The following sample types were collected in each state: Illinois - 716 stream sediment, 1046 ground water, 337 stream water; Indiana - 126 stream sediment, 443 ground water, 111 stream water; Kentucky - 4901 stream sediment, 6408 ground water, 3966 stream water; Tennessee - 3309 stream sediment, 3574 ground water, 1584 stream water; Ohio - 1214 stream sediment, 2049 ground water, 1205 stream water. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. Supplementary analyses by other techniques are reported for U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn. These analyses were made on 248 sediment samples from Tennessee. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation.

  1. Nature of petrographic variation in Taylor-Copland Coal of middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinkle, E.J.; Hower, J.C.; Tully, D.G.; Helfrich, C.T.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taylor-Copland Coal is petrographically distinctive in that it has lowest average vitrinite content (63%) and concomitant highest inertinite (25%) and exinite (12%) of all eastern Kentucky coals. Additionally, average total sulfur is 3.4%, or nearly twice the 1.8% figure determined for all eastern Kentucky samples. Deviations from the maceral averages are equally distinctive. Particularly interesting is an areally extensive, though discontinuous, sample sequence showing significantly lower vitrinites (commonly 40%), very high inertinites (40%), and high exinite content (15-20%). The high-inertinite and high total-sulfur trends and variations for each were presumed to be related to proximity to the coal of marine lithologic units of the overlying Magoffin Member. However, it was found that maceral and possible sulfur trends are probably unrelated to roof rock variation, but are related to existence or absence of a thick durain coal lithotype toward the middle of some coal beds. Palynology reveals that spores in the durain-rich samples are poorly preserved (micrinitized), but assemblages and relative percentages of genera forming the assemblages remained unchanged from those found in high-vitrinite (durain-free) samples. Unchanged spore assemblages possibly indicate that unchanging plant communities existed through the durain-forming episode of the Taylor-Copland swamp. Rather, the effect of the durain phase on the Taylor-Copland swamp was to accelerate degradation (oxidation) of peat deposits associated with the surrounding plant community.

  2. Association of the sites of heavy metals with nanoscale carbon in a Kentucky electrostatic precipitator fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Hower; Uschi M. Graham; Alan Dozier; Michael T. Tseng; Rajesh A. Khatri [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HRTEM-STEM-EELS) was used to study fly ashes produced from the combustion of an eastern Kentucky coal at a southeastern-Kentucky wall-fired pulverized coal utility boiler retrofitted for low-NOx combustion. Fly ash was collected from individual hoppers in each row of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) pollution-control system, with multiple hoppers sampled within each of the three rows. Temperatures within the ESP array range from about 200 {degree}C at the entry to the first row to <150{degree}C at the exit of the third row. HRTEM-STEM-EELS study demonstrated the presence of nanoscale (10 s nm) C agglomerates with typical soot-like appearance and others with graphitic fullerene-like nanocarbon structures. The minute carbon agglomerates are typically juxtaposed and intergrown with slightly larger aluminosilicate spheres and often form an ultrathin halo or deposit on the fly ash particles. The STEM-EELS analyses revealed that the nanocarbon agglomerates host even finer (<3 nm) metal and metal oxide particles. Elemental analysis indicated an association of Hg with the nanocarbon. Arsenic, Se, Pb, Co, and traces of Ti and Ba are often associated with Fe-rich particles within the nanocarbon deposits. 57 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and closure of the solid waste landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the proposed construction, operation, and closure of a Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) that would be designed in accordance with Commonwealth of Kentucky landfill regulations (401 Kentucky Administrative Regulations Chapters 47 and 48 and Kentucky Revised Statutes 224.855). PGDP produces approximately 7,200 cubic yards per year of non-hazardous, non-radioactive solid waste currently being disposed of in a transitional contained (residential) landfill cell (Cell No. 3). New Kentucky landfill regulations mandate that all existing landfills be upgraded to meet the requirements of the new regulations or stop receiving wastes by June 30, 1995. Cell No. 3 must stop receiving wastes at that time and be closed and capped within 180 days after final receipt of wastes. The proposed SWL would occupy 25 acres of a 60-acre site immediately north of the existing PGDP landfill (Cell No. 3). The EA evaluated the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action and reasonable alternative actions. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action which will significantly affect the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, it is determined that an environmental impact statement will not be prepared, and DOE is issuing this FONSI.

  4. International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Kentucky during Winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    International Symposium on Gaseous and Odour Emissions from Animal Production Facilities, Horsens, Jutland, Denmark 1-4 June, 2003 Ammonia Emissions from Broiler Houses in Kentucky during Winter Kenneth D a comprehensive database of ammonia emission rates (ER) from US poultry facilities. The influence of common

  5. STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalkin, Allan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2(OC(NH 2 )2)5](N0 3 )2 by Allan Zalkin*, Helena Ruben andU0 2 (OC(NH 2)2)5](N0 3)2 by Allan Zalkin, Hel~na Ruben and

  6. Planetary fluids He and NH/sub 3/ at high shock pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nellis, W.J.; Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Young, D.A.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid He at 4.3 K and 1 atm was shocked to 16 GPa (160 kbar) and 12,000 K and double-shocked to 56 GPa and 21,000 K. Liquid perturbation theory was used to determine an effective interatomic potential from which the equation of state of He can be obtained over a wide range of densities and temperatures in the envelopes of the outer planets. A new fast optical pyrometer and a cryogenic specimen holder for liquid NH/sub 3/ were developed to measure shock temperatures of 4400 and 3600 K at pressures of 59 and 48 GPa. These conditions correspond to those in the ice layers in Uranus and Neptune. The shock temperature data are in reasonable agreement with an equation of state by Ree based on an intermolecular potential derived from NH/sub 3/ Hugoniot data.

  7. Tracing the evolutionary stage of Bok globules: CCS and NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marka, C; Launhardt, R; Semenov, D A; Henning, Th

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We pursue the investigation of a previously proposed correlation between chemical properties and physical evolutionary stage of isolated low-mass star-forming regions. In the past, the NH3/CCS abundance ratio was suggested to be a potentially useful indicator for the evolutionary stage of cloud cores. We aim to study its applicability for isolated Bok globules. A sample of 42 Bok globules with and without signs of current star formation was searched for CCS(2-1) emission, the observations were complemented with NH3 measurements available in the literature and own observations. The abundance ratio of both molecules is discussed with respect to the evolutionary stage of the objects and in the context of chemical models. The NH3/CCS ratio could be assessed for 18 Bok globules and is found to be moderately high and roughly similar across all evolutionary stages from starless and prestellar cores towards internally heated cores harbouring protostars of Class 0, Class I or later. Bok globules with extremely high CC...

  8. Intra- and inter-unit variation in fly ash petrography: Examples from a western Kentucky power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Goodman, J. [Prestonburg High School, KY (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash was collected from eight mechanical and ten baghouse hoppers at each of twin 150-MW wall-fired units in a western Kentucky power station. The fuel burned at that time was a blend of low-sulfur, high volatile bituminous Central Appalachian coals. The baghouse ash showed less variation between units than the mechanical units. The coarser mechanical fly ash showed significant differences in the amount of total carbon and in the ratio of isotropic coke to both total carbons and total coke; the latter excluding inertinite and other unburned, uncoked coal. There was no significant variation in ratios of inorganic fly ash constituents. The inter-unit differences in the amount and forms of mechanical fly ash carbon appear to be related to differences in pulverizer efficiency, leading to greater amounts of coarse coal, therefore unburned carbon, in one of the units.

  9. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Waste Disposition Activities at the Paducah Site Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1339), which is incorporated herein by reference, for proposed disposition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site (Paducah Site) in Paducah, Kentucky. All of the wastes would be transported for disposal at various locations in the United States. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment with in the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  10. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently drilled wells. The calibrated model is then further used for field development strategies to improve and enhance gas recovery.

  11. Superfund record of decison (EPA Region 4): USDOE Paducah Gas Diffusion Plant, Solid Waste Management Units 2 and 3 of Waste Area Group 22, Paducah, KY, August 22, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) 2 and 3 of Waste Area Group (WAG) 22 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. The primary objective of this interim remedial action, or corrective measure, is to reduce the infiltration of precipitation into buried waste and mitigate any leaching of chemicals of concern from the wastes while the DOE collects additional data to support evaluation of a final remedial action. The prinicipal threat associated with SWMU 2 is the potential for transport of contaminants to the ground water operable unit and subsequent threats associated with the potential contamination of an aquifer and transport of contaminants beyond DOE property.

  12. Aerobic and Anaerobic Transformations of Pentachlorophenol in Wetland Soils Elisa M. D'Angelo* and K. R. Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    . of Agronomy, Univ. of Kentucky, N-122 Agricultural Sci. Bldg. North, Lexington, KY 40546-0091; and K.R. Reddy), availability of electron acceptors (Haggblom et al., 1993), electron donors (Ku- watsuka and Igarashi, 1975

  13. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE News Release - Henderson North Middle School...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 6, 2015 Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov Henderson North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl PADUCAH, Ky. - Henderson North Middle School won the U.S....

  15. The Social Cost of the Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCubbin, Donald R.; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for two modelrural areas (Paducah, Kentucky and Farmmgton,non-model New and rural areas Paducah representative of theSubtotal Urban Farmmgton, Paducah, Total U.S. NM KY Source

  16. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 553 683694, 2001 June 1 V ( 2001. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Markus

    of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1 Big Red Way, Bowling Green, KY 42104. 13 Max Piikkio # , 22 Instituto de de Canarias, Calle E­38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain. Astrof. # sica V

  17. Laboratory-measured H2SO4-H2O-NH3 ternary homogeneous nucleation rates: Initial observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    -ammonia (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) ternary homogeneous nucleation (THN), with a fast flow nucleation reactor attached. 1. Introduction [2] Nucleation is a gas-to-particle conversion process [Seinfeld and Pandis, 2006

  18. Presented in Conway, Lee, Merrimack and Plymouth, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. Participants will learn to: symbolize GIS data; add labelsPresented in Conway, Lee, Merrimack and Plymouth, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program Arc

  19. Presented in Concord, Merrimack and West Lebanon, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. Participants will learn to: symbolize GIS data; add labelsPresented in Concord, Merrimack and West Lebanon, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program Arc

  20. Presented in Lee and Concord, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Winter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    .1 to produce effective maps, edit and create GIS data, as well as, conduct geospatial analysis. ParticipantsPresented in Lee and Concord, NH by the UNHCE Geospatial Outreach Program ArcGIS Workshops Winter

  1. Influence of coal quality parameters on utilization of high-sulfur coals: Examples from Springfield (western Kentucky No. 9) coal bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, T.B.; Hower, J.C.; Cobb, J.C. (Kentucky Energy Cabinet, Lexington (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Springfield (Western Kentucky No. 9) coal bed is the most important energy resource in the Western Kentucky coalfield (Eastern Interior coalfield), accounting for over 30 million tons of annual production from remaining resources of over 9 billion tons. For many coal quality parameters, the quality of the coal bed is relatively consistent throughout the region. For example, the Springfield has about 80-85% vitrinite, 10% ash, and 3.5-4.5% total sulfur at most sites in the coalfield. However, coal quality variation is more than just the changes in ash and sulfur. As demonstrated by the Springfield coal bed, it is a complex interaction of related and unrelated variables many of which directly affect utilization of the coal. Significant, though generally predictable, changes are observed in other parameters. Comparison of data from the Millport (Muhlenberg and Hopkins Countries), Providence (Hopkins and Webster Counties), and Waverly (Union County) 7{1/2} Quadrangles illustrated such variations.

