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  1. Kentucky

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky

  2. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. Supplement I. [Additional information on 38 items requested by KY/DNREP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Jr., John F.

    1981-02-13

    In response to a letter from KY/DNREP, January 19, 1981, ICRC and DOE have prepared the enclosed supplement to the Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Permit Application for Air Contaminant Source for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Each of the 38 comments contained in the letter has been addressed in accordance with the discussions held in Frankfort on January 28, 1981, among representatives of KY/DNREP, EPA Region IV, US DOE, and ICRC. The questions raised involve requests for detailed information on the performance and reliability of proprietary equipment, back-up methods, monitoring plans for various pollutants, composition of wastes to flares, emissions estimates from particular operations, origin of baseline information, mathematical models, storage tanks, dusts, etc. (LTN)

  3. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. [Demonstration plant at Newman, KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-11-21

    This document and its several appendices constitute an application for a Kentucky Permit to Construct an Air Contaminant Source as well as a Prevention of Significant Air Quality Deterioration (PSD) Permit Application. The information needed to satisfy the application requirements for both permits has been integrated into a complete and logical description of the proposed source, its emissions, control systems, and its expected air quality impacts. The Department of Energy believes that it has made every reasonable effort to be responsive to both the letter and the spirit of the PSD regulations (40 CFR 52.21) and Kentucky Regulation No. 401 KAR 50:035. In this regard, it is important to note that because of the preliminary status of some aspects of the process engineering and engineering design for the Demonstration Plant, it is not yet possible precisely to define some venting operations or their associated control systems. Therefore, it is not possible precisely to quantify some atmospheric emissions or their likely impact on air quality. In these instances, DOE and ICRC have used assumptions that produce impact estimates that are believed to be worst case and are not expected to be exceeded no matter what the outcome of future engineering decisions. As these decisions are made, emission quantities and rates, control system characteristics and efficiencies, and vent stack parameters are more precisely defined; this Permit Application will be supplemented or modified as appropriate. But, all needed modifications are expected to represent either decreases or at worst no changes in the air quality impact of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant.

  4. Kentucky - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Kentucky

  5. Kentucky - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Kentucky

  6. Kentucky - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Kentucky

  7. Hickman, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky: Energy Resources (Redirected from Hickman, KY) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.5711721, -89.1861791 Show Map Loading map......

  8. West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West Kentucky Community & Technical College 4810 Alben Barkley Dr Paducah County, KY 42001 Contact Co-Coordinator: Robert "Buz" Smith Email: Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov Phone: ...

  9. West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West Kentucky Community & Technical College 4810 Alben Barkley Dr Paducah County, KY 42001 Contact Co-Coordinator: Robert "Buz" Smith Email: Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov Phone: ...

  10. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:15:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3035KY3" "Date","Kentucky...

  11. City of Murray, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Murray, Kentucky (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Murray Place: Kentucky Phone Number: (270) 753-5312 Website: www2.murray-ky.net Twitter:...

  12. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Kentucky | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Kentucky Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Kentucky. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 4, 2016 CX-100532 Categorical Exclusion Determination 5m/W Solar/Photovoltaic Array on Abandoned Landfill #5 Award Number: DE-EE0006623 CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 07/11/2014 Location(s): KY Office(s): Golden Field Office March 4, 2016 CX-100532 Categorical Exclusion Determination 5m/W

  13. DOE Headquarters Review Focuses on Improved LATA Kentucky Worker Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security headquarters representatives recently spent three days at the Paducah site helping EM cleanup contractor LATA Kentucky better identify and correct issues before they result in worker illness or injury.

  14. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-KY.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KY.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Kentucky Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - KY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    01 Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - KY 01 Site ID (CSD Index Number): KY.01 Site Name: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Summary: Site Link: http://energy.gov/pppo/paducah-site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Alternate Name Documents: Location: Paducah, Kentucky Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). DOE oversees

  16. Harlan County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky Cumberland, Kentucky Evarts, Kentucky Harlan, Kentucky Loyall, Kentucky Lynch, Kentucky South Wallins, Kentucky Wallins Creek, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Henderson County North Middle School won the U.S. Department of Energy’s West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl February 6, 2015 during competition among 12 middle school teams. The...

  18. Jefferson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Broeck Pointe, Kentucky Brownsboro Farm, Kentucky Brownsboro Village, Kentucky Cambridge, Kentucky Coldstream, Kentucky Creekside, Kentucky Crossgate, Kentucky Douglass...

  19. Hardin County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elizabethtown, Kentucky Fort Knox, Kentucky Muldraugh, Kentucky Radcliff, Kentucky Sonora, Kentucky Upton, Kentucky Vine Grove, Kentucky West Point, Kentucky Retrieved from...

  20. Kenton County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lakeside Park, Kentucky Ludlow, Kentucky Park Hills, Kentucky Ryland Heights, Kentucky Taylor Mill, Kentucky Villa Hills, Kentucky Walton, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:...

  1. Schools Near EM Sites in Kentucky, Ohio Advance to DOE's National Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bowl | Department of Energy Schools Near EM Sites in Kentucky, Ohio Advance to DOE's National Science Bowl Schools Near EM Sites in Kentucky, Ohio Advance to DOE's National Science Bowl March 31, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Members of Lone Oak Middle School’s winning team at DOE’s 2014 West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl, left to right, David Perriello, Drew Schofield, Ethan Brown, and David Dodd, formulate their answer to a question in the middle school finals Feb. 28 in Paducah, Ky.

  2. Christian County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commonwealth AgriEnergy Places in Christian County, Kentucky Crofton, Kentucky Fort Campbell North, Kentucky Hopkinsville, Kentucky LaFayette, Kentucky Oak Grove, Kentucky...

  3. Owen County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Owen County, Kentucky Gratz, Kentucky Monterey, Kentucky Owenton, Kentucky Sparta, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOwenCounty,Kentucky...

  4. Kentucky Department of Agriculture

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Wilbur Frye (Office of Consumer & Environmental Protection, Kentucky Department of Agriculture) described Biofuel Quality Testing in Kentucky.

  5. Kentucky DOE EPSCoR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grulke, Eric; Stencel, John

    2011-09-13

    The KY DOE EPSCoR Program supports two research clusters. The Materials Cluster uses unique equipment and computational methods that involve research expertise at the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville. This team determines the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of nanostructured materials and examines the dominant mechanisms involved in the formation of new self-assembled nanostructures. State-of-the-art parallel computational methods and algorithms are used to overcome current limitations of processing that otherwise are restricted to small system sizes and short times. The team also focuses on developing and applying advanced microtechnology fabrication techniques and the application of microelectrornechanical systems (MEMS) for creating new materials, novel microdevices, and integrated microsensors. The second research cluster concentrates on High Energy and Nuclear Physics. lt connects research and educational activities at the University of Kentucky, Eastern Kentucky University and national DOE research laboratories. Its vision is to establish world-class research status dedicated to experimental and theoretical investigations in strong interaction physics. The research provides a forum, facilities, and support for scientists to interact and collaborate in subatomic physics research. The program enables increased student involvement in fundamental physics research through the establishment of graduate fellowships and collaborative work.

  6. Oldham County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Oldham County, Kentucky Buckner, Kentucky Crestwood, Kentucky Goshen, Kentucky La Grange, Kentucky Orchard Grass...

  7. Lincoln County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crab Orchard, Kentucky Eubank, Kentucky Hustonville, Kentucky Junction City, Kentucky Stanford, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLincolnCounty,Kent...

  8. Hopkins County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Hopkins County, Kentucky Dawson Springs, Kentucky Earlington, Kentucky Hanson, Kentucky Madisonville, Kentucky Mortons...

  9. TEAM CUMBERLAND Kentucky Dam Village State Resort Park

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TCU_Report_FY2010.pdf TCU_Report_FY2010.pdf (188.6 KB) More Documents & Publications HSI_Annual_Report_FY2010.pdf Inspection Letter Report: INS-L-09-04 Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Federal Performance Report on Executive Agency Actions to Assist Tribal Colleges and Universities

    TEAM CUMBERLAND Kentucky Dam Village State Resort Park 113 Administration Drive, Gilbertsville, KY 42044 April 6, 2016 On Tuesday, April 5 th , Team Cumberland attendees are invited to gather in the lobby of the lodge

  10. Kentucky National Guard Radiation Specialist Course | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Kentucky National Guard Radiation Specialist Course Kentucky National Guard Radiation Specialist Course Kentucky National Guard Radiation Specialist Course (628.78 KB) More ...

  11. Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report and Investigation, Paducah, Kentucky

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, Paducah Kentucky Why DOE-EM Did This Review The groundwater underlying the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is contaminated by chlorinated solvents, principally trichloroethylene (TCE), as well as other

  12. Gallatin County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Gallatin County, Kentucky Glencoe, Kentucky Sparta, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. Pendleton County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Pendleton County, Kentucky Butler, Kentucky Falmouth, Kentucky Williamstown, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:...

  14. Barren County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Barren County, Kentucky Cave City, Kentucky Glasgow, Kentucky Park City, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  15. Monroe County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Monroe County, Kentucky Fountain Run, Kentucky Gamaliel, Kentucky Tompkinsville, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:...

  16. Caldwell County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Caldwell County, Kentucky Dawson Springs, Kentucky Fredonia, Kentucky Princeton, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Grayson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Grayson County, Kentucky Caneyville, Kentucky Clarkson, Kentucky Leitchfield, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  18. Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants May 28, 2010 - 3:04pm Addthis Montaplast North America, Inc. is replacing almost ...

  19. Kentucky/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentives for Kentucky CSV (rows 1 - 71) Incentive Incentive Type Active Atmos Energy - Natural Gas and Weatherization Efficiency Program (Kentucky) Utility Rebate Program Yes...

  20. Kentucky Save Energy Now Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This fact sheet contains details regarding a Save Energy Now industrial energy efficiency project that the U.S. Department of Energy funded in Kentucky.

  1. Western Kentucky thrives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2005-10-01

    Independents and big boys struggle to keep up with increasing demand and a lack of experienced workers in the Illinois Basin. This is the second of a two part series reviewing the coal mining industry in the Illinois Basin which also includes Indiana and Western Kentucky. It includes a classification/correction to Part 1 of the article published in the September 2005 issue (see Coal Abstracts Entry data/number Dec 2005 00204). 4 photos.

  2. New coal technology to flourish at Kentucky plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankinship, S.

    2007-08-15

    Within four years a 76 MW (net) advanced supercritical coal unit, TC2, will go into service at the Trimble County power plant on the Ohio River near Louiseville, KY, USA. The unit is designed to burn a blend of eastern bituminous and western sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coals. TC2 is one of four US power plants to receive a $125 m tax credit under the 2005 EPACT Qualifying Advanced Coal Program for high efficiency and low emission generating units. Trimble County is owned and operated by E.ON US subsidiaries Kentucky Utilities and Louiseville Gas & Electric. It was originally designed to accommodate four 500 MW coal-fired units fired by bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin. 1 photo.

  3. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5290ky2m.xls"

  4. Madison County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Madison County, Kentucky Berea, Kentucky Richmond, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMadisonCounty,Kent...

  5. Fulton County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Fulton County, Kentucky Fulton, Kentucky Hickman, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFultonCounty,Kentu...

  6. Kentucky Consortium for Carbon Storage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consortium for Carbon Storage Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kentucky Consortium for Carbon Storage Place: Lexington, Kentucky Zip: 40506-0107 Product: Kentucky based...

  7. Trimble County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Trimble County, Kentucky Bedford, Kentucky Milton, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTrimbleCounty,Kentu...

  8. Calloway County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Calloway County, Kentucky Hazel, Kentucky Murray, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCallowayCounty,Kent...

  9. Kentucky Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the Middle School Coach page. Kentucky Region Middle School Regional Kentucky West Kentucky Regional Middle...

  10. Kentucky.pdf | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Kentucky's School Energy Managers pose for a photo during an orientation session. | Photo courtesy of Chris Wooten, Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center Kentucky's School Energy Managers pose for a photo during an orientation session. | Photo courtesy of Chris Wooten, Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In what could potentially be the first program of its scale, Kentucky has hired a new green team of 35

  11. Columbus, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Columbus is a city in Hickman County, Kentucky. It falls under Kentucky's 1st congressional district.12...

  12. Kentucky Residential Energy Code Field Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance – Chicago, ILPartners:   -  Kentucky Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction (DHBC) – Frankfort, KY  -  Kentucky Department of Energy...

  13. Adairville, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Adairville is a city in Logan County, Kentucky. It falls under Kentucky's 1st congressional district.12...

  14. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  15. West KY Regional Middle School Science Bowl

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deegan Lawrence (far right) from Henderson County North Middle School gives an answer as teammates D.J. Banks (middle) and Alex Chandler look on during DOE’s West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl in Paducah February 6. Henderson North won the competition and will compete in DOE’s National Science Bowl® in Washington, D.C. April 30 through May 4.

  16. EIS-0318: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project, Trapp, Kentucky (Clark County)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide cost-shared financial support for The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project, an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky.

  17. West Kentucky Rural E C C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Kentucky Rural E C C Jump to: navigation, search Name: West Kentucky Rural E C C Place: Kentucky Phone Number: 270-247-1321 or 1-877-495-7322 Website: www.wkrecc.com Twitter:...

  18. Breathitt County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Breathitt County, Kentucky Jackson, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBreathittCounty,Ke...

  19. City of Owensboro, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owensboro, Kentucky (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Owensboro Place: Kentucky Phone Number: (270) 926-3200 Website: omu.org Facebook: https:...

  20. City of Glasgow, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Glasgow Place: Kentucky Phone Number: (270) 651-8341 Website: www.glasgowepb.net Facebook: https:...

  1. Crittenden County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Crittenden County, Kentucky Marion, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCrittendenCounty,Ke...

  2. Kentucky Hybrid Electric School Bus Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    icon tiarravt062settle2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Kentucky Hybrid Electric School Bus Program Kentucky Hybrid Electric School Bus Program Plug IN Hybrid Vehicle Bus...

  3. Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, ...

  4. Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  5. City of Olive Hill, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Olive Hill, Kentucky (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Olive Hill City of Place: Kentucky Phone Number: (606) 286-2192 Website: www.cityofolivehillutiliti...

  6. South Kentucky RECC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation (RECC) provides service to more than 60,000 customers in southeastern Kentucky. To promote energy efficiency to residential customers, South...

  7. Kentucky DNR Oil and Gas Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DNR Oil and Gas Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kentucky DNR Oil and Gas Division Address: 1025 Capital Center Drive Place: Kentucky Zip: 40601 Website:...

  8. Fayette County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Fayette County, Kentucky Lexington-Fayette urban, Kentucky Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFayetteCounty,Kentu...

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  10. State Energy Program: Kentucky Implementation Model Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are resources associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office State Energy Program Kentucky Implementation Model.

  11. Tennessee Valley Authority (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Kentucky Phone Number: 865-632-2101 Website: www.tva.comabouttvacontact.h Twitter: @TVANewsroom Facebook: https:www.facebook.comTVAapp116943498446376 Outage...

  12. Kentucky/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidebook >> Kentucky Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical...

  13. Sonora, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sonora, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.524226, -85.8930192 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  14. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2014,"06301967" ,"Release...

  15. ,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...282016 11:29:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Underground Storage" ... Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)","Kentucky Natural Gas in ...

  16. Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co (Tennessee) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kentucky Utilities Co (Tennessee) Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 800-981-0600 Website: lge-ku.comcustomer-serviceou Outage...

  17. Recovery Act State Memos Kentucky

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kentucky For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION

  18. Kentucky DOE-EPSCoR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.M.; Ochsenbein, M.P.

    2003-04-14

    The KY DOE EPSCoR Program included efforts to impact positively the pipeline of science and engineering students and to establish research, education and business infrastructure, sustainable beyond DOE EPSCoR funding.

  19. High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Top Innovation | Department of Energy High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY - Building America Top Innovation High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY - Building America Top Innovation Photo of a Housing Award logo with a home. This Top Innovation highlights Building America field projects that demonstrated minimal or cost-neutral impacts for high-performance homes and that have significantly influenced the housing

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Schools Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Horsepower for Kentucky Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    to Its Fleet Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG Vehicles to Its Fleet to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG Vehicles to Its Fleet on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG Vehicles to Its Fleet on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG Vehicles to Its Fleet on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Trucking Company Adds CNG

  2. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentucky’s most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry – the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealth’s economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentucky’s electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Kentucky

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63,024 63,971 65,041 1990's 67,086 68,461 69,466 71,998 73,562 74,521 76,079 77,693 80,147 80,283 2000's 81,588 81,795 82,757 84,110 84,493 85,243 85,236 85,210 84,985 83,862 2010's 84,707 84,977 85,129 85,999 85,318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. Kentucky Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2 5 2010's 4 4...

  5. Kentucky Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 21 20...

  6. Kentucky Residents Cash in on Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A look at Kentucky's energy efficient rebate program, which has issued nearly 29,500 rebates for 16 different types of energy efficient appliances to residents across the state.

  7. Biodiesel is Working Hard in Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of biodiesel fuel in 6 school districts throughout Kentucky. It contains usage information for each school district, as well as contact information for local Clean Cities Coordinators and Biodiesel suppliers.

  8. City of Hickman, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hickman, Kentucky (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Hickman Place: Kentucky Phone Number: (270) 236-3951 or (270) 236-2535 Website: hickman.cityof.org...

  9. West Point, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Point is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky. It falls under Kentucky's 2nd congressional...

  10. Kentucky's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Kentucky's 1st congressional district Commonwealth AgriEnergy Four Rivers BioEnergy Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleKentucky%27s1stcongressiona...

  11. Kentucky Launches State-Wide School Energy Manager Program |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In what could potentially be the first program of its scale, Kentucky has hired a new green team of 35 energy managers. Kentucky's School Energy Managers Project (SEMP) will ...

  12. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",2592,1669,1917,3318,2580 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-"...

  13. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",815,817,824,824,824 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Transportation Data for Alternative

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels and Vehicles Kentucky Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center:

  15. A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Rick

    2002-03-18

    The accompanying report, manual and assimilated data represent the initial preparation for submission of an Application for Primacy under the Class II Underground Injection Control (UIC) program on behalf of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to identify deficiencies in Kentucky law and regulation that would prevent the Kentucky Division of Oil and Gas from receiving approval of primacy of the UIC program, currently under control of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Atlanta, Georgia.

  16. Kentucky Save Energy Now Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State and Utility Engagement Activities » Kentucky Save Energy Now Initiative Kentucky Save Energy Now Initiative Kentucky The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO; formerly the Industrial Technologies Program), has developed multiple resources and a suite of tools focused on best practices to help industrial manufacturers reduce their energy intensity. AMO adopted the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) objective of reducing industrial energy intensity 2.5%

  17. Hart County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hart County, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.3101304, -85.8486236 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  18. Gatton Academy Wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Paducah Deactivation Project, Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services, Professional Project Services (Pro2Serve), and Paducah Water sponsor the West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl. ...

  19. Nelson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nelson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.7647455, -85.4788065 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  20. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky...

  1. Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Science Bowl February 6, 2015 during competition among 12 middle school teams. The team will represent western Kentucky in the middle school competition of DOE's National Science ...

  2. Boyle County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boyle County, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.6526034, -84.8150781 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  3. Columbia Gas of Kentucky- Home Savings Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Kentucky offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient appliances and equipment. These programs include:

  4. Washington County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington County, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.7516142, -85.1479364 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Green County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.2570117, -85.56121 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  6. Kentucky Utilities Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Utilities Company's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

  7. Kentucky Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 ... Release Date: 11192015 Next Release Date: 12312016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus ...

  8. Mr. Todd Mullins Federal Facility Agreement Manager Kentucky...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... (EPA), and the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet ... about the environmental program so they can provide input ... Stakeholders are individuals, groups, communities, and other ...

  9. Lyon County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lyon County, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.0247261, -88.0900762 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  10. Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kentucky has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, gas, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment ...

  11. Clay County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.1738044, -83.7199136 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  12. Powell County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.8380647, -83.8260884 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  13. Webster County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.4892188, -87.7369607 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  14. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  15. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

  16. South Kentucky Rural Electric Coop Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop Corp Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 800-772-4636 Website: www.skrecc.com Twitter: @skrecc Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesSouth-Kentucky-RECC...

  17. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production ...

  18. Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

  19. Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public...

  20. STEM Mentors Reach Nearly 300 Western Kentucky Sixth Graders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – EM is reaching out to public middle schools in the City of Paducah and McCracken and Ballard counties to encourage local students to study science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

  1. Seismic Hazard Assessment for Western Kentucky, Northeastern Kentucky and Southeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, James C; Wang, Zhenming; Woolery, Edward W; Kiefer, John D

    2002-07-01

    Earthquakes pose a seismic hazards and risk to the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Furthermore, the seismic hazards and risk vary throughout the Commonwealth. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the seismic hazard maps developed by the US Geological Survey for seismic safety regulation for nuclear facilities. Under current US Geological Survey's seismic hazard assessment it is economically unfeasible to build a new uranium plant near Paducah relative to the Portsmouth, Ohio site. This is not to say that the facility cannot be safely engineered to withstand the present seismic load, but enormously expensive to do so. More than 20 years observations and research at UK have shown that the US Geological Survey has overestimated seismic hazards in western Kentucky, particularly in the Jackson Purchase area that includes Paducah. Furthermore, our research indicates underestimated seismic hazards in northeastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. Such overestimation and underestimation could jeopardize possible site selection of PGDP for the new uranium plant. The existing database, research experience, and expertise in UK's Kentucky Geological Survey and Department of Geological Science put this institution in a unique position to conduct a comprehensive seismic hazard evaluation.

  2. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appalachian Basin, Kentucky and Tennessee By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  3. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  4. Preliminary Notice of Violation, LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC - WEA-2012-01 | Department of Energy LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC - WEA-2012-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC - WEA-2012-01 May 23, 2012 Issued to LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC related to a Heat Stress Event and a Uranium Hexafluoride Release at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. On May 23, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight

  5. Indiana-Kentucky Electric Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Indiana-Kentucky Electric Corp Place: Ohio Website: www.ovec.comindex.php Outage Hotline: (740) 289-7200 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  6. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  7. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  8. Perry County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Perry County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 193. It is classified as...