  2. Thermal Stability of MOCVD and HVPE GaN Layers in H2, HCl, NH3 and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    GaN, and the black is the sapphire substrate. At 900 C nearly 1/4 of the film has sublimated leavingThermal Stability of MOCVD and HVPE GaN Layers in H2, HCl, NH3 and N2 M. A. Mastro1 ) (a), O. M.60.Dv; 81.15.Gh; S7.14 This work represents a complete study of GaN annealed in H2, HCl, NH3 and N2

  3. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Applications for Batteries of Zhejiang Province and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G., E-mail: hgpan@zju.edu.cn; Liu, Y. F. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Applications for Batteries of Zhejiang Province and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  4. Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

  5. Influence of fuel sulfur on the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/ addition has been studied in a lean-burning oil fired laboratory combustion tunnel with pyridine and thiophene added to the fuel oil. Two distinct, but interrelated effects were observed. The conversion of a fixed amount of fuel nitrogen to NO in the flame increased as the fuel sulfur concentration increased. In the post-combustion gases, there was a shift in the temperature dependence of the reduction process when the sulfur combustion products were present. The extent of the NO reduction was not significantly altered, but the optimum temperature for reduction shifted to higher values as the sulfur concentration increased.

  6. Simultaneous removal of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} from coal gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) are the primary sulfur and nitrogen contaminants released when coal is gasified. Before coal gas can be utilized in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant to produce electricity, these contaminants need to be removed. The objective of this research was to develop sorbent-catalysts with the ability to simultaneously remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} from coal gas. Microreactor tests with HART-49, a zinc-based sorbent-catalyst with Ni, Co, and Mo as catalyst additives, showed that this material had the potential to remove 90% NH{sub 3} and reduce H{sub 2}S to <20 ppmv at 1 atm and 550 to 700 C. HART-49 was prepared in attrition-resistant fluidizable form (HART-56) using up to 75 wt% binder. Bench-scale fluidized-bed multicycle tests were conducted with the attrition-resistant sorbent-catalyst, HART-56, at 20 atm and 550 C. The H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal performance over the first two cycles was good in the presence of 5% steam but deteriorated thereafter when steam level was increased to 15%. The results point to a complex mechanism for simultaneous H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, potentially involving both chemisorption and catalytic decomposition of NH{sub 3}. Further research and development is needed to develop a sorbent-catalyst for simultaneous H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal at IGCC hot-gas cleanup conditions.

  7. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

  8. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  9. Diffusive and rotational dynamics of condensed n-H2 confined in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prisk, Timothy R [ORNL; Bryan, Matthew [Indiana University; Sokol, Paul E [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report an inelastic neutron scattering study of liquid and solid n-H2 confined within MCM-41. This is a high surface area, mesoporous silica glass with a narrow pore size distribution centered at 3.5 nm. The scattering data provides information about the diffusive and rotational dynamics of the adsorbed n-H2 at low temperatures. In the liquid state, the neutron scattering data demonstrates that only a fraction of the adsorbed o-H2 is mobile on the picosecond time scale. This mobile fraction undergoes liquid-like jump diffusion, and values for the residence time t and effective mean-squared displacement hu2i are reported as a function of pore filling. In the solid state, the rotational energy levels of adsorbed H2 are strongly perturbed from their free quantum rotor behavior in the bulk solid. The underlying orientational potential of the hindered rotors is due to the surface roughness and heterogeneity of the MCM-41 pore walls. This potential is compared to the hindering potential of other porous silicas, such as Vycor. Strong selective adsorption makes the interfacial layer rich in o-H2, leaving the inner core volume consisting of a depleted mixture of o-H2 and p-H2.

  10. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part II. Depositional settings of the coal bearing, upper Tradewater Formation in western Kentucky with emphasis on the Mannington (No. 4) coal zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baynard, D.N.; Hower, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depositional settings were determined in the coal bearing, Middle Pennsylvanian, upper Tradewater Formation in western Kentucky with emphasis on the Mannington (No. 4) coal zone. The coals have been analyzed for maceral contents, lithotypes, dry sulfur/ash percentages, vitrinite reflectance values, pyrite/marcasite contents, and associated lithologies at different vertical and lateral scales. This study concludes that: (1) the thin coarsening - or fining upward sequences, under the Mannington (No. 4) coal zone are possibly shallow bayfill and channel-fill deposits that provided an environment that has slight differences in topography, (2) rapid vertical and lateral change in total vitrinite, dry sulfur/ash percentages and lithotypes at different scales in the Mannington (No. 4) coal zone are indicative of wideranging Eh and pH values and possibly result from slight changes in paleotopography, and (3) the Davis (No. 6) coal was deposited after a period of thick coarsening - or fining upward sequences, possibly providing a relatively flat-stable surface for peat development. The consistent total vitrinite, dry sulfur/ash values, and thickness trends indicate a more restricted environment (pH and Eh) in the Davis (No. 6) swamp. 41 references, 25 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Experimental verification of the high pressure crystal structures in NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yanping; Huang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhonglong; Li, Wenbo; Jiang, Shuqing; Duan, Defang; Bao, Kuo; Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian, E-mail: cuitian@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed high-pressure study on NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} has been carried out using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering with a diamond anvil cell up to 20 and 33 GPa, respectively. The Rietveld refinement based on the XRD pattern and analysis of Raman data indicate two first-order phase transitions from the ambient pressure I4 mm structure (?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) to a high pressure Cmc2{sub 1} phase (?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 2.14 GPa, and further into a monoclinic P2{sub 1} (Z = 2) phase (?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 9.67 GPa. Fitting the measured volumetric compression data to the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reveals a bulk modulus of B{sub 0} = 9.9 0.5 and 17.0 3.0 GPa (with fixed B{sub 0}{sup ?} = 4) for the ?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} below and above 5 GPa, respectively. Still, with the splitting of the NBH rock mode in Raman experiment, it is concluded that a second-order isostructural phase transition occurs at 5 GPa. By analyzing the dihydrogen bonding framework, the origin of the isostructural phase transition is attributed to the number of dihydrogen bondings per molecule in the Cmc2{sub 1} phase increasing from 12 to 14 at 5 GPa.

  12. Functional analysis of the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jung Hwan; Choi, Yoo Jin; Choi, Won Suk; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Park, Won Sang, E-mail: wonsang@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: NH{sub 2}-terminal and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 inhibited tumor cell growth. NH{sub 2}-terminal and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 regulated cell cycle. NH{sub 2}-terminal and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 inhibited epigenetic regulators. -- Abstract: Gastrokine 1 (GKN1) protects the gastric antral mucosa and promotes healing by facilitating restitution and proliferation after injury. GKN1 is down-regulated in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells and loss of GKN1 expression is tightly associated with gastric carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms as a tumor suppressor are largely unknown. Presently, the hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1, pGKN1{sup D13N}, pGKN1{sup ?68199}, and pGKN1{sup ?167,165199} were shown to suppress gastric cancer cell growth and recapitulate GKN1 functions. As well, the hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 had a synergistic anti-cancer effect with 5-FU on tumor cell growth, implying that the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 are sufficient for tumor suppression, thereby suggesting a therapeutic intervention for gastric cancer. Also, its domain inducing endogenous miR-185 directly targeted the epigenetic effectors DNMT1 and EZH2 in gastric cancer cells. Our results suggest that the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and BRICHOS domain of GKN1 are sufficient for its tumor suppressor activities.

  13. Preparation of hexagonal WO{sub 3} from hexagonal ammonium tungsten bronze for sensing NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilagyi, Imre Miklos [Materials Structure and Modeling Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-1111 Budapest, Szt. Gellert ter 4 (Hungary)], E-mail: imre.szilagyi@mail.bme.hu; Wang Lisheng; Gouma, Pelagia-Irene [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 314 Old Engineering Building, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2275 (United States); Balazsi, Csaba [Ceramics and Nanocomposites Laboratory, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary); Madarasz, Janos; Pokol, Gyoergy [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-1111 Budapest, Szt. Gellert ter 4 (Hungary)

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexagonal tungsten oxide (h-WO{sub 3}) was prepared by annealing hexagonal ammonium tungsten bronze, (NH{sub 4}){sub 0.07}(NH{sub 3}){sub 0.04}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.09}WO{sub 2.95}. The structure, composition and morphology of h-WO{sub 3} were studied by XRD, XPS, Raman, {sup 1}H MAS (magic angle spinning) NMR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and BET-N{sub 2} specific surface area measurement, while its thermal stability was investigated by in situ XRD. The h-WO{sub 3} sample was built up by 50-100 nm particles, had an average specific surface area of 8.3 m{sup 2}/g and was thermally stable up to 450 deg. C. Gas sensing tests showed that h-WO{sub 3} was sensitive to various levels (10-50 ppm) of NH{sub 3}, with the shortest response and recovery times (1.3 and 3.8 min, respectively) to 50 ppm NH{sub 3}. To this NH{sub 3} concentration, the sensor had significantly higher sensitivity than h-WO{sub 3} samples prepared by wet chemical methods.

  14. Stratigraphy and organic petrography of Mississippian and Devonian oil shale at the Means Project, East-Central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, B.J.; Hutton, A.C.; Henstridge, D.A.; Ivanac, J.F.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Means Oil Shale Project is under consideration for financial assistance by the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation. The project site is located in southern Montgomery County, about 45 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. In the site area the Devonian Ohio Shale and the Mississippian Sunbury Shale are under study; these oil shales were deposited in the Appalachian Basin. The objective of the Means Project is to mine, using open pit methods, an ore zone which includes the Sunbury and upper Cleveland and which excludes the Bedford interburden. The thick lower grade oil shale below this ore zone renders the higher grade shale at the base of the Huron commercially unattractive. The oil shale at Means has been classified as a marinite, an oil shale containing abundant alginite of marine origin. Lamalginite is the dominant liptinite and comprises small, unicellular alginite with weak to moderate fluorescence at low rank and a distinctive lamellar form. Telalginite, derived from large colonial or thick-walled, unicellular algae, is common in several stratigraphic intervals.

  15. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

  16. Influence of fuel sulfur on the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More intensive regulations of the emissions of nitrogen oxides from stationary combustion sources have prompted the innovation and characterization of new control technologies suitable for applications in utilities. One of the more recent and attractive abatement technologies is the Thermal DeNO/sub x/ process which has been described by Lyon and Longwell. This process removes NO by selectively reducing it with NH/sub 3/ added to the post-combustion gases containing excess oxygen. This process is thus independent of the NO formation mechanism and makes no distinction between thermal and fuel NO. The present study is concerned with characterizing the selective reduction process for light distillate oil fuel admixed with variable amounts of pyridene and thiophene in a laboratory scale combustion tunnel under a variety of experimental conditions. This paper reports on those aspects of the study concerned with the investigation of possible synergistic effects between the sulfur and selective reduction chemistry.

  17. Mechanistic studies of the CVD of silicon nitride from SiF{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An industrial process for the CVD of silicon nitride from SiF{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} was studied with a wide variety of techniques, ranging from numerical models of the coupled chemistry and fluid mechanics to experimental studies of chemical reactions. The latter includes a set of molecular beam experiments that probed the temperature and flux dependencies of the reaction of SiF{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} at the surface. These experiments showed that the CVD reactor chemistry was dominated by surface kinetics rather than gas-phase decomposition.