  9. Campbell County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Campbell County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 037. It is classified as...

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  11. Jackson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 109. It is classified as...

  12. Johnson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Johnson County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 115. It is classified as...

  13. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  14. Carter County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carter County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 043. It is classified as...

  15. Butler County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Butler County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 031. It is classified as...

  16. Henry County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Henry County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 103. It is classified as...

  17. Hickman County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hickman County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 105. It is classified as...

  18. Marion County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 155. It is classified as...

  19. Lee County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 129. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  20. Floyd County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Floyd County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 071. It is classified as...

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 7,021 6,303 6,870 ...

  2. Montgomery County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montgomery County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 173. It is classified as...

  3. Pike County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 195. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  4. Lewis County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lewis County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 135. It is classified as...

  5. Y-12 team garners efficiency best practices at Toyota's Kentucky...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 team garners ... Y-12 team garners efficiency best practices at Toyota's Kentucky plant Posted: October 17, 2014 - 2:25pm Y-12 Production managers recently gained a new...

  6. Harrison County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Harrison County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 097. It is classified as...

  7. Scott County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Scott County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 209. It is classified as...

  8. Simpson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Simpson County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 213. It is classified as...

  9. Taylor County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 217. It is classified as...

  10. Anderson County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Anderson County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 005. It is classified as...

  11. Logan County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 141. It is classified as...

  12. Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  13. SEP Success Story: Kentucky Launches State-Wide School Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In what could potentially be the first program of its scale, Kentucky has hired a new green team of 35 energy managers. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Energy efficiency ...

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 237,759 230,940 241,558 256,522 253,652 150,627 26,888 26,673 18,707 1990's 28,379 40,966 47,425 45,782 42,877 44,734 46,015 43,352 37,929 44,064 2000's 36,734 36,901 41,078 42,758 38,208 38,792 39,559 38,158 58,899 60,167 2010's 66,579 60,941 92,883 85,549 79,985 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  15. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,782 2,613 2,006 1,408 1,663 1,611 1977-2014 Adjustments 97 -58 -34 -282 103 -9 1977-2014 Revision Increases 126 103 178 43 159 72 1977-2014 Revision Decreases 760 540 639 276 58 46 1977-2014 Sales 0 0 100 0 1 0 2000-2014 Acquisitions 0 39 84 0 1 0 2000-2014 Extensions 713 383 4 0 132 0 1977-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 1 0 0 0 1977-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 1 1977-2014 Estimated Production 108 96 101 83 81 70

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry

  16. EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site | Department of Energy 59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site Summary This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste

  17. Western Kentucky University Research Foundation Biodiesel Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Cao, Yan

    2013-03-15

    production and combustion of ethanol and 41 % by bio-diesel. Bio-diesel also releases less air pollutants per net energy gain than ethanol. Bio-diesel has advantages over ethanol due to its lower agricultural inputs and more efficient conversion. Thus, to be a viable alternative, a bio-fuel firstly should be producible in large quantities without reducing food supplies. In this aspect, larger quantity supplies of cellulose biomass are likely viable alternatives. U. S. Congress has introduced an initiative and subsequently rolled into the basic energy package, which encourages the production of fuel from purely renewable resources, biomass. Secondly, a bio-fuel should also provide a net energy gain, have environmental benefits and be economically competitive. In this aspect, bio-diesel has advantages over ethanol. The commonwealth of Kentucky is fortunate to have a diverse and abundant supply of renewable energy resources. Both Kentucky Governor Beshear in the energy plan for Kentucky "Intelligent Energy Choices for Kentucky's Future", and Kentucky Renewable Energy Consortium, outlined strategies on developing energy in renewable, sustainable and efficient ways. Smart utilization of diversified renewable energy resources using advanced technologies developed by Kentucky public universities, and promotion of these technologies to the market place by collaboration between universities and private industry, are specially encouraged. Thus, the initially question answering Governor's strategic plan is if there is any economical way to make utilization of larger quantities of cellulose and hemicellulose for production of bio-fuels, especially bio-diesel. There are some possible options of commercially available technologies to convert cellulose based biomass energy to bio-fuels. Cellulose based biomass can be firstly gasified to obtain synthesis gas (a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}), which is followed up by being converted into liquid hydrocarbon fuels or oxygenate hydrocarbon fuel

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Brew Co - NH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: R. BREW CO. (NH.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Concord , New Hampshire NH.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NH.01-2 Site Operations: Conducted vacuum furnace tests using uranium and copper billets. NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NH.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NH.01-1

  19. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 508 49 66 0 0 0 534 6 13 0 2010's 39 84 0 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Proved

  20. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 432 50 2 0 5 1 432 4 10 0 2010's 0 100 0 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas

  1. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas Processed in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Processed in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 22,637 25,315 24,086 23,759 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Kentucky-West Virginia

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in West Virginia

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 1,465 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Kentucky-West Virginia

  4. Unitary Structure of the QCD Sum Rules and KYN and KY{xi} Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, T.; Ozpineci, A.; Yakovlev, S. B.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2006-01-12

    New relations between QCD Borel sum rules for strong coupling constants of K-mesons to baryons are derived. It is shown that starting from the sum rule for the coupling constants g{pi}{sigma}{sigma} and g{pi}{sigma}{lambda} it is straightforward to obtain corresponding sum rules for the gKYN, gKY{xi} couplings, Y = {sigma}, {lambda}.

  5. Quality characteristics of Kentucky coal from a utility perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F.; Hoover, J.C.

    1999-07-01

    Coal in Kentucky has been, and continues to be, a valuable energy source, especially for the electric utility industry. However, Federal mandates in Titles III and IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and more recently proposed ``greenhouse gas'' emission reductions, have placed increasingly stringent demands on the type and grade of coal that can be burned in an environmentally-accepted manner. Therefore, a greater understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of thickness and quality parameters, and the geological factors that control their distribution, is critical if Kentucky will continue to be a major producer of high quality coal. Information from the Kentucky Geological Survey's Coal Resource Information System data base (KCRIS) is used in this paper to document the geological and stratigraphic distribution of important factors such as bed thickness, calorific value, ash yield, and total sulfur content. The distribution of major and minor elements that naturally occur in Kentucky coal is also discussed as some of these elements contribute to slagging and fouling in coal-fired furnaces; others may require monitoring with passage of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  6. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  7. Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     Kentucky Utilities Company's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

  8. Schools Near EM Sites in Kentucky, Ohio Advance to DOE's National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lone Oak Middle Schools winning team at DOEs 2014 West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl, left to right, David Perriello, Drew Schofield, Ethan Brown, and David Dodd,...

  9. SEP Success Story: Kentucky Launches State-Wide School Energy Manager Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In what could potentially be the first program of its scale, Kentucky has hired a new green team of 35 energy managers. Learn more.

  10. Construction Begins on DOE-Sponsored Carbon-Capture Project at Kentucky Power Plant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today, construction began on an innovative $19.5 million carbon-capture pilot, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, at Kentucky Utilities’ E.W. Brown Generating Station near Harrodsburg, Kentucky. The 2 megawatt thermal system will be the first megawatt-scale carbon-capture pilot unit in the Commonwealth.

  11. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- How$martKY On-Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC, Fleming-Mason RECC, Grayson RECC, and Jackson Energy) work with MACED to provide energy retrofits as part of utility service...

  12. Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 93 44 49 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  13. Kentucky Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Kentucky Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 0 0 2000's 0 0 4 4 5 5 0 0 1 3 2010's 0 0 0 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Proved Nonproducing Reserves of Crude

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Kentucky Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1990's 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 2000's 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 2010's 1 5 4 5 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 26 1980's 25 25 35 31 24 27 29 23 24 15 1990's 24 24 32 25 39 42 45 47 53 69 2000's 56 72 65 65 71 69 104 88 96 101 2010's 124 88 81 95 108 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  16. Kentucky Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",95720,95075,95478,86937,95182 " Coal",91198,90483,91621,84038,91054 " Petroleum",3341,2791,2874,2016,2285 " Natural Gas",1177,1796,979,878,1841 " Other Gases",4,5,4,4,3 "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",3050,2134,2377,3681,3020 "Pumped

  17. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 64 -66 1980's 67 -20 -4 6 55 -126 7 68 16 14 1990's -31 97 -107 -34 40 43 -55 321 -93 34 2000's -4 158 -24 49 -40 65 -22 37 81 97 2010's -58 -34 -282 103 -9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  18. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 48 52 49 1980's 60 52 44 38 54 53 56 58 60 65 1990's 62 78 61 66 64 67 58 79 63 59 2000's 67 73 79 78 83 85 66 80 93 108 2010's 96 101 83 81 70 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  19. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10 26 16 1980's 3 11 33 13 22 12 6 10 51 60 1990's 42 27 35 8 35 10 10 18 20 30 2000's 2 42 92 49 96 101 23 373 200 713 2010's 383 4 0 132 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  20. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 17 23 17 1980's 11 8 19 14 29 26 9 17 18 13 1990's 19 6 12 31 101 12 12 3 41 41 2000's 77 397 383 167 153 77 21 152 133 760 2010's 540 639 276 58 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  1. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 35 79 37 1980's 39 91 54 32 65 343 126 65 25 67 1990's 93 99 73 34 49 100 43 107 14 230 2000's 363 348 377 128 176 251 56 62 187 126 2010's 103 178 43 159 72 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,025 7,165 6,940 4,056 852 830 627 1990's 657 702 707 689 611 702 682 641 548 641 2000's 419 475 535 536 617 698 653 691 587 391 2010's 772 278 641 280 278 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  3. Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial ...

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Kentucky.

  5. Kentucky State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Kentucky State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Kentucky. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Kentucky. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Kentucky.

  6. Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas & Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

  7. Transitioning Kentucky Off Oil: An Interview with Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the blog series celebrating Clean Cities' 20th anniversary, we interviewed Clean Cities Coordinator Melissa Howell to learn how she is helping transition Kentucky off oil.

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 167,899 166,624 167,576 172,320 177,680 185,467 192,473 199,674 202,983 198,545 192,581 1991 183,697 180,169 176,535 181,119 183,491 186,795 192,143 195,330 198,776 198,351 191,831 189,130 1992 189,866 188,587 183,694 182,008 180,781 182,342 185,893 187,501 191,689 202,391 200,871 197,857 1993 192,736 181,774 172,140

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 1,515 1,794 1,753 - = No Data Reported;

  10. Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 502 1980's 525 547 580 581 630 793 866 921 938 993 1990's 1,039 1,177 1,118 1,030 978 1,075 1,022 1,403 1,275 1,501 2000's 1,810 1,925 1,974 1,946 1,963 2,210 2,333 2,554 2,812 2,887 2010's

  11. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 0 1 1980's 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2000's 5 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 1 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,336 1,873 2,155 2,279 2,402 2,112 1,718 1990's 2,492 1,730 2,105 2,573 2,162 1,945 1,744 1,816 1,777 1,615 2000's 2,075 1,980 3,442 2,278 2,044 2,879 3,524 2,676 3,914 4,862 2010's 5,626 5,925 6,095 6,095 4,388 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63,024 63,971 65,041 1990's 67,086 68,461 69,466 71,998 73,562 74,521 76,079 77,693 80,147 80,283 2000's 81,588 81,795 82,757 84,110 84,493 85,243 85,236 85,210 84,985 83,862 2010's 84,707 84,977 85,129 85,999 85,318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,391 1,436 1,443 1990's 1,544 1,587 1,608 1,585 1,621 1,630 1,633 1,698 1,864 1,813 2000's 1,801 1,701 1,785 1,695 1,672 1,698 1,658 1,599 1,585 1,715 2010's 1,742 1,705 1,720 1,767 1,780 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 596,320 606,106 614,058 1990's 624,477 633,942 644,281 654,664 668,774 685,481 696,989 713,509 726,960 735,371 2000's 744,816 749,106 756,234 763,290 767,022 770,080 770,171 771,047 753,531 754,761 2010's 758,129 759,584 757,790 761,575 760,131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 22,854 15,750 16,632 2000's 13,826 14,912 11,993 14,279 10,143 8,254 6,510 11,885 12,957 12,558 2010's 13,708 12,451 8,604 7,157 8,426 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 227,931 205,129 218,399 2000's 225,168 208,974 227,920 223,226 225,470 234,080 211,049 229,799 225,295 206,833 2010's 232,099 223,034 225,924 229,983 254,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6 15 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016

  19. Kentucky Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,720 61,518 73,126 80,195 70,125 44,725 72,417 1990's 75,333 78,904 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 79,547 81,868 76,770 2000's 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,609 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437 114,116 NA 2010's 135,355

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 1990's 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2000's 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2010's 5 4 5 5 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  1. West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us High School Regionals West Kentucky

  2. West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals West Kentucky

  3. Mr. Todd Mullins Federal Facility Agreement Manager Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    JUN 1 1 2013 Mr. Todd Mullins Federal Facility Agreement Manager Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Division of Waste Management 200 Fair Oaks Lane, 2 nd Floor Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 Ms. Jennifer Tufts Federal Facility Agreement Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 61 Forsyth Street Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Mullins and Ms. Tufts: PPPO-02-1813000-13B TRANSMITTAL OF THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS PLAN UNDER THE FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT AT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF

  4. DOE Awards Grants to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Energy and Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cabinet | Department of Energy Grants to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Energy and Environment Cabinet DOE Awards Grants to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Energy and Environment Cabinet October 31, 2014 - 3:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461, Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center (EMCBC) is awarding two separate grants together totaling about $7 million to the Commonwealth of

  5. Origin State>> CA ID ID IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Energx Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Technologies West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.24 0.25 0.25 1970's 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.35 0.50 0.54 0.55 0.55 0.58 0.95 1980's 0.89 1.01 1.52 1.51 1.70 2.39 1.88 1.82 2.56 2.13 1990's 2.24 2.03 1.92 2.28 2.24 1.64 2.55 2.66 2.39 2.07 2000's 3.16 4.78 3.01 4.54 5.26 6.84 8.83 7.35 8.42 NA 2010's 4.47 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 58,567 62,011 60,735 61,687 66,432 71,791 79,578 86,584 93,785 97,094 92,657 86,693 1991 79,816 76,289 72,654 77,239 79,610 82,915 88,262 91,449 94,895 94,470 87,950 85,249 1992 84,385 83,106 78,213 76,527 75,300 76,861 80,412 82,020 86,208 96,910 95,391 92,376 1993 87,306 76,381 66,748 66,019 72,407 80,245 87,794

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.33 0.27 0.23 1970's 0.20 0.22 0.24 0.25 0.29 0.37 0.48 0.60 0.57 1.26 1980's 1.67 2.18 2.85 3.05 2.93 2.89 2.44 1.97 1.77 2.00 1990's 2.12 2.35 2.51 2.67 1.95 1.83 2.63 2.51 2.45 2.11 2000's 3.27 3.96 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,500 8,573 8,579 1970's 6,574 6,133 6,063 5,441 5,557 5,454 5,231 4,764 6,192 3,923 1980's 6,845 5,638 6,854 6,213 6,516 6,334 4,466 2,003 2,142 1,444 1990's 1,899 2,181 2,342 2,252 2,024 2,303 2,385 2,404 2,263 2,287 2000's 1,416 1,558 1,836 1,463 2,413 1,716 2,252 1,957 2,401 3,270 2010's 4,576 4,684

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,028 1,030 1,031 1,028 1,028 1,033 2014 1,029 1,024 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,037 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,022 1,017 1,019 2015 1,023 1,018 1,015 1,016 1,023 1,021 1,024 1,015 1,020 1,024 1,021 1,024 2016 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,026 1,01

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2014 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2015 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2016 3 2 3 3 4 4

    Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.78 5.30 4.62 5.10 5.54 6.68 6.75 6.68

  12. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Gardner, T.L.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Miller, M.E.; Schuessler, B.K.

    1996-11-01

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of five between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  13. Department of Energy Cites LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Worker Safety and Health and Nuclear Safety Violations | Department of Energy LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC for Worker Safety and Health and Nuclear Safety Violations Department of Energy Cites LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC for Worker Safety and Health and Nuclear Safety Violations May 24, 2012 - 3:32pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to LATA

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Kentucky

  15. Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EversourceNH Outage Hotline: 800-662-7764 Outage Map: www.eversource.comContentgen Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.psnh.comSaveEnergyMo...

  16. Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Go Solar Ready – Solar Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments Go Solar Ready Map provides general information about the estimated annual solar energy potential on building rooftops in the OKI region. The intention of this tool is to provide the user a general understanding of the solar energy available on rooftops in the OKI tristate region.

  17. EIS-0073: Solvent Refined Coal-I Demonstration Project, Daviess County, Kentucky

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental, economic, and social impacts associated with construction and operation of a 6,000-tons-per-stream-day-capacity coal liquefaction facility in Newman, Kentucky, and the potential impacts of a future expansion of the proposed facility to an approximately 30,000 tons per stream day capacity.

  18. Secretary Bodman Highlights President Bush's Solar America Initiative in Merrimack, NH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MERRIMACK , NH - Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman joined Representatives Jeb Bradley (NH-1st) and Charles Bass (NH-2nd) to highlight President Bush's Solar America Initiative,...

  19. Effect of Structural Stress on the Laser Quality of Highly Doped Yb:KY(WO4)2/KY(WO4)2 and Yb:KLu(WO4)2/KLu(WO4)2 Epitaxial Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvajal, J.; Raghothamachar, B; Silvestre, O; Chen, H; Pujol, M; Petrov, V; Dudley, M; Aguilo, M; Diaz, F

    2009-01-01

    In this communication we demonstrate how the difference in laser performance of two highly doped (20 at %) epitaxial layers of Yb-doped KY(WO4)2 (KYW) grown on a KYW substrate and Yb-doped KLu(WO4)2 (KLuW) grown on a KLuW substrate, respectively, is related to the presence of structural stress in the epilayers, investigated by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography. From the results obtained, it is clear that the samples that show a larger amount of structural stress, Yb:KYW/KYW epitaxies, lead to lower efficiency in laser operation, giving a direct correlation between the existence and magnitude of such structural stress and the loss in efficiency of laser performance in such epitaxial layers which, from a spectroscopical point of view, are otherwise equivalent.

  20. Luminescent and lasing characteristics of heavily doped Yb{sup 3+}:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisel', V E; Troshin, A E; Shcherbitskii, V G; Kuleshov, N V; Pavlyuk, A A; Brunner, F; Paschotta, R; Morier-Genoud, F; Keller, U

    2006-04-30

    The luminescence decay times are measured taking into account reabsorption for KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Yb(KYW:Yb) crystals with atomic concentrations of active ions from 0.2% to 30%. The radiative lifetime of Yb{sup 3+} ions was measured to be 233 {mu}s. The cw output power of 1.46 and 1.62 W was achieved with the slope efficiency 52% and 47% for Yb:KYW lasers with the atomic concentration of Yb{sup 3+} ions equal to 10% and 30%, respectively. Using a semiconductor mirror with a saturable absorber (SESAM) in the passive mode-locking regime, pulses of duration 194 and 180 fs were obtained at wavelengths of 1042 and 1039 nm for crystals with Yb{sup 3+} concentrations equal to 10% and 30%, respectively, the average output power being 0.63 and 0.75 W. (lasers and amplifiers)

  1. Williamstown Utility Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Comm Place: Kentucky Phone Number: (859) 824-3633 Website: www.wtownky.orgDepartmentsEl Twitter: @WilliamstownKY Facebook: https:www.facebook.comWilliamstownKY Outage...

  2. Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all ...

  3. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based ...

  4. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-07-28

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the

  5. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-10-29

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of

  6. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-01-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of

  7. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-04-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf

  8. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  10. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","11/19/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","12/31/2016"

  11. Kentucky Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",19177,19088,19016,19268,19560 " Coal",14386,14374,14301,14553,14566 " Petroleum",135,77,77,77,70 " Natural Gas",4656,4638,4638,4638,4924 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" "Renewables",871,880,886,893,893 "Pumped

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.78 5.30 4.62 5.10 5.54 6.68 6.75 6.68 2000's 5.49 7.78 9.42 11.15 -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010's -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring

  13. Students Imagine Paducah Site as Technical, Industrial Hub

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    PADUCAH, Ky. – University of Kentucky (UK) College of Design students envision the Paducah site as a thriving, multiple-use area in the future.

  14. SREL Reprint #3210

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Environmental Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA 4Department of Microbiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA Abstract: Arkashin Schurf (Arkashin) and...

  15. SREL Reprint #3215

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. Jones3, Cris Hagen2, and Stacey L. Lance2 1Department of Biological Sciences, Moore 235, Eastern Kentucky University, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475, USA...

  16. SREL Reprint #3291

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de Mxico, Mexico 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC, USA 3Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA 4Department of...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- HowmartKY On-Bill Financing Energy Efficiency Program Four rural utility cooperatives in Eastern Kentucky (Big Sandy RECC,...

  18. Regional News Coverage 2015 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 ... and Science in Kentucky, Bowling Green, KY .pdf file (18KB) The Westminster ...

  19. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  20. Sherwin-Williams’ Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study summarizes energy efficiency achievements made by Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, manufacturing facility under the Save Energy Now LEADER program, now known as the Better Plants Program. This includes a variety of steam system and compressed air technology improvements.