  18. Mechanistic studies of the CVD of silicon nitride from SiF[sub 4] and NH[sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R J; Ho, P

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An industrial process for the CVD of silicon nitride from SiF[sub 4] and NH[sub 3] was studied with a wide variety of techniques, ranging from numerical models of the coupled chemistry and fluid mechanics to experimental studies of chemical reactions. The latter includes a set of molecular beam experiments that probed the temperature and flux dependencies of the reaction of SiF[sub 4] and NH[sub 3] at the surface. These experiments showed that the CVD reactor chemistry was dominated by surface kinetics rather than gas-phase decomposition.

  19. Laser studies of the reactivity of NH(X{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}) with the surface of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, E.R.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Buss, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactivity of NH(X{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}) with the surface of both a silicon nitride film and a depositing hydrogenated silicon nitride film has been measured to be essentially zero with an upper limit of 0.1 for substrate temperatures of 300-700 K. The reactivity was directly determined using spatially resolved laser-induced fluorescence of NH in a plasma-generated molecular beam incident on the surface. The NH adsorbs and then desorbs from the surface with a a spatial distribution consistent with a cosine angular distribution. No dependence of reactivity on rotational state of the NH was observed. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Access Management in Multi-Administration Networks S. P. Lord, N.H. Pope, and Susan Stepney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Access Management in Multi-Administration Networks S. P. Lord, N.H. Pope, and Susan Stepney GEC of linking together networks controlled by different administrations, and allowing these administrations and representations. S. P. Lord, N. H. Pope, and Susan Stepney. Access Management in multi-administration networks

  1. Effective interactions between the N-H bond orientations in lithium imide and a proposed ground-state structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Effective interactions between the N-H bond orientations in lithium imide and a proposed ground Received 28 February 2006; revised manuscript received 17 July 2006; published 4 October 2006 Lithium imide in the structure. By searching an effective Hamiltonian in which the energy of lithium imide is expressed

  2. Association of coal metamorphism and hydrothermal mineralization in Rough Creek fault zone and Fluorspar District, Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Fiene, F.L.; Trinkle, E.J.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ambient coal rank (metamorphism) of the Carboniferous coals in the Western Kentucky coalfield ranges from high volatile A bituminous (vitrinite maximum reflectance up to 0.75% R/sub max/) in the Webster syncline (Webster and southern Union Counties) to high volatile C bituminous (0.45 to 0.60% R/sub max/) over most of the remainder of the area. Anomalous patterns of metamorphism, however, have been noted in coals recovered from cores and mines in fault blocks of the Rough Creek fault zone and Fluorspar District. Coals in Gil-30 borehole (Rough Creek faults, Bordley Quadrangle, Union County) vary with no regard for vertical position, from high volatile C(0.55% R/sub max/) to high volatile A (0.89%R/sub max) bituminous. Examination of the upper Sturgis Formation (Missourian/Virgilian) coals revealed that the higher rank (generally above 0.75% R/sub max/) coals had vein mineral assemblages of sphalerite, twinned calcite, and ferroan dolomite. Lower rank coals had only untwinned calcite. Several sites in Webster County contain various coals (Well (No. 8) to Coiltwon (No. 14)) with vitrinite reflectances up to 0.83% R/sub max/ and associated sphalerite mineralization. Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian (Caseyville Formation Gentry coal) coals in the mineralized Fluorspar District have ranks to nearly medium volatile bituminous (1.03% R/sub max/). The regional rank trend exhibited by the fualt zones is generally higher rank than the surrounding areas. Sphalerite mineralization in itself is not unique within Illinois basin coals, but if it was partly responsible for the metamorphism of these coals, then the fluid temperature must have been higher within the above mentioned fault complexes.

  3. Kentucky-Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease20 55 1060,941

  4. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  5. Update and Improve Subsection NH Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report described the results of investigation on Task 10 of DOE/ASME Materials NGNP/Generation IV Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 10 is to Update and Improve Subsection NH -- Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods. Five newly proposed promising creep-fatigue evaluation methods were investigated. Those are (1) modified ductility exhaustion method, (2) strain range separation method, (3) approach for pressure vessel application, (4) hybrid method of time fraction and ductility exhaustion, and (5) simplified model test approach. The outlines of those methods are presented first, and predictability of experimental results of these methods is demonstrated using the creep-fatigue data collected in previous Tasks 3 and 5. All the methods (except the simplified model test approach which is not ready for application) predicted experimental results fairly accurately. On the other hand, predicted creep-fatigue life in long-term regions showed considerable differences among the methodologies. These differences come from the concepts each method is based on. All the new methods investigated in this report have advantages over the currently employed time fraction rule and offer technical insights that should be thought much of in the improvement of creep-fatigue evaluation procedures. The main points of the modified ductility exhaustion method, the strain range separation method, the approach for pressure vessel application and the hybrid method can be reflected in the improvement of the current time fraction rule. The simplified mode test approach would offer a whole new advantage including robustness and simplicity which are definitely attractive but this approach is yet to be validated for implementation at this point. Therefore, this report recommends the following two steps as a course of improvement of NH based on newly proposed creep-fatigue evaluation methodologies. The first step is to modify the current approach by incorporating the partial advantages the new method offer, and the second step is to replace the current method by the simplified test approach when it has become technically mature enough. The recommendations are basically in line with the work scope of the Task Force on Creep-Fatigue of the Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design of the Standards Committee of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee Section III.

  6. Measurements of NH3 and CO2 with distributed-feedback diode lasers near 2.0 m in bioreactor vent gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurements of NH3 and CO2 with distributed-feedback diode lasers near 2.0 m in bioreactor vent K. Hanson Measurements of NH3 and CO2 were made in bioreactor vent gases with distributed3 and CO2 concentration in bioreactor vent gases that were recorded at NASA Johnson Space Center

  7. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Disubstituted Ethanes. A Comparison of NH,,,O-and OH,,,O-Hydrogen Bonding through Conformational Analysis of 4-Amino-4-oxobutanoate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Disubstituted Ethanes. A Comparison of NH,,,O- and OH,,,O- Hydrogen Bonding through Conformational Analysis of 4-Amino-4-oxobutanoate (succinamate) and Monohydrogen 1 of amide NH,,,O- and carboxyl OH,,,O- hydrogen bonds were investigated via conformational analysis

  8. AdministrAtion And FinAnce mission stAtement Administration and Finance exists to support the strategic mission of Northern Kentucky University by providing quality service through sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Richard L.

    20132013 AdministrAtion And FinAnce mission stAtement Administration and Finance exists to support within Administration and Finance are committed to the development, implementation, and continuous of Northern Kentucky University. Administration and Finance strives to provide a climate conducive

  9. 82 College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences 2007-2008 University of Kentucky Bulletin M. Scott Smith, Ph.D., is Dean and Director of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    82 College of Agriculture and School of Human Environmental Sciences 2007-2008 University of Kentucky Bulletin M. Scott Smith, Ph.D., is Dean and Director of the College of Agriculture; Linus R for Academic Programs. Theresearch,teaching,extension,andregu- latory functions of the College of Agriculture

  10. What level of Internet access does Paducah, Kentucky have? In order to answer this question, I ran a search of ISPs (Internet Service Providers) in the (502) area code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    What level of Internet access does Paducah, Kentucky have? In order to answer this question, I ran a search of ISPs (Internet Service Providers) in the (502) area code (the area code which contains Paducah on these search results, I think that the level of Internet access availability in Paducah is equivalent

  11. LATA KY WEA-2012-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to Energy PerformanceJohn CymbalskyKristina Johnson About Us Dr.TRIBALLANL

  12. Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the aforementioned anomalies at depth. Moreover, high CO{sub 2} concentrations associated with coals in the vadose zone suggest a strong affinity for adsorbing CO{sub 2}. Overall, the low permeability of reclaimed mine lands and coals and CO2 adsorption by the latter is likely to reduce the ability of surface geochemistry tools to detect a microseepage signal.

  13. RELAP5 assessment using semiscale SBLOCA test S-NH-1. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.J.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-inch cold leg break test S-NH-1, conducted at the 1/1705 volume scaled facility Semiscale was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 and MOD3 Version 5m5. Loss of HPIS was assumed, and reactor trip occurred on a low PZR pressure signal (13.1 MPa), and pumps began an unpowered coastdown on SI signal (12.5 MPa). The system was recovered by opening ADV`s when the PCT became higher than 811 K. Accumulator was finally injected into the system when the primary system pressure was less than 4.0 MPa. The experiment was terminated when the pressure reached the LPIS actuation set point RELAP5/MOD2 analysis demonstrated its capability to predict, with a sufficient accuracy, the main phenomena occurring in the depressurization transient, both from a qualitative and quantitative points of view. Nevertheless, several differences were noted regarding the break flow rate and inventory distribution due to deficiencies in two-phase choked flow model, horizontal stratification interfacial drag, and a CCFL model. The main reason for the core to remain nearly fully covered with the liquid was the under-prediction of the break flow by the code. Several sensitivity calculations were tried using the MOD2 to improve the results by using the different options of break flow modeling (downward, homogeneous, and area increase). The break area compensating concept based on ``the integrated break flow matching`` gave the best results than downward junction and homogeneous options. And the MOD3 showed improvement in predicting a CCFL in SG and a heatup in the core.

  14. Study of NH stretching vibrations in small ammonia clusters by infrared spectroscopy in He droplets and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Sartakov, Boris G.; Vilesov, Andrey F.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared spectra of the NH stretching vibrations of (NH3)n clusters (n=2-4) have been obtained using the helium droplet isolation technique and first principles electronic structure anharmonic calculations. The measured spectra exhibit well-resolved bands, which have been assigned to the ?1, ?3, and 2?4 modes of the ammonia fragments in the clusters. The formation of a hydrogen bond in ammonia dimers leads to an increase of the infrared intensity by about a factor of four. In the larger clusters the infrared intensity per hydrogen bond is close to the one for dimers and approaches the value in the NH3 crystal. The intensity of the 2?4 overtone band in the trimer and tetramer increases by a factor of 10 relative to that in the monomer and dimer, and is comparable to the intensity of the ?1 and ?3 fundamental bands in larger clusters. This indicates the onset of the strong anharmonic coupling of the 2?4 and ?1 modes in larger clusters. The experimental assignments are compared to the ones obtained from first principles electronic structure anharmonic calculations for the dimer and trimer clusters. The anharmonic calculations were performed at the Mller-Plesset (MP2) level of electronic structure theory and were based on a second-order perturbative evaluation of rovibrational parameters and their effects on the vibrational spectra and average structures. In general there is excellent (<20 cm-1) agreement between the experimentally measured band origins for the N-H stretching frequencies and the calculated anharmonic vibrational frequencies. However, the calculations were found to overestimate the infrared intensities in clusters by about a factor of four. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy, in part by the Chemical Sciences program and in part by the Engineering and Geosciences Division. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  15. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E. [University of Idaho

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  16. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  17. Supporting Information Surface Electric Fields of Aqueous Solutions of NH4NO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S1 Supporting Information Surface Electric Fields of Aqueous Solutions of NH4NO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3 interfaces of (a) 1.0 M and 2.0 M LiNO3, (b) 1.0 M and 1.7 M NaNO3, (c) 1.0 M and 1.6 M NH4NO3, and (d) 1.0 M water 1.0 M NaNO3 1.7 M NaNO3 c water 1.0 M NH4 NO3 1.6 M NH4 NO3 | (2) | 2 (10 3 arb.units) Wavenumber

  18. COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR survey used a 200 megahertz (MHz) antenna to provide the maximum depth penetration and subsurface detail yielding usable signals to a depth of about 6 to 10 feet in this environment and allowed discrimination of objects that were deeper, particularly useful in the southern area of the site where shallow depth metallic debris (primarily roof flashing) complicated interpretation of the EM and magnetic data. Several geophysical anomalies were defined on the contour plots that indicated the presence of buried metal. During the first phase of the project, nine anomalies or anomalous areas were detected. The sizes, shapes, and magnitudes of the anomalies varied considerably, but given the anticipated size of the primary target of the investigation, only the most prominent anomalies were considered as potential caches of 30 to 60 buried drums. After completion of a second phase investigation, only two of the anomalies were of sufficient magnitude, not identifiable with existing known metallic objects such as monitoring wells, and in positions that corresponded to the location of alleged dumping activities and were recommended for further, intrusive investigation. Other important findings, based on the variable frequency EM method and its combination with total field magnetic and GPR data, included the confirmation of the position of the old NSDD, the ability to differentiate between ferrous and non-ferrous anomalies, and the detection of what may be plumes emanating from the landfill cell.

  19. Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealths utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) YearLiquids58,8992009 2010

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) YearLiquids58,8992009

  2. Kentucky Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease Condensate

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) DecadeYear(Million

  4. Theory of Hydride-Proton Transfer (HPT) Carbonyl Reduction by [Os(III)(tpy)(Cl)(NH=CHCH3)(NSAr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum mechanical analysis reveals that carbonyl reduction of aldehydes and ketones by the imine-based reductant cis-[Os{sup III}(tpy)(Cl)(NH?CHCH{sub 3})(NSAr)] (2), which is accessible by reduction of the analogous nitrile, occurs by hydride-proton transfer (HPT) involving both the imine and sulfilimido ligands. In carbonyl reduction, water or alcohol is necessary to significantly lower the barrier for proton shuttling between ligands. The ?N(H)SAr group activates the carbonyl group through hydrogen bonding while the ?NC(H)CH{sub 3} ligand delivers the hydride.

  5. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

  6. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the second-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Second-year results include: All current milestones have been met and other components of the project have been functioning in parallel toward satisfaction of year-3 milestones. We also have been effecting the ultimate goal of the project in the dissemination of information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky have much greater extensibility than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that is generating considerable exploration interest. If this structure is productive, it will be one of the largest structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. We have made numerous presentations, convened a workshop, and are beginning to disseminate our results in print. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  7. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

  8. 4D Density Determination of NH Radicals in an MSE Microplasma Combining Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Martin; Schenk, Andreas; Gericke, Karl-Heinz [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An application of microplasmas is surface modification under mild conditions and of small, well defined areas. For this, an understanding of the plasma composition is of importance. First results of our work on the production and detection of NH radicals in a capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) microplasma are presented. A microstructured comb electrode was used to generate a glow discharge in a hydrogen/nitrogen gas mixture by applying 13.56 MHz RF voltage. The techniques of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are used for space and time resolved, quantitative detection of the NH radical in the plasma. The rotational temperature was determined to be 820 K and, the density 5.1x10{sup 12} cm{sup 3}. Also, time dependent behaviour of the NH production was observed.

  9. Unusual defect physics in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Wan-Jian, E-mail: wanjian.yin@utoledo.edu; Shi, Tingting; Yan, Yanfa, E-mail: yanfa.yan@utoledo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin-film solar cells based on Methylammonium triiodideplumbate (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) halide perovskites have recently shown remarkable performance. First-principle calculations show that CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} has unusual defect physics: (i) Different from common p-type thin-film solar cell absorbers, it exhibits flexible conductivity from good p-type, intrinsic to good n-type depending on the growth conditions; (ii) Dominant intrinsic defects create only shallow levels, which partially explain the long electron-hole diffusion length and high open-circuit voltage in solar cell. The unusual defect properties can be attributed to the strong Pb lone-pair s orbital and I p orbital antibonding coupling and the high ionicity of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}.

  10. Encapsulation of titanium (IV) silsesquioxane into the NH{sub 4}USY zeolite: Preparation, characterization and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro do Carmo, Devaney [Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Av. Brasil Centro, 56 CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: docarmo@dfq.feis.unesp.br; Dias Filho, Newton Luiz [Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Av. Brasil Centro, 56 CEP 15385-000, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Ramos Stradiotto, Nelson [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Instituto de Quimica PO Box, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the encapsulation of titanium (IV) silsesquioxane into the supercavities of NH{sub 4}USY ultra stabilized zeolite, after chemical treatment. The modified zeolite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra, Nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravity. This encapsulated titanium (IV) silsesquioxane can adsorb Azure A chloride after treatment with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, without modifier leaching problems. In an electrochemical study, the cyclic voltammograms of the graphite paste modified electrode, shows two redox couples with formal potential (E{sup 0}') -0.1 V and 0.21 V to I and II redox couples respectively (v=700mVs{sup -1}; Britton Robinson buffer (B-R) solution, pH 3) versus SCE ascribed to a monomer and dimmer of azure. This paper shows the use of ultra stabilized zeolite in the electrochemical field as host for molecules with nanometric dimensions.

  11. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

  12. Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation.

  13. Task 16 -- Sampling and analysis at the Vortec vitrification facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laudal, D.L.; Lilemoen, C.M.; Hurley, J.P.; Ness, S.R.; Stepan, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{reg_sign}) facility, to be located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. To assure that costs of sampling and analysis are contained, Vortec and the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have decided that initially the primary focus of the sampling activities will be on meeting permitting requirements of the state of Kentucky. Therefore, sampling will be limited to the feedstock entering the system, and the glass, flue gas, and water leaving the system. The authors provide suggestions for optional sampling points and procedures in case there is later interest in operations or mass balance data. The permits do not require speciation of the materials in the effluents, only opacity, total radioactivity, total particulate, and total HCl emissions for the gaseous emissions and total radioactivity in the water and solid products. In case future testing to support operations or mass balances is required, the authors include in this document additional information on the analyses of some species of interest. They include heavy metals (RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] and Cu and Ni), radionuclides (Th{sub 230}, U{sub 235}, Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and Pu{sup 239}), and dioxins/furans.

  14. Solvent extraction of Li+, H3O+ and NH4+ into nitrobenzene by using sodium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makrlik, Emanuel [Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Kamyck; Selucky, P. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez, Czech Republic; Vanura, Petr [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Czech Republic; Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + NaL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = Li+, H3O+, NH+4; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: zH3O+ < Li+ < NH+4.

  15. Phase Transformations of the Ternary System (NH4)2SO4-H2SO4-H2O and the Implications for Cirrus Cloud Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the presence of NH4 + ions in the aerosol of the upper troposphere. Low-temperature ternary phase diagrams distribution alters the cloud's radiative properties, persistence, and surface area available for heterogeneous radiation, which insulates or warms Earth, and scattering the sun's visible radiation upward, thus cooling

  16. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3,,A~ ... and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    with a classical mechanical treatment of nuclear motion on coupled potential-energy surfaces. Whereas older mixedMixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3,,A~ ... and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories David Bonhommeaua and Donald G

  17. An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Summary Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal by extracting it from liquid manure and potentially using the recovered NH3 as fertilizer. For this purpose, lab

  18. Assessment of the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration of technetium-99 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site in Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, B.; McDonald, J.A.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clausen, J.L. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States). Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This short report summarizes the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration/transport of {sup 99}Tc at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site in Paducah, Kentucky. Limited data suggest that inorganic colloidal materials (e.g., aluminosilicate clay minerals) may not play a significant role in the retention and transport of Tc. Studies by size fractionation reveal that both Tc and natural organic matter (NOM) are largely present in the <3K fraction. The role of NOM on Tc retention and transport is not conclusive on the basis of this study. However, a literature review suggests that Tc is very likely associated with the groundwater organics. The presence of the organic matter could have increased the solubility and cotransport of Tc at the PGDP site. Further studies, applying such techniques as gel chromatography, size exclusion, and spectroscopy, may be useful to determine the association of organic matter with Tc. If Tc is associated with groundwater organics, appropriate protocols for removal of organic matter associated with Tc may be developed. Time and resources were limited so this study is not comprehensive with respect to the role of mobile organic and inorganic colloidal materials on Tc transport in subsurface soils. The redox conditions (DO) of groundwaters reported may not represent the true groundwater conditions, which could have influenced the association and dissociation of Tc with groundwater colloidal materials. Because Tc concentrations in the groundwater (on the order of nCi/L) at the PGDP site is much lower than the solubility of reduced Tc (IV) (on the order of {approximately}10{sup {minus}8} mol/L or parts per billion), regardless of the redox conditions, Tc will stay in solution phase as TC(IV) or Tc(VII). The mechanisms of adsorption/association vs precipitation must be understood under reduced and low Tc conditions so that strategic plans for remediation of Tc contaminated soils and groundwaters can be developed.

  19. Effects of constraints in general branched molecules: A quantitative ab initio study in HCO-L-Ala-NH2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Echenique; J. L. Alonso; Ivan Calvo

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A general approach to the design of accurate classical potentials for protein folding is described. It includes the introduction of a meaningful statistical measure of the differences between approximations of the same potential energy, the definition of a set of Systematic and Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates (SASMIC), much convenient for the simulation of general branched molecules, and the imposition of constraints on the most rapidly oscillating degrees of freedom. All these tools are used to study the effects of constraints in the Conformational Equilibrium Distribution (CED) of the model dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH2. We use ab initio Quantum Mechanics calculations including electron correlation at the MP2 level to describe the system, and we measure the conformational dependence of the correcting terms to the naive CED based in the Potential Energy Surface (PES) without any simplifying assumption. These terms are related to mass-metric tensors determinants and also occur in the Fixman's compensating potential. We show that some of the corrections are non-negligible if one is interested in the whole Ramachandran space. On the other hand, if only the energetically lower region, containing the principal secondary structure elements, is assumed to be relevant, then, all correcting terms may be neglected up to peptides of considerable length. This is the first time, as far as we know, that the analysis of the conformational dependence of these correcting terms is performed in a relevant biomolecule with a realistic potential energy function.

  20. MOSE: zooming on the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances at the surface layer at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lascaux, Franck; di Arcetri, INAF / Osservatorio Astrofisico; 10.1117/12.925934

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of the MOSE project, in this contribution we present a detailed analysis of the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances and their dependency on the model and orography horizontal resolutions in proximity of the ground. The investigated sites are Cerro Paranal (site of the ESO Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the ESO European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), in Chile. At both sites, data from a rich statistical sample of different nights are available - from AWS (Automated Weather Stations) and masts - giving access to wind speed, wind direction and temperature at different levels near the ground (from 2 m to 30 m above the ground). In this study we discuss the use of a very high horizontal resolution (dX=0.1 km) numerical configuration that overcomes some specific limitations put in evidence with a standard configuration with dX=0.5 km. In both sites results are very promising. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF.