  1. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-04-26

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  2. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-01

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2004-08-01

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  4. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-07-29

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  5. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2005-01-28

    Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

  6. Summary of Carbon Storage Project Public Information Meeting and Open House, Hawesville, Kentucky, October 28, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Harris; David Williams; J. Richard Bowersox; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-06-01

    The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) completed a second phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection and seismic imaging in the Knox Group, a Cambrian‐Ordovician dolomite and sandstone sequence in September 2010. This work completed 2 years of activity at the KGS No. 1 Marvin Blan well in Hancock County, Kentucky. The well was drilled in 2009 by a consortium of State and industry partners (Kentucky Consortium for Carbon Storage). An initial phase of CO{sub 2} injection occurred immediately after completion of the well in 2009. The second phase of injection and seismic work was completed in September 2010 as part of a U.S. DOE–funded project, after which the Blan well was plugged and abandoned. Following completion of research at the Blan well, a final public meeting and open house was held in Hancock County on October 28, 2010. This meeting followed one public meeting held prior to drilling of the well, and two on‐site visits during drilling (one for news media, and one for school teachers). The goal of the final public meeting was to present the results of the project to the public, answer questions, and address any concerns. Despite diligent efforts to publicize the final meeting, it was poorly attended by the general public. Several local county officials and members of the news media attended, but only one person from the general public showed up. We attribute the lack of interest in the results of the project to several factors. First, the project went as planned, with no problems or incidents that affected the local residents. The fact that KGS fulfilled the promises it made at the beginning of the project satisfied residents, and they felt no need to attend the meeting. Second, Hancock County is largely rural, and the technical details of carbon sequestration were not of interest to many people. The county officials attending were an exception; they clearly realized the importance of the project in future economic development for the county.

  7. Array-type NH.sub.3 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, David Lawrence; Montgomery, Frederick Charles; Armstrong, Timothy R; Warmack, Robert J

    2013-12-31

    An array-type sensor that senses NH.sub.3 includes non-Nernstian sensing elements constructed from metal and/or metal-oxide electrodes on an O.sub.2 ion conducting substrate. In one example sensor, one electrode may be made of platinum, another electrode may be made of manganese (III) oxide (Mn.sub.2O.sub.3), and another electrode may be made of tungsten trioxide (WO.sub.3). Some sensing elements may further include an electrode made of La.sub.0.6Sr.sub.0.4Co.sub.0.2Fe.sub0.8O.sub.3 and another electrode made of LaCr.sub.0.95.Mg.sub.0.05O.sub.3.

  8. Hollow-fiber gas-membrane process for removal of NH{sub 3} from solution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Y.; Cabral, J.M.S.; Wang, S.

    1996-07-01

    A hollow-fiber supported gas membrane process for the separation of NH{sub 3} from aqueous solutions containing both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A lumen laminar flow and radial diffusion model was applied to calculate the membrane wall transfer coefficient from the data stripping a single volatile component, NH{sub 3} or CO{sub 2}, from their individual aqueous solutions. Influence of the type of membranes and operating conditions on mass-transfer rate were discussed, especially the influence of the membrane transfer coefficient on the film mass-transfer coefficient in the lumen. Appropriate configurations of the hollow-fiber modules for stripping of a single component were analyzed to optimize mass transfer. To predict the stripping of NH{sub 3} from a solution containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, a mathematical model incorporating local chemical equilibria and Nernst-Planck diffusion was developed to describe the mass transport. The models described the experimental data fairly well. The experimental results showed that the supported gas membrane process can be used to remove NH{sub 3} effectively from aqueous media containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  9. Geologic mapping of near-surface sediments in the northern Mississippi Embayment, McCracken County, KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Joshua L; Fryar, Alan E; Greb, s F

    2006-04-01

    POSTER: The Jackson Purchase region of western Kentucky consists of Coastal Plain sediments near the northern margin of the Mississippi Embayment. Within this region is the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), a uranium enrichment facility operated by the US Department of Energy. At PGDP, a Superfund site, soil and groundwater studies have provided subsurface lithologic data from hundreds of monitoring wells and borings. Despite preliminary efforts by various contractors, these data have not been utilized to develop detailed stratigraphic correlations of sedimentary units across the study area. In addition, sedimentary exposures along streams in the vicinityof PGDP have not been systematically described beyond the relatively simple geologic quadrangle maps published by the US Geological Survey in 1966-67. This study integrates lithologic logs, other previous site investigation data, and outcrop mapping to provide a compilation of near-surface lithologic and stratigraphic data for the PGDP area. A database of borehole data compiled during this study has been provided to PGDP for future research and archival.

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 105,889 1991 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 103,881 1992 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 105,481 1993 105,430 105,394 105,392 105,446

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,828 1,992 2,277 1970's 2,317 2,212 1,509 1,238 1,206 1,218 1,040 1,107 1,160 1,214 1980's 989 1,040 9,772 8,361 9,038 9,095 6,335 3,254 2,942 2,345 1990's 3,149 2,432 2,812 3,262 2,773 2,647 2,426 2,457 2,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11,248 1990's 11,713 12,169 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 13,825 14,381 14,750 2000's 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 14,175 15,892 16,563 16,290 17,152 2010's 17,670 14,632 17,936 19,494 19,256 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -1,772 682 336 86 308 -489 138 -272 -702 -351 130 2,383 1991 21,249 14,278 11,919 15,552 13,179 11,123 8,684 4,865 1,110 -2,624 -4,707 -1,444 1992 4,569 6,818 5,559 -712 -4,310 -6,053 -7,850 -9,429 -8,687 2,440 7,441 7,127 1993 2,921 -6,726 -11,466

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,053 1,501 1,828 1990's 1,575 2,035 2,451 2,809 3,171 4,169 3,773 3,860 4,076 4,315 2000's 5,584 6,424 7,590 7,942 7,864 7,488 6,092 6,304 6,673 7,047 2010's 7,163 7,188 6,941 7,919 7,819 - = No Data

  15. Field Sampling Plan for the Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. P. Martin; L. N. Peterson; C. J. Taylor

    1999-08-01

    This plan describes the field and analytical activities to be conducted at the Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky, in order to evaluate natural attenuation processes within the aquifer system. Sampling will consist of a single round to take place in October 1999. Analytes will consist of the contaminants of concern (chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons), electron donors (non-chlorinated organic compounds), oxidation-reduction indicators, and water quality parameters. These activities are conducted in order to evaluate the water quality parameters. These activities are conducted in order to evaluate the extent to which natural attenuation processes, in the form of anaerobic reductive dechlorination, may be taking place in the aquifer system. These data will then be used to select the appropriate remediation technology for this site.

  16. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Huntington quadrangle: Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Huntington quadrangle of Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia covers 7250 square miles of the easternmost Midwestern Physiographic Province. Paleozoic exposures dominate the surface. These Paleozoics deepen toward the east from approximately 500 feet to a maximum depth of 8000 feet. Precambrian basement is thought to underlie the entire area. No known uranium deposits exist in the area. One hundred anomalies were found using the standard statistical analysis. Some high uranium concentration anomalies that may overlie the stratigraphic equivalent of the Devonian-Mississippian New Albany or Chattanooga Shales may represent significant levels of naturally occurring uranium. Future studies should concentrate on this unit. Magnetic data are largely in concurrence with existing structural interpretations but suggest some complexities in the underlying Precambrian.

  17. Modeling Study of SCR/PGM Interactions in NH3 Slip Catalysts | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Study of SCR/PGM Interactions in NH3 Slip Catalysts Modeling Study of SCR/PGM Interactions in NH3 Slip Catalysts The focus of this research is on the optimization of NH3 slip catalyst performance by simulating the behavior of different SCR/PGM configurations. p-19_nova.pdf (250.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Experimental and Modelling Study of the Effect of Diffusional Limitations on the NH3 SCR Activity Selective ammonia slip catalyst enabling highly efficient NOx

  18. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  19. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-11

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  20. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-04-28

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  1. ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall

    2003-02-10

    Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

  2. Geologic characterization and carbon storage resource estimates for the knox group, Illinois Basin, Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, David; Ellett, Kevin; Rupp, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Research documented in this report includes (1) refinement and standardization of regional stratigraphy across the 3-state study area in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, (2) detailed core description and sedimentological interpretion of Knox cores from five wells in western Kentucky, and (3) a detailed calculation of carbon storage volumetrics for the Knox using three different methodologies. Seven regional cross sections document Knox formation distribution and thickness. Uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for all three states helps to resolve state-to-state differences that previously made it difficult to evaluate the Knox on a basin-wide scale. Correlations have also refined the interpretation of an important sandstone reservoir interval in southern Indiana and western Kentucky. This sandstone, a CO2 injection zone in the KGS 1 Blan well, is correlated with the New Richmond Sandstone of Illinois. This sandstone is over 350 ft (107 m) thick in parts of southern Indiana. It has excellent porosity and permeability at sufficient depths, and provides an additional sequestration target in the Knox. The New Richmond sandstone interval has higher predictability than vuggy and fractured carbonates, and will be easier to model and monitor CO2 movement after injection.

  3. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 01: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire July 23, 2010 EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire

  4. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  5. Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon C. Nuttall; Cortland F. Eble; James A. Drahovzal; R. Marc Bustin

    2005-09-30

    Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO2. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine both CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO2 displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO2 adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton in the more organic-rich zones. There is a direct linear correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO2 adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial volumetric estimates based on these data indicate a CO2 sequestration capacity of as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. In the Big Sandy Gas Field area of eastern Kentucky, calculations using the net thickness of shale with 4 percent or greater total organic carbon, indicate that 6.8 billion tonnes of CO2 could be sequestered in the five county area. Discounting the uncertainties in reservoir volume and injection efficiency, these results indicate that the black shales of Kentucky are a potentially large geologic sink for CO2. Moreover, the extensive occurrence of gas shales in Paleozoic and Mesozoic

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA-88-377-2120, Armco Coke Oven, Ashland Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinnes, G.M.; Fleeger, A.K.; Baron, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    In response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union, a study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ARMCO Coke Oven (SIC-3312), Ashland, Kentucky. The facility produces about 1,000,000 tons of coke annually. Of the approximately 400 total employees at the coke oven site, 55 work in the by products area. Air quality sampling results indicated overexposure to both benzene (71432) and coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs). Airborne levels of benzene ranged as high as 117 parts per million (ppm) with three of 17 samples being above the OSHA limit of 1ppm. Airborne concentrations of CTPVs ranged as high as 0.38mg/cu m with two of six readings being above OSHA limit of 0.2mg/cu m. Several polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were also detected. The authors conclude that by products area workers are potentially overexposed to carcinogens, including benzene, CTPVs, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. An epidemiologic study is considered unlikely to yield meaningful information at this time, due to the small number of workers and the short follow up period. The authors recommend specific measures for reducing potential employee exposures, including an environmental sampling program, a preventive maintenance program, improved housekeeping procedures, and reducing exposure in operators' booths.

  7. October 1999 Groundwater Sampling and Data Analysis, Distler Brickyard Site, Hardin County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. P. Martin, L. N. Peterson; C. J. Taylor

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the results of a sampling event conducted at the Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky, October 1999. The purpose of the sampling event was to evaluate the extent of natural biodegradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) occurring at the Site. Sampling locations were selected to evaluate three areas of the suspected CAH plume: the source area, an axial cross-section, and a downgradient transect. Due to inadequate recharge to and the poor physical condition of some monitoring wells at the Site, the sampling approach was modified to reflect wells that could be sampled. Results indicate that natural anaerobic degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons is occurring in the presumed source area around monitoring well GW-11. The primary contaminant of concern, trichloroethene, migrates downgradient from the source area into the Coarse Grained Alluvium Aquifer at concentrations slightly greater than the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). Based on the available, the following hypothesis is proposed: the source area has been remediated through soil removal activities and subsequent anaerobic reductive dechlorination. If this is the case, this Site may be a good candidate for implementation of a monitored natural attenuation remedy. However, more data are necessary before this hypothesis can be confirmed.

  8. Biogas production in Kentucky: A best management practice alternative for nonpoint source pollution prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourarakis, D.P.; Coleman, S.A.; Thom, W.O.

    1996-12-31

    Despite continued conservation efforts on the part of private landowners, citizens groups, universities, and government agencies, the lack of adequate animal waste management systems still poses a significant threat to both water and land quality in Kentucky. Recent surveys indicate that only a fraction of the animal confinement units in the state have waste management systems in good operating condition. Biogas production systems are not presently included as a technological option or {open_quotes}best management practice{close_quotes} (BMP) for recycling animal wastes and are not eligible for Cost Share financial aid programs. Abundant animal manure is produced as a reasonably collectible resource in farm operations where dairy cattle, swine, and poultry are raised. Broiler and layer houses are rapidly proliferating in the western part of the state. This paper assesses the economic viability of using a low-cost, floating cover lagoon technology to collect biogas and generate electricity in several types of animal raising operations. In cases where the biogas energy can be used effectively on the farm and the technology receives partial funding as a BMP, the technology is economically viable.

  9. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Nineteen. Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Kentucky governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  10. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

  11. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the, ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah.

  12. Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

    1993-08-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Percent) Kentucky Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 36.3 23.0 19.6 25.2 19.8 15.5 10.9 5.6 1.2 -2.7 -5.1 -1.7 1992 5.7 8.9 7.7 -0.9 -5.4 -7.3 -8.9 -10.3 -9.2 2.6 8.5 8.4 1993 3.5 -8.1 -14.7 -13.7 -3.8 4.4 9.2 12.9 14.8 3.2 -1.2 -9.6 1994 -25.7 -31.2 -28.1 -20.1 -13.8 -10.6 -7.3 -4.7 -7.2 -4.8 1.4 4.5 1995 14.0 16.7 18.3 14.2 16.8 12.2

  14. Sauk structural elements and depositional response in Ohio and northern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coogan, A.H.; Peng, Shengfeng (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Three area structural elements were inherited from Precambrian events--the Rome Trough, Middle Run trough at the Grenville Line, and the Ohio platform on part of the more stable Grenville Province. They strongly influence the type of basal Sauk clastic and non-clastic deposits as documented from hundreds of wells in Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky. These elements and the topography resulting from erosion during the Lipalian Interval most directly influence sedimentation during the onlap phase of the basal Sauk Sequence. Clastic wedge-base deposits are the Mt. Simon, Rome'', and Eau Claire formations. Deposition of the middle Cambrian Conasauga Shale coincides with the maximum marine onlap and wedge middle position. Upper Sauk Sequence deposition of the Knox Group carbonate rocks (Cooper Ridge Dolomite, Beekmantown Dolomite) and their interbedded clastic units (Steam Corners and Rose Run formations) represents the shallowing upward, pulsating clastic depositional events which anticipate the differential uplift and erosion that occurred later during the Taconic Orogeny and Early Ordovician hiatus. New Taconic structural elements involve the uplift of the central Ohio platform on the western part of the Grenville Province along reactivated, pre-Grenville sutures identified by CoCorp seismic lines. Platform uplift exposes lower Knox rocks to erosion. Younger Knox rocks are preserved east of the fault line zone. The Appalachian Basin's western edge is marked at this time by the trend of the Rose Run and Beekmantown subcrop below the Knox Unconformity surface and by the edge of the high magnetic intensity basement.

  15. Simulation of an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physiccal Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge. We compared the simulation results with the theoretical and experimental results of the other gas discharge in which the magnetic field is considered. Results that obtained using this method are in good agreement with literature. The simulation results show that the positive ammonia ion density follows the positive argon ion density. The Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sup +} density at 100 mTorr. The largest ammonia ion is NH{sub 3}{sup +} ion, followed by NH{sub 2}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and NH{sup +} ions. The contribution of NH{sup +} ions to the density of the positive ammonia ions is marginal. The influence of pressure on the plasma discharge has been studied by simulation, and the mechanisms have been discussed. The average plasma density increases as pressure increased. The plasma density appears to be more inhomogeneous than that at the lower pressure. The ratio of charge particles changed as pressure increased. The Ar{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density as the pressure increased. It makes NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratio increase as pressure increased. It shows that the electron temperature drops with rising pressure by numerical calculation.

  16. baepgig-clean | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-80KB] (Withdrawn) Kentucky Pioneer Energy, L.L.C.; Trapp, Clark County, KY PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Kentucky Pioneer Energy LLC Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project: 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration [PDF-3.2MB] (Apr 2006) Design Reports Kentucky Pioneer Energy IGCC CCT Demonstration Project, 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration, Basis of Design [PDF-696KB] (May 2002) Environmental Reports Kentucky Pioneer Integrated

  17. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps Research to identify most promising catalytic ...

  18. Crystal structure and characterization of the novel NH{sup +} Midline-Horizontal-Ellipsis N hydrogen bonded polar crystal [NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}NH][BF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtas, M.; Gagor, A.; Czupinski, O.; Medycki, W.; Jakubas, R.

    2012-03-15

    Dielectric properties and phase transitions of the piperazinium tetrafluoroborate ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}NH][BF{sub 4}], abbreviated as PFB) crystal are related to the one-dimensional arrangement of the cations linked by the bistable NH{sup +} Midline-Horizontal-Ellipsis N hydrogen bonds and molecular motions of the [BF{sub 4}]{sup -} units. The crystal structure of [NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}NH][BF{sub 4}] is monoclinic at room temperature with the polar space group Pn. The polar/acentric properties of the room temperature phase IV have been confirmed by the piezoelectric and pyroelectric measurements. DSC measurements show that the compound undergoes three first-order structural phase transitions: at 421/411 K (heating/cooling), at 386/372 K and at 364/349 K. {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR measurements indicate the reorientational motions of [BF{sub 4}]{sup -} anions and piperazinium(+) cations as well as the proton motion in the hydrogen-bonded chains of piperazine along the [001] direction. Over the phase I the isotropic reorientational motions or even self-diffusion of the cations and anions are expected. The conductivity measurements in the vicinity of the II-I PT indicate a superionic phase over the phase I. - Graphical abstract: It must be emphasized that the titled compound represents the first organic-inorganic simple salt containing the single-protonated piperazinium cation which was studied by means of the wide variety of experimental techniques. A survey of Cambridge Structural Database (CSD version 5.32 (November 2010) and updates (May 2011)) for structure containing the piperazinium cations yields 248 compounds with the doubly protonated piperazinium(2+) cations and only eight compounds with the singly protonated piperazinium(+) cations. Among these structures only one is the hybrid organic-inorganic material. This is piperazinium nitrate characterized structurally. The crystal packing of [NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}NH][BF{sub 4}], phase IV. The

  19. Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation The feasibility of on-board ammonia generation was examined using synthesized exhaust compositions deer09_wong.pdf (82.51 KB) More Documents & Publications On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation (OAG) Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System

  20. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  1. Comparison of stress-measuring techniques at the DNA-UTP site, Rodgers Hollow, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) is developing explosives technology through its Underground Technology Program (UTP). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has supported the DNA by conducting research to characterize the in situ stress and rock mass deformability at one of the UTP underground sites at Rodgers Hollow, near Louisville, Kentucky on the Fort Knox Military Reservation. The purpose of SNL`s testing was to determine the in situ stress using three different measurement techniques and, if possible, to estimate the rock mass modulus near the underground opening. The three stress-measuring techniques are (1) borehole deformation measurements using overcoring, (2) Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) complemented by laboratory ultrasonic and mechanical properties testing, and (3) the in situ flatjack technique using cancellation pressure. Rock mass modulus around the underground opening was estimated using the load deformation history of the flatjack and surrounding rock. Borehole deformation measurements using the overcoring technique probably represent the most reliable method for in situ stress determination in boreholes up to 50 ft (15 m) deep in competent rock around an isolated excavation. The technique is used extensively by the tunneling and mining industries. The ASR technique is also a core-based technique and is used in the petroleum and natural gas industries for characterization of in situ stress from deep boreholes. The flatjack technique has also been used in the tunneling and mining industries, and until recently has been limited to measurement of the stress immediately around the excavation. Results from the flatjack technique must be further analyzed to calculate the in situ stress in the far field.

  2. Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J. |; Doll, W.E.; Phillips, B.E.

    1994-09-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    KentucKy 2014 EIA reports and publications Kentucky accounts for roughly one-tenth of total U.S. coal production and about one-fifth of production east of the Mississippi River. Kentucky has more coal mines than any other state; almost one-third of all U.S. coal mines are located in the state. Kentucky had two oil refineries with a combined operating capacity of about 245,000 barrels per day in 2013. KentucKy energy highlights: State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2011 *

  4. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; Naber, Jeffrey D.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity andmore » the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).« less

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site, Maxey Flats Disposal Site (KY.02) Remediated by EPA; a portion of the records are managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/maxey_flats/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Maxey Flats, KY, Disposal Site Location: Fleming County, Kentucky Evaluation Year: Not considered for

  6. Structures and phases transition in hexylenediammonium pentachlorobismuthate (III) [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}NH{sub 3}]BiCl{sub 5} crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouasri, A.; Jeghnou, H.; Rhandour, A.; Roussel, P.

    2013-04-15

    The crystal structure of [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}NH{sub 3}]BiCl{sub 5} was determined at: 223 K [P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (Z=4), a=7.788(1), b=13.886(2), c=13.972(2) Å], 308 K [P2{sub 1}/n (Z=8), a=19.972(3), b=7.772(2), c=20.166(3) Å, β=92.32(1)°] and 378 K [Pnma (Z=4), a=13911(2), b=7.834(7), c=14.457(2) Å]. It was consisted of isolated (BiCl{sub 5}{sup 2−}){sub n} anionic chains composed by distorted octahedra BiCl{sub 6}{sup 3−} sharing two corners and {sup +}NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}NH{sub 3}{sup +} cations placed in the free cavities between anionic chains. In the β phase, there are two crystallographically inequivalent cations and two one-dimensional anionic chains (BiCl{sub 5}{sup 2−}){sub n} in which BiCl{sub 6}{sup 3−} octahedra was doubly tilted and simply tilted. Two structural phase transitions at low and high temperatures α (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, 223 K)↔β (P2{sub 1}/n, 308 K)↔γ (Pnma, 373 K) are observed and discussed. It was crystallographically showed that both anionic and cationic entities contribute to phase transitions mechanisms. The BiCl{sub 6}{sup 3−} octahedra were found to posses significant distortions on decreasing temperature and became more distorted in α (223 K) phase. It is argued that these deformations are caused by weak to moderate N--H···Cl hydrogen bonding. - Graphical abstract: Projection of the crystal structure of [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}NH{sub 3}]BiCl{sub 5} down the a axis at 208 K. Highlights: ► The crystal shows two phase transitions: α(223 K)↔β(308 K)↔γ(373 K). ► A discontinuous transition may be occurred between α and β phases. ► The α↔β and β↔γ phase transitions are of first order. ► Both anionic and cationic motions contribute to phase transition mechanisms. ► The BiCl{sub 6}{sup 3−} octahedra showed significant distortions on decreasing temperature.

  7. Numerical analysis of a mixture of Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Zhao Zhen [Chemistry Department, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Physical Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge at low pressure. The electromagnetic field model solved by the three-dimensional Simpson method is coupled to a fluid plasma model. The finite difference method was employed to discrete the governing equations. 40 species (neutrals, radicals, ions, and electrons) are consisted in the model. In total, 75 electron-neutral, 43 electron-ion, 167 neutral-neutral, 129 ion-neutral, 28 ion-ion, and 90 3-body reactions are used in the model. According to the simulation, the distribution of the densities of the considered plasma species has been showed and the mechanisms of their variations have been discussed. It is found that the main neutrals (Ar*, Ar**, NH{sub 3}{sup *}, NH, H{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, H, and N{sub 2}) are present at high densities in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge when the mixing ratio of Ar/NH{sub 3} is 1:1 at 20 Pa. The density of NH is more than that of NH{sub 2} atom. And NH{sub 3}{sup +} are the most important ammonia ions. But the uniformity of the space distribution of NH{sub 3}{sup +} is lower than the other ammonia ions.

  8. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2012-04-30

    Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

  9. Photolysis of solid NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O mixtures at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-12-07

    We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH{sub 3} sample, the main species ejected are NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N{sub 2} ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH{sub 3} infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

  10. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  11. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps Research to identify most promising catalytic formulations and operation for the in-situ generation of NH3, storage on a downstream SCR catalyst, and utilized to reduce the remaining NOx deer12_toops.pdf (3.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

  12. NH{sub 3} sensor based on CSA doped PANi-SnO{sub 2} nanohybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khuspe, G. D.; Navale, S. T.; Chougule, M. A.; Mulik, R. N.; Godse, P. R.; Patil, V. B.; Sen, Shashwati

    2014-04-24

    The PANi-SnO{sub 2} hybrid nanocomposite based thin films doped with 10–50 wt % CSA were deposited on the glass substrates using the spin coating technique. The sensor response in relation to the CSA doping concentration and the gas concentration has been systematically studied. A significant sensitivity (91%) towards 100 ppm NH{sub 3} operating at room temperature is observed for the 30 wt % CSA doped PANi-SnO2 nanohybrid. The sensing mechanism of CSA doped PANi-SnO{sub 2} materials to NH{sub 3} was presumed to be the effect of p–n heterojunctions.

  13. Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Genset | Department of Energy NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel Genset 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_malyala.pdf (164.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Two Catalyst Formulations - One Solution for NOx After-treatment Systems Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction Development of Optimal Catalyst

  14. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype

  15. Investigation on thermal evaporated CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Youzhen; Xu, Xuemei; Yang, Junliang; Wang, Chenggong; Wang, Congcong; Gao, Yongli; Xie, Fangyan

    2015-09-15

    CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I, PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} films were fabricated by evaporation and characterized with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XPS results indicate that the PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} films are more uniform and stable than the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I film. The atomic ratio of the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I, PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} films are C:N:I=1.00:1.01:0.70, Pb:I= 1.00:1.91 and C: N: Pb: I = 1.29:1.07:1.00:2.94, respectively. The atomic ratio of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} is very close to that of the ideal perovskite. Small angle x-ray diffraction results demonstrate that the as evaporated CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} film is crystalline. The valence band maximum (VBM) and work function (WF) of the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} film are about 0.85eV and 4.86eV, respectively.

  16. Role of the N*(1535) resonance and the {pi}{sup -}p{yields}KY amplitudes in the OZI forbidden {pi}N{yields}{phi}N reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doering, M.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2008-08-15

    We study the {pi}N{yields}{phi}N reaction close to the {phi}N threshold within the chiral unitary approach, by combining the {pi}{sup -}p{yields}K{sup +}{sigma}{sup -},{pi}{sup -}p{yields}K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup 0}, and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}K{sup 0}{lambda} amplitudes with the coupling of {phi} to the K components of the final states of these reactions via quantum loops. We obtain good agreement with experiment when the dominant {pi}{sup -}p{yields}K{sup 0}{lambda} amplitude is constrained with its experimental cross section. We also evaluate the coupling of N*(1535) to {phi}N and find a moderate coupling as a consequence of partial cancellation of the large KY components of N*(1535). We also show that the N*(1535) pole approximation is too small to reproduce the measured cross section for the {pi}{sup -}N{yields}{phi}N reaction.

  17. Site Specific Metal Criteria Developed Using Kentucky Division of Water Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Phipps, T.L.

    1999-10-09

    Alternative limits for Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were developed for treated wastewater from four outfalls at a Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Guidance from the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW) was used to (1) estimate the toxicity of the effluents using water fleas (Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae; (2) determine total recoverable and dissolved concentrations of Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn ; (3) calculate ratios of dissolved metal (DM) to total recoverable metal (TRM); and (4) assess chemical characteristics of the effluents. Three effluent samples from each outfall were collected during each of six test periods; thus, a total of 18 samples from each outfall were evaluated for toxicity, DM and TRM. Subsamples were analyzed for alkalinity, hardness, pH, conductivity, and total suspended solids. Short-term (6 or 7 d), static renewal toxicity tests were conducted according to EPA methodology. Ceriodaphnia reproduction was reduced in one test of effluent from Outfall A , and effluent from Outfall B was acutely toxic to both test species during one test. However, the toxicity was not related to the metals present in the effluents. Of the 18 samples from each outfall, more than 65% of the metal concentrations were estimated quantities. With the exception of two total recoverable Cu values in Outfall C, all metal concentrations were below the permit limits and the federal water quality criteria. Ranges of TR for all outfalls were: Cd, ,0.1-0.4 {micro}g/L; Cr,1.07-3.93 {micro}g/L; Cu, 1.59-7.24 {micro}g/L; Pb, <0.1-3.20 {micro}g/L; Ni, 0.82-10.7 {micro}g/L, Zn, 4.75-67.3 {micro}g/L. DM:TRM ratios were developed for each outfall. The proportion of dissolved Cu in the effluents ranged from 67 to 82%; the proportion of dissolved Ni ranged from 84 to 91%; and the proportion of dissolved Zn ranged from 74 to 94%. The proportion of dissolved Pb in the effluents was considerably lower (37-51%). TRM and/or DM concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, or Zn differed significantly

  18. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Yeamans, Charles B.; Hunn, John D; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.; Weck, Dr. Phil F

    2012-01-01

    Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

  20. EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

  1. DOE/EA-1927, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Final Environmental Assessment for Potential Land and Facilities Transfers, McCracken County, Kentucky

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Final Environmental Assessment for Potential Land and Facilities Transfers, McCracken County, Kentucky U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office December 2015 DOE/EA-1927 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 CFR Code of Federal Regulations dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy DUF 6 depleted uranium hexafluoride EA

  2. Theoretical investigation of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Kunqi; Sheng, Li

    2015-04-14

    The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, and dissociation energies of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) were investigated using the following method: Becke-3-parameter-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP), Boese-Matrin for Kinetics (BMK), second-order Mller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)). The results indicate that HHeNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HArNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HKrNH{sub 3}{sup +}, and HXeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions are metastable species that are protected from decomposition by high energy barriers, whereas the HNeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ion is unstable because of its relatively small energy barrier for decomposition. The bonding nature of noble-gas atoms in HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} was also analyzed using the atoms in molecules approach, natural energy decomposition analysis, and natural bond orbital analysis.

  3. Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation Reaction Pathways of H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) Oligomers: Importance of Dihydrogen Interactions (DHI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jun; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Hu, Han-Shi; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2010-09-06

    The H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers are possible products from dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (NH3BH3) and ammonium borohydride (NH4BH4), which belong to a class of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these oligomers and their further dehydrogenation is essential for developing BNHx-based hydrogen storage materials. We have performed computational modeling using density functional theory (DFT), ab initio wavefunction theory, and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the energetics and formation pathways for the H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) oligomers, polyaminoborane (PAB), from NH3BH3 monomers and the subsequent dehydrogenation steps to form polyiminoborane (PIB). Through transition state searches and evaluation of the intrinsic reaction coordinates, we have investigated the B-N bond cleavage, the reactions of NH3BH3 molecule with intermediates, dihydrogen release through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen transfer, dehydrocoupling/cyclization of the oligomers, and the dimerization of NH3BH3 molecules. We discovered the formation mechanism of H(NH2BH2)n+1H oligomers through reactions of the H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers first with BH3 followed by reactions with NH3 and the release of H2, where the BH3 and NH3 intermediates are formed through dissociation of NH3BH3. We also found that the dimerization of the NH3BH3 molecules to form c-(NH2BH2)2 is slightly exothermic, with an unexpected transition state that leads to the simultaneous release of two H2 molecules. The dehydrogenations of the oligomers are also exothermic, typically by less than 10 kcal/(mol of H2), with the largest exothermicity for n=3. The transition state search shows that the one-step direct dehydrocoupling cyclization of the oligomers is not a favored pathway because of high activation barriers. The dihydrogen bonding, in which protic (HN) hydrogens interact with hydridic

  4. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-28

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride

  5. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  6. Paducah Site Interns Learn About EM Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Thirteen college students took a break from the books to participate in a summer internship program hosted by LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, the cleanup contractor at EM’s Paducah site.

  7. EM Reviews Portsmouth, Paducah Site Contractor Performance, Determines Award Fees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, Ky. – EM has completed annual performance evaluations of four prime contractors working on the deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning of the former gaseous diffusion plants near Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky.

  8. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...Parts1-2'O29","AND(LEN(zip)5,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip)))","Enter a valid 5 digit zip code." ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  9. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...arts1-2'R29","AND(LEN(zip4)4,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip4)))","Enter a valid zip code ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  10. EIA-802

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 1-2'O27","AND(LEN(zip)5,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip)))","Enter a valid 5 digit zip code." ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  11. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...arts1-3'R27","AND(LEN(zip4)4,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip4)))","Enter a valid zip code ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  12. EIA-802

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...-2'O27:P27","AND(LEN(zip)5,ISNUMBER(VALUE(zip)))","Enter a valid 5 digit zip code." ... methods:",,,..."KY","Kentucky " "Doing Business As:",,,..."LA","Loui...

  13. Energy Department Investments in Innovative Carbon Capture Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... University of Kentucky Research Foundation Lexington, KY An Advanced Catalytic Solvent for Lower Cost Post-combustion CO2 Capture in a Coal-Fired Power Plant Approx. 3 million The ...

  14. Stratigraphy and organic petrography of Mississippian and Devonian oil shale at the Means Project, East-Central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, B.J.; Hutton, A.C.; Henstridge, D.A.; Ivanac, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    The Means Oil Shale Project is under consideration for financial assistance by the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation. The project site is located in southern Montgomery County, about 45 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. In the site area the Devonian Ohio Shale and the Mississippian Sunbury Shale are under study; these oil shales were deposited in the Appalachian Basin. The objective of the Means Project is to mine, using open pit methods, an ore zone which includes the Sunbury and upper Cleveland and which excludes the Bedford interburden. The thick lower grade oil shale below this ore zone renders the higher grade shale at the base of the Huron commercially unattractive. The oil shale at Means has been classified as a marinite, an oil shale containing abundant alginite of marine origin. Lamalginite is the dominant liptinite and comprises small, unicellular alginite with weak to moderate fluorescence at low rank and a distinctive lamellar form. Telalginite, derived from large colonial or thick-walled, unicellular algae, is common in several stratigraphic intervals.

  15. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A modified Spaci-IR technique can measure transient NH3 and NOx concentrations; data have been used to calibrate and validate an SCR model, with good agreement between experiments and simulations.

  17. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G. Liu, Y. F.

    2014-08-25

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  18. Kentucky-Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    10,369 190,694 181,000 178,850 194,795 203,102 1990-2016 Base Gas 112,965 112,965 112,964 112,961 112,959 112,957 1990-2016 Working Gas 97,404 77,729 68,036 65,889 81,836 90,145 1990-2016 Net Withdrawals 7,953 19,675 9,656 2,150 -16,117 -8,262 1990-2016 Injections 2,105 575 1,883 3,203 17,718 10,554 1990-2016 Withdrawals 10,058 20,250 11,540 5,354 1,601 2,292 1990-2016 Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Volume 17,237 11,014 21,500 21,915 22,918 21,339 1990-2016 Percent 21.5

  19. Kentucky-Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    60,941 67,568 61,463 56,226 2011-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 3,625 3,593 3,606 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 5,006

  20. Effects of reactant rotational excitations on H{sub 2} + NH{sub 2} → H + NH{sub 3} reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    Rotational mode specificity of the title reaction is examined using an initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method on an accurate ab initio based global potential energy surface. This penta-atomic reaction presents an ideal system to test several dynamical approximations, which might be useful for future quantum dynamics studies of polyatomic reactions, particularly with rotationally excited reactants. The first approximation involves a seven-dimensional (7D) model in which the two non-reactive N–H bonds are fixed at their equilibrium geometry. The second is the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation within the 7D model. Finally, the J-shifting (JS) model is tested, again with the fixed N–H bonds. The spectator-bond approximation works very well in the energy range studied, while the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting integral cross sections (ICSs) agree satisfactorily with the coupled-channel counterparts in the low collision energy range, but deviate at the high energies. The calculated integral cross sections indicate that the rotational excitation of H{sub 2} somewhat inhibits the reaction while the rotational excitations of NH{sub 2} have little effect. These findings are compared with the predictions of the sudden vector projection model. Finally, a simple model is proposed to predict rotational mode specificity using K-averaged reaction probabilities.

  1. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; Naber, Jeffrey D.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity and the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).

  2. Apatite fission track evidence for post-Early Cretaceous erosional unroofing of Middle Pennsylvanian sandstones from the southern Appalachian Basin in Kentucky and Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettcher, S.S.; Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission track ages and mean etchable track lengths for 7 samples of Middle Pennsylvanian (Breathitt Formation) depositional age from the southern Appalachian Basin of KY and VA suggest that 3--4 km of erosional unroofing has occurred since the Early Cretaceous. The samples were collected over a 1,600 km[sup 2] area at the northern end of the Pine Mountain Overthrust southeast of Pikeville, KY. This new data set overlaps 8 published apatite fission track ages and 3 mean etchable lengths from the Cumberland Plateau and Valley and Ridge areas of WV. Because all of the apatite fission track ages are significantly younger than the depositional age, maximum burial temperatures in the area exceeded 125 C, such that fission tracks that formed in the detrital apatite prior to deposition have been totally annealed. Furthermore, mean etchable track lengths show considerable length reduction from initial values revealing that the samples resided in the zone of partial annealing on the order of 100 Ma following attainment of maximum temperatures. The burial history for these samples began with deposition and rapid burial of synorogenic sediments in front of the westward advancing Alleghenian deformation front. The fission track data are compatible with the hypothesis that maximum temperatures were attained during the Late Paleozoic as tectonically driven synorogenic fluids penetrated the foreland basin deposits. Slow erosional unroofing (< 15 m/Ma for a thermal gradient of 30 C/km) has occurred since the onset of Triassic-Jurassic rifting along the atlantic continental margin and continued into the Cenozoic.

  3. RELAP5/MOD2 assessment simulation of semiscale MOD-2C test S-NH-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megahed, M M

    1987-10-01

    This report documents an evaluation of the RELAP5/MOD2/Cycle 36.05 thermal hydraulic computer code for a simulation of a small-break loss-of-coolant accident transient (SBLOCA). The experimental data base for the evaluation is the results of Test S-NH-3 performed in the Semiscale MOD-2C test facility. The test modeled a 0.5% SBLOCA with an accompanying failure of the high-pressure injection emergency core cooling system. The test facility and RELAP5/MOD2 model used in the calculations are described. Evaluations of the accuracy of the calculations are presented in the form of comparisons of measured and calculated histories of selected parameters associated with the primary and secondary systems. A conclusion was reached that the code is capable of making SBLOCA calculations efficiently. However, some of the SBLOCA-related phenomena were not properly predicted by the code, suggesting a need for code improvement.

  4. The thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH and subsequent reactions : ab initio transition state theory and reflected shock tube experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Ruscic, B.; Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, N. K.; Su, M.-C.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Sonoma State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    Primary and secondary reactions involved in the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH are studied with a combination of shock tube experiments and transition state theory based theoretical kinetics. This coupled theory and experiment study demonstrates the utility of NH{sub 2}OH as a high temperature source of OH radicals. The reflected shock technique is employed in the determination of OH radical time profiles via multipass electronic absorption spectrometry. O-atoms are searched for with atomic resonance absorption spectrometry. The experiments provide a direct measurement of the rate coefficient, k{sub 1}, for the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH. Secondary rate measurements are obtained for the NH{sub 2} + OH (5a) and NH{sub 2}OH + OH (6a) abstraction reactions. The experimental data are obtained for temperatures in the range from 1355 to 1889 K and are well represented by the respective rate expressions: log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?10.12 {+-} 0.20) + (?6793 {+-} 317 K/T) (k{sub 1}); log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?10.00 {+-} 0.06) + (?879 {+-} 101 K/T) (k{sub 5a}); log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?9.75 {+-} 0.08) + (?1248 {+-} 123 K/T) (k{sub 6a}). Theoretical predictions are made for these rate coefficients as well for the reactions of NH{sub 2}OH + NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}OH + NH, NH + OH, NH{sub 2} + NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2} + NH, and NH + NH, each of which could be of secondary importance in NH{sub 2}OH thermal decomposition. The theoretical analyses employ a combination of ab initio transition state theory and master equation simulations. Comparisons between theory and experiment are made where possible. Modest adjustments of predicted barrier heights (i.e., by 2 kcal/mol or less) generally yield good agreement between theory and experiment. The rate coefficients obtained here should be of utility in modeling NO{sub x} in various combustion environments.

  5. Tuned sensitivity towards H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} with Cu doped barium strontium titanate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simion, C. E. Teodorescu, V. S.; Stănoiu, A.; Sackmann, A.; Ruşti, C. F.; Piticescu, R. M.

    2014-11-05

    The different amount of Cu-doped Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) thick film materials have been tested for their gas-sensing performances towards NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S under dry and 50% relative humidity (RH) background conditions. The optimum NH{sub 3} sensitivity was attained with 0.1mol% Cu-doped BST whereas the selective detection of H{sub 2}S was highlighted using 5mol% Cu-doped BST material. No cross-sensitivity effects to CO, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and SO{sub 2} were observed for all tested materials operated at their optimum temperature (200°C) under humid conditions (50% RH). The presence of humidity clearly enhances the gas sensitivity to NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S detection.

  6. Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

    2009-12-31

    Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the

  7. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Kentucky Municipal Energy Agency A Regional Power Supply Solution April 6, 2016 NEWGEN STRATEGIES AND SOLUTIONS, LLC Today's Discussion Objective - Achieve a better understanding of KyMEA and current efforts to improve Kentucky municipals' power supply plan and to develop a path forward Topics 1. Kentucky Municipals' Power Supply Situation 2. Historical Perspective - Recognizing the Opportunity for Change 3. Forming a Strategy for the Future  Creating a New Agency  Expected benefits 4.

  8. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Urbane Homes,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Louisville, Kentucky | Department of Energy Urbane Homes, Louisville, Kentucky Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Urbane Homes, Louisville, Kentucky Case study of Urbane Homes who worked with Building America research partner NAHBRC to build HERS-57 homes with rigid foam insulated slabs and foundation walls, advanced framed walls, high-efficiency heat pumps, and ducts in conditioned space. Urbane Homes - Louisville, KY (668.24 KB) More Documents & Publications High

  9. Increasing biogas yield of rural biogas digester by addition of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, G.C.; Chen, G.Q.; Chen, M.; Liu, K.X.; Zhou, S.Y.

    1983-12-01

    By addition of 0.3% NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ instead of animal manure into rural biogas digester in which the rotted rice straw was the major feedstock, the biogas yield doubled in comparison with the check digester (0.1 m/sup 3//m/sup 3//d) and the fertility of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ did not decrease because of biogas fermentation. Many digesters have been built in China. But, owing to the problems of improper management, unsuitable influent mixing, etc., neither digesters nor feedstock were fully utilized. In order to solve these problems, adding NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ into digester instead of animal manure was tried. Its results showed that the suitable C/N ratio of influent mixing was obtained, the fertility of effluent went up, and biogas producing rate increased. The concentration of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ is 0.2-0.6%, but the optimal is 0.3%.

  10. Update and Improve Subsection NH –– Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama

    2009-10-26

    This report described the results of investigation on Task 10 of DOE/ASME Materials NGNP/Generation IV Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 10 is to Update and Improve Subsection NH -- Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods. Five newly proposed promising creep-fatigue evaluation methods were investigated. Those are (1) modified ductility exhaustion method, (2) strain range separation method, (3) approach for pressure vessel application, (4) hybrid method of time fraction and ductility exhaustion, and (5) simplified model test approach. The outlines of those methods are presented first, and predictability of experimental results of these methods is demonstrated using the creep-fatigue data collected in previous Tasks 3 and 5. All the methods (except the simplified model test approach which is not ready for application) predicted experimental results fairly accurately. On the other hand, predicted creep-fatigue life in long-term regions showed considerable differences among the methodologies. These differences come from the concepts each method is based on. All the new methods investigated in this report have advantages over the currently employed time fraction rule and offer technical insights that should be thought much of in the improvement of creep-fatigue evaluation procedures. The main points of the modified ductility exhaustion method, the strain range separation method, the approach for pressure vessel application and the hybrid method can be reflected in the improvement of the current time fraction rule. The simplified mode test approach would offer a whole new advantage including robustness and simplicity which are definitely attractive but this approach is yet to be validated for implementation at this point. Therefore, this report recommends the following two steps as a course of improvement of NH based on newly proposed creep-fatigue evaluation

  11. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  12. Analysis of natural gases, AL, AR, FL, GA, IL, IN, IA, KY, LA, MD, MI, MS, MO, NJ, NY, NC, OH, PA, TN, VA, and WV; 1951-1991 (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines diskette contains analysis and related source data for 2,357 natural gas samples collected from miscellaneous states, which include the following states: Alabama, Arkansas (except Arkoma Basin), Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. All samples were obtained and analyzed as part of the Bureau's investigations of occurrences of helium in natural gases of countries with free market economies. The survey has been conducted since 1917. The analysis contained on the diskette contain the full range of component analysis data. Five files are on the diskette: READ.ME, MISC.TXT, MISC.DBF, USHEANAL.DBF, and BASINCDE.TXT.