  1. Direct Observation of Long Electron-Hole Diffusion Distance beyond 1 Micrometer in CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Thin Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yu; Li, Yunlong; Wang, Wei; Bian, Zuqiang; Xiao, Lixin; Wang, Shufeng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high performance perovskite based on CH3NH3PbI3, the formerly reported short charge diffusion distance is a confliction to thick working layer in solar cell devices. We carried out a study on charge diffusion in spin-coated CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin film by transient fluorescent spectroscopy. A thickness-dependent fluorescent lifetime was found. This effect correlates to the defects at crystal grain boundaries. By coating the film with electron or hole transfer layer, PCBM or Spiro-OMeTAD respectively, we observed the charge transfer directly through the fluorescent decay. One-dimensional diffusion model was applied to obtain long charge diffusion distances, which is ~1.3 micron for electrons and ~5.2 micron for holes. This study gives direct support to the high performance of perovskite solar cells.

  2. Effect of NH{sub 3} on the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of TiO{sub 2} film at low temperature using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Xuemei; Takoudis, Christos G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of NH{sub 3} on TiO{sub 2} film deposition using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium (TDEAT) and O{sub 2} as source gases in a low pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor was studied at low temperatures ranging from 100 to 250 deg. C. TiO{sub 2} film is traditionally deposited at temperature above 300 deg. C using oxygen-based Ti precursors, such as titanium tetraisopropoxide. In this study, the authors demonstrate that a combination of both reactive precursors, i.e., TDEAT and NH{sub 3}, is an effective technique for TiO{sub 2} film deposition at lower temperatures, albeit with some nitrogen incorporation. It was found that films can be formed at temperatures as low as 100 deg. C when NH{sub 3} is used. At higher temperatures, the growth rate of TiO{sub 2} films deposited using NH{sub 3} is higher than that of films deposited without NH{sub 3} by up to one order of magnitude. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data show that NH{sub 3} enhances the formation of TiNO and TiN, and x-ray diffraction analysis shows that all as-deposited films have amorphous structure. Both x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiles show that nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen are uniformly distributed throughout the film. The mechanism of enhancement of growth rate using NH{sub 3} is also discussed.

  3. Tiu Ch Chn La D n Khi Phc Sm Vo ngy 21 thng 4 nm 2011, cc y Vin nh Gi Tn Hi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    con ngi bng cch khi phc, phc hi mi trng sng, thay th, hoc thu gom mt lng tng ng vi ngun ti nguyn thin nhin c cht lng, gi tr sinh thi hoc dn dng tng ng n b cc ti nguyn v dch v b tn hi t s c, nhng vn c chp nhn v hu ch gip sng lc mt s lng ln cc d n c tim nng. Khng mt yu t no c s dng nh

  4. Energetics of H and NH2 on GaN,,1010... and implications for the origin of nanopipe defects John E. Northrup and R. Di Felice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energetics of H and NH2 on GaN,,101¯0... and implications for the origin of nanopipe defects John E-terminated GaN 101¯0 surfaces. The calculations indicate that H adsorption on GaN 101¯0 will proceed. The implications of these results for the origin of nanopipe defects in GaN are examined. S0163-1829 97 51832

  5. School Finance Reform: Do Equalized Expenditures Imply Equalized Teacher Salaries?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Streams, Meg; Butler, J.S.; Cowen, Joshua; Fowles, Jacob; Toma, Eugenia T.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It has experienced long-standing 510 Streams, Butler, Cowen, Fowles, and Toma Table 1. Socioeconomic and Demographic Characteristics of Kentucky and Selected States KY NY FL NC Population, 2007 4,241,474 19,297,729 18,251,243 9,061,032 Bachelors degree... employing large- scale administrative data. For this reason, Kentuckys ex- perience of major school finance and curricular reform is highly salient for understanding teacher labor market dynamics. This study examines the time path of teacher salaries...

  6. Curriculum Vita ROBIN G. BRUMFIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    by size of firm and market channel. Directed by Dr. P.V. Nelson. 1980 M.S. in Horticultural Science, North of marketing flowering potted plants in terms of size of firm, market channel, and market period. Directed, Kentucky Department of Energy, Lexington, KY. 8/82 1/78- Graduate Research Assistant in Floriculture, North

  7. Curriculum Vita ROBIN G. BRUMFIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    by size of firm and market channel. Directed by Dr. P.V. Nelson. 1980 M.S. in Horticultural Science, North of marketing flowering potted plants in terms of size of firm, market channel, and market period. Directed University, 12/82 Richmond, KY. 3/82- Principal Research Analyst, Kentucky Department of Energy, Lexington

  8. Spermiation of paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Acipenseriformes) stimulated with injection of LHRH analogue and carp pituitary powder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    Note Spermiation of paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Acipenseriformes) stimulated with injection Center, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY 40601, USA c Zoology Department, University of Oklahoma spathula) was tested. Single injections of the LH-RH analogue at 0.2, 0.1, or 0.05 mgkg1 increased

  9. Controls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0053, USA b Department of Geological Sciences, The University of TexasControls on the regional-scale salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, Texas, USA Sunil Mehtaa, *, Alan E. Fryara , Jay L. Bannerb a Department of Geological Sciences, University

  10. Logic Programs with Abstract Constraint Atoms: The Role of Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Cao Son

    of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA, {lliu1,mirek}@cs.uky.edu 2 Department of Computer Science, New Mexico]. Another semantics has been proposed in [21]. Following the approach proposed in [11], and exploiting characterizations of answer sets, providing a reasoner with alternative ways to deter- mine them. The original

  11. Logic Programs with Abstract Constraint Atoms: The Role of Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA, {lliu1,mirek}@cs.uky.edu 2 Department of Computer Science, New Mexico]. Another semantics has been proposed in [21]. Following the approach proposed in [11], and exploiting characterizations of answer sets, providing a reasoner with alternative ways to deter mine them. The original

  12. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    , the primary forage base is endophyte- infected (E+) Kentucky 31 (KY31) tall fescue. Tall fescue sets performance and disorders caused by the presence of the fungal endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum reduces its-infected. The endophytic fungus produces ergot alkaloids that are toxic to livestock (Ball, Hoveland, and Lacefield 2002

  13. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 426 (1999) 249}253 Precise momentum determination of the external COSY proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magiera, Andrzej

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ( nster, Germany Institute of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Energy, Soxa, Bulgaria Institute of Physics., Cairo, Egypt. Now at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA. 0168-9002/99/$ } see front matter 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII: S 0 1 6 8 - 9 0

  14. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    propelled the energy- and natural resource-production states to the top of the nation's employment Oklahoma TX Texas AR Arkansas LA Louisiana AL balA am a KY Kentucky TN Tennessee WV VA Virginia GA Georgia, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas MIDWEST East North Central Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin West

  15. The Effect of HF/NH4F Etching on the Morphology of Surface Fractures on Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, L; Suratwala, T; Feit, M D; Miller, P E; Steele, R A

    2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of HF/NH{sub 4}F, wet chemical etching on the morphology of individual surface fractures (indentations, scratches) and of an ensemble of surface fractures (ground surfaces) on fused silica glass has been characterized. For the individual surface fractures, a series of static or dynamic (sliding) Vickers and Brinnell indenters were used to create radial, lateral, Hertzian cone and trailing indentation fractures on a set of polished fused silica substrates which were subsequently etched. After short etch times, the visibility of both surface and subsurface cracks is significantly enhanced when observed by optical microscopy. This is attributed to the removal of the polishing-induced Bielby layer and the increased width of the cracks following etching allowing for greater optical scatter at the fracture interface. The removal of material during etching was found to be isotropic except in areas where the etchant has difficulty penetrating or in areas that exhibit significant plastic deformation/densification. Isolated fractures continue to etch, but will never be completely removed since the bottom and top of the crack both etch at the same rate. The etching behavior of ensembles of closely spaced cracks, such as those produced during grinding, has also been characterized. This was done using a second set of fused silica samples that were ground using either fixed or loose abrasives. The resulting samples were etched and both the etch rate and the morphology of the surfaces were monitored as a function of time. Etching results in the formation of a series of open cracks or cusps, each corresponding to the individual fractures originally on the surface of the substrate. During extended etching, the individual cusps coalesce with one another, providing a means of reducing the depth of subsurface damage and the peak-to-valley roughness. In addition, the material removal rate of the ground surfaces was found to scale with the surface area of the cracks as a function of etch time. The initial removal rate for the ground surface was typically 3.5 x the bulk etch rate. The evolving morphology of ground surfaces during etching was simulated using an isotropic finite difference model. This model illustrates the importance that the initial distributions of fracture sizes and spatial locations have on the evolution of roughness and the rate at which material is removed during the etching process. The etching of ground surfaces can be used during optical fabrication to convert subsurface damage into surface roughness thereby reducing the time required to produce polished surfaces that are free of subsurface damage.

  16. This book describes the responsibilities of show personnel and outlines the job descriptions of various positions for the NH 4-H State Horse Show (or any other 4-H horse show).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of various positions for the NH 4-H State Horse Show (or any other 4-H horse show). June 2013 #12;Table of Contents Organizing a 4-H Horse Show ........................................................................................... 1 State 4-H Horse Show Philosophy................................................................ 1

  17. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Saurabh

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim ...

  18. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Implementation of the Authorized Limits Process for Waste Acceptance at the C-746-U Landfill Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1414) for the proposed implementation of the authorized limits process for waste acceptance at the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, which is incorporated herein by this reference, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA). Therefore preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Kentucky Natural Gas Processed in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) DecadeYear(Million Cubic

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Kentucky

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal2009Year Jan Feband PlantFuel(Million Cubic

  1. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. ODonnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  2. Preparation of Single Phase Films of CH3NH3Pb(I1-xBrx)3 with Sharp Optical Band Edges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadhanala, Aditya; Deschler, Felix; Thomas, Tudor H; Dutton, Sin E.; Goedel, Karl C.; Hanusch, Fabian C.; Lai, May L.; Steiner, Ullrich; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo; Cahen, David; Friend, Richard H.

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ?inorganic perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3?xClx) solar cells now show photovoltaic (PV) performance1?4 approaching 18%,5,6 and high charge-carrier mobilities.7 Perovskite films have also shown promising photoluminescence quantum efficiencies (PLQEs) of more than 70% and lasing... .; Grat?zel, M.; Mhaisalkar, S.; Sum, T. C. Low-Temperature Solution- Processed Wavelength-Tunable Perovskites for Lasing. Nat. Mater. 2014, 13, 476?480. (9) Deschler, F.; Price, M.; Pathak, S.; Klintberg, L. E.; Jarausch, D.- D.; Higler, R.; Hu?ttner, S...

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu/SAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR 2: Solid-state Ion Exchange and One-pot Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are synthesized using two methods: solid-state ion exchange (SSIE) and one-pot synthesis. SSIE is conducted by calcining SAPO-34/CuO mixtures at elevated temperatures. For the one-pot synthesis method, Cu-containing chemicals (CuO and CuSO4) are added during gel preparation. A high-temperature calcination step is also needed for this method. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. In Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE, Cu presents both as isolated Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuO. The former is highly active and selective in NH3-SCR, while the latter catalyzes a side reaction; notably, the non-selective oxidation of NH3 above 350 C. Using the one-pot method followed by a high-temperature aging treatment, it is possible to form Cu SAPO-34 samples with predominately isolated Cu2+ ions at low Cu loadings. However at much higher Cu loadings, isolated Cu2+ ions that bind weakly with the CHA framework and CuO clusters also form. These Cu moieties are very active in catalyzing non-selective NH3 oxidation above 350 C. Low-temperature reaction kinetics indicate that Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE have core-shell structures where Cu is enriched in the shell layers; while Cu is more evenly distributed within the one-pot samples. Reaction kinetics also suggest that at low temperatures, the local environment next to Cu2+ ion centers plays little role on the overall catalytic properties. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830. The authors also thank Shari Li (PNNL) for surface area/pore volume measurements, and Bruce W. Arey (PNNL) for SEM measurements. Discussions with Drs. A. Yezerets, K. Kamasamudram, J.H. Li, N. Currier and J.Y. Luo from Cummins, Inc. and H.Y. Chen and H. Hess from Johnson-Matthey are greatly appreciated.