  13. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to

  14. Groundwater Sampling and Soil Gas Data Analysis, Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky -- June - August 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jennifer Pauline; Peterson, Lance Nutting; Taylor, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater and soil gas sampling conducted at the Distler Brickyard Site, Hardin County, Kentucky, June-August, 2000. The purpose of the sampling activities was to address remaining data gaps regarding the feasibility of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of chloroethene/ane contamination. Specifically, data gaps fall into four categories: 1) effect of seasonal recharge on contaminant concentrations, 2) geochemical conditions in the Fine Grained Alluvium (FGA), 3) conditions along the flowpath between Wells GW-11 and MW-3, and 4) the extent of aerobic degradation in the Coarse Grained Alluvium (CGA). A data collection strategy composed of both groundwater sampling and passive soil vapor sampling devices (Gore-Sorbers?) was used. The Gore-Sorber? technology was used to collect data from the FGA, which because of its low hydraulic conductivity and variable saturation makes collection of groundwater samples problematic. Gore-Sorbers were deployed in 15 wells, most of them being in the FGA, and groundwater samples were collected in 17 wells, which were mostly in the CGA. Both sampling methods were utilized in a subset of wells (7) in order to determine the general comparability of results obtained from each method. Results indicate that water levels in both the FGA and CGA were higher in June-August 2000 than in October 1999, likely due to increased infiltration of precipitation through the FGA during the wetter months. Redox conditions in the FGA and downgradient CGA were iron-reducing, less reducing than in October-1999. In general, concentrations of chloroethenes/anes were higher in June-August 2000 than October 1999. Trichloroethene (TCE) was present at concentrations as high as 65 µg/L in the FGA and 19 µg/L in the CGA. This is substantially higher than the maximum concentration in October 1999 of 11 µg/L. The following conclusions were drawn from these data collection activities: 1) two potential

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    47 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 5.69 5.18 4.17 4.47 5.16 NA 1984-2015 Residential 10.02 10.44 10.19 9.80 10.62 10.94 1967-2015 Commercial 8.61 8.79 8.28 8.32 9.04 8.80 1967-2015 Industrial 5.57 5.16 3.96 4.84 5.80 4.36 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel -- -- -- 1992-2012 Electric Power W W W W W W 1997-2015 Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 2,613 2,006 1,408 1,663 1,611 1977-2014 Adjustments -58 -34 -282 103 -9 1977-2014 Revision Increases

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Citygate Price 3.24 3.26 3.26 2.97 2.93 2.85 1989-2016 Residential Price 7.88 7.65 8.79 10.37 14.91 20.24 1989-2016 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 97.2 96.4 95.8 96.2 96.2 96.2 2002-2016 Commercial Price 6.72 6.37 7.09 7.98 9.17 10.75 1989-2016 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 83.2 83.4 79.6 75.4 70.8 66.7 1989-2016 Industrial Price 3.79 3.64 3.32 2.82 3.21 2.98 2001-2016 Percentage

  17. Kentucky Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 1 0 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 149 106 75 6 3 6 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 149 106 75 6 3 6 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 5.69 5.18 4.17 4.47 5.16 NA 1984-2015 Residential Price 10.02 10.44 10.19 9.80 10.62 10.94 1967-2015 Percentage of ...

  19. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngprisumdcuskym.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngprisumdcuskym.htm" ,"Source:","Energy ...

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24 3.26 3.26 2.97 2.93 2.85 1989-2016 Residential 7.88 7.65 8.79 10.37 14.91 20.24 1989-2016 Commercial 6.72 6.37 7.09 7.98 9.17 10.75 1989-2016 Industrial 3.79 3.64 3.32 2.82 3.21 2.98 2001-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W 2002-2016 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2016

  1. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and optical properties of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chemingui, S.; Ferhi, M. Horchani-Naifer, K.; Férid, M.

    2014-09-15

    Polycrystalline powders of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} polyphosphate have been grown by the flux method. This compound was found to be isotopic with NH{sub 4}Ce(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and RbHo(PO{sub 3}){sub 4}. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1/n} with unit cell parameters a=10.474(6) Å, b=9.011(4) Å, c=10.947(7) Å and β=106.64(3)°. The title compound has been transformed to triphosphate Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} after calcination at 800 °C. Powder X-ray diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopies and the differential thermal analysis have been used to identify these materials. The spectroscopic properties have been investigated through absorption, excitation, emission spectra and decay curves of Dy{sup 3+} ion in both compounds at room temperature. The emission spectra show the characteristic emission bands of Dy{sup 3+} in the two compounds, before and after calcination. The integrated emission intensity ratios of the yellow to blue (I{sub Y}/I{sub B}) transitions and the chromaticity properties have been determined from emission spectra. The decay curves are found to be double-exponential. The non-exponential behavior of the decay rates was related to the resonant energy transfer as well as cross-relaxation between the donor and acceptor Dy{sup 3+} ions. The determined properties have been discussed as function of crystal structure of both compounds. They reveal that NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} is promising for white light generation but Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} is potential candidates in field emission display (FED) and plasma display panel (PDP) devices. - Graphical abstract: The CIE color coordinate diagrams showing the chromatic coordinates of Dy{sup 3+} luminescence in NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}. - Highlights: • The polycrystalline powders of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} are synthesized. • The obtained powders are characterized. • The spectroscopic properties of Dy{sup 3+} ion

  3. RELAP5 assessment using semiscale SBLOCA test S-NH-1. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.J.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    2-inch cold leg break test S-NH-1, conducted at the 1/1705 volume scaled facility Semiscale was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 and MOD3 Version 5m5. Loss of HPIS was assumed, and reactor trip occurred on a low PZR pressure signal (13.1 MPa), and pumps began an unpowered coastdown on SI signal (12.5 MPa). The system was recovered by opening ADV`s when the PCT became higher than 811 K. Accumulator was finally injected into the system when the primary system pressure was less than 4.0 MPa. The experiment was terminated when the pressure reached the LPIS actuation set point RELAP5/MOD2 analysis demonstrated its capability to predict, with a sufficient accuracy, the main phenomena occurring in the depressurization transient, both from a qualitative and quantitative points of view. Nevertheless, several differences were noted regarding the break flow rate and inventory distribution due to deficiencies in two-phase choked flow model, horizontal stratification interfacial drag, and a CCFL model. The main reason for the core to remain nearly fully covered with the liquid was the under-prediction of the break flow by the code. Several sensitivity calculations were tried using the MOD2 to improve the results by using the different options of break flow modeling (downward, homogeneous, and area increase). The break area compensating concept based on ``the integrated break flow matching`` gave the best results than downward junction and homogeneous options. And the MOD3 showed improvement in predicting a CCFL in SG and a heatup in the core.

  4. A reaction mechanism for titanium nitride CVD from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, R.S.; Allendorf, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    A gas-phase and surface reaction mechanism for the CVD of TiN from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is proposed. The only gas-phase process is complex formation, which can compete with deposition. The surface mechanism postulates the stepwise elimination of Cl and H atoms from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, respectively, to form solid TiN and gaseous HCl. The mechanism also accounts for the change in oxidation state of Ti by allowing for liberation of N{sub 2}. Provided that the surface composition is at steady state, the stoichiometry of the overall reaction is reproduced exactly. In addition, the global kinetic law predicted by the mechanism is successfully fit to new deposition data from a rotating disk reactor and is shown to be consistent with literature results.

  5. Capacitive deionization of NH{sub 4}CIO{sub 4} solutions with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A process for capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes was developed. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system; electricity is used instead. An aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ions are removed from the water by the imposed electric field and trapped in the extensive cathodic and anodic double layers. Thsi process produces one stream of purified water and a second stream of concentrate. Effects of cell voltage, salt concentration, and cycling on electrosorption capacity were studied and results reported.

  6. RELAP5/MOD2 assessment using semiscale experiments S-NH-1 and S-LH-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuann, Ruey-ying; Liang, Kuo-shing; Jacobson, J L

    1987-10-01

    This report presents the results of the RELAP5/MOD2 posttest assessment utilizing two small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests (S-NH-1 and S-LH-2) which were performed in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility. Test S-NH-1 was a 0.5% small break LOCA where the high-pressure injection system (HPIS) was inoperable throughout the transient. Test S-LH-2 was a 5% small break LOCA involving a relatively high upper-head-to-downcomer initial bypass flow and nominal emergency core cooling. Through comparisons between data and best-estimate RELAP5 calculations, the capabilities of RELAP5 to calculate the transient phenomena are assessed. For S-NH-1, emphasis was placed on the capability of the code to calculate various operator actions to initiate core heatup in the absence of HPIS. For S-LH-2, the capability of the code to calculate basic small break system response, such as vessel level during loop seal formation and clearing, break uncovery, and primary pressure response following accumulator injection, was assessed. 10 refs., 76 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Synthesis, crystal growth, structural and magnetic characterization of NH4MCl2(HCOO), M=(Fe, Co, Ni)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greenfield, Joshua T.; Ovidiu Garlea, V.; Kamali, Saeed; Chen, Michael; Kovnir, Kirill

    2015-09-24

    In this paper, an ambient-pressure solution route and an improved solvothermal synthetic method have been developed to produce polycrystalline powders and large single crystals of NH4MCl2(HCOO) (M=Fe, Co, Ni). The magnetic structure of the 1D linear chain compound NH4FeCl2(HCOO) has been determined by low-temperature neutron powder diffraction, revealing ferromagnetic intra-chain interactions and antiferromagnetic inter-chain interactions. Finally, the newly-reported Co and Ni analogs are isostructural with NH4FeCl2(HCOO), but there are significant differences in the magnetic properties of each compound; the Ni analog behaves similarly to the Fe compound but with stronger magnetic coupling, exhibiting antiferromagnetic ordering (TN=8.5 K) and a broadmore » metamagnetic transition between 2 and 5 T, while the Co analog does not order magnetically above 2 K, despite strong antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interactions.« less

  8. High-temperature phase transformation and topochemical nature in ferroelastic (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    The electrical conductivity of ferroelastic ammonium sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed an anomaly at around 130 C (=403 K, T{sub P}) on heating with large and irreversible thermal hysteresis through thermal cycle. Ferroelastic domain walls and surface morphology of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated by hot-stage polarizing microscopy. Structural phase transition from an orthorhombic ferroelastic phase to a hexagonal paraelastic phase was not identified at T{sub P} upon heating. On further heating above T{sub P}, microscopic spots appeared and grew on the crystal surface, suggesting that the high-temperature anomaly at T{sub P} was an indication of an onset of thermal decomposition controlled by topochemical factors. The increase of electrical conductivity above T{sub P} was attributed to proton migration. - Graphical abstract: Surface morphology of the (100) face of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} on heating, showing chemical reaction at the surface. - Highlights: We investigate the high-temperature phase transformation of ammonium sulfate. The increasing conductivity upon heating is attributed to proton migration. Structural phase transition from orthorhombic to hexagonal phase is not confirmed. High-temperature anomaly is related to an onset of thermal decomposition. The nature of the high-temperature anomaly is topochemical controlled by defects.

  9. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+: Removing the Distinction Between Endo- and Exo- Protonation Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Houston JS; Wiese, Stefan; Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

    2015-04-03

    A new Ni(II) complex, [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ (7PPh2NH = 3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) has been synthesized, and its electrochemical properties are reported. The 7PPh2NH ligand features an NH, ensuring properly positioned protonated amine groups (NH+) for electrocatalysis, regardless of whether protonation occurs exo- or endo- to the metal center. The compound is an electrocatalyst for H2 production in the presence of organic acids (pKa range 1013 in CH3CN) with turnover frequencies ranging from 160770 s-1 at overpotentials between 320470 mV, as measured at the half peak potential of the catalytic wave. In stark contrast to [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ and other [Ni(7PPh2NR')]2+ complexes, catalytic turnover frequencies for H2 production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ do not show catalytic rate enhancement upon the addition of H2O. This finding supports the assertion that [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ eliminates the distinction between the endo- and exo-protonation isomers. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2014-12-09

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  11. A Pyrrolyl-based Triazolophane: A Macrocyclic Receptor With CH and NH Donor Groups That Exhibits a Preference for Pyrophosphate Anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Cia, Jiajia; Gong, Han-Yuan; Yang, Xiauping; Arambula, Jonathan F.; Hay, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    A pyrrolyl-based triazolophane, incorporating CH and NH donor groups, acts as a receptor for the pyrophosphate anion in chloroform solution. It shows selectivity for this trianion, followed by HSO{sub 4}{sup -} > H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} > Cl{sup -} > Br{sup -} (all as the corresponding tetrabutylammonium salts), with NH-anion interactions being more important than CH-anion interactions. In the solid state, the receptor binds the pyrophosphate anion in a clip-like slot via NH and CH hydrogen bonds.

  12. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and

  13. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boerner, A. J.; Maldonado, D. G.; Hansen, Tom

    2012-09-01

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil

  14. Fe/SSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIR/Mössbauer Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kollar, Marton; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles H.F.

    2015-03-01

    Using a traditional aqueous solution ion-exchange method under a protecting atmosphere of N2, an Fe/SSZ-13 catalyst active in NH3-SCR was synthesized. Mössbauer and FTIR spectroscopies were used to probe the nature of the Fe sites. In the fresh sample, the majority of Fe species are extra-framework cations. The likely monomeric and dimeric ferric ions in hydrated form are [Fe(OH)2]+ and [HO-Fe-O-Fe-OH]2+, based on Mössbauer measurements. During the severe hydrothermal aging (HTA) applied in this study, a majority of cationic Fe species convert to FeAlOx and clustered FeOx species, accompanied by severe dealumination of the SSZ-13 framework. The clustered FeOx species do not give a sextet Mössbauer spectrum, indicating that these are highly disordered. However, some Fe species in cationic positions remain after aging as determined from Mössbauer measurements and CO/NO FTIR titrations. NO/NH3 oxidation reaction tests reveal that dehydrated cationic Fe are substantially more active in catalyzing oxidation reactions than the hydrated ones. For NH3-SCR, enhancement of NO oxidation under ‘dry’ conditions promotes SCR rates below ~300 • C. This is due mainly to contribution from the “fast” SCR channel. Above ~300 • C, enhancement of NH3 oxidation under ‘dry’ conditions, however, becomes detrimental to NOx conversions. The HTA sample loses much of the SCR activity below ~300 • C; however, above ~400 • C much of the activity remains. This may suggest that the FeAlOx and FeOx species become active at such elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the high-temperature activity may be maintained by the remaining extra-framework cationic species. For potential practical applications, Fe/SSZ-13 may be used as a co-catalyst for Cu/CHA as integral aftertreatment SCR catalysts on the basis of the stable high temperature activity after hydrothermal aging. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. Commercial low-Btu coal-gasification plant. Feasibility study: General Refractories Company, Florence, Kentucky. Volume I. Project summary. [Wellman-Galusha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-11-01

    In response to a 1980 Department of Energy solicitation, the General Refractories Company submitted a Proposal for a feasibility study of a low Btu gasification facility for its Florence, KY plant. The proposed facility would substitute low Btu gas from a fixed bed gasifier for natural gas now used in the manufacture of insulation board. The Proposal from General Refractories was prompted by a concern over the rising costs of natural gas, and the anticipation of a severe increase in fuel costs resulting from deregulation. The proposed feasibility study is defined. The intent is to provide General Refractories with the basis upon which to determine the feasibility of incorporating such a facility in Florence. To perform the work, a Grant for which was awarded by the DOE, General Refractories selected Dravo Engineers and Contractors based upon their qualifications in the field of coal conversion, and the fact that Dravo has acquired the rights to the Wellman-Galusha technology. The LBG prices for the five-gasifier case are encouraging. Given the various natural gas forecasts available, there seems to be a reasonable possibility that the five-gasifier LBG prices will break even with natural gas prices somewhere between 1984 and 1989. General Refractories recognizes that there are many uncertainties in developing these natural gas forecasts, and if the present natural gas decontrol plan is not fully implemented some financial risks occur in undertaking the proposed gasification facility. Because of this, General Refractories has decided to wait for more substantiating evidence that natural gas prices will rise as is now being predicted.

  16. Task 16 -- Sampling and analysis at the Vortec vitrification facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laudal, D.L.; Lilemoen, C.M.; Hurley, J.P.; Ness, S.R.; Stepan, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{reg_sign}) facility, to be located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. To assure that costs of sampling and analysis are contained, Vortec and the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have decided that initially the primary focus of the sampling activities will be on meeting permitting requirements of the state of Kentucky. Therefore, sampling will be limited to the feedstock entering the system, and the glass, flue gas, and water leaving the system. The authors provide suggestions for optional sampling points and procedures in case there is later interest in operations or mass balance data. The permits do not require speciation of the materials in the effluents, only opacity, total radioactivity, total particulate, and total HCl emissions for the gaseous emissions and total radioactivity in the water and solid products. In case future testing to support operations or mass balances is required, the authors include in this document additional information on the analyses of some species of interest. They include heavy metals (RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] and Cu and Ni), radionuclides (Th{sub 230}, U{sub 235}, Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and Pu{sup 239}), and dioxins/furans.

  17. Inhibitory effect of high NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration on anaerobic biotreatment of fresh leachate from a municipal solid waste incineration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhao; Dang, Yan; Li, Caihua; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • High NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentrations inhibit anaerobic treatment of leachate. • Inhibitory effect of NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentrations on anaerobic granular sludge is reversible. • High NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentrations inhibit bioactivities of microorganisms instead of survival. - Abstract: Fresh leachate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration plants generally contains extremely high NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration which could inhibit the bioactivity of microorganisms. The inhibitory effect of high NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration on anaerobic biotreatment of fresh leachate from a MSW incineration plant in China has been investigated in this study. The inhibition processes was studied by both static tests and a laboratory-scale expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. The specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of the microorganisms in anaerobic granular sludge was inhibited with the NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration increasing to 1000 mg/L in static tests. As well the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and the methane yield decreased in the EGSB reactor, while the volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulated and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the anaerobic granular sludge increased with NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration rising to 1000 mg/L, without any rebounding during 30 days of operation. Decreasing NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration to 500 mg/L in influent, the COD removal efficiency recovered to about 85% after 26 days. 1000 mg/L of NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N in leachate was suggested to be the inhibition threshold in EGSB reactor. High-throughput sequencing results showed little changes in microbial communities of the sludge for a high NH{sub 4}{sup +}–N concentration, indicating that the survival of most microorganisms was not affected under such a condition. It inhibited the bioactivity of the microorganisms, resulting in decrease of the COD removal efficiency.

  18. Observational results of a multi-telescope campaign in search of interstellar urea [(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Snyder, Lewis E.; Kuo, Hsin-Lun; Looney, Leslie W.; Friedel, Douglas N.; McGuire, Brett A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Lovas, Frank J.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2014-03-10

    In this paper, we present the results of an observational search for gas phase urea [(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO] observed toward the Sgr B2(N-LMH) region. We show data covering urea transitions from ?100 GHz to 250 GHz from five different observational facilities: the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association (BIMA) Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the NRAO 12 m telescope, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST). The results show that the features ascribed to urea can be reproduced across the entire observed bandwidth and all facilities by best-fit column density, temperature, and source size parameters which vary by less than a factor of two between observations merely by adjusting for telescope-specific parameters. Interferometric observations show that the emission arising from these transitions is cospatial and compact, consistent with the derived source sizes and emission from a single species. Despite this evidence, the spectral complexity of both (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO and of Sgr B2(N) makes the definitive identification of this molecule challenging. We present observational spectra, laboratory data, and models, and discuss our results in the context of a possible molecular detection of urea.

  19. Passive SCR for lean gasoline NOX control: Engine-based strategies to minimize fuel penalty associated with catalytic NH3 generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Parks, James E.; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.

    2016-02-18

    Lean gasoline engines offer greater fuel economy than common stoichiometric gasoline engines. However, excess oxygen prevents the use of the current three-way catalyst (TWC) to control nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions in lean exhaust. A passive SCR concept, introduced by General Motors Global R&D, makes use of a TWC that is already onboard to generate NH3 under slightly rich conditions, which is stored on the downstream SCR. The stored NH3 is then used to reduce NOX emissions when the engine switches to lean operation. In this work, the effect of engine parameters, such as air-fuel equivalence ratio and spark timing, onmore » NH3 generation over a commercial Pd-only TWC with no dedicated oxygen storage component was evaluated on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine. NOX reduction, NH3 formation, and reductant utilization processes were evaluated, and fuel efficiency was assessed and compared to the stoichiometric engine operation case. We found air-fuel equivalence ratio to be one of the most important parameters in controlling the NH3 production; however, the rich operation necessary for NH3 production results in a fuel consumption penalty. The fuel penalty can be minimized by adjusting spark timing to increase rich-phase engine out NOX emissions and, thereby, NH3 levels. Additionally, higher engine out NOX during engine load increase to simulate acceleration resulted in additional fuel savings. Ultimately, a 10% fuel consumption benefit was achieved with the passive SCR approach by optimizing rich air-fuel equivalence ratio and spark timing while also utilizing acceleration load conditions.« less

  20. Assessment of the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration of technetium-99 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site in Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, B.; McDonald, J.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Clausen, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    This short report summarizes the influences of groundwater colloids on the migration/transport of {sup 99}Tc at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site in Paducah, Kentucky. Limited data suggest that inorganic colloidal materials (e.g., aluminosilicate clay minerals) may not play a significant role in the retention and transport of Tc. Studies by size fractionation reveal that both Tc and natural organic matter (NOM) are largely present in the <3K fraction. The role of NOM on Tc retention and transport is not conclusive on the basis of this study. However, a literature review suggests that Tc is very likely associated with the groundwater organics. The presence of the organic matter could have increased the solubility and cotransport of Tc at the PGDP site. Further studies, applying such techniques as gel chromatography, size exclusion, and spectroscopy, may be useful to determine the association of organic matter with Tc. If Tc is associated with groundwater organics, appropriate protocols for removal of organic matter associated with Tc may be developed. Time and resources were limited so this study is not comprehensive with respect to the role of mobile organic and inorganic colloidal materials on Tc transport in subsurface soils. The redox conditions (DO) of groundwaters reported may not represent the true groundwater conditions, which could have influenced the association and dissociation of Tc with groundwater colloidal materials. Because Tc concentrations in the groundwater (on the order of nCi/L) at the PGDP site is much lower than the solubility of reduced Tc (IV) (on the order of {approximately}10{sup {minus}8} mol/L or parts per billion), regardless of the redox conditions, Tc will stay in solution phase as TC(IV) or Tc(VII). The mechanisms of adsorption/association vs precipitation must be understood under reduced and low Tc conditions so that strategic plans for remediation of Tc contaminated soils and groundwaters can be developed.

  1. Design and construction of coal/biomass to liquids (CBTL) process development unit (PDU) at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placido, Andrew; Liu, Kunlei; Challman, Don; Andrews, Rodney; Jacques, David

    2015-10-30

    This report describes a first phase of a project to design, construct and commission an integrated coal/biomass-to-liquids facility at a capacity of 1 bbl. /day at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) – specifically for construction of the building and upstream process units for feed handling, gasification, and gas cleaning, conditioning and compression. The deliverables from the operation of this pilot plant [when fully equipped with the downstream process units] will be firstly the liquid FT products and finished fuels which are of interest to UK-CAER’s academic, government and industrial research partners. The facility will produce research quantities of FT liquids and finished fuels for subsequent Fuel Quality Testing, Performance and Acceptability. Moreover, the facility is expected to be employed for a range of research and investigations related to: Feed Preparation, Characteristics and Quality; Coal and Biomass Gasification; Gas Clean-up/ Conditioning; Gas Conversion by FT Synthesis; Product Work-up and Refining; Systems Analysis and Integration; and Scale-up and Demonstration. Environmental Considerations - particularly how to manage and reduce carbon dioxide emissions from CBTL facilities and from use of the fuels - will be a primary research objectives. Such a facility has required significant lead time for environmental review, architectural/building construction, and EPC services. UK, with DOE support, has advanced the facility in several important ways. These include: a formal EA/FONSI, and permits and approvals; construction of a building; selection of a range of technologies and vendors; and completion of the upstream process units. The results of this project are the FEED and detailed engineering studies, the alternate configurations and the as-built plant - its equipment and capabilities for future research and demonstration and its adaptability for re-purposing to meet other needs. These are described in

  2. Low Surface Recombination Velocity in Solution-Grown CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Single Crystal

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ye; Yan, Yong; Yang, Mengjin; Choi, Sukgeun; Zhu, Kai; Luter, Joseph M.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2015-08-06

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are attracting intense research effort due to their impressive performance in solar cells. While the carrier transport parameters such as mobility and bulk carrier lifetime shows sufficient characteristics, the surface recombination, which can have major impact on the solar cell performance, has not been studied. Here we measure surface recombination dynamics in CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite single crystals using broadband transient reflectance spectroscopy. The surface recombination velocity is found to be 3.4±0.1 103 cm s-1, B2–3 orders of magnitude lower than that in many important unpassivated semiconductors employed in solar cells. Our result suggests that the planar grain sizemore » for the perovskite thin films should be larger thanB30 mm to avoid the influence of surface recombination on the effective carrier lifetime.« less

  3. Unusual defect physics in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Wan-Jian Shi, Tingting; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-10

    Thin-film solar cells based on Methylammonium triiodideplumbate (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) halide perovskites have recently shown remarkable performance. First-principle calculations show that CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} has unusual defect physics: (i) Different from common p-type thin-film solar cell absorbers, it exhibits flexible conductivity from good p-type, intrinsic to good n-type depending on the growth conditions; (ii) Dominant intrinsic defects create only shallow levels, which partially explain the long electron-hole diffusion length and high open-circuit voltage in solar cell. The unusual defect properties can be attributed to the strong Pb lone-pair s orbital and I p orbital antibonding coupling and the high ionicity of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}.

  4. 4D Density Determination of NH Radicals in an MSE Microplasma Combining Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Martin; Schenk, Andreas; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    2010-10-13

    An application of microplasmas is surface modification under mild conditions and of small, well defined areas. For this, an understanding of the plasma composition is of importance. First results of our work on the production and detection of NH radicals in a capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) microplasma are presented. A microstructured comb electrode was used to generate a glow discharge in a hydrogen/nitrogen gas mixture by applying 13.56 MHz RF voltage. The techniques of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are used for space and time resolved, quantitative detection of the NH radical in the plasma. The rotational temperature was determined to be 820 K and, the density 5.1x10{sup 12} cm{sup 3}. Also, time dependent behaviour of the NH production was observed.

  5. Structural study of Ni- or Mg-based complexes incorporated within UiO-66-NH{sub 2} framework and their impact on hydrogen sorption properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Žunkovič, E.; Mazaj, M.; Mali, G.; Rangus, M.; Devic, T.; Serre, C.; Logar, N. Zabukovec

    2015-05-15

    Nickel and magnesium acetylacetonate molecular complexes were post-synthetically incorporated into microporous zirconium-based MOF (UiO-66-NH{sub 2}) in order to introduce active open-metal sites for hydrogen sorption. Elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption and DFT calculations revealed that 5 molecules of Ni(acac){sub 2} or 2 molecules of Mg(acac){sub 2} were incorporated into one unit cell of UiO-66-NH{sub 2}. {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C CPMAS and {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy showed that, although embedded within the pores, both Ni- and Mg-complexes interacted with the UiO-66-NH{sub 2} framework only through weak van der Waals bonds. Inclusion of metal complexes led to the decrease of hydrogen sorption capacities in Ni-modified as well as in Mg-modified samples in comparison with the parent UiO-66-NH{sub 2}. The isosteric hydrogen adsorption enthalpy slightly increased in the case of Ni-modified material, but not in the case of Mg-modified analogue. - Graphical abstract: A post-synthesis impregnation of Mg- and Ni-acetylacetonate complexes performed on zirconium-based MOF UiO-66-NH{sub 2} does influence the hydrogen sorption performance with respect to the parent matrix. The structural study revealed that Mg- and Ni-acetylacetonate molecules interact with zirconium-terephthalate framework only by weak interactions and they are not covalently bonded to aminoterephthalate ligand. Still, they remain confined into the pores even after hydrogen sorption experiments. - Highlights: • Mg- and Ni-acetylacetonate molecules embedded in the pores of UiO-66-NH{sub 2} by PSM. • Molecules of complexes interact with framework only by van der Waals interactions. • Type/structure of deposited metal-complex impact hydrogen enthalpy of adsorption.

  6. Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3 with WO3-TiO2 Catalysts: Influence of Catalyst Synthesis Method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Yuanyuan; Ford, Michael E.; Zhu, Minghui; Liu, Qingcai; Wu, Zili; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-02-02

    A series of supported WO3/TiO2 catalysts was prepared by a new synthesis procedure involving co-precipitation of an aqueous TiO(OH)2 and (NH4)10W12O41*5H2O slurry under controlled pH conditions. The morphological properties, molecular structures, surface acidity and surface chemistry of the supported WO3/TiO2 catalysts were determined with BET, in situ Raman, in situ IR and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) spectroscopy, respectively. Isotopic 18O-16O exchange demonstrated that tungsten oxide was exclusively present as surface WOx species on the TiO2 support with mono-oxo W=O coordination. In contrast to previous studies employing impregnation synthesis that found only surface one mono-oxo O=WO4 site on TiO2, the co-precipitationmore » procedure resulted in the formation of two distinct surface WOx species: mono-oxo O=WO4 (~1010-1017 cm-1) on low defect density patches of TiO2 and a second mono-oxo O=WO4 (~983-986 cm-1) on high defect density patches of TiO2. The concentration of the second WOx surface species increases as a function of solution pH. Both surface WOx sites, however, exhibited the same NO/NH3 SCR reactivity. The co-precipitated WO3-TiO2 catalysts synthesized in alkaline solutions exhibited enhanced performance for the NO/NH3 SCR reaction that is ascribed to the greater number of surface defects on the resulting TiO2 support. For the co-precipitated catalyst prepared at pH10, surface NH4+ species on Br nsted acid sites were found to be more reactive than surface NH3* species on Lewis acid sites for SCR of NO with NH3.« less

  7. Solvent extraction of Li+, H3O+ and NH4+ into nitrobenzene by using sodium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makrlik, Emanuel; Selucky, P.; Vanura, Petr; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + NaL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = Li+, H3O+, NH+4; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: zH3O+ < Li+ < NH+4.

  8. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational levels of NH4+ and isotopomers on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hua -Gen Yu; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-29

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4+) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4+ and ND4+ exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. As a result, the low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm–1.

  9. Microstructures and properties of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3?x}Cl{sub x} hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Kohei E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Suzuki, Atsushi E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Zushi, Masahito E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp

    2015-02-27

    Halide-perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was produced on mesoporous TiO{sub 2} layer by spin-coating a precursor solution of PbCl{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I in dimethylformamide. The role of the annealing process and chlorine (Cl) doping for the perovskite-phase formation was investigated. It was found that crystallization of the perovskite materials was stimulated by the annealing process, and that longer annealing time is necessary for the Cl-doped perovskite compared with that of non-doped perovskite phase.

  10. Rotational spectrum of the molecular ion NH{sup +} as a probe for {alpha} and m{sub e}/m{sub p} variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beloy, K.; Borschevsky, A.; Hauser, A. W.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Kozlov, M. G.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-06-15

    We identify the molecular ion NH{sup +} as a potential candidate for probing variations in the fine-structure constant {alpha} and electron-to-proton mass ratio {mu}. NH{sup +} has an anomalously low-lying excited {sup 4}{Sigma}{sup -} state, being only a few hundred cm{sup -1} above the ground {sup 2}{Pi} state. Being a light molecule, this proximity is such that rotational levels of the respective states are highly intermixed for low angular momenta. We find that several low-frequency transitions within the collective rotational spectrum experience enhanced sensitivity to {alpha} and {mu} variation. This is attributable to the close proximity of the {sup 2}{Pi} and {sup 4}{Sigma}{sup -} states, as well as the ensuing strong spin-orbit coupling between them. Suggestions that NH{sup +} may exist in interstellar space and recent predictions that trapped-ion precision spectroscopy will be adaptable to molecular ions make NH{sup +} a promising system for future astrophysical and laboratory studies of {alpha} and {mu} variation.

  11. EERE Success Story-Energy-Saving Solutions in the Bluegrass State |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Saving Solutions in the Bluegrass State EERE Success Story-Energy-Saving Solutions in the Bluegrass State October 9, 2015 - 2:50pm Addthis The City of Greensburg, Kentucky, established an energy savings performance contract to make HVAC and lighting improvements in several city buildings, saving money and improving comfort for building occupants. | Courtesy of Greensburg, KY The City of Greensburg, Kentucky, established an energy savings performance contract to make HVAC

  12. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Specialist Course Louisville Fire Department Fire Training Center Louisville, KY, March 4-8, 2013 J. Curt Pendergrass, PhD Supervisor, Radioactive Materials Section Kentucky Radiation Health Branch RS Course Instructors & Support Staff  Tom Clawson  Mark Linsley  Ken Keaton  Celeste Cusack  Major Ed Dunagan, Chief Training Officer, Louisville Fire Department  Kentucky Radiation Health Branch Staff NFPA 472: Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous

  13. Density Functional Studies of Stoichiometric Surfaces of Orthorhombic Hybrid Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yun; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-12-19

    Organic/inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are highly attractive for dye-sensitized solar cells as demonstrated by their rapid advances in energy conversion efficiency. In this work, the structures, energetics, and electronic properties for a range of stoichiometric surfaces of the orthorhombic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 are theoretically studied using density functional theory. Various possible spatially and constitutionally isomeric surfaces are considered by diversifying the spatial orientations and connectivities of surface Pb-I bonds. The comparison of the surface energies for the most stable configurations identified for various surfaces shows that the stabilities of stoichiometric surfaces are mainly dictated by the coordination numbers of surface atoms,more » which are directly correlated with the numbers of broken bonds. Additionally, Coulombic interactions between I anions and organic countercations on the surface also contribute to the stabilization. Electronic properties are compared between the most stable (100) surface and the bulk phase, showing generally similar features except for the lifted band degeneracy and the enhanced bandgap energy for the surface. These studies on the stoichiometric surfaces serve as the first step toward gaining a fundamental understanding of the interfacial properties in the current structural design of perovskite based solar cells, in order to achieve further breakthroughs in solar conversion efficiencies.« less

  14. Density Functional Studies of Stoichiometric Surfaces of Orthorhombic Hybrid Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yun; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are highly attractive for dye-sensitized solar cells as demonstrated by their rapid advances in energy conversion efficiency. In this work, the structures, energetics, and electronic properties for a range of stoichiometric surfaces of the orthorhombic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 are theoretically studied using density functional theory. Various possible spatially and constitutionally isomeric surfaces are considered by diversifying the spatial orientations and connectivities of surface Pb-I bonds. The comparison of the surface energies for the most stable configurations identified for various surfaces shows that the stabilities of stoichiometric surfaces are mainly dictated by the coordination numbers of surface atoms, which are directly correlated with the numbers of broken bonds. Additionally, Coulombic interactions between I anions and organic countercations on the surface also contribute to the stabilization. Electronic properties are compared between the most stable (100) surface and the bulk phase, showing generally similar features except for the lifted band degeneracy and the enhanced bandgap energy for the surface. These studies on the stoichiometric surfaces serve as the first step toward gaining a fundamental understanding of the interfacial properties in the current structural design of perovskite based solar cells, in order to achieve further breakthroughs in solar conversion efficiencies.

  15. The efficiency limit of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Ren, Xingang; Chen, Luzhou; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2015-06-01

    With the consideration of photon recycling effect, the efficiency limit of methylammonium lead iodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) perovskite solar cells is predicted by a detailed balance model. To obtain convincing predictions, both AM 1.5 spectrum of Sun and experimentally measured complex refractive index of perovskite material are employed in the detailed balance model. The roles of light trapping and angular restriction in improving the maximal output power of thin-film perovskite solar cells are also clarified. The efficiency limit of perovskite cells (without the angular restriction) is about 31%, which approaches to Shockley-Queisser limit (33%) achievable by gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells. Moreover, the Shockley-Queisser limit could be reached with a 200 nm-thick perovskite solar cell, through integrating a wavelength-dependent angular-restriction design with a textured light-trapping structure. Additionally, the influence of the trap-assisted nonradiative recombination on the device efficiency is investigated. The work is fundamentally important to high-performance perovskite photovoltaics.

  16. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH{sub 3}-molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-05-18

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH{sub 3} flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures.

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Processed in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W 4.91 4.91 5.24 2003 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2004 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2005 W W W 9.04 W W W W W W W W 2006 W 9.57 W W W W W 8.62 W W W W 2007 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2008 9.16 9.60 W W W W W W W W W W 2009 W W W 6.74 11.32 W W W W W W W 2010 W W W W W W W W W W 5.25 W 2011 W W W W 5.98 W 5.41 W W W W W 2012 W 5.38 W W W W W W W W W 6.84 2013 5.98 6.54 W 5.96 W W W W W W 5.28 W 2014 W W W W W W

  18. Microsoft Word - figure_03.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil and Gas Reserves"; PointLogic Energy; Ventyx; and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and predecessor agencies. IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI ...

  19. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    60,167 66,579 60,941 92,883 85,549 79,985 1967-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 2,469 3,317 3,398 4,740 4,651 4,668 1983-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 3,270 4,576 4,684 6,571 6,443 6,471

  20. van der Waals forces and confinement in carbon nanopores: Interaction between CH4, COOH, NH3, OH, SH and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-04-13

    Interactions between CH4, COOH, NH3, OH, SH and armchair (n,n)(n=4,7,14) and zigzag (n,0)(n=7,12,25) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been systematically investigated within the framework of dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D2). Endohedral and exohedral molecular adsorption on SWCNT walls is energetically unfavorable or weak, despite the use of C6/r6 pairwise London-dispersion corrections. The effects of pore size and chirality on the molecule/SWCNTs interaction were also assessed. Furthermore, chemisorption of COOH, NH3, OH and SH at SWCNT edge sites was examined using a H-capped (7,0) SWCNT fragment and its impact on electrophilic, nucleophilic and radical attacks was predicted by means of Fukuimore » functions.« less

  1. Calorimetric, spectroscopic and structural investigations of phase polymorphism in [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3}. Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolega, Diana; Mikuli, Edward; Inaba, Akira; Gorska, Natalia; Holderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Nitek, Wojciech

    2013-01-15

    Four crystalline phases of the coordination compound [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3} are identified by adiabatic calorimetry. Three phase transitions, one at T{sub C3}(IV{yields}III)=30.7 K, the second at T{sub C2}(III{yields}II)=91.7 K (both accompanied by comparable entropy changes 3.0 and 3.1 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, respectively) and the third at T{sub C1}(II{yields}I)=241.6 K (accompanied by an entropy change of 8.1 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}) were discovered. X-ray single crystal diffraction (at 293 K) demonstrates that phase I is a highly dynamic disordered cubic phase (Fm3{sup Macron }m, No. 225) with two types of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions differing in a degree of disorder. In phase II (at 170 K) the structure remains cubic (Ia3{sup Macron }, No. 206), with two different types of cations and four different types of anions. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with NH{sub 3} ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a lowering of the symmetry of the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} complex cation. Both NH{sub 3} ligands and BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions perform fast reorientations ({tau}{sub R} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -12} s), which are significantly slowed down below the phase transition at T{sub C3}. {sup 1}H NMR studies led to estimate the values of the activation energy of NH{sub 3} ligands reorientation in the phases II and I as equal to {approx}8 kJ mol{sup -1}. In phase I the whole hexammineruthenium(III) cations reorientation as a tumbling process can be noticed. The activation energy value of this motion is {approx}24 kJ mol{sup -1}. {sup 19}F NMR studies give the values of the activation energy of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions reorientation as {approx}6 kJ mol{sup -1}. Above the phase transition temperature half of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions perform a tumbling motion with E{sub a} Almost-Equal-To 8 kJ mol{sup -1}. - Graphical abstract: A series of complementary methods, such as Adiabatic Calorimetry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Fourier

  2. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore » in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  3. Modeling of plasma chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH{sub 3} cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge described using the one-dimensional fluid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physical Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2013-01-15

    The keynote of our research is to study the gas phase chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH{sub 3} cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge, which is very important to produce the iron-nitride magnetic fluid. For this purpose, a home-made one dimensional fluid model with the Scharfetter-Gummel method has been developed. The equations solved are the particle balances, assuming a drift-diffusion approximation for the fluxes, and the electron energy equation. The self-consistent electric field is obtained by the simultaneous solution of Poisson's equation. The simulations were carried out for the different ammonia concentrations (2%, 3.5%, and 7%), at a voltage of 1 kV, and a driving frequency of 20 kHz. It concluded that the major ion products of Ar are Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. Ar{sup +} is the most important positive ions, followed by Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. It is shown that the NH{sup +} density is smaller than that of the other ammonia ions. The density of NH{sub 4}{sup +} is more than that of the other ammonia ions when the ammonia concentration increased. The diffuse mode can be established after the discharge was ignited, and the mode changes to filamentary mode with an increase in ammonia concentration.

  4. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Cocations on the Activity and Hydrothermal Stability of Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Washton, Nancy M.; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-10-13

    Using a three-step aqueous solution ion-exchange method, cocation modified Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts were synthesized. These catalysts, in both fresh and hydrothermally aged forms, were characterized with several methods including temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 (NH3-TPD), and 27Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and diffuse reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopies. Their catalytic performance was probed using steady-state standard NH3-SCR. Characterization results indicate that cocations weaken interactions between Cu-ions and the CHA framework making them more readily reducible. By removing a portion of Brønsted acid sites, cocations also help to mitigate hydrolysis of the zeolite catalysts during hydrothermal aging as evidenced from 27Al NMR. Reaction tests show that certain cocations, especially Li+ and Na+, promote low-temperature SCR rates while others show much less pronounced effects. In terms of applications, our results indicate that introducing cocations can be a viable strategy to improve both low- and high-temperature performance of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts.

  5. The Origin and Coupling Mechanism of the Magnetoelectric Effect in TM Cl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 ( TM = Ni and Co)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mun, Eundeok; Wilcox, Jason; Manson, Jamie L.; Scott, Brian; Tobash, Paul; Zapf, Vivien S.

    2014-01-01

    Most research on multiferroics and magnetoelectric effects to date has focused on inorganic oxides. Molecule-based materials are a relatively new field in which to search for magnetoelectric multiferroics and to explore new coupling mechanisms between electric and magnetic order. We present magnetoelectric behavior in NiCl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 (DTN) and CoCl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 (DTC). These compounds form tetragonal structures where the transition metal ion (Ni or Co) is surrounded by four electrically polar thiourea molecules [SC(NH 2 ) 2 ]. By tracking the magnetic and electric properties of these compounds as a function ofmore » magnetic field, we gain insights into the coupling mechanism by observing that, in DTN, the electric polarization tracks the magnetic ordering, whereas in DTC it does not. For DTN, all electrically polar thiourea molecules tilt in the same direction along the c -axis, breaking spatial-inversion symmetry, whereas, for DTC, two thiourea molecules tilt up and two tilt down with respect to c -axis, perfectly canceling the net electrical polarization. Thus, the magnetoelectric coupling mechanism in DTN is likely a magnetostrictive adjustment of the thiourea molecule orientation in response to magnetic order.« less

  6. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore »in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  7. Synthesis, crystal growth, structural and magnetic characterization of NH4MCl2(HCOO), M=(Fe, Co, Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenfield, Joshua T.; Ovidiu Garlea, V.; Kamali, Saeed; Chen, Michael; Kovnir, Kirill

    2015-09-24

    In this paper, an ambient-pressure solution route and an improved solvothermal synthetic method have been developed to produce polycrystalline powders and large single crystals of NH4MCl2(HCOO) (M=Fe, Co, Ni). The magnetic structure of the 1D linear chain compound NH4FeCl2(HCOO) has been determined by low-temperature neutron powder diffraction, revealing ferromagnetic intra-chain interactions and antiferromagnetic inter-chain interactions. Finally, the newly-reported Co and Ni analogs are isostructural with NH4FeCl2(HCOO), but there are significant differences in the magnetic properties of each compound; the Ni analog behaves similarly to the Fe compound but with stronger magnetic coupling, exhibiting antiferromagnetic ordering (TN=8.5 K) and a broad metamagnetic transition between 2 and 5 T, while the Co analog does not order magnetically above 2 K, despite strong antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interactions.