  4. Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

  5. Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM standard D4806. The total credit amount available for all...

  6. FACT BOOKLET UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    with EdR continues to make progress. In January, the UK Board of Trustees authorized Phase II-C of the ongoing public-private partnership with EdR to construct more than 1,140 additional modern residence hall

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) YearLiquids58,899 60,167

  8. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  9. Vapor-liquid equilibria in the system NH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O + LiBr. 2: Data correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.; Korinth, C.; Keller, J.U. [Univ. of Siegen (Germany). Institute Fluid- and Thermodynamics

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The systems ammonia + water (NH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O) and water + lithium bromide (H{sub 2}O + LiBr) provide two working pairs most often used today in air-conditioning systems and systems for reusing industrial waste heat, such as absorption heat pumps and heat transformers. A quasi-chemical reaction model has been developed to correlate vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the system ammonia (NH{sub 3}) + water (H{sub 2}O) + lithium bromide (LiBr) in the temperature range form 303.15 to 473.15 K and at pressures up to 2.0 MPa. this model assumes the formation of ion clusters, i.e., Li{sup +} and Br{sup {minus}} ions surrounded by ammonia and water molecules. Further, ammonia nd water molecules are assumed to form a second species of complexes. The activities of the various components in the liquid phase are modeled by the NRTL equation. The vapor phase, assumed to consist of ammonia and water only, is modeled by the equation of state of Ishikawa, Chung, and Lu.

  10. West KY Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advance to DOE's National Science Bowl Subscribe to EM News Email Updates Gov Delivery logo To receive the latest news and updates about the Office of Environmental Management,...

  11. High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresentedGenerationBuildingBuilding

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - KY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CTOregon Metallurgical Corp -Oxnard01

  13. High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHighLouisiana

  14. Calculation of exact vibrational spectra for P{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}NH using a phase space wavelet basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Thomas, E-mail: tom.halverson@ttu.edu; Poirier, Bill [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact quantum dynamics calculations of vibrational spectra are performed for two molecular systems of widely varying dimensionality (P{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}NH), using a momentum-symmetrized Gaussian basis. This basis has been previously shown to defeat exponential scaling of computational cost with system dimensionality. The calculations were performed using the new SWITCHBLADE black-box code, which utilizes both dimensionally independent algorithms and massive parallelization to compute very large numbers of eigenstates for any fourth-order force field potential, in a single calculation. For both molecules considered here, many thousands of vibrationally excited states were computed, to at least an intermediate level of accuracy (tens of wavenumbers). Future modifications to increase the accuracy to spectroscopic levels, along with other potential future improvements of the new code, are also discussed.

  15. Crystal structure and electric properties of the organicinorganic hybrid: [(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]ZnCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostafa, M.F., E-mail: Mohga40@Yahoo.com; El-khiyami, S.S.

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The new organic-inorganic hybrid [(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]ZnCl{sub 4}, M{sub r}=325.406 crystallized in a triclinic, P1, a=7.2816 (5) , b=10.0996 (7) , c=10.0972 (7) , ?=74.368 (4), ?=88.046 (4), ?=85.974 (3), V=713.24 (9) {sup 3} and Z=2, D{sub x}=1.486 Mg m{sup ?3}. Differential thermal scanning and x-ray powder diffraction, permittivity and ac conductivity indicated three phase transitions. Conduction takes place via correlated barrier hopping. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted.

  16. High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

  17. Vanderbilt Center for Nashville Studies CULTURAL TAX DISTRICT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    .....................................................................................................11 Paducah, KY.............................................................................11 Seattle

  18. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Saurabh

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect...

  19. Structure of duplex DNA containing the cisplatin 1,2-{Pt(NH3)2}[superscript 2]+-d(GpG) crosslink at 1.77 [Angstrom] resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Ryan C.

    We report the 1.77- resolution X-ray crystal structure of a dodecamer DNA duplex with the sequence 5?-CCTCTGGTCTCC-3? that has been modified to contain a single engineered 1,2-cis-{Pt(NH3)2}2+-d(GpG) cross-link, the major ...

  20. Experimental and Theoretical EPR Study of Jahn?Teller-Active [HIPTN[subscript 3]N]MoL Complexes (L = N[subscript 2], CO, NH[subscript 3])

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNaughton, Rebecca L.

    The trigonally symmetric Mo(III) coordination compounds [HIPTN[subscript 3]N]MoL (L = N[subscript 2], CO, NH[subscript 3]; [HIPTN3N]Mo = [(3,5-(2,4,6-i-Pr[subscript 3]C[subscript 6]H[subscript 2])[subscript 2]C[subscript ...

  1. Application of x-ray tomography to optimization of new NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for vehicle on-board emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Mark A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed potential sensors for the detection of hydrocarbons, NO{sub x}, and NH{sub 3} have been previously developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL sensors have a unique design incorporating dense ceramic-pelletlmetal-wire electrodes and porous electrolytes. The performance of current-biased sensors using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and platinum and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} electrodes is reported. X-ray tomography has been applied to non-destructively examine internal structures of these sensors. NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon response of the sensors under various bias conditions is reported, and very little NO{sub x} response hysteresis was observed. The application of a 0.6 {mu}A bias to these sensors shifts the response from a hydrocarbon response to a NO{sub x} response equal for both NO and NO{sub 2} species at approximately 500 {sup o}C in air.

  2. MOSE: a feasibility study for optical turbulence forecasts with the Meso-Nh mesoscale model to support AO facilities at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masciadri, E; 10.1117/12.925924

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present very encouraging preliminary results obtained in the context of the MOSE project, an on-going study aiming at investigating the feasibility of the forecast of the optical turbulence and meteorological parameters (in the free atmosphere as well as in the boundary and surface layer) at Cerro Paranal (site of the Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), both in Chile. The study employs the Meso-Nh atmospheric mesoscale model and aims at supplying a tool for optical turbulence forecasts to support the scheduling of the scientific programs and the use of AO facilities at the VLT and the E-ELT. In this study we take advantage of the huge amount of measurements performed so far at Paranal and Armazones by ESO and the TMT consortium in the context of the site selection for the E-ELT and the TMT to constraint/validate the model. A detailed analysis of the model performances in reproducing the atmospheric parameters (T, V, p, H, ...) near the g...

  3. The superionic phase transitions in (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure up to 400?MPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindner, ?.; Zdanowska-Fr?czek, M., E-mail: mzf@ifmpan.poznan.pl; Paw?owski, A.; Fr?czek, Z. J. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, Pozna? 60-179 (Poland)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on proton conductivity of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2} superionic crystal was studied in a wide temperature range and different isobaric conditions by means of impedance spectroscopy method. The measurements were performed along the trigonal c axis of the crystal, i.e., along the direction perpendicular to the plane in which, in the superionic phases, a dynamically disordered H-bond network is formed. The obtained pressure-temperature phase diagram is linear with increasing pressure. The triple point, which is the point of coexistence of the three phases: ferroelastic phase IV, ferroelastic phase III, and superionic phase II was found at p?=?116.3?MPa and T?=?287.3?K. High pressure leads to increase in the temperature range of stability of both superionic phases and to a drastic decrease in the temperature width of the ferroelastic phase III. With increasing pressure, the range of the superionic phase II expands at the expense of the range of the ferroelastic phase III, which is unstable and vanishes at the triple point.

  4. LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

  5. Determination of structure and phase transition of light element nanocomposites in mesoporous silica: case study of NH3BH3 in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, infused in mesoporous silica MCM-41 and its evolution over the temperature range of 80 to 300 K was investigated using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data in order to understand the origin of improved dehydrogenation properties of the system. Our study shows how X-ray PDF analysis can be used to elucidate the structure of light guest species loaded in mesoporous silica materials despite of its low scattering power of composed elements (N, B, and H) compared to its host (SiO2). PDF analyses of two AB-loaded compositions with weight ratio AB:MCM-41=1:1 and 3:1 provide a strong evidence that AB aggregate, previously found in AB:MCM-41?1:1 samples, is same species as neat AB. For both of them an orthorhombic to tetragonal structural phase transition occurs at 225 K on warming. On the other hand, AB residing inside meso-pores, which is found in AB:MCM-41=1:2 sample, does not undergo such phase transition. It rather stays in tetragonal phase over a wide temperature range of 110 to 240 K and starts to lose structural correlation above 240 K. This strongly suggests that nano-confinement of AB inside meso-pores stabilizes high temperature tetragonal phase at much lower temperature. These results provide important clues to two critical questions: why nan-compositions of AB leads dehydrogenation to lower temperature and why the neat AB like propoerties are recovered at high AB loading samples. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  6. Three sandglass-type molybdophosphates obtained via a new route: Synthesis and characterization of X{sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (X=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Yanchun; Liu Liping; Yan Xingjuan; Chu Wei; Zhu Yingying; Song Yuting [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Huang Rudan [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)], E-mail: huangrudan1@bit.edu.cn

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new polyoxometalates X{sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (X=Na{sup +}, 1; K{sup +}, 2; NH{sub 4}{sup +}, 3) have been synthesized with the classical Keggin and/or Dawson heteropolymolybdophosphates and PCl{sub 5} in acetonitrile-water solutions via hydrothermal treatment. The three compounds were characterized by different analyses including IR, {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrochemistry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Single crystal X-ray analyses were carried out on Na{sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (3). Compound 1 and 3 crystallize in the orthorhombic system. The structure of compound 2 was confirmed by the IR spectra and powder XRD. All the three compounds contain the same octamolybdophosphate polyoxoanion [PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}]{sup 7-}, which consists of two Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15} moieties linked by one central PO{sub 4} tetrahedron, leading to a remarkable sandglass-like structure. - Graphical Abstract: with the Keggin and/or Dawson heteropolymolybdophosphates and PCl{sub 5} in acetonitrile-water solutions via hydrothermal treatment, three new polyoxometalates X{sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (X=Na{sup +}, 1; K{sup +}, 2; NH{sub 4}{sup +}, 3) have been synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray analyses were carried out on Na{sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 7}[PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}] (3). All the three compounds contain the new sandglass-like structure [PMo{sub 8}O{sub 30}]{sup 7-}.

  7. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng tra c u t i website c a chng ti : httpThng tin nhanh NTU, tr ng i h c t ng h p l n nh t v lu i nh t i Loan, thng bo cc chng trnh o

  8. Latin American Theatre Review, Volume 29, Number 1: Back Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US; fgn. $21 /$6 I/Esprit Crateur The International Bilingual Quarterly Dept of French, 1015 Patterson Tower The University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 206 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW REVISTA IBEROAMERICANA Instituto Internacional de...-Issue subscription with the next Issue, cut or copy this form. [ j $15/lndividuais [ I $25/Institutions (] S12/Student (] S9/Sing!e Issues (Issue # ) Additional Postage: S1 /Canada & Mexico, $3/outside North America Prepayment required by charge, check on U.S...