  8. Cost-Efficient Work Rids Paducah Site of Old Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Workers have been removing old storage trailers and large metal containers from the Paducah site at no extra cost to taxpayers as a result of about $150,000 in labor efficiencies and other savings in the work scope of cleanup contractor LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky.

  9. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Power Coop Inc",54,"J K Smith",22,"GT6",98,74,98,,"GT","NG","DFO",1,2005,"OP" "KY","Clark",5580,"East Kentucky Power Coop Inc",54,"J K Smith",22,"GT7",98,74,98,,"GT","NG","...

  10. Best Practices Case Study: Urbane Homes - Crestwood, KY, Various Locations, Greater Louisville, KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    Case study of Urbane Homes, who worked with Building America to build market rate homes with HERS scores of 57 to 62. Despite a down market they’ve sold every home within 3 weeks of listing, without any advertising.

  11. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  12. Exploiting parameter space in MOFs: a 20-fold enhancement of phosphate-ester hydrolysis with UiO-66-NH 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Katz, Michael J.; Moon, Su-Young; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Beyzavi, M. Hassan; Stephenson, Casey J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-02-24

    The hydrolysis of nerve agents is of primary concern due to the severe toxicity of these agents. Using a MOF-based catalyst (UiO-66), we have previously demonstrated that the hydrolysis can occur with relatively fast half-lives of 50 minutes. However, these rates are still prohibitively slow to be efficiently utilized for some practical applications (e.g., decontamination wipes used to clean exposed clothing/skin/vehicles). We thus turned our attention to derivatives of UiO-66 in order to probe the importance of functional groups on the hydrolysis rate. Three UiO-66 derivatives were explored; UiO-66-NO2 and UiO-66-(OH)2 showed little to no change in hydrolysis rate. However,more » UiO-66-NH2 showed a 20 fold increase in hydrolysis rate over the parent UiO-66 MOF. Half-lives of 1 minute were observed with this MOF. In order to probe the role of the amino moiety, we turned our attention to UiO-67, UiO-67-NMe2 and UiO-67-NH2. In these MOFs, the amino moiety is in close proximity to the zirconium node. We observed that UiO-67-NH2 is a faster catalyst than UiO-67 and UiO-67-NMe2. We conclude that the role of the amino moiety is to act as a proton-transfer agent during the catalytic cycle and not to hydrogen bond or to form a phosphorane intermediate.« less

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu/SAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR 2: Solid-state Ion Exchange and One-pot Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-01-01

    Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are synthesized using two methods: solid-state ion exchange (SSIE) and one-pot synthesis. SSIE is conducted by calcining SAPO-34/CuO mixtures at elevated temperatures. For the one-pot synthesis method, Cu-containing chemicals (CuO and CuSO4) are added during gel preparation. A high-temperature calcination step is also needed for this method. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. In Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE, Cu presents both as isolated Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuO. The former is highly active and selective in NH3-SCR, while the latter catalyzes a side reaction; notably, the non-selective oxidation of NH3 above 350 ºC. Using the one-pot method followed by a high-temperature aging treatment, it is possible to form Cu SAPO-34 samples with predominately isolated Cu2+ ions at low Cu loadings. However at much higher Cu loadings, isolated Cu2+ ions that bind weakly with the CHA framework and CuO clusters also form. These Cu moieties are very active in catalyzing non-selective NH3 oxidation above 350 ºC. Low-temperature reaction kinetics indicate that Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE have core-shell structures where Cu is enriched in the shell layers; while Cu is more evenly distributed within the one-pot samples. Reaction kinetics also suggest that at low temperatures, the local environment next to Cu2+ ion centers plays little role on the overall catalytic properties. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental

  14. Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A.; Williams, Paul T.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

  15. Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B.

    2010-10-15

    The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

  16. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Kentucky. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Until April 1, 1979, the Public Service Commission had been vested with exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of rates and service of utilities. As of that date two new agencies, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) and the Utility Regulatory Commission (URC), have replaced the Public Service Commission. The ERC consists of three full-time members appointed by the governor for four year terms and is responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Kentucky statutes relating to electric and gas utilities. The three-member URC is responsible for enforcing the provisions relating to non-energy utilities such as telephone, sewer, and water utilities. The statutes vest all regulatory authority over public utilities in either the ERC or the URC. Local governments retain only the power to grant local franchises. However, it should be noted, that any utility owned or operated by a political subdivision of the state is exempt from regulation. Thus, local government has complete authority over utilities which are self-owned. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. METALLICITIES, DUST, AND MOLECULAR CONTENT OF A QSO-DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEM REACHING log N(H I) = 22: AN ANALOG TO GRB-DLAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimaraes, R.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.; Srianand, R.; Rahmani, H.; Lopez, S.

    2012-06-15

    We present the elemental abundance and H{sub 2} content measurements of a damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) system with an extremely large H I column density, log N(H I) (cm{sup -2}) = 22.0 {+-} 0.10, at z{sub abs} = 3.287 toward the QSO SDSS J081634+144612. We measure column densities of H{sub 2}, C I, C I*, Zn II, Fe II, Cr II, Ni II, and Si II from a high signal-to-noise and high spectral resolution VLT-UVES spectrum. The overall metallicity of the system is [Zn/H] = -1.10 {+-} 0.10 relative to solar. Two molecular hydrogen absorption components are seen at z = 3.28667 and 3.28742 (a velocity separation of Almost-Equal-To 52 km s{sup -1}) in rotational levels up to J = 3. We derive a total H{sub 2} column density of log N(H{sub 2}) (cm{sup -2}) = 18.66 and a mean molecular fraction of f = 2N(H{sub 2})/[2N(H{sub 2}) + N(H I)] = 10{sup -3.04{+-}0.37}, typical of known H{sub 2}-bearing DLA systems. From the observed abundance ratios we conclude that dust is present in the interstellar medium of this galaxy, with an enhanced abundance in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds. However, the total amount of dust along the line of sight is not large and does not produce any significant reddening of the background QSO. The physical conditions in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds are constrained directly from the column densities of H{sub 2} in different rotational levels, C I and C I*. The kinetic temperature is found to be T Almost-Equal-To 75 K and the particle density lies in the range n{sub H} = 50-80 cm{sup -3}. The neutral hydrogen column density of this DLA is similar to the mean H I column density of DLAs observed at the redshift of {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs). We explore the relationship between GRB-DLAs and the high column density end of QSO-DLAs finding that the properties (metallicity and depletion) of DLAs with log N(H I) > 21.5 in the two populations do not appear to be significantly different.

  19. Influence of catalyst synthesis method on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 with V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Yuanyuan; Ford, Michael E.; Zhu, Minghui; Liu, Qingcai; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-04-14

    We compared the molecular structures, surface acidity and catalytic activity for NO/NH3/O2 SCR of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts for two different synthesis methods: co-precipitation of aqueous vanadium and tungsten oxide precursors with TiO(OH)2 and by incipient wetness impregnation of the aqueous precursors on a reference crystalline TiO2 support (P25; primarily anatase phase). Bulk analysis by XRD showed that co-precipitation results in small and/or poorly ordered TiO2(anatase) particles and that VOx and WOx do not form solid solutions with the bulk titania lattice. Surface analysis of the co-precipitated catalyst by High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering (HS-LEIS) confirms that the VOx and WOx aremore » surface segregated for the co-precipitated catalysts. In situ Raman and IR spectroscopy revealed that the vanadium and tungsten oxide components are present as surface mono-oxo O = VO3 and O = WO4 sites on the TiO2 supports. Co-precipitation was shown for the first time to also form new mono-oxo surface VO4 and WO4 sites that appear to be anchored at surface defects of the TiO2 support. IR analysis of chemisorbed ammonia showed the presence of both surface NH3* on Lewis acid sites and surface NH4+* on Brønsted acid sites. TPSR spectroscopy demonstrated that the specific SCR kinetics was controlled by the redox surface VO4 species and that the surface kinetics was independent of TiO2 synthesis method or presence of surface WO5 sites. SCR reaction studies revealed that the surface WO5 sites possess minimal activity below ~325 °C and their primary function is to increase the adsorption capacity of ammonia. A relationship between the SCR activity and surface acidity was not found. The SCR reaction is controlled by the surface VO4 sites that initiate the reaction at ~200 °C. The co-precipitated catalysts were always more active than the corresponding impregnated catalysts. Finally, we ascribe the higher activity of the co-precipitated catalysts to the presence of

  20. Low Surface Recombination Velocity in Solution-Grown CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ye; Yan, Yong; Yang, Mengjin; Choi, Sukgeun; Zhu, Kai; Luter, Joseph M.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2015-08-06

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are attracting intense research effort due to their impressive performance in solar cells. While the carrier transport parameters such as mobility and bulk carrier lifetime shows sufficient characteristics, the surface recombination, which can have major impact on the solar cell performance, has not been studied. Here we measure surface recombination dynamics in CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite single crystals using broadband transient reflectance spectroscopy. The surface recombination velocity is found to be 3.4±0.1 103 cm s-1, B2–3 orders of magnitude lower than that in many important unpassivated semiconductors employed in solar cells. Our result suggests that the planar grain size for the perovskite thin films should be larger thanB30 mm to avoid the influence of surface recombination on the effective carrier lifetime.

  1. Qualifying composition dependent p and n self-doping in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuchuan; Huang, Jinsong; Xie, Haipeng; Lyu, Lu; Liu, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yongli

    2014-10-20

    We report the observation of self-doping in perovskite. CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was found to be either n- or p-doped by changing the ratio of methylammonium halide (MAI) and lead iodine (PbI{sub 2}) which are the two precursors for perovskite formation. MAI-rich and PbI{sub 2}-rich perovskite films are p and n self-doped, respectively. Thermal annealing can convert the p-type perovskite to n-type by removing MAI. The carrier concentration varied as much as six orders of magnitude. A clear correlation between doping level and device performance was also observed.

  2. Simplification of femtosecond transient absorption microscopy data from CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films into decay associated amplitude maps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doughty, Benjamin; Simpson, Mary Jane; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong

    2016-02-16

    This work aims to simplify multi-dimensional femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) data into decay associated amplitude maps that describe the spatial distributions of dynamical processes occurring on various characteristic timescales. Application of this method to TAM data obtained from a model methyl-ammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite thin film allows us to simplify the dataset consisting of a 68 time-resolved images into 4 decay associated amplitude maps. These maps provide a simple means to visualize the complex electronic excited-state dynamics in this system by separating distinct dynamical processes evolving on characteristic timescales into individual spatial images. This approach provides new insightmore » into subtle aspects of ultrafast relaxation dynamics associated with excitons and charge carriers in the perovskite thin film, which have recently been found to coexist at spatially distinct locations.« less

  3. Origin and elimination of photocurrent hysteresis by fullerene passivation in CH3NH3PbI3 planar heterojunction solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, Yuchuan; Xiao, Zhengguo; Bi, Cheng; Yuan, Yongbo; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-12-15

    The large photocurrent hysteresis observed in many organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells has become a major hindrance impairing the ultimate performance and stability of these devices, while its origin was unknown. Here we demonstrate the trap states on the surface and grain boundaries of the perovskite materials to be the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and that the fullerene layers deposited on perovskites can effectively passivate these charge trap states and eliminate the notorious photocurrent hysteresis. Fullerenes deposited on the top of the perovskites reduce the trap density by two orders of magnitude and double the power conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3more » solar cells. As a result, the elucidation of the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and its elimination by trap passivation in perovskite solar cells provides important directions for future enhancements to device efficiency.« less

  4. Interaction of vacuum ultraviolet light with a low-k organosilicate glass film in the presence of NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Swayambhu; Lee, Joe; Graves, David; Gaddam, Sneha; Pokharel, Sundari; Wilks, Justin; Pasquale, Frank; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2010-07-19

    In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and ex situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize effects on organosilicate films of 147 nm irradiation in the presence of 10{sup -4} Torr NH{sub 3}. XPS and FTIR data indicate Si-O and Si-C bond scission, with nitridation only at Si sites. Photoirradiation causes the surface layer to become enriched in sp{sup 2} carbon. FTIR spectra of silanol formation upon exposure to ambient indicate reactive sites in the bulk have lifetimes of up to six days. XPS data indicate lifetimes of approxminutes for surface states. Nitrogen uptake passivates with longer exposure times, indicating surface densification.

  5. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appearmore » at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.« less

  6. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in {sup 14}NH{sub 3}: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M. Schneider, A.; Seyfang, G.

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ{sub pv}E between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} fundamentals as well as the 2ν{sub 4} overtone of {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν{sub 1}, ν{sub 3}, and 2ν{sub 4} levels in the context of previously known data for ν{sub 2} and its overtone, as well as ν{sub 4}, and the ground state. Thus, now, {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling constants for all

  7. Application of x-ray tomography to optimization of new NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for vehicle on-board emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Mark A; Brosha, Eric L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Garzon, Fernando H

    2009-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors for the detection of hydrocarbons, NO{sub x}, and NH{sub 3} have been previously developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL sensors have a unique design incorporating dense ceramic-pelletlmetal-wire electrodes and porous electrolytes. The performance of current-biased sensors using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and platinum and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} electrodes is reported. X-ray tomography has been applied to non-destructively examine internal structures of these sensors. NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon response of the sensors under various bias conditions is reported, and very little NO{sub x} response hysteresis was observed. The application of a 0.6 {mu}A bias to these sensors shifts the response from a hydrocarbon response to a NO{sub x} response equal for both NO and NO{sub 2} species at approximately 500 {sup o}C in air.

  8. Partially disordered antiferromagnetism and multiferroic behavior in a frustrated Ising system CoCl2–2SC(NH2)2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mun, Eundeok; Weickert, Dagmar Franziska; Kim, Jaewook; Scott, Brian L.; Miclea, Corneliu Florin; Movshovich, Roman; Wilcox, Jason; Manson, Jamie; Zapf, Vivien S.

    2016-03-07

    We investigate partially disordered antiferromagnetism in CoCl2-2SC(NH2)2, in which ab-plane hexagonal layers are staggered along the c axis rather than stacked. A robust 1/3 state forms in applied magnetic fields in which the spins are locked, varying as a function of neither temperature nor field. By contrast, in zero field and applied fields at higher temperatures, partial antiferromagnetic order occurs, in which free spins are available to create a Curie-like magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the crystallographic structure and the specific heat, magnetization, and electric polarization down to T = 50mK and up to μ0H = 60T. The Co2+more » S = 3/2 spins are Ising-like and form distorted hexagonal layers. The Ising energy scale is well separated from the magnetic exchange, and both energy scales are accessible to the measurements, allowing us to cleanly parametrize them. In transverse fields, a quantum Ising phase transition can be observed at 2 T. Lastly, we find that magnetic exchange striction induces changes in the electric polarization up to 3μC/m2, and single-ion magnetic anisotropy effects induce a much larger electric polarization change of 300μC/m2.« less

  9. LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D.

    2013-05-01

    Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

  10. Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 ... KY Grant County, KY Grayson County, KY Green County, KY Greenup County, KY Hancock ...

  11. Conversion efficiency improvement of inverted CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cells with room temperature sputtered ZnO by adding the C{sub 60} interlayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Wei-Chih Chen, Peter; Lin, Kun-Wei; Wang, Yuan-Ting; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2015-12-21

    We have demonstrated the performance of inverted CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite-based solar cells (SCs) with a room temperature (RT) sputtered ZnO electron transport layer by adding fullerene (C{sub 60}) interlayer. ZnO exhibits a better matched conduction band level with perovskite and Al work function and around energy offset of 2.2 eV between highest occupied molecular orbital level of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite and valance band level of ZnO. However, the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite layer will be damaged during direct RT sputtering deposition of ZnO. Therefore, the C{sub 60} interlayer having matched conduction band level with ZnO and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite added between the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite and RT sputtered ZnO layers for protection prevents sputtering damages on the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite layer. The short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}, 19.41 mA/cm{sup 2}) and open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}, 0.91 V) of the SCs with glass/ITO/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/perovskite/C{sub 60}/RT sputtered ZnO/Al structure is higher than the J{sub SC} (16.23 mA/cm{sup 2}) and V{sub OC} (0.90 V) of the reference SC with glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/perovskite/C{sub 60}/bathocuproine (BCP)/Al structure. Although the SCs with the former structure has a lower fill factor (FF%) than the SCs with the latter structure, its conversion efficiency η% (10.93%) is higher than that (10.6%) of the latter.

  12. Determination of structure and phase transition of light element nanocomposites in mesoporous silica: case study of NH3BH3 in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2009-09-30

    The structure of ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, infused in mesoporous silica MCM-41 and its evolution over the temperature range of 80 to 300 K was investigated using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data in order to understand the origin of improved dehydrogenation properties of the system. Our study shows how X-ray PDF analysis can be used to elucidate the structure of light guest species loaded in mesoporous silica materials despite of its low scattering power of composed elements (N, B, and H) compared to its host (SiO2). PDF analyses of two AB-loaded compositions with weight ratio AB:MCM-41=1:1 and 3:1 provide a strong evidence that AB aggregate, previously found in AB:MCM-41?1:1 samples, is same species as neat AB. For both of them an orthorhombic to tetragonal structural phase transition occurs at 225 K on warming. On the other hand, AB residing inside meso-pores, which is found in AB:MCM-41=1:2 sample, does not undergo such phase transition. It rather stays in tetragonal phase over a wide temperature range of 110 to 240 K and starts to lose structural correlation above 240 K. This strongly suggests that nano-confinement of AB inside meso-pores stabilizes high temperature tetragonal phase at much lower temperature. These results provide important clues to two critical questions: why nan-compositions of AB leads dehydrogenation to lower temperature and why the neat AB like propoerties are recovered at high AB loading samples. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Formation and consumption of NO in H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} flames doped with NO or NH{sub 3} at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmakov, A.G.; Chernov, A.A.; Knyazkov, D.A.; Bolshova, T.A.; Korobeinichev, O.P.; Rybitskaya, I.V.; Konnov, A.A.

    2010-03-15

    Flat premixed burner-stabilized H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} flames, neat or doped with 300-1000 ppm of NO or NH{sub 3}, were studied experimentally using molecular-beam mass-spectrometry and simulated numerically. Spatial profiles of temperature and concentrations of stable species, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, NH{sub 3}, and of H and OH radicals obtained at atmospheric pressure in lean ({phi} = 0.47), near-stoichiometric ({phi} = 1.1) and rich ({phi} = 2.0) flames are reported. Good agreement between measured and calculated structure of lean and near-stoichiometric flames was found. Significant discrepancy between simulated and measured profiles of NO concentration was observed in the rich flames. Sensitivity and reaction path analyses revealed reactions responsible for the discrepancy. Modification to the model was proposed to improve an overall agreement with the experiment. (author)

  14. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals than in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.

  15. Electrical and physical characterization of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-GaSb interface for 1%, 5%, 10%, and 22% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S surface treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peralagu, Uthayasankaran Thayne, Iain G.; Povey, Ian M.; Carolan, Patrick; Lin, Jun; Hurley, Paul K.; Contreras-Guerrero, Rocio; Droopad, Ravi

    2014-10-20

    In this work, the impact of ammonium sulfide ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S) surface treatment on the electrical passivation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-GaSb interface is studied for varying sulfide concentrations. Prior to atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaSb surfaces were treated in 1%, 5%, 10%, and 22% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S solutions for 10 min at 295 K. The smallest stretch-out and flatband voltage shifts coupled with the largest capacitance swing, as indicated by capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements, were obtained for the 1% treatment. The resulting interface defect trap density (D{sub it}) distribution showed a minimum value of 4 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}eV{sup −1} at E{sub v} + 0.27 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination revealed the formation of interfacial layers and increased roughness at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-GaSb interface of samples treated with 10% and 22% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S. In combination, these effects degrade the interface quality as reflected in the CV characteristics.

  16. UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    42S Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment for University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Lexington, KY February 2014 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1642S Fischer-Tropsch Process Development Unit February 2014 Cover Sheet Proposed

  17. PPPO Leadership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us » PPPO Leadership PPPO Leadership Robert E. Edwards, III Manager Mr. Robert Edwards was appointed Manager of the Department of Energy's Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) on July 24, 2016. He joined PPPO as Deputy Manager on December 30, 2012. Located in Lexington, Kentucky, PPPO is charged with the environmental remediation, deactivation, and decontamination and decommissioning of the former gaseous diffusion plants near Paducah, KY and Portsmouth, OH. More about Mr. Edwards Dr.

  18. Effects of Si/Al Ratio on Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts: Implications for the active Cu species and the Roles of Brønsted Acidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-03

    Cu/SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios of 6, 12 and 35 were synthesized with Cu incorporation via solution ion exchange. The implications of varying Si/Al ratios on the nature of the multiple Cu species that can be present in the SSZ-13 zeolite are a major focus of this work, as highlighted by the results of a variety of catalyst characterization and reaction kinetics measurements. Specifically, catalysts were characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), NH3 temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and DRIFTS and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties were examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions on selected catalysts under differential conditions. Besides indicating possible variably active multiple Cu species for these reactions, the measurements are also used to untangle some of the complexities caused by the interplay between redox of Cu ion centers and Brønsted acidity. All three reactions appear to follow a redox reaction mechanism, yet the roles of Brønsted acidity are quite different. For NO oxidation, increasing Si/Al ratio lowers Cu redox barriers, thus enhancing reaction rates. Brønsted acidity appears to play essentially no role for this reaction. For standard NH3-SCR, residual Brønsted acidity plays a significant beneficial role at both low- and high-temperature regimes. For NH3 oxidation, no clear trend is observed suggesting both Cu ion center redox and Brønsted acidity play important and perhaps competing roles. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of

  19. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" ... " Hydro Conventional",824,4 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood ...