  9. Supporting Online Material for H. Yu et al. "Effects of Amines on Formation of Sub-3 nm Particles and their Subsequent Growth" Table S1. Concentrations of impurity NH3, methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine in the nucleation system detected by CI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    as the following: 10 ccm H2O vapor (in OH generator), 3 lpm N2, 100 ccm SO2, 60 ccm O2, 50 ccm amine or NH3, 5 lpm

  10. 13286 J. Phys. Chem. 1994,98, 13286-13293 Kinetics of Ti(a3F,a5F)and V(a4F,a6D)Depletion by NH3 and H2S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    ) and V(a6D) upon interactions with NH3 and HzS are studied in a fast-flow reactor at a He pressure of 0) x Introduction Information about the gas-phase kinetics for the reactions of simple molecules studied the activation of NH3 and H2S by neutral titanium and vanadium atoms. In addition to the gas

  11. KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission may, by rule or order, authorize and require the transportation of natural gas in intrastate commerce by intrastate pipelines, or by local distribution companies with...

  12. Western Kentucky University Research Foundation Biodiesel Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Cao, Yan [Co-Principal Investigator] [Co-Principal Investigator

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum-based liquid hydrocarbons is exclusively major energy source in the transportation sector. Thus, it is the major CO{sub 2} source which is the associated with greenhouse effect. In the United States alone, petroleum consumption in the transportation sector approaches 13.8 million barrels per day (Mbbl/d). It is corresponding to a release of 0.53 gigatons of carbon per year (GtC/yr), which accounts for approximate 7.6 % of the current global release of CO{sub 2} from all of the fossil fuel usage (7 GtC/yr). For the long term, the conventional petroleum production is predicted to peak in as little as the next 10 years to as high as the next 50 years. Negative environmental consequences, the frequently roaring petroleum prices, increasing petroleum utilization and concerns about competitive supplies of petroleum have driven dramatic interest in producing alternative transportation fuels, such as electricity-based, hydrogen-based and bio-based transportation alternative fuels. Use of either of electricity-based or hydrogen-based alternative energy in the transportation sector is currently laden with technical and economical challenges. The current energy density of commercial batteries is 175 Wh/kg of battery. At a storage pressure of 680 atm, the lower heating value (LHV) of H{sub 2} is 1.32 kWh/liter. In contrast, the corresponding energy density for gasoline can reach as high as 8.88 kWh/liter. Furthermore, the convenience of using a liquid hydrocarbon fuel through the existing infrastructures is a big deterrent to replacement by both batteries and hydrogen. Biomass-derived ethanol and bio-diesel (biofuels) can be two promising and predominant U.S. alternative transportation fuels. Both their energy densities and physical properties are comparable to their relatives of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel, however, biofuels are significantly environmental-benign. Ethanol can be made from the sugar-based or starch-based biomass materials, which is easily fermented to create ethanol. In the United States almost all starch ethanol is mainly manufactured from corn grains. The technology for manufacturing corn ethanol can be considered mature as of the late 1980s. In 2005, 14.3 % of the U.S. corn harvest was processed to produce 1.48 x10{sup 10} liters of ethanol, energetically equivalent to 1.72 % of U.S. gasoline usage. Soybean oil is extracted from 1.5 % of the U.S. soybean harvest to produce 2.56 x 10{sup 8} liters of bio-diesel, which was 0.09 % of U.S. diesel usage. However, reaching maximum rates of bio-fuel supply from corn and soybeans is unlikely because these crops are presently major contributors to human food supplies through livestock feed and direct consumption. Moreover, there currently arguments on that the conversion of many types of many natural landscapes to grow corn for feedstock is likely to create substantial carbon emissions that will exacerbate globe warming. On the other hand, there is a large underutilized resource of cellulose biomass from trees, grasses, and nonedible parts of crops that could serve as a feedstock. One of the potentially significant new bio-fuels is so called "cellulosic ethanol", which is dependent on break-down by microbes or enzymes. Because of technological limitations (the wider variety of molecular structures in cellulose and hemicellulose requires a wider variety of microorganisms to break them down) and other cost hurdles (such as lower kinetics), cellulosic ethanol can currently remain in lab scales. Considering farm yields, commodity and fuel prices, farm energy and agrichemical inputs, production plant efficiencies, byproduct production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and other environmental effects, a life-cycle evaluation of competitive indicated that corn ethanol yields 25 % more energy than the energy invested in its production, whereas soybean bio-diesel yields 93 % more. Relative to the fossil fuels they displace, greenhouse gas emissions are reduced 12 % by the production and combustion of ethanol and 41 % by bio-diesel. Bio-diesel also releases less ai

  13. ,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  14. University of Kentucky College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    and graduate students CE Fall, 2010 x x x x 1.4.4 J) Array of CE Courses to Paducah CE Fall 2011 x x x x UK

  15. Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or biomass as a feedstock. Beginning Aug. 1, 2010, tax incentives are also available for energy-efficient alternative fuel production facilities and up to five alternative fuel...

  16. Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements...

  17. Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or facilities, and the standards for certification of...

  18. Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and...

  19. Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit provides for a property tax credit for new clean coal facilities constructed at a cost exceeding $150 million and used for the purposes of generating electricity....

  20. Geochemistry studies in Eastern Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here are the results of inorganic geochemical studies on well cuttings from fourteen wells in the Big Sandy Gas Field. Both x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction were used in analysis. Resultant mineralic data and elemental data were mapped by computer and by hand for five intervals of Ohio Shale and for the Berea/Bedford sequence. Comparisons of the geochemistry trend maps were made with lithology, structure, thermal maturation, gas open flow, and paleoenvironment. Techniques used included visual map comparison, computer map comparison programs utilizing correlation coefficients based on grid derived data sets, cluster analysis, x-y plots, and r/sup 2/ (coefficient of determination). A limited number of regional maps are included. It is concluded that inorganic geochemical analysis can be useful in: (1) suggesting paleoenvironmental trends; (2) establishing depositional trends; (3) enhancing exploration in terms of setting limits and pinpointing potential areas for hydrocarbon recovery; and (4) identification of likely locations for large gas fields when used with other geological studies. Elemental data analysis is the most accurate, and can be done quickly and inexpensively. It is concluded that the Big Sandy gas field area is a unique stratigraphic-structural gas trap, in which sedimentary factors, depositional basin features, plant evolution and occurrence, and structural elements all played important roles. Combinations of certain of these ingredients in different amounts may exist in other parts of the basin, and thus, suggest areas for hydrocarbon accumulation and potential recovery.

  1. Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    blended biodiesel does not qualify. The biodiesel tax credit is applied against the corporation income tax imposed under KRS 141.040 and/or the limited liability entity tax (LLET) imposed under KRS...

  2. KRS Chapter 278: Nuclear Power Facilities (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No construction shall commence on a nuclear power facility in the Commonwealth until the Public Service Commission finds that the United States government, through its authorized agency, has...

  3. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK LiquefiedCubic Feet)

  4. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions

  5. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14 Dec-1424,371

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14Feet)

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14Feet)Alaska

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet)

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  11. Kentucky Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet)YearSeparationYear

  12. Kentucky Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease20 55 10 41 3415

  13. Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease20 55 10 41

  14. Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease20 55 10 4120,359

  15. Louisville, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole,Lotsee, Oklahoma: EnergyInformationLouisville

  16. Inter-County Energy Efficiency Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inter-County Energy Cooperative offers several energy efficiency and demand-side management programs for residential customers. Incentives are available for heat pumps (including geothermal, air...

  17. Kentucky Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) DecadeYear(Million Cubic Feet)

  19. Kentucky Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead Price

  20. Kentucky Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead PriceProved Reserves

  1. Electric Energy Inc (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation, search ToolEcowareEkisolarModelElectric

  2. Elizabethtown, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,Electrosolar JumpElettropiemme

  3. Frankfort, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked DeerForwardEnergyFourFrance:

  4. Frankfort, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked

  5. Wickliffe, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird, Idaho: EnergyWhitman County,Whittingham,

  6. Clean Cities: Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowa

  7. Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,Kas Farmssource History View New Pages

  8. Kentucky/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,Kas Farmssource History View New

  9. Kentucky/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island,Kas Farmssource History View

  10. Sonora, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan Inc Jump to: navigation,

  11. Maxey Flats, Kentucky, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-IGYS,:?' _.JI' ;i.\'3

  12. Somerset, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp Jump to:Solibro AB JumpSomalia:

  13. Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistec Srl Jump to:

  14. Tennessee Valley Authority (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation Tengchong County Zhongdian EnergyTennessee

  15. Muldraugh, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,SpurrMulberry, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump

  16. Radcliff, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevada <RECServices,RYPOS IncRadcliff,

  17. Upton, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION

  18. Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and toolsoperation plans for

  19. Columbus, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:Governor s(Redirected

  20. Service Assessment Record Tornado Outbreaks of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 E. WFO Paducah, Kentucky

  1. Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

  2. Centrosymmetric [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} vs. noncentrosymmetric polar [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}: A hydrogen-bonding effect on the out-of-center distortion of TiF{sub 6} octahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-ah [Department of Chemistry Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Woo [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Ok, Kang Min, E-mail: kmok@cau.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The syntheses, structures, and characterization of organically templated zero-dimensional titanium fluoride materials, A{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} (A=[N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}] or [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]), are reported. Phase pure samples of A{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} were synthesized by either solvothermal reaction method or a simple mixing method. While [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} crystallizes in a centrosymmetric space group, R-3, [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} crystallizes in a noncentrosymmetric polar space group, Cm. The asymmetric out-of-center distortion of TiF{sub 6} octahedra in polar [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} are attributable to the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the fluorine atoms in TiF{sub 6} octahedra and the nitrogen atoms in the [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sup +} cation. Powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements on the [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, using 1064 nm radiation, indicate the material has SHG efficiency of 25 Multiplication-Sign that of {alpha}-SiO{sub 2}, which indicates an average nonlinear optical susceptibility, Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket d{sub eff} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {sub exp} of 2.8 pm/V. Additional SHG measurements reveal that the material is not phase-matchable (Type 1). The magnitudes of out-of-center distortions and dipole moment calculations for TiF{sub 6} octahedra will be also reported. - Graphical abstract: The out-of-center distortion of TiF{sub 6} octahedron in the polar noncentrosymmetric [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} is attributable to the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the F in TiF{sub 6} octahedron and the H-N in the [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sup +}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two titanium fluorides materials have been synthesized in high yields. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen-bonds are crucial for the out-of-center distortion of TiF{sub 6} octahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} has a SHG efficiency of 25 Multiplication-Sign that of {alpha}-SiO{sub 2}.

  3. Effective hole extraction using MoO{sub x}-Al contact in perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Zhu, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Zhu@nrel.gov [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an 11.4%-efficient perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cell using low-cost molybdenum oxide/aluminum (i.e., MoO{sub x}/Al) as an alternative top contact to replace noble/precious metals (e.g., Au or Ag) for extracting photogenerated holes. The device performance of perovskite solar cells using a MoO{sub x}/Al top contact is comparable to that of cells using the standard Ag top contact. Analysis of impedance spectroscopy measurements suggests that using 10-nm-thick MoO{sub x} and Al does not affect charge-recombination properties of perovskite solar cells. Using a thicker (20-nm) MoO{sub x} layer leads to a lower cell performance caused mainly by a reduced fill factor. Our results suggest that MoO{sub x}/Al is promising as a low-cost and effective hole-extraction contact for perovskite solar cells.