  20. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy ... Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 824 4.0 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood Waste 52 0.3 MSW...

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,294 858 858 912 845 1,565 1989-2015 Commercial 1,336 1,075 1,139 1,330 1,154 1,709 1989-2015 Industrial 8,722 8,564 8,478 8,791 8,464 8,840 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 0 2 2 2...

  2. ,"Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcuskym.xls" ...

  3. Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MWh Coal Power 84,379,768 MWh Gas Power 843,725 MWh Petroleum Power 2,028,175 MWh Nuclear Power 0 MWh Other 12,629 MWh Total Energy Production 90,997,966 MWh Percent of...

  4. ,"Kentucky Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

  5. Energy Incentive Programs, Kentucky | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What load managementdemand response options are available to me? Duke Energy offers two load management programs that may be of interest to federal customers. The Peak Load ...

  6. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions 713 383 4 0 132 0 1977-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 1 0 0 0 1977-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 1 1977-2014 Estimated Production 108 96 101 83 ...

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    09 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Gross Withdrawals 113,300 135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 78,737 1967-2014 From Gas Wells 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 94,665 78,737 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 0 0 1967-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2014 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Marketed Production 113,300 135,330 124,243 106,122

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0

  9. Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    190,694 181,000 178,850 194,795 203,102 205,878 1990-2016 Base Gas 112,965 112,964 112,961 112,959 112,957 112,956 1990-2016 Working Gas 77,729 68,036 65,889 81,836 90,145 92,922 1990-2016 Net Withdrawals 19,675 9,656 2,150 -16,117 -8,262 -2,776 1990-2016 Injections 575 1,883 3,203 17,718 10,554 5,041 1990-2016 Withdrawals 20,250 11,540 5,354 1,601 2,292 2,265 1990-2016 Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Volume 11,014 21,500 21,915 22,918 21,339 18,578 1990-2016 Percent 16.5

  10. Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    21,722 221,722 221,722 221,722 221,722 221,722 2002-2016 Total Working Gas Capacity 107,571 107,571 107,571 107,571 107,571 107,571 2012-2016 Total Number of Existing Fields 23 23 23 23 23 23

  11. Kentucky Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Exports to Taiwan Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Exports to Taiwan Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 2,748 2,754 2,755 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 07/29/2016 Next Release Date: 08/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to

  12. Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky Refinery Yield

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Miscellaneous Products 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1993-2015 Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) -6.0 -6.0 -5.5 -5.9 -5.8 -5.6 1993-2015 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable;...

  13. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcuskym.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngconssumdcuskym.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  14. Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grant money helps purchase software that will track energy use and help county officials identify potential savings.

  15. Kentucky Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2 3 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Kansas Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Proved Reserves

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 68 70 218 241 324 388 872 1,078 426 267 178 302 2002 293 537 811 629 560 2,192 4,626 1,996 1,262 296 261 251 2003 627 173 152 189 302 155 464 958 158 101 105 282 2004 406 277 311 554 475 551 511 526 233 141 219 627 2005 886 323 596 483 1,332 3,265 2,647 3,340 1,900 585 762 1,063 2006 344 411 575 224 1,084 1,504 3,274 3,669 273 179 302 447 2007 399 1,322 710 1,529 1,221 1,671 1,156 6,535 2,015 1,481 579 758 2008 1,346 942 655 275

  17. Kentucky Hybrid Electric School Bus Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  18. Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,938 2,159 -12,704 1,982 21,264 -5,015 1967-2014 Injections 71,972 85,167 77,526 64,483 60,782 80,129 1967-2014 Withdrawals 67,034 87,326 64,822 66,464 82,045 75,114...

  19. Kentucky Utilities Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 10171 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  20. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,020 1,024 1,021 1,024 1,027 1,025 2013-2016

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 3,591 7,852 5,644 4,269 4,991 5,462 7,829 7,379 7,268 5,324 3,591 2,996 1991 1,910 2,777 4,468 4,883 2,671 3,345 5,395 4,818 4,660 4,074 4,315 4,110 1992 5,509 3,635 2,314 2,151 1,697 2,787 4,724 4,202 5,539 10,882 3,272 2,656 1993 1,967 990 928 2,687 7,049 7,985 7,838 5,873 7,014 3,907 1,397 482 1994 431 928 1,526 6,100 10,571 9,346 9,742 7,138 4,696 4,684 3,438 1,230 1995 1,189 478 2,868 4,780 13,288 7,749 8,687 5,375 6,889

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.45 3.40 3.49 2000's 5.08 4.70 3.60 W W W 7.96 W W W 2010's

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Wellhead Price 4.47 1967-2010 Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 5.69 5.18 4.17 4.47 5.16 NA 1984-2015 Residential Price 10.02 10.44 10.19 9.80 10.62 10.94 1967-2015 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 95.7 95.5 95.9 96.2 96.3 96.3

  3. Kentucky Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  4. Kentucky Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 5 8 1 29 52 1967-2014 Propane-Air 18 5 8 1 29 52 1980-2014

  5. Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    190,694 181,000 178,850 194,795 203,102 205,878 1990-2016 Base Gas 112,965 112,964 112,961 112,959 112,957 112,956 1990-2016 Working Gas 77,729 68,036 65,889 81,836 90,145 92,922 1990-2016 Net Withdrawals 19,675 9,656 2,150 -16,117 -8,262 -2,776 1990-2016 Injections 575 1,883 3,203 17,718 10,554 5,041 1990-2016 Withdrawals 20,250 11,540 5,354 1,601 2,292 2,265 1990-2016 Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year Volume 11,014 21,500 21,915 22,918 21,339 18,578 1990-2016 Percent 16.5

  6. Kentucky Hybrid Electric School Bus Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  7. Electric Energy Inc (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5748 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Industrial: 0.0355kWh...

  8. Dragline mining returns to western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-05-15

    Armstrong Coal Co. now owns three Page draglines-one now operating at the Midway Surface mine, one due to go into operation at the Equality surface mine and a third that is being rebuilt also for use there. Armstrong is banking on the economics of scale to once again prove that these older machines are still the most efficient way to move large volumes of overburden. 4 photos.

  9. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 ...

  11. Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky: An Implementation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon Presentation More Documents & Publications DOE Perspectives on Sustainable Bioenergy Landscapes HIA ZERH Judge Bios The 2nd US-China Energy Efficiency Forum Agenda - ...

  12. Kentucky Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1-800-572-1113 Outage Map: www.kentuckypower.comoutages Green Button Access: Planned Green Button Reference Page: www.aep.comnewsroomnews References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  13. ,"Kentucky Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Excel File Name:","resepg0r5301skybcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistresepg0r5301skybcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  14. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...292016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570sky2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistna1570sky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  15. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 19,177 19,088 19,016 19,268 19,560 Coal 14,386 14,374 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  16. Maxey Flats, Kentucky, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (known as the ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants at 40 CFR 61, and Resource ...

  17. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Part 1. Evaluation of Phase 2 CO2 Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2. Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowersox, Richard; Hickman, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2012-12-20

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO2 in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO2 storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO2 were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO2 was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole – including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite – at 1152–2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO2 was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter.

  18. Morphology control of open-framework zinc phosphate Zn{sub 4}(H{sub 3}O)(NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} via microwave-assisted technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Ling; Song, Yu; Yang, Wei; Xue, Run-Miao; Zhai, Shang-Ru; An, Qing-Da

    2013-08-15

    Open-framework zinc phosphates were synthesized by microwave-assisted technique, and it was shown that the morphology of as-prepared materials could be easily tailored by changing synthesis temperature, reaction time and pH value. During the synthesis, when the reaction temperature increases from 130 C to 220 C, the products transformed from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron along with the disappearance of the hexagonal prisms vertical plane. Simultaneously, both the reaction time and pH value could promote the nucleation and growth of crystal particles. More interestingly, the target products with different morphologies could be obtained by varying the usage of NaOH or NH{sub 3}H{sub 2}O at 130 C during the microwave synthesis process. - Graphical abstract: Zinc phosphates with variable morphologies can be obtained by simply tuning the microwave-heating temperatures. Display Omitted - Highlights: Synthesis of open-framework Zn{sub 4} (H{sub 3}O) (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} compounds employing microwave technique. Dependence of morphology on the reaction conditions. Morphology transformation from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron was observed.

  19. High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH3-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, J. R.; Neufeld, C. J.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Mishra, U. K.; Speck, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cellsgrown by NH3 -based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorptionmeasurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

  20. Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2012-04-03

    As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

  1. Origin and elimination of photocurrent hysteresis by fullerene passivation in CH3NH3PbI3 planar heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuchuan; Xiao, Zhengguo; Bi, Cheng; Yuan, Yongbo; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-12-15

    The large photocurrent hysteresis observed in many organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells has become a major hindrance impairing the ultimate performance and stability of these devices, while its origin was unknown. Here we demonstrate the trap states on the surface and grain boundaries of the perovskite materials to be the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and that the fullerene layers deposited on perovskites can effectively passivate these charge trap states and eliminate the notorious photocurrent hysteresis. Fullerenes deposited on the top of the perovskites reduce the trap density by two orders of magnitude and double the power conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells. As a result, the elucidation of the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and its elimination by trap passivation in perovskite solar cells provides important directions for future enhancements to device efficiency.

  2. F-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH...

  3. F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE...

  4. Chapter V

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... AL LA GA AR NC NY MI PA IN VA MS TN KY OH ME SC WV MD VT MA NH CT NJ DE R I DC b Coal Fired Power Plant Supplied by the Powder River Basin Powder River Basin 0 220 110 Miles The ...

  5. SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors by directly controlling Zn{sup 2+} and NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O species in an emulsion process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao Yuchao; Wu Xiaofeng; Wang Zhen; Chen Yunfa

    2011-07-15

    SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors were synthesized by a facile one-spot microemulsion process using TEOS as silica source, wherein cyclohexane including triton X-100 and n-octanol as oil phase and Zn{sup 2+} or NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O aqueous solution as dispersive phase, respectively. The products were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction. It was suggested that the as-synthesized silica nanospheres possessed grape-stone-like porous or single hollow interior, and also found that the ammonia dosage and aging time played key roles in controlling the size and structure of silica nanospheres. Furthermore, the comparative results confirmed that in-situ zinc species [ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2}] acted as the temporary templates to construct grape-stone-like interior, and a simultaneously competing etching process occurred owing to the soluble Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2+} complex formation while the additional excessive ammonia was introduced. With the aging time being extended, the in-situ nanocrystals tended to grow into bigger ones by Ostwald Ripening, producing single hollow interior. - Graphical Abstract: Formation process of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with porous and single hollow interior. Highlights: > ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2} nanocrystals as the temporary templates shape the interior structures of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres. > Fabrication of porous and single hollow interiors needs no additional processes such as roasting or dissolving. > Tailorable interiors can be easily obtained through adjusting the aging time of temporary templates.

  6. Simple and low-temperature preparation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} sphere-like nanoparticles via solid-state thermolysis of the [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhadi, Saeid; Pourzare, Kolsoum

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} precursor was used for synthesizing pure Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. ? Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized at low temperature of 200 C. ? Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals show a weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. ? This simple method is low-cost and suitable for high-scale production of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. -- Abstract: In this work, spinel-type Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were easily prepared via decomposition of the hexamminecobalt(III) nitrate complex, [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, at low temperature (200 C). The product was characterized by thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, UVvis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) specific surface area measurement and magnetic measurements. The results confirmed that pure single-phase Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with weak ferromagnetic behavior were obtained by this method. TEM images showed that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are sphere-like with an average diameter size of around 15 nm. The optical spectrum indicated two direct band gaps at 2.15 and 3.56 eV which are blue-shifted relative to reported values for the bulk sample. Using this fast and simple method, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles can be produced without expensive and toxic solvents or complicated equipment.

  7. Effective hole extraction using MoO{sub x}-Al contact in perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Zhu, Kai

    2014-05-26

    We report an 11.4%-efficient perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cell using low-cost molybdenum oxide/aluminum (i.e., MoO{sub x}/Al) as an alternative top contact to replace noble/precious metals (e.g., Au or Ag) for extracting photogenerated holes. The device performance of perovskite solar cells using a MoO{sub x}/Al top contact is comparable to that of cells using the standard Ag top contact. Analysis of impedance spectroscopy measurements suggests that using 10-nm-thick MoO{sub x} and Al does not affect charge-recombination properties of perovskite solar cells. Using a thicker (20-nm) MoO{sub x} layer leads to a lower cell performance caused mainly by a reduced fill factor. Our results suggest that MoO{sub x}/Al is promising as a low-cost and effective hole-extraction contact for perovskite solar cells.

  8. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A″ state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C.; Sun, M. T.

    2013-10-21

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +})(ν=0,j=0)→NH(a{sup 1}Δ)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  9. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-04-19

    Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

  10. Designed synthesis of multifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}–NH{sub 2}@CS–Co(II) towards efficient oxidation of ethylbenzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shi; Zhai, Shang-Ru; An, Qing-Da; Li, Ming-Hui; Song, Yu; Song, Xiao-Wei

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cooperative integration of magnetic cores and chitosan layers. • Efficient and durable catalyst for the oxidation of ethylbenzene to acetophenone. • Exceptional results of 82.5% EB conversion and 80.4% AP selectivity. • Magnetic recoverable catalyst with excellent reusability even after 10 times run. - Abstract: The preparation of Co(II) supported magnetic heterogeneous catalyst, i.e. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}–NH{sub 2}@CS–Co, and its efficient and selective catalytic properties toward the oxidation of ethylbenzene to acetophenone are presented. The materials were characterized by various physicochemical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. The reaction conditions were thoroughly investigated and highly improved catalytic performance (82.5% conversion of ethylbenzene and 80.1% selectivity to acetophenone) was gained under more mild reaction conditions of lower temperature (70 °C), shorter reaction period (60 min) and cheaper and greener oxygen source (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). More importantly, it could be reused successively at least 10 times when more than 80% of its catalytic activity maintained.

  11. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Price (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 79.6 82.7 80.7 80.8 80.3 80.1 81.1 64.7 80.5 70.5 2000's 81.4 82.5 80.5 81.8 82.1 80.5 80.2 79.8 80.2 78.8 2010's 79.3 78.9 76.2 76.6 78.4 77.6 Price (Percent)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 79.9 63.4 54.5 49.6 55.4 2000's 59.3 60.5 60.0 59.1 55.5 51.2 56.3 76.0 74.9 85.3 2010's 87.7 88.6 94.9 94.5 94.5

  12. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    26,767 18,297 19,826 47,451 63,446 52,160 1998-2014 Pipeline Prices 5.04 5.48 5.45 4.08 6.63 10.55 1998...

  13. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appear at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9011ky2m.xls"

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9012ky2m.xls"

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vented and Flared (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ky2m.xls"

  17. Microsoft Word - tran_abstract.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate K.A.Tran 1,2 , M.F. Volia 1,3 , E.E. Tereshatov 1 , and C.M. Folden 1 1 Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 USA 2 Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 40475 USA 3 Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 USA The chemical properties of superheavy elements are relatively unknown due to their short half- lives and difficulty of production. In preparation for a future experiment

  18. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,027 1,035 1,036 2010's 1,030 1,027 1,030 1,028 1,028 1,025

  19. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,028 1,030 1,031 1,028 1,028 1,033 2014 1,029 1,024 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,037 1,034 ...

  20. Michael W. Hancock, P.E., President Secretary, Kentucky Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...ial.transportation.org Statement of Chris Smith Senior Program Manager for Freight ... you have additional questions. Sincerely, Chris Smith Senior Program Manager for Freight

  1. Sherwin-Williams Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26%...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    dozens of energy-savings projects over the past few years. The facility is a Lean Manufacturing Leader, adhering to the lean manufacturing business- management strategy, ...

  2. Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013 Adjustments 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0...

  3. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1989" ,"Data 2","Production",10,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1991" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",7,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1990" ,"Data 4","Consumption",6,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016"

  4. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 45,070 40,507 55,002 66,792 75,729 68,122 71,487 70,973 1990's 73,434 76,723 77,348 84,714 ...

  5. ,"Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W 4.91 4.91 5.24 2003 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2004 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2005 W W W 9.04 W W W W W W W W ...

  7. Department of Energy Cites LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hazard abatement; (3) safety and health standards; (4) occupational medicine; (5) management responsibilities; (6) quality improvement; (7) work processes; and (8) recordkeeping. ...

  8. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 2","Dry Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1977" ,"Data 3","Production",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next

  9. ,"Kentucky Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  10. EECBG Success Story: Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy Use |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Port of Milwaukee's wind turbine not only generates power for the Port Administration building, it also serves as a tool to educate the community about wind power. | Photo courtesy of the Port of Milwaukee. The Port of Milwaukee's wind turbine not only generates power for the Port Administration building, it also serves as a tool to educate the community about wind power. | Photo courtesy of the Port of Milwaukee. On the shore of Lake Michigan, a 154-foot wind turbine symbolizes

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,919 2,785 2,128 1,515 1,794 1,753 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 2,887 2,674 2,030 1,422 1,750 1,704 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, ...

  12. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 5,697 7,677 8,520 8,183 7,489 9,115 5,881 6,968 11,760 2,755 7,527 11,496 2007 3,406 11,177 11,028 2,999 9,590 13,070 1,236 8,146 7,953 7,263 7,873 9,740 2008 5,222 7,491 8,501 8,780 9,590 9,270 14,157 11,552 8,504 8,568 14,157 5,923 2009 7,603 12,215 4,388 4,959 12,194 10,773 3,106 10,861 11,461 10,245 9,907 12,318 2010 9,912 17,124 4,128 10,287 10,652 9,940 11,821 9,979 11,091 18,920 4,638 12,261 2011 9,162 9,704 11,350 10,611 8,658

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 89,174 89,039 81,304 1970's 77,892 72,723 63,648 62,396 71,876 60,511 66,137 60,902 70,044 59,520 1980's 57,180 61,312 51,924 46,720 61,518 73,126 80,195 70,125 73,629 72,417 1990's 75,333 78,904 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 79,547 81,869 76,770 2000's 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437 114,116 113,300 2010's 135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 78,737

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11,054 8,742 7,395 9,901 6,629 6,460 6,740 6,597 7,074 7,364 8,090 8,851 2002 10,214 9,404 9,297 8,186 8,277 7,314 7,074 6,669 7,743 9,145 9,856 9,932 2003 11,702 9,996 8,913 7,847 7,552 6,781 6,777 7,226 7,568 8,569 8,686 10,655 2004 11,629 10,760 10,598 9,045 8,910 8,413 8,094 8,712 8,332 9,496 9,776 10,526 2005 11,242 10,146 10,519 9,307 8,613 8,097 7,726 8,471 8,177 9,076 9,805 10,826 2006 10,029 9,456 9,754 9,263 9,134 8,377 7,610

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 8.55 8.47 8.09 7.29 6.31 5.90 5.58 5.10 4.29 4.78 5.09 4.77 2002 4.88 4.69 4.15 4.57 4.50 4.26 4.14 3.99 4.25 4.66 5.46 5.36 2003 5.80 6.30 8.68 6.38 6.42 6.88 6.54 6.03 6.40 5.88 6.42 6.92 2004 7.65 7.53 6.89 6.77 6.84 7.39 7.27 7.21 6.61 6.97 8.58 8.08 2005 7.92 8.11 7.89 8.38 8.17 7.79 8.32 8.91 11.11 13.42 14.35 12.71 2006 14.01 12.04 10.47 9.40 9.66 8.17 8.08 8.48 8.12 7.19 9.00 9.40 2007 7.92 8.56 8.64 8.57 8.72 8.70 8.31 7.65 6.91

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 3,591 7,852 5,644 4,269 4,991 5,462 7,829 7,379 7,268 5,324 3,591 2,996 1991 1,910 2,777 4,468 4,883 2,671 3,345 5,395 4,818 4,660 4,074 4,315 4,110 1992 5,509 3,635 2,314 2,151 1,697 2,787 4,724 4,202 5,539 10,882 3,272 2,656 1993 1,967 990 928 2,687 7,049 7,985 7,838 5,873 7,014 3,907 1,397 482 1994 431 928 1,526 6,100 10,571 9,346 9,742 7,138 4,696 4,684 3,438 1,230 1995 1,189 478 2,868 4,780 13,288 7,749 8,687 5,375 6,889

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 89,168 89,024 81,304 1970's 77,892 72,723 63,648 62,396 71,876 60,511 66,137 60,902 70,044 59,520 1980's 57,180 61,312 51,924 46,720 61,518 73,126 80,195 70,125 73,629 72,417 1990's 75,333 78,904 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 79,547 81,869 76,770 2000's 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437 114,116 113,300 2010's 135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 78,737

  19. Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 9,700 10,403 8,293 5,319 3,161 1,809 1,332 1,337 1,446 3,109 6,141 13,034 1990 9,736 8,409 6,367 5,007 2,448 1,599 1,376 1,288 1,375 3,306 5,741 9,412 1991 11,629 9,644 7,168 3,430 1,805 1,378 1,278 1,168 1,487 3,120 7,676 9,682 1992 11,805 8,511 7,813 4,179 2,626 1,835 1,326 1,416 1,413 3,376 6,997 10,617 1993 11,143 11,145 9,198 4,989 1,908 1,710 1,289 1,137 1,410 3,858 7,612 11,510 1994 15,487 10,560 8,417 3,601 2,314 1,260 1,178 1,211

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 219,914 220,597 220,597 2003 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 220,597 2004 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,211 220,804 220,804 220,804 2005 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804 2006 220,804 220,804 220,804 220,804