  4. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A? state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C. [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)] [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Sun, M. T. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +})(?=0,j=0)?NH(a{sup 1}?)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  5. COMPUTER SCIENCE North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SX Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    ever whole-body computational solution for flow over a submarine (incorporating hull, lifting surface-realistic computer graphics: The Last Starfighter, as well as a variety of Clio and NCGA award-winning television

  6. Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophones to study reservoir fracture systems. Methods currently applied to study fracture systems include tilt

  7. COMPUTER SCIENCE North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SX Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    grid, demand response will help accommodate fluctuating energy sources such as solar and wind vulnerabilities is hard. Energy companies want fine-grained consumption data but this may contravene European privacy law. And there are many incentive problems: smart meters will be operated by energy companies, who

  8. NEBRASKA TRANSCRIPT68 Carl (Ky) Rohman, '47, Lincoln, was honored by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    and Nebraska government classes, Nebraska Politics, Urban Politics and courses focused on political action. Naylor, '71, has retired from the practice of law after many years as a criminal defense lawyer moving to North Platte to go into private practice. He then moved to Grand Island where he worked

  9. THE MARMARA SEA GATEWAY SINCE ~16 KY BP: NON-CATASTROPHIC CAUSES OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Michael A.

    than 1000 years. Sufficient Mediterranean water to change the Sr-isotopic composition of slope Gateway, Bosphorus Strait, Black Sea Flood Hypothesis, Outflow Hypothesis, climate change 1. INTRODUCTION of the Black Sea to the Eastern Mediterranean has been intensely debated. Ryan, Pitman and coworkers advocate

  10. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of thisAppalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf Jumpand3, 20 December

  11. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of thisAppalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf Jumpand3, 20

  12. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of thisAppalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf Jumpand3,

  13. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-ZeroNew Wave Power ProjectTom Walsh & Co.When

  14. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-KY.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Originalfaq.pdfFinal.pdf JumpIN.pdf Jump

  15. NH Acid Rain Control Act (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Act is implemented under New Hampshire's acid deposition control program established under the Rules to Control Air Pollution in Chapter Env-A 400. The goal of the Act is to reduce emissions...

  16. Improvement of ASME NH for Grade 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard Riou

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared in the context of Task 3 of the ASME/DOE Gen IV material project. It has been identified that creep-fatigue evaluation procedures presently available in ASME (1) and RCC-MR (2) have been mainly developed for austenitic stainless steels and may not be suitable for cyclic softening materials such as mod 9 Cr 1 Mo steel (grade 91). The aim of this document is, starting from experimental test results, to perform a review of the procedures and, if necessary, provide recommendations for their improvements.

  17. Determination of the ( Ammonium (NH4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of methods of the RSIL, including routine analytical methods called standard operating procedures (SOPs), along with safety guidelines, maintenance procedures, and other information about the operation

  18. Chitosan (polysaccharide) Cationic polyelectrolyte (NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    deposition and biofunctionalization Packaging - Polycarbonate packaging material - Leak free packaging by top and bottom polycarbonate pieces Robust sealing technology Biofunctionalization in microfluidic

  19. NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Act calls for annual reductions of multiple pollutants, including SO2, Nox, CO2, and mercury. The Act calls for an 87% reduction in SO2 emissions and a 70% reduction in Nox emissions from...

  20. Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashton Greens Jump Lease.UT"OH"

  1. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousandby thePricePricetheTable 1. U.S.9 2010 2011 2012

  2. Application of the SELECS methodology to evaluate socioeconomic and environmental impacts of commercial-scale coal liquefaction plants at six potential sites in Kentucky. Final report from the study on development of environmental guidelines for the selection of sites for fossil energy conversion facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northrop, G. M.; D'Ambra, C. A.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and socioeconomic impacts likely to occur during the operational phase of two coal liquefaction processes have been evaluated with SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) for each of six potential sites in Kentucky for commercial scale facilities capable of processing about 26,000 tons of coal per stream day. The processes considered in this evaluation are SRC-I, a direct liquefaction route with solid boiler fuel as the principal product, and Coal-to-Methanol-to-Gasoline, an indirect liquefaction route with transportation fuel as the primary product. For comparative purposes, the impacts of a 2-gigawatt coal-fired steam-electric power plant (with coal requirements comparable to the liquefaction facilities) and an automobile parts manufacturing plant (with employment requirements of 849, comparable to the liquefaction facilities) have also been evaluated at each site. At each site, impacts have been evaluated for one or two nearby cities or towns and four to six counties where significant impacts might be expected. The SELECS methodology affords a well-organized and efficient approach to collecting and assessing a large volume of data needed to comprehensively determine the potential socioeconomic and environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commercial scale synfuel and other energy conversion facilities. This study has also shown that SELECS is equally applicable to determine the impacts of other facilities, such as automobile parts manufacturing. In brief, the SELECS methodology serves the purpose of objectively screening sites in order to choose one at which adverse impacts will be least, and/or to determine what aspect of a proposed facility might be modified to lessen impacts at a specific site.

  3. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole â?? including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite â?? at 1152â??2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4â??1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6â??1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

  4. Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobukowski, Erik

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

  5. Inter-County Energy Touchstone New Construction Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inter-County Energy Cooperative provides incentives of up to $750 for homeowners that follow the Touchstone Energy Home standards when designing a new home. In order to participate in the program,...

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

  7. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Number C-04 Start Date 07/01/1997 End Date 06/30/1999 Research Category Water Quality Focus Category #1 Methods Focus Category #2 Water Quality Focus Category #3 Toxic Substances Lead Institution University column), and the blood plasma surrogate (growth media) maintained on the basolateral side (facing blood

  8. Kentucky Department of Education Program of Studies Mathematics Primary 35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    , reason, and solve problems.) is infused throughout the mathematics instruction P-12 and is integral

  9. Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    students' knowledge in all areas of science, including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, energy, and math. Middle school student teams consist of four students,...

  10. Rockets 2 Race Cars Teacher Program at Kentucky Speedway (NASA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register here. Go Green Edition / The Heat is ON! Get your students revved up about science, technology, engineering and mathematics with NASA's Rockets 2 Race Cars STEM Education program....

  11. Chapter 50 Division for Air Quality: General Administrative Procedures (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 50 of the Division of Air Quality section within Energy and Environment Cabinet Department For Environmental Protection outlines the general administrative procedures for maintaining air...

  12. Mr. Todd Mullins Federal Facility Agreement Manager Kentucky...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    etc.). If you have any questions or require additional information, please contact Robert Smith at (270) 441-6821. Sincerely, , " , U H U ' " Woodard Facility Agreement Manager...

  13. Michael W. Hancock, P.E., President Secretary, Kentucky Transportation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (202) 624-5806 * transportation.org * centennial.transportation.org Statement of Chris Smith Senior Program Manager for Freight American Association of State Highway and...

  14. Kentucky River Pleasant Hill/ S.R.33 Burgin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkel, Raphael

    plumbing (no sink, no toilets). There is a refrigerator and (hopefully) a sufficient number of electrical

  15. Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

  16. Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also establishes recordkeeping and reporting standards....

  17. Synthesis Gas Demonstration Plant, Baskett, Kentucky: environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed plant is presented. The construction and operation of the plant are discussed in detail.

  18. Northern Kentucky University Honor Roll of Donors 2009-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Richard L.

    Frank and Jane Caccamo * Gary `78 and Marlene Cohen `77 * Robert E. Collier PhD * Carol B. Cornell Theatres Acclaim Award R. Scott Lucke `01 Blake R. Maislin `97 #12;Page 2 -- NKUF Honor Roll of Donors

  19. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  20. University of Kentucky Chemical and Materials Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Stephen E.

    synthesis and characterization of materials with advanced nanostructure and properties. Examples and control the "bottom- up" formation of these inorganic materials by polymerization, controlled. Understand self-assembly and its use for materials synthesis 6. Be able to apply physical chemical

  1. University of Kentucky Chemical and Materials Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Stephen E.

    the chemical synthesis and characterization of materials with advanced nanostructure and properties. Examples and control the "bottom-up" formation of these inorganic materials by polymerization, controlled precipitation. Understand self-assembly and its use for materials synthesis 6. Be able to apply physical chemical

  2. New urban manufacturing neo-industrial design in Louisville, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhie, Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American manufacturing is experiencing a modest renaissance. U.S. firms are choosing to re-shore manufacturing jobs not out of their sense of patriotism, but because it makes good business sense. The costs of transportation ...

  3. Potential turbine fuels from western Kentucky tar sand bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, H.F.; Johnson, C.A.; Sutton, W.A.; Benslay, R.M. (Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (USA))

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The declining quality of petroleum is a particular problem for aviation turbine fuels. Since these fuels are required to meet stringent corrosion, thermal stability and purity specification, very little in the way of contaminants or heteroatoms can be tolerated. However, heavier and more sour crude supplied result in lower straight-run turbine fuel yields, higher sulfur contents, and higher aromatic contents. While all turbine fuels were originally prepared from high quality stocks by distillation, many commercial and military fuels now require hydrotreatment to meet specifications. The work described in this program extrapolates these present trends to very heavy feedstocks. Tar sands bitumen and heavy crude oils are low API gravity, high viscosity hydrocarbonaceous materials commonly exhibiting high levels of heteroatomic species, high metals content and high levels of asphaltenes, plus water and solids not readily separated by conventional technology without dilution. Tar sands bitumen is highly cyclic with many polycyclic rings and naphthenic constituents. Sulfur is primarily in thiophenic structures, with nitrogen included in the ring structure. Asphaltenes are in high proportion, with a large amount of sulfur, nitrogen and metallic inclusions. Each of these characteristics represent specific concerns to refiners.

  4. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Federal Facilities Agreement a variety of environmental assessment and cleanup activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Four

  5. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supporting a variety of environmental assessment and cleanup activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The main project coordinated by the KWRRI during 2011 involved gathering input from stakeholders regarding potential future uses of the property associated with the plant after the plant is shut down

  6. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (CHS), 3) Technical Support for Environmental Construction

  7. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and other contaminants at the Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal Site and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Over 20 separate projects were active during 2006 and most of these dealt areas (civil/environmental engineering, plant and soil sciences, forestry, biosystems and ag engineering

  8. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The main project undertaken by KWRRI during 2010-2011 involved gathering input from stakeholders regarding potential future uses of the property associated with the plant areas including civil engineering (3), chemistry (3), biology (3), geology (2), and plant and soil

  9. Department of Energy Cites LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    assessment; (2) hazard abatement; (3) safety and health standards; (4) occupational medicine; (5) management responsibilities; (6) quality improvement; (7) work processes; and...

  10. Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied NaturalSeparation0

  11. Kentucky Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied

  12. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK LiquefiedCubic Feet) NewYear

  13. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK LiquefiedCubic

  14. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK LiquefiedCubicAdjustments

  15. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK

  16. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions (Billion Cubic Feet)

  17. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions (Billion Cubic

  18. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions (Billion

  19. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions (BillionIncreases

  20. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions (BillionIncreasesSales

  1. Kentucky Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-154 4

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-154

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14 Dec-14

  4. Kentucky Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14

  5. Kentucky Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14Feet) Decade

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan Feb MarDecade

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan Feb

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan FebFeet) Year

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan FebFeet)

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year JanIndustrial

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year JanIndustrial

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year JanIndustrialThousand

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) YearLiquids Production

  19. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) YearLiquids

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr