Sample records for kwh kwh kwh

  1. Property:Incentive/PVNPFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation, searchExpireDtStringPVNPFitDolKWh Jump

  2. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  3. KWhOURS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 Climate ZoneJeromeCountyKGRA Energy LLC JumpKOENENKWhOURS

  4. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flatshydro Home Water Powerlaunch Home Kch's picturemax

  5. OpenEI Community - max kwh

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast, 2012Coastfred

  6. Comparing Mainframe and Windows Server Transactions per kWh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    ..................................................................................................................................15 Air Conditioner (Heat Pump) Efficiency Units

  7. kWh Analytics: Quality Ratings for PV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the information given during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  8. Property:Incentive/PVComFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation, searchExpireDtString

  9. Property:Incentive/PVResFitDolKWh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation,

  10. KWH_APS_DPP07_1Page.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathan Pershingrelocates 18-ton machine |Inference of

  11. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2AirCompressors | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory Jump to: navigation,Energy

  12. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2CirculationFans | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory Jump to:

  13. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcEngineHeaters | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory Jump to:Energy

  14. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory Jump

  15. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory JumpInformation

  16. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeComputersServers |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory

  17. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategoryInformation

  18. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Laundry | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open

  19. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This is

  20. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pcs | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This

  1. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search

  2. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pumps | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation,

  3. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation,Information

  4. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas Jump to:Energy

  5. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas Jump

  6. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrcHeating | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas Jump

  7. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas JumpInformation

  8. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Oil-FiredBoiler | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGas

  9. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Other | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTownGasInformation

  10. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2OtherElctrty | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,Information

  11. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Pellets | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,InformationInformation Pellets Jump to: navigation, search This is

  12. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,InformationInformation Pellets Jump to: navigation, search This

  13. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2WoodChips | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,InformationInformation Pellets Jump to: navigation, search

  14. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategory JumpInformationEnergy

  15. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  16. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    172015 15:50 SLCAIP Hydro Generation Estimates Month Forecast Generation less losses (kWh) Less Proj. Use (kWh) Net Generation (kWh) SHP Deliveries (kWh) Firming Purchases (kWh)...

  17. Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Design of Urban Transit Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griswold, Julia Baird

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of veh (kWh/veh-km) Cost per kWh ($/kWh) Operating cost ($/of veh (kWh/veh-km) Cost per kWh ($/kWh) Operating cost ($/

  18. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kW. 9˘/kWh 7˘/kWh Gas Turbine 5˘/kWh Combined-Cycle Oilhigh operating costs (such as gas turbines) during those fewtechnology. 9˘/kWh 7˘/kWh Gas Turbine 5˘/kWh Combined-Cycle

  19. A study of time-dependent responses of a mechanical displacement ventilation (DV) system and an underfloor air distribution (UFAD) system : building energy performance of the UFAD system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jong Keun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kWh. The elec- tricity cost per kWh is obtained from U.S.Ad- ministration. The gas cost per kWh is calculated fromper kWh. The electricity cost per kWh is obtained from U.S.

  20. Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, M.J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kW demand and costs per annual kWh sales. Cost estimates arePer Un-served kWh Cost Per Annual kWh Small C&I Cost PerPer Un-served kWh Cost Per Annual kWh Residential Cost Per

  1. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increases in size, the cost per kWh decreases significantly.batteries typically cost about $100 per kWh for “wet” typesto MW in size and cost $500 to $800 per kWh. As the overall

  2. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The informationvariable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The informationto represent the cost per delivered kWh), while CAPP may be

  3. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity rates on a cost per kWh basis only with someTable 2-5 presents the cost per kWh produced by variousHybrid battery module cost per kWh required for lifecycle

  4. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the amortised investment cost per kWh of the DG unit is lessis equal to the fixed cost per kWh of switching states. Forcurves reflects the investment cost per kWh. As indicated in

  5. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    amortised investment cost per kWh e of the DG unit is lessis equal to the fixed cost per kWh e of switching states.reflects the investment cost per kWh e . As indicated in

  6. COST-EFFECTIVE VISIBILITY-BASED DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR GENERAL OFFICE LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clear, Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were calculated at the stated cost per Kwh by assuming 30to the work surface. The costs per Kwh essentially span themostly dependent upon the cost per Kwh divided by the area

  7. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 2-5 presents the cost per kWh produced by variouselectricity rates on a cost per kWh basis only with someHybrid battery module cost per kWh required for lifecycle

  8. The Potential of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles as Grid Resources: the Case of a Gas and Petroleum Oriented Elecricity Generation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Mark R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the battery depletion cost per kWh transferred could bethe battery depletion cost per kWh transferred from off-peakhigher battery depletion cost per kWh transferred under the

  9. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The informationvariable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The informationto represent the cost per delivered kWh), while CAPP may be

  10. Electricity Rate Structures and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Use Rates Undermine California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ation-adjusted) levelized cost per kWh of power the panelsarrive at a lifetime real cost per kWh produced. Studies ofnot for soiling. The cost per kWh is then calculated by ?

  11. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 2-5 presents the cost per kWh produced by variousHybrid battery module cost per kWh required for lifecycleelectricity rates on a cost per kWh basis only with some

  12. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kWh) (kWh) b b Refrigerator and Freezer (kWh) Source: Unionseveral months for refrigerators and freezers to a maximumPart 2, June, 1980. Refrigerator/freezers Freezers Clothes

  13. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    associated reductions in cost per kWh. Over time, largerpack costs for BEV sedan as a function of assumed per kWh

  14. A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zachary Mills

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have lower operational costs per kWh produced. There is alsoper kWh of energy, the energy payback time (EPBT), the cost

  15. Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auffhammer, Maximilian; Blumstein, Carl; Fowlie, Meredith

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    programs, and the average cost per kWh saved. Using utilitythat the average per kWh program costs reported by utilities

  16. Energy dispatch schedule optimization and cost benefit analysis for grid-connected, photovoltaic-battery storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottrott, A.; Kleissl, J.; Washom, B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or $100- 400 per kWh) at an installed cost of approximatelyinstalled cost of about $400 - $500 per kWh (approximately

  17. Investigation of the Role of Trap States in Solar Cell Reliability using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezryadina, Anna Sergeyevna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity. The average cost per kWh (Kilowatt Hour) ofdirectly currently cost around $0.24 per kWh in Central and

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    annual energy savings Electric: 12024 kWh Natural Gas: 181 Therms Electric: 13593 kWh Natural gas: 35 Therms Energy cost rates Estimated annual emissions reductions...

  19. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating, given the higher cost per KWh for electricity, aaverage cost of electrical energy per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - area guizhou province Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and John Gibson Summary: exporting Provinces in 2006 included Shanxi, 43 billion KWh (coal based); Guizhou 36 billion KWh (coal based... driving demand and supply. The final...

  2. Nonlinear Pricing in Energy and Environmental Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Koichiro

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the state level, the cost per kWh reduction was 14.8 cents.study concludes that the cost per kWh savings range from 29kWh consumption. The average cost per kWh reduction is 14.8

  3. Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0.32 LPG kWh x 0.214 therms x 6.27 litres x 1.49 Coking Coal tonnes x 2736 kWh x 0.331 Aviation.63 Petrol tonnes x 3135 kWh x 0.24 litres x 2.30 Fuel Oil tonnes x 3223 kWh x 0.27 Coal2 tonnes x 2548 kWh xWh x 0.25 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 kWh x 0.34 Refinery Miscellaneous kWh x 0.24 therms x 7

  4. Portland General Electric Company Fourth Revision of Sheet No. 32-1 P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Canceling Third Revision of Sheet No. 32-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Over 5,000 kWh 0.264 ˘ per kWh Energy Charge Standard Cost of Service Offer 4.677 ˘ per kWh (I) or Time.00 Transmission and Related Services Charge 0.248 ˘ per kWh Distribution Charge First 5,000 kWh 2.350 ˘ per kWh-of-Use (TOU) Offer (enrollment is necessary) On-Peak Period 7.817 ˘ per kWh (I) Mid-Peak Period 4.677 ˘ per kWh

  5. How to Estimate the Value of Service Reliability Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and costs per annual kWh. Cost estimates are provided forper event, costs per average kW, costs per un-served kWhinvestments: 1. Cost per un-served kWh is substantially

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial users. Costs and per kWh increased from to 2.7rf-30, 1978, the average cost per kWh was 6.09i for residential

  7. Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstration energy-efficient office building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation kWh Making ice, Cooling storage is 1846.8kWh 2 Icebuilding is equipped with a cooling ice storage system Peakmeasured data on ice storage power and cooling load was not

  8. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10,000-psi tank cost $2,458, or $11.1/kWh. Carbon fiber wastank cost is in the range of $10-$17/kWh and carbon fiber

  9. DOE Offers $15 Million Geothermal Heat Recovery Opportunity ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FOA also calls for the reduction of the levelized cost of electricity for new methods of geothermal energy production from 0.10 kWh to 0.06 kWh. Applicants must submit an...

  10. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to small scale electricity generation plants and is alsoElectricity Use (KWh/gallon FT Liquid) Plant Electricity Generation (Electricity Usage (MW) Plant Electricity Use (KWh/gallon FT Liquid) Plant Electricity Generation (

  11. The relationship between policy choice and the size of the policy region: Why small jurisdictions may prefer renewable energy policies to reduce CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accordino, Megan H.; Rajagopal, Deepak

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be true. Either, coal generation can be sold in bothin the policy region and coal generation must be utilized inKWh) Pre-Policy Coal Generation (KWh) ? r ? g ? c Demand

  12. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5. Power generation via IGCC from bituminous coal. It shouldElectricity Generation (KWh/gallon FT Liquid) Coal-to-PowerElectricity Generation (KWh/gallon FT Liquid) Coal-to-Power

  13. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with PV Annual PV Energy Production ( $ / kWh ) Expressingwith PV Annual PV Energy Production ( $ / kWh ) It is clearanalysis, and the annual energy production of a PV system,

  14. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Helium isotope trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particularly for geothermal energy development. Mantlex 10 kWh of accessible geothermal energy. This is a sizable

  15. The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market share [1] levelized cost of energy [$/kWh] specificwith the lowest levelized costs of energy supply will gain

  16. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    battery 220$/kWh and 2125$/kW photovoltaics Table ES 5. Energy storage parameters Description charging efficiency (

  17. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substantial (517 kW) and the battery bank huge (2082 kWh),181 kW), as is the battery bank (1518 kWh). In this case thePV array and a huge battery bank (6434 kWh). Note that this

  18. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substantial (517 kW) and the battery bank huge (2082 kWh),181 kW), as is the battery bank (1518 kWh). In this case thePV array and a huge battery bank (6434 kWh). Note that this

  19. Exceeding Energy Consumption Design Expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castleton, H. F.; Beck, S. B. M.; Hathwat, E. A.; Murphy, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the building consumed 208.7 kWh m-2 yr-1, 83% of the expected energy consumption (250 kWh m-2 yr-1). This dropped further to 176.1 kWh m-2 yr-1 in 2012 (70% below expected). Factors affecting building energy consumption have been discussed and appraised...

  20. Essays on the Economics of Environmental Issues: The Environmental Kuznets Curve to Optimal Energy Portfolios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meininger, Aaron G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    levelized generating costs per kWh. Expected portfolioThis is due to the high cost per kWh (low return) shown in2 costs are derived by multiplying 1kg of CO 2 per kWh for

  1. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the current cost of production of 3.5 Rs per kWh. It isthe average cost of production to be 3.50 Rs. per kWh, or $the cost of production significantly at 4.80 Rs. per kWh. As

  2. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    customer groups. While the cost per kWh for each respectivewith the average cost declines, per kWh for average andcost of doing so would be zero (prior to 2011), or small, on the order of 5 cents per kWh (

  3. LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased Energy Cost (B$) @ $0.10 per kWh Decrease Energytypical energy costs ($0.05 to $0.10 per kWh), and standardand for energy costs of $0.05 and $0.10 per kWh for four

  4. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to operate fans cost 0.10 € per kWh, the daily energy costdata, and energy costs of 0.04 € per kWh for heat and 0.1 €0.05 and 0.15 € per kWh, the benefit-cost ratios are 80 and

  5. Potential Electricity Impacts of a 1978 California Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is assumed to cost 11 mills per kWh in steam expense.33are assumed to cost 32 mills per kWh to PG&E. fuel costs,we arrive at costs of 24 mills per kWh for oil genera- tion

  6. Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost adds approxi- mately $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) torealize costs ranging from $0.05 to $0.07 per kWh. Where on-costs from biomass currently range from $0.06 to $0.10 per kWh

  7. Selecting Thermal Storage Systems for Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, C. L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per meter + KWH charge. On peak monthly average (June 89 thru September 89) $.0676/KWH. Off peak monthly average (October 89 thru May 90) $.0481/KWH. Natural Gas - Lone Star Gas Company - September 88 thru August 89 monthly average $4.41 MCF...

  8. J.Ongena Our Energy Future Bochum, 18 November 2012 How to shape our future energy supply ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    ­ 5kWh One liter of petrol ­ 10kWh One aluminum can for coke, water,... (15g) ­ 0.6kWh Energy : Some: There are only 3 different methods to produce energy 1. Burning Fossil Fuels : Coal, Oil, Gas ? Enormous in the world (2007) Energy source Power [TW] Contribution [%] Oil 4.6 36.6 Coal 3.12 24.9 Gas 3.02 24.1 Hydro

  9. Final Project Due: May 18, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 Geos 206 Final Project Due: May 18, 2010 Save the trees, and the music stands: An Energy: Monthly totals Total Electricity in kWh Average kWh per day Cost $.11/kWh Emissions .41 kg/kWh (unit in kg electricity bill, cost and emissions of the Bernhard/Chapin complex. 4 Figure 3: This graph provides a monthly

  10. Analysis of Energy Consumption of Duplex Residences in College Station, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S. B.; Woods, P. K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating base ioad base load cooling heating days temperature kwh kwh kwh % month month January 31 48.5 0 705 836 54 0 1 February 28.25 52.4 0 507 762 60 0 1 March 31 60.3 0 255 836 77 0 1 April 30 68.2 0 0 809 100 0 0 May 31 74.6 175 0 836 83 1 0...

  11. Consumer-Friendly and Environmentally-Sound Electricity Rates for the Twenty-First Century By Lee S. Friedman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    and changing fuel costs. However, the cost of providing electricity varies from as low as 1-cent per kWh continue to pay a rate per kilowatt-hour (kWh) that does not vary at all within a day. I will refer to over $1 per kWh depending upon the time and day that it is provided. Those on time invariant rates pay

  12. The Cost of Power Disturbances to Industrial & Digital Economy Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    -4: Average Cost Per Outage by Annual kWh and Duration 2-5 Figure 2-5: Average Cost Per Outage for DE by Data-5: Average Annual Per Establishment Cost of Outages by Annual kWh 3-6 Figure 3-6: Aggregate Annual Cost-4: Average Annual Per Establishment Cost of PQ Problems by Annual kWh 4-4 Figure 4-5: Aggregate Annual Cost

  13. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy intensive of the four types—consume 2,951 kWh of electricity per million gallons (3.8 million liters) of treated water

  14. Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .498 Coking Coal tonnes x 2810 x 2810 kWh x 0.349 x 0.332 Aviation Spirit tonnes x 3128 x 3128 kWh x 0.250 x 0.281 x 0.267 Burning Oil1 tonnes x 3150 x 3150 kWh x 0.258 x 0.245 litres x 2.518 x 2.518 Coal 2 tonnes xWh x 0.249 x 0.237 Lubricants tonnes x 3171 x 3171 kWh x 0.263 x 0.250 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 x

  15. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biogas digester .. Installation of a biogas digester  In order to demonstrate heat value of biogas production: 321 kWh.   The digester is 

  16. Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. McParland, "Open Automated Demand Response Communications2011. Utility & Demand Response Programs Energy ProviderAnnual Consumption (kWh) Demand Response Program Curtailment

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative fuels experience Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT Summary: -hours (kWh) of experience. The company's presently markets phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) and PEM units... 2008 FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES...

  18. Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only by electrical lighting (481 trillion BTU vs. 1340only by electrical lighting (141 billion kWh vs. 393 billion

  19. Measured Energy Savings from the Application of Reflective Roofs in 3 AT&T Regeneration Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the buildings are about 125kWh per year (8.6 kWh/m2 [0.8 kWh/ft2 ]); at a cost of $0.1/kWh, savings are about the reflectivities increased to about 72%. In two of these buildings, we monitored savings of about 0.5kWh per day of about 13kWh per day (860 Wh/m2 [80 Wh/ft2 ]). These savings probably resulted from the differences

  20. Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    battery storage.grid, the cost of battery storage per unit of load servedalong with 22 kWh of battery storage. This study claims only

  1. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot...

  2. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

  3. Essays in Public Economics and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, Francois

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    but only economic incentives (kWh) Simulations: totargets through economic incentives is often consideredtargets through economic incentives (e.g. , prices) is often

  4. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Helium isotope trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particularly for geothermal energy development. Mantlex 10 kWh of accessible geothermal energy. This is a sizableBasic Energy Sciences and Office of Geothermal Technologies

  5. Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ") 179 MW lifecycle Site heat rate (Btu/kwh): 9,350 ("new and clean") 9,430 lifecycle (36% efficiency

  6. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widyolar, Bennett

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    47 3.8 Economic Evaluation…………………………………………………………….49 4. AElectrical (kWh) Electrical COP 3.8 Economic Evaluation Asimple economic evaluation of the system was performed using

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

  8. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  10. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  14. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  16. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real Prices (2005$) Crude Oil (left) US Retail Gasoline (retail prices in California including PG&E residential electricity $0.1144/kWh, gasolineretail prices Gasoline

  17. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real Prices (2005$) Crude Oil (left) US Retail Gasoline (retail prices in California including PG&E residential electricity $0.1144/kWh, gasolineretail prices Gasoline

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot...

  19. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity prices with non-generation costs of $0.07816/kWh (Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 2006). Households

  20. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity prices with non-generation costs of $0.07816/kWh (Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 2006). Households

  1. Water, Neighborhoods and Urban Design: Micro-Utilities and the Fifth Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Vicki; Fraker, Harrison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the very aggressive “passive house” standard of 15 Kwh/m2-yplus energy houses”) which combine a passive solar direct

  2. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transformers Electric Rice Cookers, DVD Recorders, MicrowaveElectric Toilet Seats Rice Cookers kWh/year kWh/year kWh/

  3. What does a negawatt really cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

  4. Long Term Operation of Renewable Energy Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Davis, D.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hot water, daylighting, passive cooling, and generation of electricity from a 10 kW wind turbine and 1.9 kW of photovoltaic panels, each connected to the utility grid through inverters. Since 1991, 16,900 kWh have been purchased and 31,300 kWh returned...

  5. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    kWh MPG per FWHET Test Cumulative MPG Cumulative AC kWh 15 FY07 EnergyCS Prius - Fuel Costs EnergyCS PHEV Prius UDDS & HWFET Fuel Cost per Mile 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015...

  6. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production can be a very electricity intensive. Provide information on energy efficiency potential Electricity Use in Indoor Production Aluminum Production ~ 16 KWH/kg Indoor Cannabis production ~ 5000 KWH 3, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Massoud Jourabchi SUBJECT: Electrical load impacts

  7. Energy Fluxes optimization for PV integrated Rim.Missaoui, Ghaith.Warkozek, Seddik. Bacha, Stphane.Ploix.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    capable both to satisfy the maximum available electrical energy constraint and to maximize user comfort-time simulation I. NOMENCLATURE t Sampling step time, [hour]. Sampling time of the anticipatory layer. i by the load [kWh]. E (i, k) Energy produced by the source i during period k [kWh]. Ppv PV power produced

  8. H A&S 222a: Introduction to Energy and Environment (Life Under the Pale Sun) out: Tues 4 April 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    turbines connected to electrical generators, making that much average electric power). An average family) in this comparison? ·Electrical energy is sold by the kilowatt hour (KWH). What is the cost of one KWH in Seattle (for example being the electrical energy required to burn a 100-watt light bulb for 10 hours). Convert

  9. 1360 Barrington Street P.O. Box 1000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    .1 cents per kWh. This seems excessive, considering that residential electricity now costs about 10 cents per kWh. It is unclear whether this is the annual cost or the projected cost in 2029. The cost the consumer cost is pegged at $141 million with an energy savings of 1,551 GWh (see Table, page 15) or about 9

  10. Physics Today Livermore ends LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    represent considerable sav- ings, since vanadium electrolyte costs about $200/kWh. The company antici- pates and for a cost of $1000 per unit. Using other bat- tery technologies, such units now sell for around $4000. Other Scuderi, business development manager, the Zn­MnO2 technology could attain the $100/kWh cost target once

  11. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cost and the marginal fuel savings (assuming a base case of ten cents per kWhper kWh, which would bring it in line with the break-even costcost per mile: electricity vs. gasoline PRICE OF ELECTRICITY ($/kWh)

  12. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojda, Nicholas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5W to 1 W, at a cost of two cents per kWh. Electric cookingassume a cost of conserved energy of two cents per kWh forCost of Conserved Energy Utility Price $ per MMbtu $ per kWh

  13. CeSOS Highlights and AMOS Visions 27-29th May 2013 Aurlien Babarit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nřrvĺg, Kjetil

    2013 Criteria for comparison > The true criterion is cost of kWh. > kWh (power production) can absorption · Income side of COE · The higher the power absorption per unit, the less the installation cost a limit to the allowed cost for viability #12;A. Babarit CeSOS Highlights and AMOS Visions ­ 27-29th May

  14. COMPUTER DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF CRYOGENIC REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the assumed electrical energy cost is $0.04 per kWh.cost (the cost is given in US$ per kWh at 80.4°K) andThe cost of nitrogen refrigeration given in $ per kWh at

  15. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) - Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station - Preliminary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003376 per BTU ($1.152 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.442....

  16. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

  17. Microgrid Selection and Operation for Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a low storage, PV, and solar thermal price run; and 6. a lowstorage of US$50/kWh for solar thermal and US$60/kWh forof 2.5US$/W & low solar thermal costs (minus 10% of original

  18. LABORATOIRE D'ECONOMIE DE LA PRODUCTION ET DE L'INTEGRATION INTERNATIONALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wh/h] Smax = Storage system capacity [kWh] SOCmax = Storage upper capacity limit [kWh] SOCmin = Storage lower = Storage efficiency Greek symbols - Decision variables (t) = Binary decision variable, (t) = 1 if the battery is in charge mode, (t) = 0 if the battery is in discharge mode (t) = Binary decision variable, (t

  19. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    short-run marginal cost or avoided cost) to get a value ofcan be added to the fuel cost avoided by each kWh (i.e. ,CCE, in ˘/kWh) and the Cost of Avoided Peak Power (CAPP, in

  20. 2015 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year) Driving Range (Miles) GHG Score** Fuel Economy (MPGe) CityHwy Starting MSRP BMW i3 125 kW21 kWh 0.2 81 10 137114 41,350 Chevrolet Spark 104 kW20 kWh 0.2 82 10 128...

  1. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conversion: 1 kwh = 10,500 Btu for power production Averageelectricity and at 10,500 Btu/kwh or 2,646 kcal/kHz energyHCs Unit Nm3/hr Nm3/hr cfh Btu/scf MM Btu/hr GJ/hr Btu/scf

  2. 23rd steam-station cost survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedlander, G.D.; Going, M.C.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 23rd Steam Station Cost Survey covering the year 1982 are summarized. The major categories of the survey are as follows: general data; output data, 1982; fuel consumption, 1982; operation 1982 (mills/net kWh); investment ($/net kWh); energy cost, 1982 (mills/net kWh); and station performance, 1982. Thirty-one fossil-fuel steam plants and four nuclear stations were included in the survey. Fuel and operating cost increases are felt to be responsible for the moderate rise in total busbar-enery costs. 11 figures, 1 table.

  3. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in particular: cement, energy (coal mining and hydropower),average of renewable energy and coal, which significantlyManufacture Coal Electricity Specific Energy (kg, kWh t -1

  4. NREL PV Projects - FUPWG Meeting: "Going Coastal for Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kWdc (1,200,000 kWh) one-axis tracking PV system - Grid connected (NREL "side of the meter") - Milestones Agreements: January 2008 Operation: August 2008 Solar Rewards...

  5. Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Iowa imposes a replacement generation tax of 0.06 cents ($0.0006) per kilowatt-hour (kWh) on various forms of electricity generated within the state. This tax is imposed in lieu of a property tax...

  6. Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstration energy-efficient office building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low price period kWh Ice storage system power consumption 2loss through the ice storage system, the average coolingto the measured results. Ice storage system The two Carrier

  7. Third-Party Financing and Power Purchase Agreements for Public...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    500 kW system @ 3.5 to 4 million Federal tax benefits 55% 6 Some key elements of a PPA Price per kWh of electricity Annual escalation factor (2-5%) Length of the agreement...

  8. Microsoft Word - Tab 2d - Project Descriptions Press Format ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Micrel; Colorado - NREL. Key Metrics Key Metrics LCOE (kWh) Manufacturing Capacity (MW) 0.1400 60 Baseline (2006) 0.3300 1 0.0600 1000 2009-2010 2014-2015 High...

  9. Solar America Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Micrel; Colorado - NREL. Key Metrics Key Metrics LCOE (kWh) Manufacturing Capacity (MW) 0.1400 60 Baseline (2006) 0.3300 1 0.0600 1000 2009-2010 2014-2015 The Boeing...

  10. Interpreting human activity from electrical consumption data through non-intrusive load monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillman, Mark Daniel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) has three distinct advantages over today's smart meters. First, it offers accountability. Few people know where their kWh's are going. Second, it is a maintenance tool. Signs of wear ...

  11. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  12. Case Study of Two MBCx Projects: Using M&V to Track Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jump, D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operation • Re-establish supply air temperature set point reset control in AHU1 • Other measures • Approximately 483,000 kWh (10%), 2.7M lbs/yr steam (51%) #0;? Estimated using DOE 2 analysis • Cost reduction $84,000 (14%), Payback 0.7 years 13 Soda Hall... 006 3/ 24/ 2 006 3/ 26/ 2 00 6 3/ 28/ 2 00 6 3/ 3 0/ 2 006 Date kW h 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 De g F AHU 1 Daily kWh AHU 3 Daily kWh AHU 4 Daily kWh OAT Daily Average AHU 1 supply fan malf. begins here. Same date as economizer fix. 17 M...

  13. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not only the tangible investment costs such as the turnkeyDG unit minus the investment cost. As for Eq. (9), it is aplus the amortised investment cost per kWh e of the DG unit

  14. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only the tangible investment costs, but also the opportunityDG unit minus the investment cost. As for Equation (9), itplus the amortised investment cost per kWh of the DG unit is

  15. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Review of Current Practice in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program Washington Renewable Energy Production Incentivesrenewable energy credits (RECs) via energy production-basedRenewable DG Program ($0.01/kWh for the first year of energy production)

  16. Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 Table 3. Renewable Energy Production Required forTable  Table 3. Renewable Energy Production Required forEnergy Consumption Renewable Energy Production B kWH Year In

  17. Sam, Booth, Targeting Net Zero DoD Project Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost Savings () 43,976,816 Base Case LCOE (kWh) 0.281 RE Case LCOE(kWh) 0.226 Power Plant 17% Energy Efficiency 25% SHW 5% PV 18% Wind 35% Contribution from EERE Phase...

  18. Research, development, and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial phase of work comprises three factorial experiments to evaluate a variety of component combinations. Goals to be met by these batteries include the following: capacity at 3 h discharge, 20 to 30 kWh; specific energy, 40 Wh/kg; specific power, 1000 W/kg for 15 s; cycle life, 800 cycles to 80% depth; price, $50/kWh. The status of the factorial experiments is reviewed. The second phase of work, design of an advanced battery, has the following goals: 30 to 40 kWh; 60 Wh/kg; 150 W/kg for 15 s; 1000 cycles to 80% depth; $40/kWh. It is not yet possible to say whether these goals can be met. Numerous approaches are under study to increase the utilization of battery chemicals. A battery design with no live electrical connection above the battery is being developed. 52 figures, 52 tables. (RWR)

  19. A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.07/kWh has on hydrogen cost for electrolysis type station.3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station,3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station, NAS

  20. A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.07/kWh has on hydrogen cost for electrolysis type station.3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station,3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station, NAS

  1. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over 122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years....

  2. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is higher than the average cost per-kWh, the question of howcost recovery adders are neglected unless they are speci?ed as a price per kWh

  3. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Authority (NYSERDA). Library Patrons in New York Check-Out Renewable Energy The new solar system on the Esopus Library in New York is expected to generate 31,200 kWh of...

  4. Chrysler RAM PHEV Fleet Results Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    number of charging events 2,590 Number of charging events at Level 1 | Level 2 588 | 1990 Total charging energy consumed (AC kWh) 17,571 Charging energy consumed at Level 1 |...

  5. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DER available include solar thermal, photovoltaics (PV) and1 absorption chiller solar thermal flow battery 220$/kWh andabsorption chiller (kW) Solar thermal (kW) PV (kW) lead-acid

  6. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics (PV), and battery storage, are considered forStorage Heat Storage Flow Battery Energy Flow Battery PowerkW) Battery Capacity (kWh) Photo voltaic (kW) Heat Storage (

  7. Electrochemical Capacitors as Energy Storage in Hybrid-Electric Vehicles: Present Status and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to assist the energy storage battery (12 kWh) in providingbattery and ultracapacitors in the vehicles when the characteristics of the energy storageBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium the energy storage

  8. Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the market, in fact, the battery-storage inverter describedalong with 22 kWh of battery storage. This study by Baek etpower, but the cost of battery storage per unit of load

  9. Fact #823: June 2, 2014 Hybrid Vehicles use more Battery Packs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    capacities as high as 85 kWh - a battery offering for the Tesla Model S. Number of Batteries Sold and Battery Capacity Sold for Model Year 2013 Graph of the number of batteries...

  10. City of Dallas- Green Energy Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2007, the City of Dallas finalized purchase contracts for more than 333 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green electricity for city facilities during 2008. The city has elected to...

  11. Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These studiesprojected electricity consumption EVs and theMPG) and EV electricity consumption (in Kwh per mile).weight of increases. 3.2. Electricity Consumption EVs of To

  12. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be added to the fuel cost avoided by each kWh (i.e. , theCost ($/yr Other Costs Avoided ($/yr) Total Annualizedapplications, where the avoided maintenance costs more than

  13. Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study found that refrigerator and freezer temperaturekWh per year), and refrigerator and freezer (1,120 kWh perrefrigeration (refrigerators and freezers) included in the

  14. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    + inverter) Fuel Cell Stack Only Cost ($/kW) Reformer Cost (Capital Cost ($/kWh) Maintenance and fuel cell stackof Ref. Cost for FCVs Fuel Cell Cost ($kW) (stack + aux

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    an R-20 insulated slab, R-70 cellulose in the attic, extensive air sealing, a mini-split heat pump, an heat recovery ventilator, solar water heating, LED lighting, 3.9 kWh PV, and...

  16. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Annika

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    top graph) as a percent of the total average energy usage ofgraph) as a percentage of each hour’s average energy usagegraph: first, kWh savings; second, normalized savings as a percent of the total average energy usage

  17. Exemption from Wholesale Energy Transaction Tax (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity from wind generation on state lands is exempt from the wholesale energy transaction tax of $0.00015/kWh transmitted. Electricity from any source, including renewables, that is generated...

  18. Development of the Supply Chain Optimization and Planning for the Environment (SCOPE) Tool - Applied to Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Fletcher, Tristan; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA) Panel (Germany) Panel (China) indicates the number of years a technology must produce electricity,Electricity (kg-CO2/kWh) Circularity Production Distribution Circularity Production Germany Hungary Italy Finland Spain USA

  19. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per delivered kWh. References EPRI, Electric Power ResearchAssessment Guide: Vol. 1: Electricity Supply-1986. EPRI.EPRI P-4463-SR. December 1986. Kahn, Edward. 1988. Electric

  20. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on average coal consumption in power generation in the samePrice of Coal used for Power Generation Source: State400 g of coal per kWh (43-46% gross generation efficiency),

  1. 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE INDEX 61 Appendix I: Indicator Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    emissions per electricity generation CO2KWH Ecosystem Vitality Climate change Renewable electricity RENEW if it is private or shared (but not public) and if hygienically separates human excreta

  2. Private Companies, Federal Agencies and National Labs Join Better...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    over the next decade. Data centers consumed about 100 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity in the U.S last year and that number is expected to grow as more information...

  3. Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production level from small hydro as recorded in 2006.  kWH Geothermal Biomass Small Hydro 830 est Wind Solar TotalRPS Geothermal Biomass Small Hydro 830 est Wind Solar Total

  4. Project Profile: Carbon Dioxide Shuttling Thermochemical Storage...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    energy generation by driving the cost towards 0.06kWh through the use of thermochemical energy storage (TCES). The project uses inexpensive, safe, and non-corrosive...

  5. 2009 Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    applications One of three deployment options for the demo system, shown in relation to diesel genset and balance of system. 3 kW 5 kWh Flywheel Engineering, Operations &...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial-end tidal carbon Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kWh range. Typical cost ranges include: Tidal generation - between 16 and 38pkWh Offshore wind - between 15... account of multiple factors for each generation type...

  7. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WindLogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO (2006)]; EnerNex et al. (IPP ISO ISO-NE ITC kW kWh MISO MW MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEMIndependent System Operator (MISO), New York ISO (NYISO),

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas, May 24, 2010. MISO. 2010. Dispatchable Intermittentand Windlogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO]; Puget Sound Energy (ITC kW kWh LADWP LIBOR MISO American Wind Energy Association

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WindLogics Inc. (2006) [MN-MISO (2006)]; EnerNex et al. (IPP ISO ISO-NE ITC kW kWh MISO MW MWh NERC NREL NYISO OEMIndependent System Operator (MISO), New York ISO (NYISO),

  10. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 B. Conversion Factors andfinal energy using a conversion factor of 0.0001229 kWh/tonto primary energy using a conversion factor of 0.000404 kWh/

  11. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 2.2. Conversion Factors anda primary energy conversion factor of 0.404 kgce/ kWh was2005; and final energy conversion factor of 0.1228 kgce/kWh

  12. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    and district heating scheme* data. Year Energy Consumption (KWh) Percentage Change 2005/06 65,916,243 N/A 2006 buildings are connected to the Nottingham District Heating Scheme. This service meets all the heating

  13. Denver Public Schools Get Solar Energy System | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Local company adds five full-time jobs to support solar panel project. Solar panels are estimated to generate 1,640,457 kWh of electricity...

  14. Integrated System Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Rate 10 4.14 MillsKWh (L5 * 1000) 730 hours per month 7 RATE FOR SCHEDULING, SYSTEM CONTROL AND DISPATCH SERVICE FOR 2014 A. Fixed Charge Rate 22.770% (1)...

  15. Integrated System Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Rate 10 4.00 MillsKWh (L5 * 1000) 730 hours per month 7 RATE FOR SCHEDULING, SYSTEM CONTROL AND DISPATCH SERVICE FOR 2015 A. Fixed Charge Rate 21.652% (1)...

  16. Refrigerator Efficiency in Ghana: Tailoring an appliance market transformation program design for Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Hagan, Essel; Van Buskirk, Robert; Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Alfred; McNeil, Michael A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the residential electricity sector in Ghana. Althoughprice of electricity for the residential sector is zero forprice of electricity for the commercial sector is $0.093/kWh

  17. City of Houston- Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the City of Houston negotiated a 5-year contract with Reliant Energy for up to 80 MW or 700 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually of renewable energy credits (RECs). These RECs will be...

  18. Study of Energy and Demand Savings on a High Efficiency Hydraulic Pump System with Infinite Turn Down Technology (ITDT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sfeir, R. A.; Kanungo, A.; Liou, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed field measurement and verification of electrical energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings is conducted on an injection molding machine used in typical plastic manufacturing facility retrofitted with a high efficiency hydraulic pump system...

  19. Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AEA Alaska Energy Authority Btu British thermal unit DOE U.S. Department of Energy EERE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy kW kilowatt kWh kilowatt-hour LCOE...

  20. Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    kWh (intermittent, 22% capacity factor on electrolyzer) Renewable pipeline quality biogas delivered to station via short pipeline (5-12 miles) 20-40MMBTU (CEC & USDA studies)...

  1. Renewable Energy Production Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supported by the state's Renewable Development Fund, Minnesota offers a payment of 1.5˘ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for on-farm biogas facilities. Previously, this incentive also offered payments to...

  2. PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 DECEMBER 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    will be turned off where possible. Last year these strategies cut UVic's electrical consumption by 170,000 kwh for submitting Great Moments is Jan. 20 The university is currently collecting submissions online of historical

  3. Implementation of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of flow batteries for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yaliang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For large-scale energy storage application, flow battery has the advantages of decoupled power and energy management, extended life cycles and relatively low cost of unit energy output ($/kWh). In this thesis, an overview ...

  4. New Braunfels Utilities- Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Braunfels Utilities offers a rebate for residential customers who purchase and install solar water heating systems on eligible homes. A rebate of the equivalent of $0.265 per kWh is available...

  5. Enhancing Resource Sustainability by Transforming Urban and Suburban Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    battery electric LLM will have about the same life cycle costBattery contribution to retail cost (€) Average maintenance cost (€/yr) Energy cost (€/l or €/kWh) (a) Total life cycle cost (

  6. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gge) (kg H 2 ) (million Btu) tons) Electricity (kWh) GaseousH 2 ) Thermal (million Btu) Biomass (dry tons) Electricity (2 (MtH 2 ). Thermal (million Btu, TBtu): One million British

  7. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $/MBtu) Electric Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) kWh = kilowatthour; TWh= terawatthour; MBtu = Million Btu; MtC = Metric tons ofon heavy load. Idle Rate (Btu/h) Table 6-9. Energy Star

  8. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gge) (kg H 2 ) (million Btu) tons) Electricity (kWh) GaseousH 2 ) Thermal (million Btu) Biomass (dry tons) Electricity (2 (MtH 2 ). Thermal (million Btu, TBtu): One million British

  9. Freescale Semiconductor Successfully Implements an Energy Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    28 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity and 26,000 million British thermal units (Btu) of natural gas between 2006 and 2009, saving more than 2 million each year. Freescale...

  10. Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per kWh), but that CO2 emissions from hydropower plantswill be less than CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel plants.kg/ha) 2. Difference in CO2 emissions vs. control plot (kg/

  11. Testing and evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries for utility load-leveling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.F.; Corp, D.O.; Hayes, E.R.; Hornstra, F.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries developed by Exide for utility load-leveling applications have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's National Battery Test Laboratory since April 1982. These batteries (36-kWh and 18-kWh modules) have a projected life of greater than 4000 deep discharge cycles. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Parametric test results and general performance observations for these batteries are reported.

  12. Testing and evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries for utility load-leveling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.F.; Corp, D.O.; Hayes, E.R.; Hornstra, F.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries developed by Exide for utility load-leveling applications have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's National Battery Test Laboratory since April 1982. These batteries (36-kWh and 18-kWh modules) have a projected life of greater than 4000 deep discharge cycles. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Parametric test results and general performance observations for these batteries are reported.

  13. Electric Currents Electric Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jaehoon

    ;Problem 3: At $0.095/kWh, what does it cost to leave a 25W porch light on day and night for a year = 219000 Watt- hour = 219kWh. So, total cost = 219 x$0.095 = $20.8 #12;Problem 4: A 100 W light bulb has of charge per unit time: = . Unit of current: Ampere (A). The purpose of a battery is to produce

  14. Mesures d'estalvi energtic Introducci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politčcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    reducció de cost es deu a la contractació de l'energia elčctrica per subhasta electrňnica per a tots els): Any Electricitat * Electricitat kWh Gas Gas kWh Aigua Aigua m2 2008 3.595.493 33.647.244 789.547 17 immediat Climatització La temperatura de consigna d'equips de climatització per a espais interiors ha de

  15. China's March on the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    ,523/3,299 5,250/10,581 25,028/43,676 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Oil Natural Gas Electricity Nuclear Electricity Coal CO/day (oil); trillion cu feet (natural gas); billion kWh (electricity); billion kWh (nuclear electricity, this economic expansion has been accompanied by a corresponding surge in energy consumption. China beca

  16. BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    average wind speed of 15.3 miles-per-hour ("mph") and annual energy production of 2,554 kilowatt hours ("k calculated that the annual energy production would be 9,513 kWh. Thus, it is impossible to reconcile the one in the Complaint and the KEMA Report, the claimed annual energy production of 2,554 kWh, and the annual energy

  17. Controlling of grid connected photovoltaic lighting system with fuzzy logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saglam, Safak; Ekren, Nazmi; Erdal, Hasan [Technical Education Faculty, Marmara University, Istanbul 34722 (Turkey)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, DC electrical energy produced by photovoltaic panels is converted to AC electrical energy and an indoor area is illuminated using this energy. System is controlled by fuzzy logic algorithm controller designed with 16 rules. Energy is supplied from accumulator which is charged by photovoltaic panels if its energy would be sufficient otherwise it is supplied from grid. During the 1-week usage period at the semester time, 1.968 kWh energy is used from grid but designed system used 0.542 kWh energy from photovoltaic panels at the experiments. Energy saving is determined by calculations and measurements for one education year period (9 months) 70.848 kWh. (author)

  18. Performance of advanced lead-acid batteries for load-leveling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.F.; Gay, E.C.; Hornstra, G.F.; Yao, N.P.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries developed by Exide for load-leveling applications have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's National Battery Test Laboratory since April 1982. These batteries (36-kWh and 18-kWh modules) have a projected life of greater than 4000 deep-discharge cycles. This paper presents the results of performance and life tests obtained to date. Battery capacities and efficiencies are shown as a function of discharge rate. The status of ongoing accelerated life-cycle tests being conducted at 50/sup 0/C and 60/sup 0/C are presented.

  19. Performance of advanced lead-acid batteries for load-leveling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.F.; Gay, E.C.; Hornstra, F.; Yao, N.P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and evaluation of advanced lead-acid batteries developed by Exide for load-leveling applications have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's National Battery Test Laboratory since April 1982. These batteries (36-kWh and 18-kWh modules) have a projected life of greater than 4000 deep-discharge cycles. This paper presents the results of performance and life tests obtained to date. Battery capacities and efficiencies are shown as a function of discharge rate. The status of ongoing accelerated life-cycle tests being conducted at 50/sup 0/C and 60/sup 0/C are presented.

  20. Study to establish cost projections for production of redox chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, J.F.; Greco, C.C.; Rusinko, R.N.; Wadsworth, A.L. III

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cost study of four proposed manufacturing processes for redox chemicals for the NASA REDOX Energy Storage System yielded favorable selling prices in the range $0.99 to $1.91/kg of chromic chloride, anhydrous basis, including ferrous chloride. The prices corresponded to specific energy storage costs from under $9 to $17/kWh. A refined and expanded cost analysis of the most favored process yielded a price estimate corresponding to a storage cost of $11/kWh. The findings supported the potential economic viability of the NASA REDOX system.

  1. Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

    The annual energy cost savings were estimated with $0.11/kWh for electricity and $0.84/therm (Climate Zone 2) and $0.64/therm (Climate Zone 3 and 4) for natural gas. 2009 IECC Cost Savings Report, p.ii January 2011 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...). 3.2 Annual Total Energy Cost Similar trends were observed in the annual energy costs estimated with $0.11/kWh for electricity and $0.84/therm (Climate Zone 2) and $0.64/therm (Climate Zone 3 and 4) for natural gas. Across the counties, the 2001...

  2. responsARBOLidad FRENTE AL CAMBIO CLIMTICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    nuestras emisiones contaminantes, y podemos COMPENSAR estas emisiones plantando árboles y asumiendo así Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA): #12;CALCULAR las emisiones de CO2: 1 Kwh. de electricidad = 356 g. en autobús = 30 g. CO2 emisiones que debemos REDUCIR y... #12;COMPENSAR plantando árboles: · Cada

  3. INTRODUCCIN En este manual de buenas prcticas se explicarn las diferentes medidas que se

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    de gas natural por su mayor rendimiento energético y las menores emisiones contaminantes. oWh eléctrico producido genera, además, unas emisiones de CO2 entre 2 y 2,5 veces mayores que un kWh térmico

  4. CALiPER Report 21.3: Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

  5. Retrofit Savings for Brazos County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Shao, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the energy and dollar savings for the period May 2000 - April 2001 for 10 of the Brazos County facilities that have been retrofit. The electricity use saved was 555,170 kWh and the demand was 1062 kW, which is equivalent to a...

  6. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    day is the resulting  load following the implementation of 408 kWh/day   Load following installation: 293 kWh/day  kWh/293 kWh/day   Load following installation: 243 kWh/day  

  7. Feature Article From Intermountain West Climate Summary, March 2012 Intermountain West Climate Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    -cooled concentrating solar plants in California and Nevada have run into opposition, driving them toward dry cooling that several thousand MW of electrical capacity might go offline if the drought persists into spring of 2012. Thermal solar plants use as much water as a coal plant per kWh, but wind power uses little to no water. So

  8. STEWARDSHIP MAINTAINING NATURAL RICHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    ;Outstanding Results 5 Energy Conservation: Saved 240 Million KWH over last fifteen years. Green BuildingLAND STEWARDSHIP MAINTAINING NATURAL RICHES TRANSPORTATION GOING THE EXTRA MILE GREEN BUILDING SHOWCASING INNOVATION WATER CONSERVING PRESCIOUS RESOURCES ENERGY MOVING TO A BRIGHTER FUTURE WASTE REDUCING

  9. Validation of an Integrated System for a Hydrogen-Fueled Power Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? · Electrons Lowest Cost ­ run electric wires vs. hydrogen pipe · Electrons ($50K), Protons ($100k) ­ Combined Heat and Power Has the Potential to Lower Power Cost by ~$0.01/kWh · CHP Requires Reformer and Fuel Feedstock ­ Potential Uses of PEM in Distributed Power Applications · Hydrogen Pipeline or Low Cost Hydrogen

  10. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kW of PV, a 53 kWh battery bank, and a 5 kW diesel genset.kW of PV, and an 880 Ah battery bank. Other projects includeand a 100 kW lead-acid battery bank. Seven Hachinohe City

  11. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composed of 10 kW of PV, a 53 kWh battery bank, and a 5 kWkW CHP plant, 35 kW of PV, and an 880 Ah battery bank. OtherPV and wind turbines, five 80 kW biogas engines, a 250 kW MCFC, and 100 kW of battery

  12. Dean's Faculty Meeting 5/7/13 UHM Total $

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    penetration PV · Smart Grid applications 1 MW / 250 kWh fast response Lithium ion Titanate battery Rick scientific analyses. Don Thomas Nicole Lautze #12;Battery Energy Storage for Generation Smoothing & Frequency Regulation ·Testing and evaluation of emerging battery technologies (integrated testing from laboratory

  13. Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Stadler

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kW) Flow Battery Energy Installed (kWh) PV Installed (kW)input to Flow Battery Electricity Generation f rom PV TotalPV array with a rated peak power of 326.7 kW as well as a flow battery

  14. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1. Energy and carbon intensity values for conventionalin “hybrid mode” kWh/mi Fuel Carbon Intensity (C) gCO 2 /ggegCO 2 /kWh Vehicle Carbon Intensity (ExC) gCO 2 /mi BEVs /

  15. Estimating the manufacturing cost of purely organic solar cells Joseph Kalowekamo 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to a levelized cost of electricity (LEC) of between 49˘ and 85˘/kWh. In order to achieve a more competitive COE that into a levelized electricity cost (LEC). We find that there is a great deal of uncertainty about the capital costs., Estimating the manufacturing cost of purely organic solar cells, Sol. Energy (2009), doi:10.1016/j

  16. Polysulfide Flow Batteries Enabled by Percolating Nanoscale Conductor Networks Frank Y. Fan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lowering the cost of stored energy below ~$100/kWh at system level remains a challenge, however2,3 . Many of higher energy density and lower system cost. Lithium polysulfide half-flow cells operating in both to decouple stored energy (the tanks) from power (the stack), inherent scalability, and potentially low cost1

  17. DISSERTATION ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF NON-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    -scale problems such as energy demand, pollution, and environment safety. The cost ($/kWh) is the primaryDISSERTATION ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF NON-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D SIMULATIONS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS

  18. OAKRIDGENATIONALLABORATORY MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    with solar photovoltaic power production at times feed electricity to the grid when TVA's cost owner a premium rate of $0.15/kWh for all the solar power these houses can produce. Under the Green an airtight envelope (~1 air change per hour at 50 Pascal) of structural insulated panels (SIP), which

  19. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overall efficiency and a power-to-heat ratio of 0.66. Thisfrom boiler based on Power/Heat of 0.607 MBtu/kWh Energywith 70% efficiency ; Power/Heat = 0.66 kWh MBtu/kWh Overall

  20. Park Load Reduction by Preconditioning of Buildings at Night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabl, A.; Norford, L. K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    arounde50%. The local utility charges approximately p - 10 $/kWe per month for demand and pc - 0.05 $$?h and Pw - 0.07 $/kwh for energy, off and on $eak respectively - nihbers that are representative. If pc/Pw were greater than r), night cooling...

  1. Can migrogrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Working Paper No. 70 March 2005 Manuscript to appear in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews #12;ii energy balance on a yearly basis if supplemented by energy storage of 2.7kWh per household. We findCan migrogrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply ? Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom

  2. Energy Systems Engineering 1 Clean Coal Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Energy Systems Engineering 1 Clean Coal Technologies Presentation at BARC 4th December 2007 #12/kWh) 0.14 0.03 0.6 #12;Energy Systems Engineering 9 Status of Advanced Coal Technologies Types of advanced coal technologies Supercritical Pulverised Combustion Circulating Fluidised Bed Combustion (CFBC

  3. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Rehabilitation of Alamo Main Canal - Final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 876 ac-ft of water per year and 331,389,647 BTUs (97,125 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $201.50 per ac...

  4. 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim710 wileyonlinelibrary.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    , overestimates the amount of Li required per kWh of stored energy, it indi- cates that in the long term the cost to renewable energy production, high energy density becomes less critical. Moreover, the abundance and low cost-scale applications, though at this point, the cost of Li is not a large contribution to the cost of LIBs. But most

  5. nature photonics | VOL 6 | MARCH 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 133 focus | commentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this requirement: if solar energy harvesting is achieved at an installed cost of $1 per watt- peak (Wp), then it will produce electricity over its lifetime at an equivalent cost of around $0.05 kWh­1 , which is compellingly equation provides a breakdown of the overall cost per watt- peak, given that the Sun provides a peak

  6. Paper Presented at Power Engineering Systems 2005 Conference, San Francisco, CA 1 June 12-16, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they were able to earn a pre-specified credit per kWh for each unit of electricity less than their benchmark that minimizes total system cost is based upon the actual cost of generation (e.g. perfectly regulated or perfectly competitive markets). But when that least-cost dispatch is based upon offers from deregulated

  7. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be recovered through variable, volume-based charges per kilowatt-hour (kWh). At the same time, however, someEXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST REDUCTIONS The Current Terrain In recent years, electric utilities have experienced

  8. Solid State Communications 150 (2010) 561563 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can cost upwards of several dollars per installed watt, with a per kWh cost several times higher than of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (aSi:H), have the potential to cut costs because much less material is required the complexity and the cost of manufacturing, and Corresponding author at: University of California, Berkeley

  9. Exploiting Performance Counters to Predict and Improve Energy Performance of HPC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and cooling cost of about $3.5 million per year, which is significant. Beyond the operating cost, some data, Tianhe-1A consumes 4.04 Megawatts of electricity [1]; a simple calculation at $0.10/KWh yields a powering

  10. Georgia Institute of Technology | Milwaukee School of Engineering | North Carolina A&T State University | Purdue University University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | University of Minnesota | Vanderbilt University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    .152 / kWh #12;Today TB3: January 13, 2010NSF CCEFP Site Visit Cost comparison - 2 MN cost calculation, cost. http://www.google.org/recharge/ #12;Today TB3: January 13, 2010NSF CCEFP Site Visit GFleet fuel sources #12;Today TB3: January 13, 2010NSF CCEFP Site Visit Emission ­ CO2 Vehicle emission per

  11. The Digital Divide: Implications on the Forest Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .htm #12;Connectivity Country Inhabitants Per Telephone Consume of Electricity Per Person In KWh China 60 areas · Limited purchasing power · Limited information flow · Paper-based documentation · High cost · 180 Million global users · Only 14% users from developing countries · Telephone density: ­ 52.3 per

  12. RESOURCE April/May 2009 31 ... with no fertilizer or tillage input and that produces no

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    for drivers in the United States. The cost per mile would be one-third as much for electricity as for gasoline (at ten cents per kWh and three dollars per gallon). I have read that a capacity increase of 20 everywhere at the rate of a horsepower per square yard (1000 watts per square meter), and it's free. I think

  13. Study Design And Realization Of Solar Water Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lounis, M. [LAAR Laboratory-Physics Department-USTOMB 31000 Oran (Algeria); Boudjemaa, F.; Akil, S. Kouider [Genie Climatic Department-CUKM 44000-Khemis Miliana (Algeria)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar is one of the most easily exploitable energy, it is moreover inexhaustible. His applications are many and are varied. The heating of the domestic water is one of the most immediate, simplest and also of most widespread exploitation of the solar energy. Algeria, from its geographical situation, it deposits one of the largest high sun surface expositions in the world. The exposition duration of the almost territory exceeds 2000 hours annually and can reach the 3900 hours (high plateaus and Sahara). By knowing the daily energy received by 1 m{sup 2} of a horizontal surface of the solar thermal panel is nearly around 1700 KWh/m{sup 2} a year in the north and 2263 KWh/m{sup 2} a year in the south of the country, we release the most important and strategic place of the solar technologies in the present and in the future for Algeria. This work consists to study, conceive and manufacture solar water heating with the available local materials so, this type of the energy will be profitable for all, particularly the poor countries. If we consider the illumination duration of the panel around 6 hours a day, the water heat panel manufactured in our laboratory produce an equivalent energy of 11.615 KWh a day so, 4239 KWh a year. These values of energy can be easily increased with performing the panel manufacture.

  14. LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and purge ports. #12;LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX 3' x 5' Solar Panels 191 watts per panel 600 KW Solar Array 2,988 Solar Panels 850,000 kWh Annual Output Solar Classroom Deck SOLAR PV SYSTEM #12 in the United States #12;LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX THE LAYOUT AFTER HOURS GYM ENTRY SOLAR

  15. Policy #2009EE001 Campus Sustainability Policy--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    . Resource Efficiency and Emissions Electricity use at IIT results comes from a mix of coal, natural gas approximately 55 million kWh every year and 3,000,000 therms of natural gas (300,000 million Btu). In 10 years manufacture entering the atmosphere through incineration or ground water through landfill. Economy The energy

  16. Sandia's research spans generation, storage, and load management at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandia's research spans generation, storage, and load management at the component and systems kW diesel genset, fuel cells, and additional interchangeable generators. Storage capabilities include a 500 kWh lead-acid battery bank, along with several additional batteries of smaller size. Over

  17. IEEE JOURNAL ON EMERGING AND SELECTED TOPICS IN CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 1, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2011 289 PowerSleep: A Smart Power-Saving Scheme With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shengquan

    that the electricity costs $0.074 per kWh. Even without considering the cost of the power delivery subsystems 289 PowerSleep: A Smart Power-Saving Scheme With Sleep for Servers Under Response Time Constraint Shengquan Wang, Jun Liu, Jian-Jia Chen, and Xue Liu Abstract--Reducing the power consumption while

  18. WHAT WE ARE DOING TO IT AND WHAT WE ARE DOING TO UNDERSTAND IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    .6 0.4 0.2 0.0 CO2emissions,Pounds(C)perKWH Coal Oil Natural gas Nuclear CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION (1990's Technology) Suffolk County 2001 Legislation How much does your household contribute? A typical household using 1000 kilowatt hours of electricity per month is responsible

  19. Revised Illustrative Example for DFS, April 29, 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HLH 31,814,906 Non-Fed Energy HLH -722,176 Tier 1 Energy HLH 31,092,730 Tier 1 HLH SSL 28,195,560 2,583,477,791 Tier 1 HLH Load Shaping 2,897,170 kWh @ 0.04716 136,631 47.16...

  20. FLASTAR: Measured Savings of a Comprehensive Energy Retrofit in a Florida Elementary School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwin, J. R.; Parker, D. S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .000 square foot facility was approximately 775,000 kWh (60 kBtu/ft^2) or $55,200 in the base year (1994). During the summer of 1995, replacement of aging chillers resulted in 30% reduction to cooling energy use. The second retrofit was occupancy sensor...

  1. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @ $50/kW and H2 storage @ $15/kWh) #12;8 CASE 2: ICEV EFFICIENCY · Currently available and projected11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug Methodology and Scenarios · Market Penetration Rates · Oil and CO2 Savings · Fuel, Fuel Cell, Battery

  2. Pedro M. Castro, Ignacio E. Grossmann, Iiro K. Harjunkoski Process operations are often subject to energy constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    between electricity supplier and cement plants (planning level) Energy cost [$/kWh] Varies significantly (minimize total electricity cost) Complexity at the level of RTN structural parameters generation r,i, r industry & electricity Currently under pressure to produce at lowest possible cost Machine drive 80% total

  3. Purdue Agricultural Economics Report Page 1 In This Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Around 40% of all new-generation power added to the electric grid in the U.S. in recent years has been converts the blades' speeds of about 18 to 20 rotations per minute to electricity-generating speeds of 1.4 million and 3 million kilowatt- hours (kWh) annually to provide electricity for 240 to 300 households

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Leganza Residence - Greenbank, Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    panel (SIPs) walls, a 10.25-inch SIPS roof, an R-20 insulated slab, a 2-ton ground source heat pump, radiant floor heat, 7.1 kWh PV, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  5. NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    for electricity generation, GHG emissions are reduced by at least 45% per kWh. But when natural gas is used that it will even meet the emissions reductions mandated by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) for corn non-GHG emissions such as particulate matter, carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide. The trade-off between

  6. 84Unit Conversions Energy, Power, Flux Energy is measured in a number of ways depending on what property is being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kilowatt- hour (1 kWh)? Problem 4 ­ How many ergs of energy are collected from a solar panel on a roof, if the sunlight provides a flux of 300 Joules/sec/meter 2 , the solar panels have an area of 27 square feet84Unit Conversions ­ Energy, Power, Flux Energy is measured in a number of ways depending on what

  7. Energy Security in Nova Scotia Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    of energy) PV ­ Photovoltaic (usually solar panels that generate electricity from the sun) RES ­ Renewable ) joules (a unit of energy) HST ­ Harmonized Sales Tax (Nova Scotia's sales tax: 8% provincial plus 6% federal) ha ­ hectare IEA ­ International Energy Agency kWh ­ Kilowatt-hour (a unit of energy) LDV ­ Light

  8. Nanomaterials for Energy and Electronics Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Synthesis of ZnO Aggregates and Their Application in Dye-sensitized Solar Cells Nanomaterials for Energy-phase Metal Oxide Nanostructures #12;Synthesis of ZnO Aggregates and Their Application in Dye-sensitized Solar require major breakthroughs to meet the long-term goal of very low cost ($0.40/kWh).2-6 Dye-sensitized

  9. Intelligent Sensor Placement for Hot Server Detection in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Guoliang

    center energy consumption in the US will grow to over 100 billion kWh at a cost of $7.4 billion by 2011, IEEE Abstract--Recent studies have shown that a significant portion of the total energy consumption temperature set points to overcool the entire room, resulting in excessive energy consumption. Sensor network

  10. Taming the Energy Hog in Cloud Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    energy consumption consumed 61 Billion kWh in 2006, enough to power 5.8 Million average US households constrained #12;Energy Expenditure of The Cloud The IT industry is on fire! constitutes about 2% of total USTaming the Energy Hog in Cloud Infrastructure Jie Liu Microsoft Research liuj@microsoft.com RTSS

  11. Power and Performance Modeling in a Virtualized Server System Massoud Pedram and Inkwon Hwang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    % of the electrical energy consumption in the US (and this in spite of continuous improvements in energy efficiency and maintenance easier, and can decrease energy consumption through resource consolidation. To develop and employ kWh in 2011. By the 2020, the data center energy consumption s expected to account for 8

  12. California Energy Commission Apply Today!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Flyer Public Programs Office (916) 654-4147 pubprog@energy.state.ca.us June 2006 #12;DON'T MISS electricity usage by about 30 percent. Electricity Savings: 2,262,207 kWh Demand Savings: 575 kW EnergyCalifornia Energy Commission Apply Today! "The college is using cutting edge on- site generation

  13. Application of motor capacitors to improve facility power usage in the industrial setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillhouse, William Jeffrey

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and duty cycle???????.. 40 16 Payback as a function of capacitor size and cost per KWH?????? 41 17 Constant vs. irregular loading conditions????????????? 46 18 Measurement point, where only load supplied??...????????. 47 19 Project survey... LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Basic power parameters??...??????????????..?? 1 2 Line resistance values[6]??????????..??.??????. 17 3 Circuit resistance for Condenser Fan 1????.?????????. 27 4 Total harmonic current...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sale at SWPA workshop June-09 v3mjs.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost (kW or kWh) Development Type Low Medium High cost now 2030 cost life time New small hydro at new dams 0 5 12 3,125 2,900 50 New hydro at existing dams 8 15 21 2,010...

  15. Energy & Water:Energy & Water: A Growing and IncreasinglyA Growing and Increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    SubstationTo SCE Mirage Substation To WAPATo WAPA #12;13 Metropolitan Small Hydro Power PlantsMetropolitan Small Hydro Power Plants 16 Plants ­ 126 MW ­ 450M kWh #12;14 FY 2006/07 Capital Investment PlanFY 2006

  16. THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas.46]. The cost of these devices was also statistically significant. Keywords: electricity use; energy efficiency the Canadian Industrial Energy End Use Data and Analysis (CIEEDAC) for their financial support made possible

  17. Pulp & Paper Industry- A Strategic Energy Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapley, C. E.

    The pulp and paper industry with yearly energy purchases of $5 billion per year including 50 billion kWh of power is one of the largest industrial energy producers in the U.S. However, structural changes in the global pulp and paper industry could...

  18. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    joules) using a conversion factor (1kWh = 3.6 MJ). However,the IPCC natural gas conversion factor of 0.0561 Mt CO 2 /finial savings and a conversion factor of 0.0036 PJ/GWh is 

  19. PV Integration by Building Energy Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . However, to validate global control algorithms, a simulator capable of interoperating with energy[kWh]. Econs (k) Total energy consumed by the load [kWh]. E (i, k) Energy consumed by the service i duringPV Integration by Building Energy Management System Rim.MissaouiÂą, Ghaith.WarkozekÂą, Seddik. Bacha

  20. Normand Mousseau Dpartement de physique,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    : Jean-Marc Jancovici (basé sur Schilling & Al. 1977, IEA, BP statistical review et Nations-Unis) #12;1 1 : Schilling & Al. 1977, IEA et Jean-Marc Jancovici (1 tep = 11 700 kWh). #12;Consommation par capita Origine

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acwy conjugate vaccine Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W Renewables 12;David Cahen, 4 ACWIS 7'09 work of 2 horses for 25 hrs 6 x 6 m2 solar cell panel for 2 days... 1 (US) gallon 3.8 liter 37 kWh 12;David Cahen, 4 ACWIS...

  2. Power translation chart kWh/d each GW / UK TWh/y / UK Mtoe/y / UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    '`Safe and fair' UK (1990) UK (2005) 60% target 80% target UK Electricity kWh thermal energy exchange rate: 1 k" from the Institute of Electrical Engineers's 2002 report Renewable energy in the UK. The "technical in the structure of our society and economy". The figures for solar photovoltaics and energy crops

  3. Monitoring System Used to Identify, Track and Allocate Peak Demand Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, W. A.

    leasing space on the site. The most common way to distribute monthly electric costs within a facility when consumption by area or department is available through submetering or other means, is to apply the average cost per KWH from the utility bill...

  4. Gnie mcanique Multi-Objective Optimization applied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggavi, Suhas

    for cogeneration; a battery, a Wind Turbine, Photovoltaic solar panels and the grid also supply electricityWh battery. 4. Flat electricity import price Min Expenditurest ! Incomest Wsupplied t t=1 T=24 " ($/kWh) Min on the quality of its operation strategy. The results have shown that buying the electricity at the market price

  5. Jay Apt, Paulina Jaramillo, and Stephen Rose Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center (CEIC)'s RenewElec Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    electric generators. 9 · Solar: ­ Photovoltaic (solar panels) ­ Solar thermal (concentrated solar power at 15-20 cents per kWh. · If installed prices fall 40%, PV can match the current price of wind) supporting wind projects and the investment tax credits (ITC) supporting solar projects. Electric Generation

  6. Analysis of Energy Conservation Options for USDOE Child Development Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Saada, T. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pumps. The architect's estimate of the energy savings from these measures totaled 31.5 MWh per year, an annual savings of about $1,575 (at $0.05/kWh). The DOE-2 predicted total annual energy use for the CDC with all the ECO's installed is 146,317 k...

  7. PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, Philip

    PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu 345,281 kWh $ 36,255 Device Type Measured lights, etc. Current Energy Use of Computing Systems Monday: Holiday What About Waste? Network Traffic on Core Switches Label Switch Type Active Ports (gigabit each) Data trace (# days) a HP 5412zl 120 150 b

  8. Application of Risk Analysis to Evaluating M&V Requirement for Energy Efficiency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, G.; Gregoire, C.; Gogte, S.; Gowans, D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shows that increasing the size of lighting project savings for which M&V is waived to 1,400,000 kWh per year would introduce an error of only ±5% to the sum of all lighting savings. The error introduced at the program level would be approximately ±2...

  9. Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume II: Detailed Savings Calculations, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed calculations for each site are shown in this Volume. For each site the ECRM description, approved loan amount, expected savings, the pre and post-retrofit energy use (electricity and gas separately), cost of energy, energy savings (in kWh...

  10. Estimated Savings from Turning Off Unnecessary Lights at the Langford Architecture Center During the 1996 Christmas Holidays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V. I.; Haberl, J. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lights been left on, the building would have consumed 100 kW more electricity every hour. The total electricity savings was about 31,200 kWh over 13 days, which is equivalent to a total cost saving of $936.00. If the College continues to turn off...

  11. Case Study Impact Evaluations of the Industrial Energy Savings Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, P.; Pearson, D.

    measures installed and the processes affected are described in this paper. The report presents energy (kWh) and peak demand (kW) savings indexed to changes in production volume, an assessment of non-energy benefits to the participating customer, and cost...

  12. The Use of Electricity in Industry and Energy Saving - The Gamma Co-Efficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, R.; Froehlich, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simple factors : the gamma factor. It is, when using energy, the number of thermies which are replaced by one kWh. Gamma is not a factor for measuring the oil saving but the using efficiency. For measuring the oil saving, the author uses 'the net gain...

  13. The ICLS system results in superior energy savings. The chart (right)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy load is less than the design goal. Energy ICLS ICLS Title 24 Ashrae 90.1 Savings Avg. Usage Design · 200 days/school yr · 8 hrs of operation/day · $0.11/kwh ** Savings per Classroom per year vs. Ashrae 90.1 CONTROL STRATEGIES Finelite, Inc. 30300 Whipple Road Union City, CA 94587-1525 510 / 441

  14. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, L.W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    otfscole [29kWh,170 kBtu] ASHRAE 90-7S. 1976 Interpretationm :+A- . Fo&kaom, . x ASHRAE 90-7SR,1980 Int.rpreta- .when ASHRAE passed its now-famous voluntary Standard 90-75,

  15. IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, vol. 5, pp. 1722 -1728, 2012, doi: 10.1109/JSTARS.2012.2196024

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be assessed thanks to Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a useful tool dedicated to evaluate the environmental. emissions per kWh for wind turbines could range from 8 g/kWh to 124 g/kWh [3]. Similar variations occur wind and solar resources, for example, appear to be abundant, technological, economic and planning

  16. Rocky Mountain Power- Self-Direction Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers a Self-Direction Credit program to its industrial and large commercial customers with annual electric usage of more than 5,000,000 kWh or a 1,000 kW peak load. Through...

  17. Rocky Mountain Power- Self-Direction Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers a Self-Direction Credit program to its industrial and large commercial customers with annual electric usage of more than 5 million kWh or a peak load of 1,000 kW or more...

  18. Building Codes for Classrooms 34MK 3401 Market Street JMHH Jon M. Huntsman Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Building Codes for Classrooms 34MK 3401 Market Street JMHH Jon M. Huntsman Hall 35MK 3550 Market Market Street KWH Kelly Writers House ACHM Anatomy/Chemistry Building L-FH Lauder-Fischer Hall ADDM Fisher-Bennett Hall LIPP Lippincott BLOC Blockley Hall LLAB Leidy Labs CAST Caster Building LRSM Lab

  19. A monetary comparison of energy recovered from microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells fed winery or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as electricity or hydrogen from organic matter. Organic removal efficiencies and values of the different energy the predominance of Geobacter species in anodic microbial communities in MECs for both wastewaters, suggesting low. An AS process typically uses 1 kWh of electricity and produces w0.4 kg of sludge per kg of oxidized COD [2

  20. Sustainable Energy --without the hot air David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    20 kWh per day per person; covering every south­facing roof with solar water­heating panels captures units. Energies are expressed as quan­ CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION Wind: 20 kWh/d Wave: 4 kWh/d Solar heating energy strategy. Are ``decentralization'' and ``combined heat and power,'' green enough, for example

  1. Model Predictive Control of Residential Energy Systems Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,JĂĽrgen

    such as air con- ditioners and refrigerators, is elastic or schedulable. Therefore, an alternate, P. Braun (k) + ui2 (k) (1) where xi is the state of charge of the battery in kWh, ui1 is the battery charge , and the definitions of f and h are obvious from (1). We assume constraints on the battery capacity and charge

  2. Field Verification of Energy and Demand Savings of Two Injection Molding Machines Retrofitted with Variable Frequency Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, S. P.; Aguiar, D.

    Detailed field measurements of energy consumption (kWh) and demand (kW) are conducted on two injection molding machines (IMMs) used in a typical plastic manufacturing facility in the San Francisco Bay Area, with/without Variable Frequency Drives...

  3. Simple and Effective Dynamic Provisioning for Power-Proportional Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Lachlan

    computer infrastructure. The closer to one PUE is, the better energy utilization is. Real-world statistics consumed an estimated 240 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of energy, roughly 1.3% of the world total energy Chen, and Lachlan L. H. Andrew Abstract--Energy consumption represents a significant cost in data

  4. Energy Use and Costs in Texas Schools and Hospitals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, J. R.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance indices among the participating institutions. For participating elementary schools, the annual electrical energy use/area ranged from 5.52 to 16.84 kwh/ft^2, the gas use from 9,363 to 66,639 Btu/ft^2, the electrical cost/area from 0.29 to 0.98 $/ft...

  5. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Silicone Materials for Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    The Photovoltaic (PV) industry has aggressive goals to decrease $/kWh and lower the overall cost of ownership for Sustainable Energy: Emphasis on Photovoltaic Materials for Module Assembly and Installation with Ann Norris properties that make them excellent candidates for photovoltaic module encapsulants and other materials

  6. INTERNATIONAL Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    exhaust from the gas turbine is sent to a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) The steam turbine drives a generator Low pressure steam from the turbine is condensed and sent back to the boiler Thermal efficiency turbine) at 10,000 to 12,000 BTU/kwh Combined Cycle BoilerFeedwater Condenser Steam Turbine & Generator

  7. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME Proceedings of the 2014 Joint Rail Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    . These operators report energy consumption in purchased electricity (kWh) instead of gallons of liquid fuel transportation alternative to reduce energy consumption and emissions in large urban areas. Use of commuter rail-term efficiency trends for rail as an urban transportation mode, this study analyzes historic trends in energy

  8. MOBILE PHONE, A SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    but mobile > fixed line household penetration) ITU, 2013 GSMA, 2013 Growth Operators activity Europe (EEA GSMA, 2014 Deloitte, 2012 Price of an entrylevel mobile broadband 12% of monthly GNI p.c. 1125Wh / year (own measures, Malmodin 2014) · network : 23kWh / user / year (Malmodin 2014) · French electricity

  9. Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Equipments A Danish Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Frame · 189 Respondents · Power consumption: 5000 ­ 6000 kWh per year · No electrical heating · Products hours 3 hours 3 hours Question 9 Question 10 Question 13 Price(DKK/kWh) 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Response

  10. Residential Furnace Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditioner performance1 , standby power, as well as igniter and combustion air blower power. Energy savings for a typical three-and-a-half ton air conditioner with typical California ducts are 45 kWh. Peak demand combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested for air moving performance. The laboratory test

  11. Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery cycle life (cycles) c Battery calendar life (years) Battery costin the battery during its life cycle in kWh, C B is cost ofBattery cycle life (cycles) Battery calendar life (years) Maximum electrical power output to motor (kW) Battery cost

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KWH X 10 3 Occup, Unaee. BTU x10 6 Qceup. Unoec. Oecuj2.H20 gal H 0 occ. -yr. x (155-60) OF x x + 40,000 BTU/occ. /yr. BTU 493,000 BTU/occ. /yr. 8,000,000 BTU/yr. 100

  13. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  14. Optimizing and Diversifying the Electric Range of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles for U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide useful information for automakers to design successful plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) products and for energy and environmental analysts to understand the social impact of PHEVs, this paper addresses the question of how many of the U.S. consumers, if buying a PHEV, would prefer what electric ranges. The Market-oriented Optimal Range for PHEV (MOR-PHEV) model is developed to optimize the PHEV electric range for each of 36,664 sampled individuals representing U.S. new vehicle drivers. The optimization objective is the minimization of the sum of costs on battery, gasoline, electricity and refueling hassle. Assuming no battery subsidy, the empirical results suggest that: 1) the optimal PHEV electric range approximates two thirds of one s typical daily driving distance in the near term, defined as $450/kWh battery delivered price and $4/gallon gasoline price. 2) PHEVs are not ready to directly compete with HEVs at today s situation, defined by the $600/kWh battery delivered price and the $3-$4/gallon gasoline price, but can do so in the near term. 3) PHEV10s will be favored by the market over longer-range PHEVs in the near term, but longer-range PHEVs can dominate the PHEV market if gasoline prices reach as high as $5-$6 per gallon and/or battery delivered prices reach as low as $150-$300/kWh. 4) PHEVs can become much more attractive against HEVs in the near term if the electric range can be extended by only 10% with multiple charges per day, possible with improved charging infrastructure or adapted charging behavior. 5) the impact of a $100/kWh decrease in battery delivered prices on the competiveness of PHEVs against HEVs can be offset by about $1.25/gallon decrease in gasoline prices, or about 7/kWh increase in electricity prices. This also means that the impact of a $1/gallon decrease in gasoline prices can be offset by about 5/kWh decrease in electricity prices.

  15. Lead-acid load-leveling battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.F.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Christianson, C.C.; Marr, J.J.; Smaga, J.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has conducted an extensive evaluation of an advanced lead-acid battery development for load-leveling applications. The battery technology was developed by the Exide Corporation under a DOE-sponsored cost-shared R and D contract with ANL during 1979-1982. The objective of that program was to increase battery life from 2000 to 4000 deep discharge cycles while maintaining or reducing initial battery cost. Full-size, 3100-Ah cells were fabricated by Exide and assembled into one 6-cell and two 3-cell batteries. These 36-kWh and 18-kWh batteries were delivered to ANL in April 1982 for testing and evaluation. Southern California Edison is currently installing a 10-MW, 40-MWh load-leveling facility comprised of batteries based on this design.

  16. Sodium/sulfur battery engineering for stationary energy storage. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, A.; Rasmussen, J. [Silent Power, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of modular systems to distribute power using batteries to store off-peak energy and a state of the art power inverter is envisioned to offer important national benefits. A 4-year, cost- shared contract was performed to design and develop a modular, 300kVA/300-kWh system for utility and customer applications. Called Nas-P{sub AC}, this system uses advanced sodium/sulfur batteries and requires only about 20% of the space of a lead-acid-based system with a smaller energy content. Ten, 300-VDC, 40-kWh sodium/sulfur battery packs are accommodated behind a power conversion system envelope with integrated digital control. The resulting design facilities transportation, site selection, and deployment because the system is quiet and non-polluting, and can be located in proximity to the load. This report contains a detailed description of the design and supporting hardware development performed under this contract.

  17. PARABOLIC TROUGH POWER FOR THE CALIFORNIA COMPETITIVE MARKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California is about to complete its third year of a deregulated competitive wholesale power market. During the first two years of the competitive market, power prices averaged between 2 and 3˘/kWh. During 2000, electric supply to California was constrained a number of times causing maximum the price of power to peak over 100˘/kWh, and the average price of power to quadruple. The power output from solar plants tends to coincide with the high power demand periods in California. This fact had been demonstrated by the solar electric generating stations (SEGS) located in the California Mojave Desert, which operate under specific contracts signed in the 1980’s and early 1990’s with the local utility. This paper, on the other hand, examines how new parabolic trough solar plants would have faired on the wholesale competitive power market during 1999 and 2000.

  18. Low Wind Speed Turbine Developments in Convoloid Gearing: Final Technical Report, June 2005 - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genesis Partners LP

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by Genesis Partners LP as part of the United States Department of Energy Wind Energy Research Program to develop wind technology that will enable wind systems to compete in regions having low wind speeds. The purpose of the program is to reduce the cost of electricity from large wind systems in areas having Class 4 winds to 3 cents per kWh for onshore systems or 5 cents per kWh for offshore systems. This work builds upon previous activities under the WindPACT project, the Next Generation Turbine project, and Phase I of the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) project. This project is concerned with the development of more cost-effective gearing for speed increasers for wind turbines.

  19. T ti E St S tTetiaroa Energy Storage System Estimated ZBB Zinc Bromide Battery Performance and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    ://rael.berkeley.edu 6Modeled 455kW gen set output power #12;Alte nati e Diesel Si ingAlternative Diesel Sizing://rael.berkeley.edu 1 #12;Island Load and DieselIsland Load and Diesel Generation Assumptions #12;Estimated Elect ical: Average daily energy use: 5,698 kWh d d 23 k Average power demand: 237 kW Peak power demand: 427 kW Load

  20. Validating Energy Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chari, S.; Thomas, D.

    13-14, 1994 Table 1 _. Measurement Schedule Description Type of Measurement Tool Raw Material Input Throughput rate Company hourly record Product Output Throughput rale Company hourly record Extruder Drive Demand and Energy kW and kWh meter... MEASUREMENTS The energy measurements are as important to a business decision maker as valid news sources are to the chief editor of a newspaper. The energy measurements become all the more important in industrial audits because of the following...

  1. Evaporative Cooling in the NW WCEC Affiliates Meeting May 7, 2013 Energy Center, UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    design for higher airflow rates · Lack of recognition in codes and HVAC efficiency ratings · Lack% (3.5 kW) Savings Summary Equipment RTU IDEC Electric Energy (kWh) 6,475 2,849 Electric Demand (kW) 5.5 2.2 #12;Water Usage Topic1 #12;· Water pump downsized 580w 380w · Single speed motor to 3-speed

  2. Case Study: Goose Creek CISD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GOOSE CREEK CISD FINANCIALS • $4,866,124 project • $600k annual savings • 5,954,383 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • Lighting and water efficiency, computer power management, HVAC, controls redesign case study McKinstry first worked with Goose... Creek CISD performing retro-commissioning through the Centerpoint/Nexant RCx rebate program. McKinstry found additional projects with good returns on investment, warranting a performance contract. Working with the district to apply for the State...

  3. Functions, Part 1 c csun Fall 2011 v15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Terry

    customers $14.00 per month plus $0.10 per kilowatt-hour (KWH) of electricity used. Thus, the monthly cost on the price? If the price per gallon is $3.40, what is the cost to fill the tank? If the price per gallon. This is read as: The cost, C(p), to fill the tank is a function of the price p per gallon. Written form: "the

  4. 3-50 A classroom is to be air-conditioned using window air-conditioning units. The cooling load is due to people, lights, and heat transfer through the walls and the windows. The number of 5-kW window air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    to a total of 9u365 = 3285 off hours per year. Disregarding the ballast factor, the annual energy and cost) = (4730 kWh/year)($0.08/kWh) = $378/year The implementation cost of this measure is the sum lamps)(60 W/lamp )(3285 hours/year) = 4730 kWh/year Cost Savings = (Energy Savings)(Unit cost of energy

  5. Kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .08 per kWh, estimate the cost per month of the energy lost through the floor. b. If the room is carpeted.8 W/m2 ·K, respectively. a. If the home is heated electrically and the cost of electricity is $0 with wall-to-wall carpeting 1.6 cm thick ( = 0.06 W/m·K) what would the energy cost be? Data: oak = 0.17 W

  6. U.S. Department of EnergyU.S. Department of EnergyU.S. Department of Energy JoAnn Milliken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Cost (targets: 2.7kWh/L, 3kWh/kg, and $2/kWh) ·Fuel Cell Cost and Durability (targets: $30 per kW, 5000 be validated under real-world conditions. ·Hydrogen Cost (target: $2 ­ $3/gge) ·Hydrogen Storage Capacity: Reduce the cost to $2.00 ­ $3.00/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent) at the pump KEY OBJECTIVE: Reduce

  7. Critical Review Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sources such as wind, solar or biomass, but the energy requirements are high (5.6 kWh/ m3H2) and typical A S S E , , § A N D R E N ´E A . R O Z E N D A L | Hydrogen Energy Center, and Department of Civil, The Netherlands, and Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC), The University of Queensland, Qld 4072, Australia

  8. INFRASTRUCTURE ECOLOGY: AN EVOLVING PARADIGM FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    /kWh for hydroelectric Energy for Water: · 4% of total electricity consumption in US for water and wastewater sector; 19.Pandit@gatech.edu #12;City People Economy Transportation Energy Water Waste Buildings Parks Government And many more: · Average consumptive use in US: 2.0 Gal/kWh · 0.5 Gal/kWh for thermoelectric; 18.0 Gal

  9. Strategic Eurasian Natural Gas Model for Energy Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chyong, Chi-Kong; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    capacities would constitute 23% of the EU’s 4 Natural gas is in a favourable position in the European electricity generation industry, especially in the context of regulating greenhouse gas emissions... . Gas-fired power plants emit roughly half the CO2 per KWh of electricity output compared to coal-fired power plants. 5 Although, on average, annual growth in gas consumption in Europe during the past twenty years exceeded the annual growth of energy...

  10. 23.07.2003 1 Forschungszentrum Jlich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experience: 1,5%/a specific energy reduction over 10 years is by far not enough! Specific primary% 15% 12% 38% 18% 1990 2000 2020 Per Energy Carrier in bln kWh 16% 20% 9% 36% 19% 15 200 24 000 Global and the Energy Options Dr. Gerd Eisenbei� Risø, 19. Mai 2003 #12;23.07.2003 2 Forschungszentrum Jülich in der

  11. Our Favorite Electrical Energy Saving Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.; Spivey, V.

    units. Required Data: Nameplate Data: Voltage Full Load Amps Phase Power Factor Horsepower Current Sequence of Units Local Temperature Data: Total Hours/Year at Observe OF Cost of Energy $0.038/KWH Labor Cost (Electrician) $25.00/Hr... an electrician would take to modify the existing electronic controls. The wage estimate includes overhead and profit. 1. c = current 2. p = proposed ESL-IE-86-06-131 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX...

  12. LED ProspectsLED Prospects photometric units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    /5/8 #12;16 Light bulb comparisonLight bulb comparison W lumens khours CRI $US Incandescent (long life) 75-life incandescent with LED. · 10 light fixtures/home, lights on for 6h/day, 333 days/yr. · Electricity 0.12 $/kWh. W khours $US Incandescent (long life) 100 10 2 LED (PAR38, warm, dimmable) 11 40 90 · What is the lifetime

  13. Predicting energy usage in a supermarket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrock, Derek Wayne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure Plan View of the Store Estimated Contribution of the Electrical Energy Using Systems in the Store. . ??. . 9 Schematic of a Typical Compressor and Refrigeration Case. . . . 13 10. Historical Energy Consumption (kWh) and Demand (k... institutional buildings using site and climate data, building system data and user variations such as occupancy and comfort level. He used the following regression equations to predict energy consumption: Consumption = Po+ Pt*(vl) + P&*(v2) + Pz*(v3) + (4*(v4...

  14. Energy Unit Conversion Factors / 1Joule (J) equals 1 2.78 x lO-7 9.49 x 1o-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Energy Unit Conversion Factors J kWh Btu -~ / 1Joule (J) equals 1 2.78 x lO-7 9.49 x 1o-4 1.25 x lo5i Uranium = 235 (1 gram) 8.28 x lOlo 2.30 x lo4 7.84 x lo7 Deuterium (1 gram) 2.38 x 1011 6

  15. Paramount Petroleum: Plant-Wide Energy-Efficiency Assessment Identifies Three Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paramount Petroleum plant-wide energy assessment identified a cost-effective electrical power and heat energy production facility and systems that could benefit from either fuel-burn adjustments or a new drive/control system. This could lead to independence from a local electric utility with much improved reliability, estimated annual energy savings of 1,200,000 kWh of electricity, and estimated annual savings of$4.1 million for energy reduction and other improvements.

  16. A Study of the Pre-Programmed Thermostat Timer as a Load Control Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, M. L.; Thedford, M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The purpose of this research was to determine if a pre-programs3 thmstat timing device can operate similarly to a dispatcher controlled load managanent device to rehce peak generation dmds without adversely affecting energy kwh) sales. SCOPE: The scope... of this research is: (1) to detennine if the device can be used as a viable means of load reduction, (2) to determine the parameters for equiprent and programing for more extensive research involving dispatcher control of dis- tribution load, and (3...

  17. Energy Policy, 2004. Vol. 32, 289-297 John Byrnea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    2012 $1.50/Wp $0.50/Wp$1.00/Wp Neij, 1997; IEA,2000 $0.15~0.25/kWh $1.50/Wp BOS 50 $3.00/Wp $1.50/Wp 22,000 A 4 15% 30% 2011 2019 Williams and Terzian, 1993; Neij, 1997; IEA,2000; Annual Review of Research and Development, Vol. 10. American Solar Energy Society, Boulder, Colorado

  18. UCDavis University of California A California Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -in Prius Battery kWh: Charge Time: Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 All Electric Range: Price: 3hrs/110v (15A) 1 in single family House · 96% own their house ­ 1% rent in SD ­ 5% rent in other areas · 38-42% have solar panels ­ 18% consider installation ­ 40% have no plan to install · Average Household size 2.7 · 83% have

  19. LET THE SUN SHINE: OPTIMAL DEPLOYMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAICS IN GERMANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /kWh, depending on its location as well as on the size and type of PV system used (EPIA Report, 2011). InvestmentLET THE SUN SHINE: OPTIMAL DEPLOYMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAICS IN GERMANY Anna CRETI JĂ©rĂ´me JOAUG Cahier n:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00751743,version1-14Nov2012 #12;Let the sun shine: optimal deployment of photovoltaics in Germany

  20. Keynote Speaker Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Difference: US and CA • An estimate from Anant Sudarshan, graduate student of Professor James Sweeney, Stanford University, forthcoming paper in the Energy Journal Per Capita Electrical Usage (kWh) Residential (2001) Commercial (2003) Industrial(2002...’s “ Portfolio Manager” to CA Commercial End Use Survey – CEUS] January 1, 2009 • Electric and gas utilities must maintain records of the energy consumption data of all nonresidential buildings to which they provide service, in a format compatible...

  1. The EPRI/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvert, S.; Goldman, P. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); DeMeo, E.; McGowin, C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Smith, B.; Tromly, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program (TVP). This paper provides an overview of the TVP, its purpose and goals, and the participating utility projects. Improved technology has significantly reduced the cost of energy from wind turbines since the early 1980s. In 1992, turbines were producing electricity for about $0.07--$0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) (at 7 m/s [16 mph sites]), compared with more than $0.30/kWh in 1980. Further technology improvements were expected to lower the cost of energy from wind turbines to $0.05/kWh. More than 17,000 wind turbines, totaling more than 1,500 MW capacity, were installed in the US, primarily in California and Hawaii. The better wind plants had availabilities above 95%, capacity factors exceeding 30%, and operation and maintenance costs of $0.01/kWh. However, despite improving technology, EPRI and DOE recognized that utility use of wind turbines was still largely limited to turbines installed in California and Hawaii during the 1980s. Wind resource assessments showed that other regions of the US, particularly the Midwest, had abundant wind resources. EPRI and DOE sought to provide a bridge from utility-grade turbine development programs under way to commercial purchases of the wind turbines. The TVP was developed to allow utilities to build and operate enough candidate turbines to gain statistically significant operating and maintenance data.

  2. Sustainable Energy without the hot air David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    -facing roof with solar water-heating panels captures 13 kWh per day per person; and wave machines intercepting- CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION Wind: 20 kWh/d Wave: 4 kWh/d Solar heating: 13 kWh/d Car: 40 kWh/d Jet flights: 30 k strategy. Are "decentralization" and "combined heat and power," green enough, for example? The gov- ernment

  3. Korea Institute of Energy Research Seong-Ryong Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    +semi-conductor,+ship) exports 172.5 Bil USD (Energy imports) '09 '10 '11(p) *Source: International Monetary Fund - 2011 World.5 38.3 36.8 36.1 22.0 14.2 17.5 15.8 3.7 *source: : Annual Energy Statistics #12;3 Annual energy consumption /p (toe,'09) Power consumption/p (kWh,'09) CO2 emission/p (tCO2,'09) *Source: Energy Balances

  4. Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residences in Texas by climate zone as well as the average statewide electricity price ( /kWh). The ratio of electric/gas and heat pump houses constructed in Texas was determined using the annual surveys, National Association of Home Builders (NAHB... of Home Builders. Upper Marlboro, MD: NAHB Research Center. NREL. 2001. Building America House Performance Analysis Procedures. (NREL/TP-550-27754) Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. p.34 Paquette, Z., J. Miller, and M. DeWein. 2010...

  5. Reduce Overhead, Implement Energy Efficiency in Water/Wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantwell, J. C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Utilize Biogas Generated On-Site - If a facility has the capability to produce biogas of sufficient quantity (approximately 15 cfm of biogas is necessary to operate a 30 kW microturbine), it may be beneficial to utilize this byproduct. Note... Orleans, LA, May 8-11, 2007. the mixing system with one blower, subsequently saving energy. The savings resulting from this improvement is nearly 400,000 kWh. Food Processor ? modification to its phosphorus removal strategy to increase biogas...

  6. Direct fuel cell for the production of electricity from lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weetall, H.H.; Forsyth, B.D.; Hertl, W.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the use of an anthraquinone mediated fuel cell for the direct production of electrical energy from sulfonated lignin and Kraft Black Liquor. The cell produces the equivalent of one kWh for each 2-3 lb sulfonated lignin and 5-8 lb black liquor combustibles. In the case of the sulfonated lignin, chain session occurs during the oxidation process, reducing the molecular weight from ca. 2 x 10/sup 4/ to less than 1000 D.

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % of its miles using a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with 40-mile all-electric-range. Households gas prices are $3.50 per gallon and electricity rates at the U.S. average of 11.2 ct per kWh, the Volt. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle PREDICTING THE MARKET POTENTIAL OF PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES

  8. Heat Transfer Derivation of differential equations for heat transfer conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veress, Alexander

    ) or kW *h or Btu. U is the change in stored energy, in units of kW *h (kWh) or Btu. qx is the heat conducted (heat flux) into the control volume at surface edge x, in units of kW/m2 or Btu/(h-ft2). qx volume is positive), in kW/m3 or Btu/(h-ft3) (a heat sink, heat drawn out of the volume, is negative

  9. Opportunities and Challenges for Solar Minigrid Development in Rural India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thirumurthy, N.; Harrington, L.; Martin, D.; Thomas, L.; Takpa, J.; Gergan, R.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this report is to inform investors about the potential of solar minigrid technologies to serve India's rural market. Under the US-India Energy Dialogue, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is supporting the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)'s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) in performing a business-case and policy-oriented analysis on the deployment of solar minigrids in India. The JNNSM scheme targets the development of 2GW of off-grid solar power by 2022 and provides large subsidies to meet this target. NREL worked with electricity capacity and demand data supplied by the Ladakh Renewable Energy Development Agency (LREDA) from Leh District, to develop a technical approach for solar minigrid development. Based on the NREL-developed, simulated solar insolation data for the city of Leh, a 250-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system can produce 427,737 kWh over a 12-month period. The business case analysis, based on several different scenarios and JNNSM incentives shows the cost of power ranges from Rs. 6.3/kWh (US$0.126) to Rs. 9/kWh (US$0.18). At these rates, solar power is a cheaper alternative to diesel. An assessment of the macro-environment elements--including political, economic, environmental, social, and technological--was also performed to identify factors that may impact India?s energy development initiatives.

  10. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  11. Demand side management in India: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nezhad, H.G.; Mehta, J.V.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India`s electricity demand has been growing by more than 8% per year over the last decade. However, despite the fact that more than 70% of its 130 million households do not have access to electricity, demand for electricity has outstripped supply resulting in frequent blackouts and routine brownouts. India`s per capita consumption of electricity is about 240 KWh compared to about 500 KWh in other developing countries and 7,000 KWh in developed nations. According to the Fifteenth Power Survey by Indian Ministry of Energy, per capita energy consumption is projected to grow at about 5.5% per year until 2020, when India`s population is projected to reach 1.2 billion people. Based on these projections, India will need a generating capacity of 450,000 MW in 2020, compared to the current capacity of about 80,000 MW. Considering rising costs, limited fuel supply, and shortages of capital for power plant construction, it is unlikely that projected capacity will be realized. The only viable option would be to utilize available power through intensive energy efficiency improvements and load management.

  12. Recovery Act: Integrated DC-DC Conversion for Energy-Efficient Multicore Processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, Kenneth L

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we have developed the use of thin-film magnetic materials to improve in energy efficiency of digital computing applications by enabling integrated dc-dc power conversion and management with on-chip power inductors. Integrated voltage regulators also enables fine-grained power management, by providing dynamic scaling of the supply voltage in concert with the clock frequency of synchronous logic to throttle power consumption at periods of low computational demand. The voltage converter generates lower output voltages during periods of low computational performance requirements and higher output voltages during periods of high computational performance requirements. Implementation of integrated power conversion requires high-capacity energy storage devices, which are generally not available in traditional semiconductor processes. We achieve this with integration of thin-film magnetic materials into a conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process for high-quality on-chip power inductors. This project includes a body of work conducted to develop integrated switch-mode voltage regulators with thin-film magnetic power inductors. Soft-magnetic materials and inductor topologies are selected and optimized, with intent to maximize efficiency and current density of the integrated regulators. A custom integrated circuit (IC) is designed and fabricated in 45-nm CMOS silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to provide the control system and power-train necessary to drive the power inductors, in addition to providing a digital load for the converter. A silicon interposer is designed and fabricated in collaboration with IBM Research to integrate custom power inductors by chip stacking with the 45-nm CMOS integrated circuit, enabling power conversion with current density greater than 10A/mm2. The concepts and designs developed from this work enable significant improvements in performance-per-watt of future microprocessors in servers, desktops, and mobile devices. These new approaches to scaled voltage regulation for computing devices also promise significant impact on electricity consumption in the United States and abroad by improving the efficiency of all computational platforms. In 2006, servers and datacenters in the United States consumed an estimated 61 billion kWh or about 1.5% of the nation's total energy consumption. Federal Government servers and data centers alone accounted for about 10 billion kWh, for a total annual energy cost of about $450 million. Based upon market growth and efficiency trends, estimates place current server and datacenter power consumption at nearly 85 billion kWh in the US and at almost 280 billion kWh worldwide. Similar estimates place national desktop, mobile and portable computing at 80 billion kWh combined. While national electricity utilization for computation amounts to only 4% of current usage, it is growing at a rate of about 10% a year with volume servers representing one of the largest growth segments due to the increasing utilization of cloud-based services. The percentage of power that is consumed by the processor in a server varies but can be as much as 30% of the total power utilization, with an additional 50% associated with heat removal. The approaches considered here should allow energy efficiency gains as high as 30% in processors for all computing platforms, from high-end servers to smart phones, resulting in a direct annual energy savings of almost 15 billion kWh nationally, and 50 billion kWh globally. The work developed here is being commercialized by the start-up venture, Ferric Semiconductor, which has already secured two Phase I SBIR grants to bring these technologies to the marketplace.

  13. Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

  14. Research, development, and demonstration of advanced lead-acid batteries for utility load leveling. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced lead-acid storage battery has been developed to the preprototype cell and module design stage. Accelerated tests on full-size plates in 3, 5, and 17-plate cell sizes predict a cycle life goal of 4000 cycles at 80% depth-of-discharge can be achieved at 25/sup 0/C on a 2 cycle per day regime. One 6-cell 36 kwh and two 3-cell 18 kwh modules of cells in series were assembled and delivered to the ANL/NBTL for utility application and accelerated cycling tests. Each module is equipped with a low cost tray, automatic watering system, and air-lift pumps for increased acid circulation in each cell. Positive grid corrosion was measured in 5-plate cells at 50 to 55/sup 0/C during 166 kAh continuous overcharge to qualify a grid alloy. Up to 60% weight loss was observed on one test alloy. With the qualified alloy catastrophic positive grid corrosion will not limit cell cycle life. An accelerated shallow cycle regime at room ambient tested 60 cell designs for the active material shedding failure mode. An anti-shedding active material additive was found to reduce positive active material shedding significantly and extend the cycle life of both the positive and the negative plate. An accelerated 2-deep cycle per day test regime at 70/sup 0/C with 80% DoD and 24% overcharge selected 10 of 60 cell designs with a predicted cycle life greater than 5000 equivalent 25/sup 0/C cycles. Equations relating cell design to deep cycle life were developed from the factorial tests on the 60 cells. Eight 35-plate preprototype cells are cycling at EXIDE to prove the room ambient cycle life predicted by the accelerated test at 70/sup 0/C. Cell, module and battery prices are projected, based on the 6 kwh preprototype cell design.

  15. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunis, B.C.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Lienau, P.J. (Oregon Inst. of Tech., Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center); Spencer, F.J. (International Management Services (United States)); Nitschke, G.F. (Nitschke (George F.) (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combination of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15% discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation, thus power utilities have been selling power for less than 2 cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  16. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Project: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A – Preliminary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    the efficiency of pumping plants. The economic water and energy savings analyses provide estimates of the economic costs per acre-foot of water savings and per BTU (kwh) of energy savings associated with one to five proposed capital improvement activity... at the time and is subject to an array of resource limitations. At times, District management’s best educated estimates (or that of the consulting engineer) are used to base cost and/or savings’ values well into the future. Obviously, this is imperfect...

  17. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) – Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station – Final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    savings analyses provide estimates of the economic costs per acre-foot of water savings and per BTU (kwh) of energy savings associated with one to five proposed capital improvement activity(ies) (each referred to as a component). An aggregate assessment... publications. This analysis report is based on the best information available at the time and is subject to an array of2 resource limitations. At times, District management’s best educated estimates (or that of the consulting engineer) are used to base cost...

  18. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Michael Strasik

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Boeing Phantom Works and its team originally proposed a three-year Phase III SPI project to develop a 30-kWh flywheel with a 100 kW power capability as a power risk management system (RMS) for power users and providers. The chief objectives for the Risk Management System Flywheel were to (1) demonstrate its ability to protect a critical load such as a small data center from swings in power availability, cost, and power factor and (2) show that the RMS flywheel can perform these functions with reduced noise, emissions, and operating costs when compared with non-HTS competitors including batteries, diesel generators, and microturbines.

  19. Review of EU airport energy interests and priorities with respect to ICT, energy efficiency and enhanced building operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, A.; Blanes, L. M.; Donnelly, C.; Keane, M. M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    settings. CASCADE is aiming also at turning FDD into the actionable information by developing an energy action plan that links Actions-Actors-ISO Standards (ISO, 2011) through a web-based management portal. The developed ICT solutions will be able... performance benchmarks 5. Making an Energy Action Plan that links actors, actions, and ISO standards based on facility specific data and providing cost/benefit (kWh, CO2, Euros). CASCADE approach focuses to the actions which airports can take in order...

  20. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidler, Phillip

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zinc/Bromine Load-Leveling Battery Development contract (No. 40-8965) was partitioned at the outset into two phases of equal length. Phase 1 started in September 1990 and continued through December 1991. In Phase 1, zinc/bromine battery technology was to be advanced to the point that it would be clear that the technology was viable and would be an appropriate choice for electric utilities wishing to establish stationary energy-storage facilities. Criteria were established that addressed most of the concerns that had been observed in the previous development efforts. The performances of 8-cell and 100-cell laboratory batteries demonstrated that the criteria were met or exceeded. In Phase 2, 100-kWh batteries will be built and demonstrated, and a conceptual design for a load-leveling plant will be presented. At the same time, work will continue to identify improved assembly techniques and operating conditions. This report details the results of the efforts carried out in Phase 1. The highlights are: (1) Four 1-kWh stacks achieved over 100 cycles, One l-kWh stack achieved over 200 cycles, One 1-kWh stack achieved over 300 cycles; (2) Less than 10% degradation in performance occurred in the four stacks that achieved over 100 cycles; (3) The battery used for the zinc loading investigation exhibited virtually no loss in performance for loadings up to 130 mAh/cm{sup 2}; (4) Charge-current densities of 50 ma/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in minicells; (5) Fourteen consecutive no-strip cycles have been conducted on the stack with 300+ cycles; (6) A mass and energy balance spreadsheet that describes battery operation was completed; (7) Materials research has continued to provide improvements in the electrode, activation layer, and separator; and (8) A battery made of two 50-cell stacks (15 kWh) was produced and delivered to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for testing. The most critical development was the ability to assemble a battery stack that remained leak free. The task of sealing the battery stack using vibration welding has undergone significant improvement resulting in a viable production process. Through several design iterations, a solid technology base for larger battery stack designs was established. Internal stack stresses can now be modeled, in addition to fluid velocity and fluid pressure distribution, through the use of a finite element analysis computer program. Additionally, the Johnson Controls Battery Group, Inc. (JCBGI) proprietary FORTRAN model has been improved significantly, enabling accurate performance predictions. This modeling was used to improve the integrity and performance of the battery stacks, and should be instrumental in reducing the turnaround time from concept to assembly.

  1. Operational results from the Saudi Solar Village Photovoltaic power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huraib, F.; Al-Sani, A.; Khoshami, B.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world's largest photovoltaic power system was carried into the operation phase a few months ago. This system was developed and fabricated in the United States and it is providing electrical energy to three remote villages in Saudi Arabia. The facility includes a 350 kW photovoltaic array, 1-MW diesel powered generator, 1100 kWH lead acid batteries, a 300 KVA inverter and a solar weather data monitoring station. The photovoltaic power system is capable of completely automatic operation. It is designed to operate in stand-alone and cogeneration modes of operation.

  2. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , The Netherlands and Finland (11W/m˛). Heating and hot water consumption represent 2/3 of energy demand in buildings in China. The thermal performance and heating system efficiency need to be improved dramatically in order to contain the soaring... Efficiency Standard for New Residential Buildings in 1995, the average energy consumption for heating in China is about 90~100kWh/m˛a 3 which is still almost twice of that in Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands and Finland (40~50KWh/m˛a). Furthermore...

  3. Energy Conservation Through Industrial Cogeneration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solt, J. C.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    illustrates potential savings. Assume that we have a business with a given thermal requirement. Assume further that it is possible to fill this requirement by recovering exhaust heat from a gas turbine which also powers an electric generator. Fuel....021 - 0.013 = 0.008 kWh ? Annual Saving/Kilowatt Installed = $72/kW CD Simple Payback: 266 --;- 72 = 3. 69 years @ Rate of Return = 15% Conclusion Solar has used gas turbine engines to provide site-generated electric power in almost every...

  4. Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER)- 2008 Annual Report to the United States Environmental Protection Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Do, S. L.

    .edu/activities/ozonecapstone/noxcalculator.htm ESA?21 Yes 9 Residential?Calculator?&?Business?Calculator http://www.10percentchallenge.org/rezcalculator.php Earthlogic,?Inc. Yes 10 Climate?Change?Calculator? http://www.americanforests.org/resources/ccc/index.php ?AMERICAN?FORESTS Yes 11...,325 Elec.?Only?(Annual?10,979? kwh) 3.2 3.2?Emission?Reductions?Calculator Leonardo?Academy Texas 12000?kWh/Year N/A 10 10 17,208 The?value?in?SOx?section? represents?SO2 4 AirHead?Emissions?Calculator AirHead Result?is?aggregate?emissions 5 Carbon...

  5. Partners for Progress- A Utility Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, C. S.

    a cogeneration facility. Given a competitive cost and CPL's quality serVice these industriales are choosing cPt as thei~ primary power supplier. The estimated cost of power from a ~6MW cogeneration facility is 3.4 cents/KWH which is the same... as the cost of CPL power. CU9'1'OM!R U9PQND TO HI!! INTDRUP'l'~ !m? Since the Public Utility COmm19B1on or Texas approved our latest interruptible rates for large industriales (10 MW and above) the company has Bold over 200 MWa of this service. This has...

  6. The Economics of Cogeneration Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, R. W.; Hall, E. W.; Sweeney, J. H.

    . The number of years of construction, the first year of oper ation, the general inflation rate, and other specific rates and escalations are parameters used to define the investment and operating costs of a cogeneration facility. Table II lists the...'set of general economic ground rules used later in the sample cogeneration opportunity analysis. Table II General Economic Groundrules Fuel Cost $/MBtu (HHV) 4.00 (1984) Escalation Rate (in percent) 7.0 Utility Avoided Cost ?/kWh 4.50 (1984...

  7. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes an advanced, low-cost receiver project for parabolic troughs, awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. Norwich Technologies is designing a novel receiver that addresses these issues for parabolic trough concentrating solar power systems. This technology represents significant operational and cost advances in the most trusted and broadly implemented form of CSP and provides a viable pathway to achieving SunShot’s $0.06/kWh goal for utility-scale CSP systems.

  8. 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Residential Buildings in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    Emissions Savings (lbs/year) Combined Estimated Cost ($) Simple Estimated Payback (yrs) 0.025 11.1 30.1- Combined Ozone Season Period NOx Emissions Savings (lbs/day) 28.5-16.3 6.7 - 34.9 ESL-TR-07-08-02 Energy Systems Laboratory - August 2007 7... individual measures above for specific savings * Energy Cost: Electricity cost = $0.15/kWh Natural gas cost = $1.00/therm 4. Savings depend on fuel mix used. See detailed writeup (Building Description) * Building type: Residential * Gross area: 2...

  9. Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A & M University Cafeterias using Low Flow Pre-Rinse Spray Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, Harsh Varun

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    equal to 100,000 British thermal units (BTU).1 Therm is equal to 29.3 kWh Temperature rise through Heater The difference in the water temperature supplied to the water heater, and the water exiting the water heater. This is typically 70*F, which... assumes a water line temperature of 75*F and a water heater setting of 145*F Water Heater Efficiency The percentage of energy delivered to the water divided by the amount of energy consumed by the water heater viii TABLE OF CONTENTS...

  10. Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project: June 17, 1997--April 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GE Wind Energy, LLC

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the technical results of the Next Generation Turbine Development Project conducted by GE Wind Energy LLC. This project is jointly funded by GE and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.The goal of this project is for DOE to assist the U.S. wind industry in exploring new concepts and applications of cutting-edge technology in pursuit of the specific objective of developing a wind turbine that can generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy of $0.025/kWh at sites with an average wind speed of 15 mph (at 10 m height).

  11. I Found My Energy Role Model | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel CellandVehicles & Fuelscents per kWh - Without2/06 THUGCI

  12. I04RL003.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel CellandVehicles & Fuelscents per kWh - Without2/065

  13. Property:Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to: navigation, searchExpireDtStringPVNPFitDolKWh

  14. Energy, Appliances and Utilities Energy&Environment * EnergySTAR * Toyota PRIUS Myths, Facts, and Hype ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    below) Typical furnace: 1 therm/hr = 100000 BTU/hr = 29.3 kW(h) heating power Typical A/C unit: 3.5 ton therm = 100000 BTU = 29.307 kWhr 1 tonR = 12000 BTU/hr = 3.516 kW(c) cooling rate 1 SEER = (1 BTU)/Whr(e) = 1000 BTU/kWhr = 0.293 kWhr(c)/kWhr(e), i.e., (cooling)/(electrical) ratio What is SEER? How does

  15. Analysis of data from electric and hybrid electric vehicle student competitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hill, N.; Larsen, R.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy sponsored several student engineering competitions in 1993 that provided useful information on electric and hybrid electric vehicles. The electrical energy usage from these competitions has been recorded with a custom-built digital meter installed in every vehicle and used under controlled conditions. When combined with other factors, such as vehicle mass, speed, distance traveled, battery type, and type of components, this information provides useful insight into the performance characteristics of electrics and hybrids. All the vehicles tested were either electric vehicles or hybrid vehicles in electric-only mode, and had an average energy economy of 7.0 km/kwh. Based on the performance of the ``ground-up`` hybrid electric vehicles in the 1993 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge, data revealed a I km/kwh energy economy benefit for every 133 kg decrease in vehicle mass. By running all the electric vehicles at a competition in Atlanta at several different constant speeds, the effects of rolling resistance and aerodynamic drag were evaluated. On average, these vehicles were 32% more energy efficient at 40 km/h than at 72 km/h. The results of the competition data analysis confirm that these engineering competitions not only provide an educational experience for the students, but also show technology performance and improvements in electric and hybrid vehicles by setting benchmarks and revealing trends.

  16. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  17. New York Power Authority/New York City Housing Authority refrigerator replacement program, first program year evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, L.F.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States); Pratt, R.G.; Miller, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acting as an energy services provider, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) has initiated a long-term project through which 20,000 refrigerators per year will be replaced with the most energy-efficient units possible in apartments managed by the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). Using bulk purchasing as an incentive to appliance manufacturers to produce energy-efficient refrigerators suitable for use in apartments, replaced in the first year of the program, which ended in December 1996. These units, kWh per year. Savings were determined by field testing and laboratory testing of 220 existing refrigerators and 56 newly-installed units. In the next program year, a 15.0-cubic-foot Maytag refrigerator, newly-designed in response to bulk purchasing incentives, is being installed. The new unit has a label rating of 437 kWh per year, 31 percent better than 1993 energy standards. Old refrigerators removed from apartments are {open_quotes}demanufactured{close_quotes} in an environmentally-appropriate way and both metals and refrigerants are recovered for reuse.

  18. Integrated Testing, Simulation and Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory verified diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reduction and cost implications of plug-in hybrid gasoline and diesel variants. These variants are run on a field-data-derived design matrix to analyze the effects of drive cycle, distance, battery replacements, battery capacity, and motor power on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. Two cost scenarios using fuel prices corresponding to forecasted highs for 2011 and 2030 and battery costs per kilowatt-hour representing current and long-term targets compare plug-in hybrid lifetime costs with diesel conventional lifetime costs. Under a future cost scenario of $100/kWh battery energy and $5/gal fuel, plug-in hybrids are cost effective. Assuming a current cost of $700/kWh and $3/gal fuel, they rarely recoup the additional motor and battery cost. The results highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle, daily driving distance, and kinetic intensity. For instances in the current-cost scenario where the additional plug-in hybrid cost is regained in fuel savings, the combination of kinetic intensity and daily distance travelled does not coincide with the usage patterns observed in the field data. If the usage patterns were adjusted, the hybrids could become cost effective.

  19. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  20. The Federal Advanced Wind Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines has been identified as a high priority activity by the US wind industry. The Department of Energy`s Wind Energy Program has begun a multi-year development program aimed at assisting the wind industry with the design, development, and testing of advanced wind turbine systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $0.05/kWh at 13 mph sites by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $0.04/kWh at 13 mph sites by the year 2000. The development plan consists of four phases: (1) Conceptual Design Studies; (2) Near-Term Product Development; (3) Next Generation Technology Integration and Design, and (4) Next- Generation Technology Development and Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies were begun in late 1990, and are scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1992. Preliminary results from these analyses are very promising and indicate that the goals stated above are technically feasible. This paper includes a brief summary of the Conceptual Design Studies and presents initial plans for the follow-on activities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  1. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.] [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  2. The Federal Advanced Wind Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hock, S M; Thresher, R W [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P R [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines has been identified as a high priority activity by the US wind industry. The Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program has begun a multi-year development program aimed at assisting the wind industry with the design, development, and testing of advanced wind turbine systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $0.05/kWh at 13 mph sites by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $0.04/kWh at 13 mph sites by the year 2000. The development plan consists of four phases: (1) Conceptual Design Studies; (2) Near-Term Product Development; (3) Next Generation Technology Integration and Design, and (4) Next- Generation Technology Development and Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies were begun in late 1990, and are scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1992. Preliminary results from these analyses are very promising and indicate that the goals stated above are technically feasible. This paper includes a brief summary of the Conceptual Design Studies and presents initial plans for the follow-on activities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  4. Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

  5. Fundamental Thermal Fluid Physics of High Temperature Flows in Advanced Reactor Systems - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program Interoffice Work Order (IWO) MSF99-0254 Final Report for Period 1 August 1999 to 31 December 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEligot, D.M.; Condie, K.G.; Foust, T.D.; McCreery, G.E.; Pink, R.J.; Stacey, D.E. (INEEL); Shenoy, A.; Baccaglini, G. (General Atomics); Pletcher, R.H. (Iowa State U.); Wallace, J.M.; Vukoslavcevic, P. (U. Maryland); Jackson, J.D. (U. Manchester, UK); Kunugi, T. (Kyoto U., Japan); Satake, S.-i. (Tokyo U. Science, Japan)

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of advanced reactors for higher efficiency and enhanced safety and for deployable reactors for electrical power generation, process heat utilization and hydrogen generation. While key applications would be advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGCRs) using the closed Brayton cycle (CBC) for higher efficiency (such as the proposed Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) of General Atomics [Neylan and Simon, 1996]), results of the proposed research should also be valuable in reactor systems with supercritical flow or superheated vapors, e.g., steam. Higher efficiency leads to lower cost/kwh and reduces life-cycle impacts of radioactive waste (by reducing waters/kwh). The outcome will also be useful for some space power and propulsion concepts and for some fusion reactor concepts as side benefits, but they are not the thrusts of the investigation. The objective of the project is to provide fundamental thermal fluid physics knowledge and measurements necessary for the development of the improved methods for the applications.

  6. Structural Composites Industries 4 kilowatt wind system development. Phase I: design and analysis, technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machine to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. The Phase I effort began in November, 1979 and was carried through the Final Design Review in February 1981. During this period extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating the following unique features: Composite Blades; Free-Standing Composite Tower; Torque-Actuated Blade Pitch Control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

  7. The feasibility of replacing or upgrading utility distribution transformers during routine maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.; McConnell, B.W.; Cohn, S.M.; Purucker, S.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is estimated that electric utilities use about 40 million distribution transformers in supplying electricity to customers in the United States. Although utility distribution transformers collectively have a high average efficiency, they account for approximately 61 billion kWh of the 229 billion kWh of energy lost annually in the delivery of electricity. Distribution transformers are being replaced over time by new, more efficient, lower-loss units during routine utility maintenance of power distribution systems. Maintenance is typically not performed on units in service. However, units removed from service with appreciable remaining life are often refurbished and returned to stock. Distribution transformers may be removed from service for many reasons, including failure, over- or underloading, or line upgrades such as voltage changes or rerouting. When distribution transformers are removed from service, a decision must be made whether to dispose of the transformer and purchase a lower-loss replacement or to refurbish the transformer and return it to stock for future use. This report contains findings and recommendations on replacing utility distribution transformers during routine maintenance, which is required by section 124(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the practicability, cost-effectiveness, and potential energy savings of replacing or upgrading existing transformers during routine utility maintenance and to develop recommendations on was to achieve the potential energy savings.

  8. Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

  9. Steam driven centrifugal pump for low cost boiler feed service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a steam driven centrifugal pump for boiler feed-water and other high pressure water applications, which was awarded Top Honors in the special pumps category of the 1982 Chemical processing Vaaler competition, because the simple design with turbine, pump and controls combined in an integral unit provides high operating efficiency and reliable performance with minimal maintenance. Single source responsibility for all components when the pump may have to be serviced is another advantage. These features meet the requirements for boiler feed pumps that are critical to maintaining a consistent steam supply in a process plant where downtime can be extremely expensive. The annual cost to operate the pump for 8000 hours is about $100,000, if electricity costs 5 cents/kwh. These pumps can be run for about $30,000 on steam, if natural gas costs $4.00/mcf. Cost savings are $70,000 annually.

  10. 30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric-transmission stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, R.D.; Rogers, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration operates the electric power transmission system that connects the Pacific Northwest and southern California. The HVAC interties develop 0.35 Hz oscillations when the lines are heavily loaded. A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter can provide system damping for the oscillation. The unit is scheduled for installation in 1982 and operation in 1982-83. Status of the project is described. The conductor has been fully tested electrically and mechanically and the 5 kA superconducting cable has been produced. The 30 MJ superconducting coil is essentially complete. All major components of the electrical and cryogenic systems except the nonconducting dewar have been completed. The refrigerator and converter are undergoing tests. The system is to be located at the BPA Tacoma Substation and operated by microwave link from Portland, OR.

  11. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at Massachusetts Military Reservation. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, B.; Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying photovoltaics (PV) systems on a superfund site located within the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR). The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.17/kWh and incentives offered in the State of Massachusetts, such as the solar renewable energy credits. According to calculations, MMR can place 8 MW of ballast-weighted, ground-mounted PV systems on the crowns of the three landfill caps and the borrow pit with the PV modules tilted at 30 degrees.

  12. Persistent Commissioning, Persistent Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, W. R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , completed in late 2012, focused on the optimization of economizer lockout setpoints and air handler operating hours, and saved 680,000 kWh and 39,000 therms annually. At a high level, the programming changes were simple in concept, though the practical... Economizers 86,083 -2,360 $8,326 $0 0 3 - Economizer Lockout Setpoints 511,190 0 $76,614 $13,200 0.17 4 - Boiler Schedule 34,891 71,763 $54,305 $4,500 0.08 5 - Optimize Boiler Lockout Setpoints 2,521 1,121 $1,158 $0 0 6 ? Exhaust Fan VFD 45,589 0 $3...

  13. Optimizing Power Factor Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

    has been reversed. The 36 different plots that are given in each Fig. 6 through 8 are for 36 different combinations PB (yr) 1.0 1.1 0.8 0.9 1.0 P F 2 ./ 0.5 -+/::.......----------------'1':7 0.5 PFl 1.0 Dr ? ZIZ Itw. DfB? zz,zzz kWh. B... ? $z,zzz. D ? $zz/kVAR. Figure 3. Payback period contours; upper triangle 1.0 PFI 0.5 ~....L---------------------t-0.5 0.9 '0.8 1.0 P F 2 / ./ 1.0 1.1 PB (yr) Figure 4. Payback period contours; lower triangle 811 ESL-IE-86...

  14. Raytheon: Compressed Air System Upgrade Saves Energy and Improves Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, Raytheon Company upgraded the efficiency of the compressed air system at its Integrated Air Defense Center in Andover, Massachusetts, to save energy and reduce costs. Worn compressors and dryers were replaced, a more sophisticated control strategy was installed, and an aggressive leak detection and repair effort was carried out. The total cost of these improvements was $342,000; however, National Grid, a utility service provider, contributed a $174,000 incentive payment. Total annual energy and maintenance cost savings are estimated at $141,500, and energy savings are nearly 1.6 million kWh. This case study was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program.

  15. Bexar County Parking Garage Photovoltaic Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golda Weir

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the Bexar County Parking Garage Photovoltaic (PV) Panel project is to install a PV System that will promote the use of renewable energy. This project will also help sustain Bexar County ongoing greenhouse gas emissions reduction and energy efficiency goals. The scope of this project includes the installation of a 100-kW system on the top level of a new 236,285 square feet parking garage. The PV system consists of 420 solar panels that covers 7,200 square feet and is tied into the electric-grid. It provides electricity to the office area located within the garage. The estimated annual electricity production of the PV system is 147,000 kWh per year.

  16. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on brownfield sites in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All of the assessed sites are landfills. The sites were assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.119/kWh and incentives offered by Puerto Rico and by the serving utility, PREPA. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site at the Refuse Hideaway Landfill in Middleton, Wisconsin. The site currently has a PV system in place and was assessed for further PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.1333/kWh and incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and by the serving utility, Madison Gas and Electric. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  18. RenewableNY - An Industrial Energy Conservation Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubarr, Tzipora

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York Industrial Retention Network (NYIRN) manages the RenewableNY program to assist industrial companies in New York City to implement energy efficiency projects. RenewableNY provides companies with project management assistance and grants to identify opportunities for energy savings and implement energy efficiency projects. The program helps companies identify energy efficient projects, complete an energy audit, and connect with energy contractors who install renewable energy and energy efficient equipment. It also provides grants to help cover the costs of installation for new systems and equipment. RenewableNY demonstrates that a small grant program that also provides project management assistance can incentivize companies to implement energy efficiency projects that might otherwise be avoided. Estimated savings through RenewableNY include 324,500 kWh saved through efficiency installations, 158 kW of solar energy systems installed, and 945 thm of gas avoided.

  19. Quantification of Energy and Emissions Saved in Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (6.0 tons/OSD) 1,772 tons/yr for SO2 2,286,012 tons/yr for CO2 * Note $0.095/kWh, $0.65/therm p. 64 Energy Systems Laboratory © 2011 RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15... Landfill gas Hydro RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. Landfill gas, hydro are next. 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 20,000,000 25,000,000 30,000,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 E le ct ri ci ty G en...

  20. Wind energy as a significant source of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, R.G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

  1. NREL/CCSE PEV Battery Second Use Project (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the Battery Second Use Project. Preliminary analysis results show (1) the impact of competing technologies, (2) potential revenue generation, and (3) supply and demand of the second use of plug-in electric vehicle batteries. The impact of competing technologies are: maximum salve value of a used battery will be limited by future battery prices, under favorable conditions, second use can only discount today's battery prices by 12% or less, however, second use will offer batteries to second applications at reduced cost (typically < $170/kWh). Revenue streams are highly variable, allowable battery costs are highly sensitive to balance-of-system costs, and batteries need to be very cheap for these applications to be viable. Supply and demand show that high-value applications have both competition and small markets, and supply from plug-in electric vehicles has the potential to overwhelm many second use markets.

  2. MIXTURES OF CO2-SF6 AS WORKING FLUIDS FOR GEOTHERMAL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Yin, Hebi [ORNL; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, mixtures of CO2 and SF6 were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal plants based on property measurements, molecular dynamics modeling, thermodynamic cycle analysis, and materials compatibility assessment. The CO2 - SF6 was evaluated for a reservoir temperature of 160 oC. Increasing the efficiency for these low reservoir sources will increase the options available for geothermal energy utilization in more sites across the country. The properties for the mixtures were obtained either from thermodynamic property measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. Optimum compositions of the CO2 - SF6 were identified for a well reservoir temperature and a given water-cooling condition. Concerning the global warming potential, it was estimated that the equivalent CO2 emissions per 1kWh for a Rankine cycle operating with 100% SF6 would be approximately of 7.6% than those for a coal-fired power plant.

  3. Off-peak air conditioning; A major energy saver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, C.D.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, the mission given to manufacturers is changing to include saving energy (kWh). Until now, saving energy was ignored because the utilities were happy to fill their night valley to reach a higher load factor. There also was a general feeling that making ice was much less efficient than standard air conditioning, and that anyone saying otherwise was a dreamer. This article discusses the energy savings based on the more prevalent ice storage technology, the similar suction temperatures of the various types of ice storage, and how storage is applied. Included are baseload power generation, partial storage with chiller priority, using air cooled condensers when making ice at night, colder duct air, heat recovery, central rooftop systems, smart controls, electric/gas combinations, supply side transmission and distribution losses, and cooling of air entering gas turbine generators during peak conditions.

  4. Electric Power monthly, November 1995 with data for August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents monthly electricity statistics, with the purpose of providing energy decisionmakers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities; the information are from six data sources: forms EIA-759, FERC Form 423, EIA-826, EIA-861, EIA-860, and Form OE-417R. An article on reclicensing and environmental issues affecting hydropower is included. Then the statistics are presented in: US electric power at a glance, utility net generation, utility consumption of fossil fuels, fossil-fuel stocks at utilities, fossil fuel receipts and costs, utility sales/revenue/average revenue per kWh, and monthly plant aggregates. Finally, nonutility power producer statistics, bibliography, technical notes, and a glossary are presented.

  5. Demonstration of the potential for energy conservation in several food-processing plants. Final report, December 15, 1977-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okos, M.R.; Marks, J.S.; Baker, T.

    1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed energy audit was performed on an operating fluid milk plant with a 1979 production of 12.33 million gallons. Approximately 52% of the fuel energy was lost to inefficient boiler operation. About 40% of the electrical demand is from refrigeration compressors. A detailed evaluation was made of various energy saving options. The process heat requirements can be economically decreased to 8.4 billion Btu from the present 26.4 billion Btu's. Similarly it was found that 1.15 million kWh of electricity could be saved based on the 1979 consumption load. Using various heat recovery options, it was found, while maintaining the normal investment criterion, the boiler fuel requirement could be decreased to less than 1 billion Btu's per year.

  6. Comparison of technologies for new energy-efficient lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.R.; Rubinstein, F.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-efficient light bulbs are being developed to replace the incandescent lamp where they can satisfy the design criteria and be used in sockets that have long hours of annual use. The four technologies discussed include the compact fluorescent lamp, coated-filament lamp, electrodeless fluorescent lamp, and compact high-intensity discharge lamp. The systems demonstrate efficacy improvements of two to four times that of their incandescent counterparts. These new lamps have required considerable advances in lamp technology. They offer the potential for achieving efficacies close to 80 lm/W. These new lamps will reduce the energy used annually by incandescent lamps (190 billion kWh) by more than 50 percent in the 1990's, at which times they will be commonly employed.

  7. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  8. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former St. Marks Refinery in St. Marks, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on a brownfield site in St. Marks, Florida. The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.08/kWh and incentives offered in the State of Florida and from the two accessible utilities, Progress Energy and the City of Tallahassee. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the fixed-tilt thin film technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  9. Development and operation of a photovoltaic power system for use at remote Antarctic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piszczor, M.F.; Kohout, L.L.; Manzo, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Colozza, A.J. [NYMA, Brook Park, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic power system, designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has successfully operated over the past two summer seasons at a remote site in Antarctica, providing utility-type power for a six-person field team. The system was installed at the Lake Hoare site for approximately five weeks during late 1992, put into storage for the Antarctic winter, and then used again during the 1993 season. The photovoltaic power system consists of three silicon photovoltaic sub-arrays delivering a total of 1.5 kWe peak power, three lead-acid gel battery modules supplying 2.4 kWh, and an electrical distribution system which delivers 120 Vac and 12 Vdc to the user. The system worked extremely well in providing quiet, reliable power. The experience gained from early system demonstrations such as this should be beneficial in accelerating the transition toward future PV systems in Antarctica and other similar areas.

  10. Commissioning and Retro Commissioning Programs for Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuklarni, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .powerofaction.com/efficiency 12 Monthly Energy Usage Before and After Retro Commissioning Project Trottier Middle School Monthly Energy Usage Trottier Middle School - kWh 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May... ? Location: Worcester, MA ? Building Area: 475,000 square feet ? Annual Energy Usage: 16,490,400 kWh/year and 339,111 therms/year ? Projected Energy Savings: 363,293 kWh/year and 17,633 therms/year ? Energy Savings Low Cost/No Cost Measures (identified...

  11. Electric power monthly. June 1966 with data for March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public, with the purpose of providing energy decisionmakers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities (Public Law 93-275). A section on upgrading transmission capacity for wholesale electric power trade is included. The tables include US electric power at a glance, utility net generation, utility consumption of fossil fuels, fossil-fuel stocks/receipts/cost at utilities, utility sales/revenue/revenue per kWh, and monthly plant aggregates.

  12. Determination analysis of energy conservation standards for distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.; McConnell, B.W.; Das, S.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information for US DOE to use in making a determination on proposing energy conservation standards for distribution transformers as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Potential for saving energy with more efficient liquid-immersed and dry-type distribution transformers could be significant because these transformers account for an estimated 140 billion kWh of the annual energy lost in the delivery of electricity. Objective was to determine whether energy conservation standards for distribution transformers would have the potential for significant energy savings, be technically feasible, and be economically justified from a national perspective. It was found that energy conservation for distribution transformers would be technically and economically feasible. Based on the energy conservation options analyzed, 3.6-13.7 quads of energy could be saved from 2000 to 2030.

  13. Environmental Impact of the Texas LoanSTAR Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athar, A.; Abbas, M.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Harvey, T.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    savings (in kwh). These categories are also useful for evaluating the environmental impact of the program. Table 1: Average Emission Factors I I NATURAL GAS I I i I TX I EIA (1993) 1 1.216 1 0.00 I 4.71 I I I COAL I I I I C TX USA I TX 1 EIA... (1993) 1 1.960 1 5.87 I 9.50 1 EPA EIA ( 1993) Region EPA 1 1.700 1 4.85 1 5.50 1 I I I I I USA I EIA (1993) 1 1,933 1 18.21 1 8.87 I 1,700 1.187 -. - Source I USA 1 EIA (1993) 1 NA 1 0.00 1 0.00 1 4.85 0.00 co2 IbsNWh Region TX TX 5...

  14. An adaptive attack on Wiesner's quantum money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharon Brodutch; Daniel Nagaj; Or Sattath; Dominique Unruh

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike classical money, which is hard to forge for practical reasons (e.g. producing paper with a certain property), quantum money is attractive because its security might be based on the no-cloning theorem. The first quantum money scheme was introduced by Wiesner circa 1970. Although more sophisticated quantum money schemes were proposed, Wiesner's scheme remained appealing because it is both conceptually clean and relatively easy to implement. We show efficient adaptive attacks on Wiesner's quantum money scheme [Wie83] (and its variant by Bennett et al. [BBBW83]), when valid money is accepted and passed on, while invalid money is destroyed. We propose two attacks, the first is inspired by the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb testing problem [EV93, KWH+95], while the second is based on the idea of protective measurements [AAV93]. It allows us to break Wiesner's scheme with 4 possible states per qubit, and generalizations which use more than 4 states per qubit.

  15. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Van Geet, O.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California. The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.13/kWh and incentives offered by Southern California Edison under the California Solar Initiative. According to the assessment, a government-owned, ground-mounted PV system represents a technically and economically feasible option. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  16. EPA Clean Energy-Environment Guide to Action 5.5 Fostering Green Power Markets Policy Description and Objective Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Green power is a relatively small but growing market that provides electricity customers the opportunity to make environmental choices about their electricity consumption. Programs in more than 40 states currently serve approximately 540,000 customers, representing nearly 4 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually. Green power is offered in both vertically integrated and competitive retail markets. Green power programs have existed for approximately 10 years and have contributed to the development of over 2,200 megawatts (MW) of new renewable capacity over that time. A recent study estimates that this could reach 8,000 MW by 2015 (Wiser et al. 2001). Because participation in green power programs is voluntary, the role for states may be more limited

  17. Conversion Factor Table http://vertex42.com/edu/kinematics.html Copyright 2005 Jon Wittwer Multiply by To Get

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    .696 psia bar 0.9869 atm, std bar 1x105 Pa Btu 778.169 ft·lbf Btu 1055.056 J Btu 5.40395 psia·ft3 Btu 2.928x10-4 kWh Btu 1x10-5 therm Btu / hr 1.055056 kJ / hr Btu / hr 0.216 ft·lbf / sec Btu / hr 3.929x10-4 hp Btu / hr 0.2931 W Btu / lbm 2.326* kJ / kg Btu / lbm 25,037 ft2 / s2 Btu / lbm·R 4.1868 kJ / kg

  18. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program has progressed to the stage of evaluating full-sized (220 Ah) cells, multicell modules, and 22 kWh batteries. Nickel electrodes that display stable capacities of up to 24 Ah/plate (at C/3 drain rate) at design thickness (2.5 mm) in tests at 200/sup +/ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are also delivering 24 Ah/plate (at C/3) at target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron plates are displaying capacity stability for 300/sup +/ test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Best finished cells are delivering 57 to 63 Wh/kg at C/3, based on cell weights of the finished cells, and in the actual designed cell volume. 6-cell module (6-1) performance has demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 53 WH/kg at the C/3 drain rate. This module is now being evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory. The 2 x 4 battery has been constructed, tested, and delivered for engineering test and evaluation. The battery delivered 22.5 kWh, as required (199 Ah discharge at 113 V-bar) at the C/3 drain rate. The battery has performed satisfactorily under dynamometer and constant current drain tests. Some cell problems, related to construction, necessitated changing 3 modules, but the battery is now ready for further testing. Reduction in nickel plate swelling (and concurrent stack electrolyte starvation), to improve cycling, is one area of major effort to reach the final battery objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes are showing promise in initial full-size cell tests and will continue to be evaluated in finished cells, along with other technology advancements. 30 figures, 14 tables.

  19. Grinding energy and physical properties of chopped and hammer-milled barley, wheat, oat, and canola straws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Tumuluru [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Biofuels and Renewable Energy Technologies Dept.; L.G. Tabil [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Y. Song [Shenyang Agricultural University (China). Coll. of Engineering; K.L. Iroba [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; V. Meda [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, specific energy for grinding and physical properties of wheat, canola, oat and barley straw grinds were investigated. The initial moisture content of the straw was about 0.13–0.15 (fraction total mass basis). Particle size reduction experiments were conducted in two stages: (1) a chopper without a screen, and (2) a hammer mill using three screen sizes (19.05, 25.4, and 31.75 mm). The lowest grinding energy (1.96 and 2.91 kWh t-1) was recorded for canola straw using a chopper and hammer mill with 19.05-mm screen size, whereas the highest (3.15 and 8.05 kWh t-1) was recorded for barley and oat straws. The physical properties (geometric mean particle diameter, bulk, tapped and particle density, and porosity) of the chopped and hammer-milled wheat, barley, canola, and oat straw grinds measured were in the range of 0.98–4.22 mm, 36–80 kg m-3, 49–119 kg m-3, 600–1220 kg m-3, and 0.9–0.96, respectively. The average mean particle diameter was highest for the chopped wheat straw (4.22-mm) and lowest for the canola grind (0.98-mm). The canola grinds produced using the hammer mill (19.05-mm screen size) had the highest bulk and tapped density of about 80 and 119 kg m-3; whereas, the wheat and oat grinds had the lowest of about 58 and 88–90 kg m-3. The results indicate that the bulk and tapped densities are inversely proportional to the particle size of the grinds. The flow properties of the grinds calculated are better for chopped straws compared to hammer milled using smaller screen size (19.05 mm).

  20. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  1. A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

  2. An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R; Goldman, P [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

  3. Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Jenne, D. S.; Thresher, R.; Copping, A.; Geerlofs, S.; Hanna, L. A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. A conceptual design for a taut moored oscillating surge wave energy converter was developed. The design had an annual electrical power of 108 kilowatts (kW), rated power of 360 kW, and intended deployment at water depths between 50 m and 100 m. The study includes structural analysis, power output estimation, a hydraulic power conversion chain system, and mooring designs. The results were used to estimate device capital cost and annual operation and maintenance costs. The device performance and costs were used for the economic analysis, following the methodology presented in SAND2013-9040 that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays up to 100 devices. The levelized cost of energy estimated for the Reference Model 5 OSWEC, presented in this report, was for a single device and arrays of 10, 50, and 100 units, and it enabled the economic analysis to account for cost reductions associated with economies of scale. The baseline commercial levelized cost of energy estimate for the Reference Model 5 device in an array comprised of 10 units is $1.44/kilowatt-hour (kWh), and the value drops to approximately $0.69/kWh for an array of 100 units.

  4. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  5. The price of electricity from private power producers: Stage 2, Expansion of sample and preliminary statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comnes, G.A.; Belden, T.N.; Kahn, E.P.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for long-term bulk power is becoming increasingly competitive and mature. Given that many privately developed power projects have been or are being developed in the US, it is possible to begin to evaluate the performance of the market by analyzing its revealed prices. Using a consistent method, this paper presents levelized contract prices for a sample of privately developed US generation properties. The sample includes 26 projects with a total capacity of 6,354 MW. Contracts are described in terms of their choice of technology, choice of fuel, treatment of fuel price risk, geographic location, dispatchability, expected dispatch niche, and size. The contract price analysis shows that gas technologies clearly stand out as the most attractive. At an 80% capacity factor, coal projects have an average 20-year levelized price of $0.092/kWh, whereas natural gas combined cycle and/or cogeneration projects have an average price of $0.069/kWh. Within each technology type subsample, however, there is considerable variation. Prices for natural gas combustion turbines and one wind project are also presented. A preliminary statistical analysis is conducted to understand the relationship between price and four categories of explanatory factors including product heterogeneity, geographic heterogeneity, economic and technological change, and other buyer attributes (including avoided costs). Because of residual price variation, we are unable to accept the hypothesis that electricity is a homogeneous product. Instead, the analysis indicates that buyer value still plays an important role in the determination of price for competitively-acquired electricity.

  6. Advanced wind turbine near-term product development. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990 the US Department of Energy initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine (AWT) Program to assist the growth of a viable wind energy industry in the US. This program, which has been managed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has been divided into three phases: (1) conceptual design studies, (2) near-term product development, and (3) next-generation product development. The goals of the second phase were to bring into production wind turbines which would meet the cost goal of $0.05 kWh at a site with a mean (Rayleigh) windspeed of 5.8 m/s (13 mph) and a vertical wind shear exponent of 0.14. These machines were to allow a US-based industry to compete domestically with other sources of energy and to provide internationally competitive products. Information is given in the report on design values of peak loads and of fatigue spectra and the results of the design process are summarized in a table. Measured response is compared with the results from mathematical modeling using the ADAMS code and is discussed. Detailed information is presented on the estimated costs of maintenance and on spare parts requirements. A failure modes and effects analysis was carried out and resulted in approximately 50 design changes including the identification of ten previously unidentified failure modes. The performance results of both prototypes are examined and adjusted for air density and for correlation between the anemometer site and the turbine location. The anticipated energy production at the reference site specified by NREL is used to calculate the final cost of energy using the formulas indicated in the Statement of Work. The value obtained is $0.0514/kWh in January 1994 dollars. 71 figs., 30 tabs.

  7. Design and laboratory testing of an unequal parallel multicompressor supermarket refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toscano, W.M.; Cooper, W.L.; Oven, M.J.; Vineyard, E.A.; Walker, D.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Supermarket Refrigeration Systems Project was structured to investigate and develop new highly energy-efficient supermarket refrigeration systems. A supermarket refrigeration system that included unequal parallel compressors, a condenser with floating head-pressure control, and a microprocessor-based electronic control system was analyzed, designed, and tested. The total system capacity is 35 hp (26.10 kW), consisting of three compressors of 5, 10, and 20 hp (3.73, 7.46, and 14.91 kW), which were determined to be the optimum number and capacity distribution. A theoretical comparison to conventional supermarket refrigeration systems revealed that the three unequal parallel compressor system with R-12 exhibited a maximum annual energy savings of 29,100 kWh, or 26 percent and with R-502 exhibited a maximum annual energy savings of 20,100 kWh, or 15 percent. A compressor capacity control algorithm was designed to select the optimum compressor combination for each operating condition by matching compressor capacity to refrigeration load. A microprocessor system was selected for system control and data acquisition. The economic analysis revealed that for a payback period of three years or less, an added microprocessor-based electronic control system that costs between $500 and $1500, depending on the refrigerant used and the refrigeration load, is acceptable. Testing was performed on the unequal parallel compressor system over a refrigeration load range of 78,000 to 160,000 Btu/hr (22.86 to 46.88 kW). For refrigerant R-12, the increase in the energy efficiency ratio (EER) for the microprocessor-based electronic control system, as compared to the mechanical pressure control system, ranged from 9.8 to 14.4 percent.

  8. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

  9. An Assessment of Envelope Measures in Mild Climate Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Less, Brennan

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy end-uses and interior comfort conditions have been monitored in 11 Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs) in a mild marine climate. Two broad categories of DER envelope were identified: first, bringing homes up to current code levels of insulation and airtightness, and second, enhanced retrofits that go beyond these code requirements. The efficacy of envelope measures in DERs was difficult to determine, due to the intermingled effects of enclosure improvements, HVAC system upgrades and changes in interior comfort conditions. While energy reductions in these project homes could not be assigned to specific improvements, the combined effects of changes in enclosure, HVAC system and comfort led to average heating energy reductions of 76percent (12,937 kWh) in the five DERs with pre-retrofit data, or 80percent (5.9 kWh/ft2) when normalized by floor area. Overall, net-site energy reductions averaged 58percent (15,966 kWh; n=5), and DERs with code-style envelopes achieved average net-site energy reductions of 65percent (18,923 kWh; n=4). In some homes, the heating energy reductions were actually larger than the whole house reductions that were achieved, which suggests that substantial additional energy uses were added to the home during the retrofit that offset some heating savings. Heating system operation and energy use was shown to vary inconsistently with outdoor conditions, suggesting that most DERs were not thermostatically controlled and that occupants were engaged in managing the indoor environmental conditions. Indoor temperatures maintained in these DERs were highly variable, and no project home consistently provided conditions within the ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 heating season comfort zone. Thermal comfort and heating system operation had a large impact on performance and were found to depend upon the occupant activities, so DERs should be designed with the occupants needs and patterns of consumption in mind. Beyond-code building envelopes were not found to be strictly necessary for the achievement of deep energy savings in existing uninsulated homes in mild marine climates, provided that other energy end-uses were comprehensively reduced. We recommend that mild climate DERs pursue envelopes in compliance with the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and pair these with high efficiency, off-the-shelf HVAC equipment. Enhanced building envelopes should be considered in cases where very low heating energy use (<1,000 kWh/year or <0.5 kWh/ft2-year) and enhanced thermal comfort (ASHRAE 55-2010) are required, as well as in those situations where substantial energy uses are added to the home, such as decorative lighting, cooling or smart home A/V and communication equipment.

  10. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Spain

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University�¢����s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

  11. Recovery Act - Demonstration of Sodium Ion Battery for Grid Level Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, Ted; Whitacre, Jay; Eshoo, Michael; Noland, James; Campbell, Williams; Spears, Christopher

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquion Energy received a $5.179 million cooperative research agreement under the Department of Energyâ??s Smart Grid Demonstration Program â?? Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies (Program Area 2.5) of FOA DE-FOE-0000036. The main objective of this project was to demonstrate Aquionâ??s low cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature sodium ion energy storage device. The centerpiece of the technology is a novel hybrid energy storage chemistry that has been proven in a laboratory environment. The objective was to translate these groundbreaking results from the small-batch, small-cell test environment to the pilot scale to enable significant numbers of multiple ampere-hour cells to be manufactured and assembled into test batteries. Aquion developed a proof of concept demonstration unit that showed similar performance and major cost improvement over existing technologies. Beyond minimizing cell and system cost, Aquion built a technology that is safe, environmentally benign and durable over many thousands of cycles as used in a variety of grid support roles. As outlined in the Program documents, the original goals of the project were to demonstrate a unit that: 1. Has a projected capital cost of less than $250/kWh at the pack level 2. A deep discharge cycle life of > 10,000 cycles 3. A volumetric energy density of >20 kWh/m3 4. Projected calendar life of over 10 years 5. A device that contains no hazardous materials and retains best in class safety characteristics. Through the course of this project Aquion developed its aqueous electrolyte electrochemical energy storage device to the point where large demonstration units (> 10 kWh) were able to function in grid-supporting functions detailed by their collaborators. Aquionâ??s final deliverable was an ~15 kWh system that has the ability to perform medium to long duration (> 2 hours) charge and discharge functions approaching 95% DC-DC efficiency. The system has functioned, and continues to function as predicted with no indication that it will not tolerate well beyond 10 calendar years and 10,000 cycles. It has been in continuous operation for more than 1 year with 1,000 cycles (of varying depth of discharge, including 100% depth of discharge) and no identifiable degradation to the system. The final thick electrode cell structure has shown an energy density of 25 kWh/m3 at a five hour (or greater) discharge time. The primary chemistry has remained non-toxic, containing no acids or other corrosive chemicals, and the battery units have passed numerous safety tests, including flame resistance testing. These tests have verified the claim that the device is safe to use and contains no hazardous materials. Current projections show costs at the pack level to offer best in class value and are competitive with lead-acid batteries, factoring in LCOE.

  12. The WEI6K, a 6-kW 7-m Small Wind Turbine: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Kyle K.; McCleer, Patrick J.; Hahlbeck, Edwin C.; DOE Project Office - Keith Bennett

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy under a DOE solicitation “Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development.” The objective of this project has been to design a new small wind turbine with improved cost, reliability and performance in grid-connected residential and small business applications, in order to achieve the overall DOE goal of cost effectiveness in Class 3 wind resources that can now be achieved in Class 5 resources. The scope of work for this project has been to complete the preliminary design of an improved small wind turbine, including preliminary loads and strength analyses; analysis and design of all major components; systems integration and structural dynamic analysis; estimation of life-cycle cost of energy; and design documentation and review. The project did not entail hardware fabrication or testing. The WEI6K Turbine resulting from this project is an upwind horizontal-axis wind turbine rated at 6 kW. It features a 3-blade 7-m diameter rotor. The generator is a direct-drive permanent magnet synchronous machine generating 3-phase power at 240 VAC. The turbine is maintained oriented in to the wind via active yaw control using electromechanical servos. Power is regulated with active blade pitch control. The turbine is presently designed to be placed on a 100-foot (30m) tower. The turbine is predicted to generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy (COE) between 7.3 and 8.9 ˘/kWh at an IEC Class II site, with an average wind speed of 8.5 m/s at hub height, depending upon whether the customer uses a guyed truss tower (the lower figure) or a monopole tower. For the NREL Reference Site, with a mean wind speed of 5.35 m/s at 10 m height, the turbine would generate at a levelized cost of energy of between 9.7 and 11.9 ˘/kWh. The lowest of these numbers is presently competitive with retail electricity rates in most of the country. The 8.9 ˘/kWh is still competitive with retail rates in many regions of the country with high electricity costs. The study further concludes that several design changes could shave 10-14% from the cost of energy determined in the preliminary design. These changes include a new tower design that offers tilt-up capability without guy wires and takes better advantage of the lowered loads produced by pitch control; design a family of airfoils more appropriate for pitch regulation on a turbine of this size; tune the pitch controller properly to minimize shedding of power during turbulent operation in the transition from Region 2 to 3; value engineer the pitch system to shave costs, including consideration of a collective pitch system; and refine the design of the hub and main frame castings to minimize weight and cost. We are generally encouraged by the results. These preliminary numbers show that we can produce a turbine that is competitive with retail electric rates at relatively windy IEC Class II sites. With further improvements in the design, we believe the turbine could be competitive at sites with lesser wind resource.

  13. Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

  14. Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a feasibility study of m0treAlables on several brownfield sites. The EPA defines a brownfield as 'a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.' All of the brownfields in this study are landfill sites. Citizens of Puerto Rico, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Puerto Rico, which are particularly well suited for solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed-tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed-tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. All of the landfills in Puerto Rico were screened according to these criteria in order to determine the sites with the greatest potential. Eight landfills were chosen for site visits based on the screening criteria and location. Because of time constraints and the fact that Puerto Rico is a relatively large island, the eight landfills for this visit were all located in the eastern half of the island. The findings from this report can be applied to landfills in the western half of the island. The economics of a potential PV system on landfills in Puerto Rico depend greatly on the cost of electricity. Currently, PREPA has an average electric rate of $0.119/kWh. Based on past electric rate increases in Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean, this rate could increase to $0.15/kWh or higher in a relatively short amount of time. In the coming years, increasing electrical rates and increased necessity for clean power will continue to improve the feasibility of implementing solar PV systems at these sites.

  15. The CUNY Energy Institute Electrical Energy Storage Development for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Project Objectives The objectives of the project are to elucidate science issues intrinsic to high energy density electricity storage (battery) systems for smart-grid applications, research improvements in such systems to enable scale-up to grid-scale and demonstrate a large 200 kWh battery to facilitate transfer of the technology to industry. 2. Background Complex and difficult to control interfacial phenomena are intrinsic to high energy density electrical energy storage systems, since they are typically operated far from equilibrium. One example of such phenomena is the formation of dendrites. Such dendrites occur on battery electrodes as they cycle, and can lead to internal short circuits, reducing cycle life. An improved understanding of the formation of dendrites and their control can improve the cycle life and safety of many energy storage systems, including rechargeable lithium and zinc batteries. Another area where improved understanding is desirable is the application of ionic liquids as electrolytes in energy storage systems. An ionic liquid is typically thought of as a material that is fully ionized (consisting only of anions and cations) and is fluid at or near room temperature. Some features of ionic liquids include a generally high thermal stability (up to 450 °C), a high electrochemical window (up to 6 V) and relatively high intrinsic conductivities. Such features make them attractive as battery or capacitor electrolytes, and may enable batteries which are safer (due to the good thermal stability) and of much higher energy density (due to the higher voltage electrode materials which may be employed) than state of the art secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Of particular interest is the use of such liquids as electrolytes in metal air batteries, where energy densities on the order of 1-2,000 Wh / kg are possible; this is 5-10 times that of existing state of the art lithium battery technology. The Energy Institute has been engaged in the development of flow-assisted nickel zinc battery technology. This technology has the promise of enabling low-cost (<$250 / kWh) energy storage, while overcoming the historical poor cycle-life drawback. To date, the results have been promising, with a cycle life of 1,500 cycles demonstrated in small laboratory cells – an improvement of approximately 400%. Prior state of the art nickel zinc batteries have only demonstrated about 400 cycles to failure.

  16. Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

  17. Technology Pathway Partnership Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John C. Dr.; Godby, Larry A.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the scientific progress and results made in the development of high efficiency multijunction solar cells and the light concentrating non-imaging optics for the commercial generation of renewable solar energy. During the contract period the efficiency of the multijunction solar cell was raised from 36.5% to 40% in commercially available fully qualified cells. In addition significant strides were made in automating production process for these cells in order to meet the costs required to compete with commercial electricity. Concurrent with the cells effort Boeing also developed a non imaging optical systems to raise the light intensity at the photovoltaic cell to the rage of 800 to 900 suns. Solar module efficiencies greater than 30% were consistently demonstrated. The technology and its manufacturing were maturated to a projected price of < $0.015 per kWh and demonstrated by automated assembly in a robotic factory with a throughput of 2 MWh/yr. The technology was demonstrated in a 100 kW power plant erected at California State University Northridge, CA.

  18. The China Motor Systems Energy Conservation Program: A major national initiative to reduce motor system energy use in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadel, Steven; Wang, Wanxing; Liu, Peter; McKane, Aimee T.

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric motor systems are widely used in China to power fans, pumps, blowers, air compressors, refrigeration compressors, conveyers, machinery, and many other types of equipment. Overall, electric motor systems consume more than 600 billion kWh annually, accounting for more than 50 percent of China's electricity use. There are large opportunities to improve the efficiency of motor systems. Electric motors in China are approximately 2-4 percent less efficient on average than motors in the U.S. and Canada. Fans and pumps in China are approximately 3-5 percent less efficient than in developed countries. Even more importantly, motors, fans, pumps, air compressors and other motor-driven equipment are frequently applied with little attention to system efficiency. More optimized design, including appropriate sizing and use of speed control strategies, can reduce energy use by 20 percent or more in many applications. Unfortunately, few Chinese enterprises use or even know about these energy-saving practices. Opportunities for motor system improvements are probably greater in China than in the U.S. In order to begin capturing these savings, China is establishing a China Motor Systems Energy Conservation Program. Elements of this program include work to develop minimum efficiency standards for motors, a voluntary ''green motor'' labeling program for high-efficiency motors, efforts to develop and promote motor system management guidelines, and a training, technical assistance and financing program to promote optimization of key motor systems.

  19. Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

  20. Transportation Electrification Load Development For A Renewable Future Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.; Mai, T.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. A set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles was developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Market saturation scenarios of 30% and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average approx. 6 kWh per day were considered. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across four daily time slices under optimal control from the utility?s perspective. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios.

  1. Performance assessment of the PNM Prosperity electricity storage project :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Dakota; Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Schoenwald, David A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the technical performance of the PNM Prosperity electricity storage project, and to identify lessons learned that can be used to improve similar projects in the future. The PNM Prosperity electricity storage project consists of a 500 kW/350 kWh advanced lead-acid battery with integrated supercapacitor (for energy smoothing) and a 250 kW/1 MWh advanced lead-acid battery (for energy shifting), and is co-located with a 500 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) resource. The project received American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding. The smoothing system is e ective in smoothing intermittent PV output. The shifting system exhibits good round-trip efficiencies, though the AC-to-AC annual average efficiency is lower than one might hope. Given the current utilization of the smoothing system, there is an opportunity to incorporate additional control algorithms in order to increase the value of the energy storage system.

  2. Galena Electric Power A Situational Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert E. Chaney; Stephen G. Colt; Ronald A. Johnson; Richard W. Wiles; Gregory J. White

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the investigation is to compare the economics of various electrical power generation options for the City of Galena. Options were assessed over a 30-year project period, beginning in 2010, and the final results were compared on the basis of residential customer electric rates ($/kWh). Galena's electric utility currently generates power using internal combustion diesel engines and generator sets. Nearby, there is an exposed coal seam, which might provide fuel for a power plant. Contributions to the energy mix might come from solar, municipal solid waste, or wood. The City has also been approached by Toshiba, Inc., as a demonstration site for a small (Model 4S) nuclear reactor power plant. The Yukon River is possibly a site for in-river turbines for hydroelectric power. This report summarizes the comparative economics of various energy supply options. This report covers: (1) thermal and electric load profiles for Galena; (2) technologies and resources available to meet or exceed those loads; (3) uses for any extra power produced by these options; (4) environmental and permitting issues and then; and (5) the overall economics of each of the primary energy options.

  3. Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

  4. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  5. Hydride generation from the Exide load-leveling cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, J.J.; Smaga, J.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stibine and arsine evolution from lead-acid cells in a 36-kWh Exide load-leveling module was measured as this module approached 1900 cycles of operation. A gas-collection apparatus enabled us to determine the maximum and average rates for evolution of both toxic hydrides. Hydride generation began once the cell voltage exceeded 2.4 V. The maximum rate for arsine occurred just above 2.5 V and consistently preceded the peak rate for stibine for each sampled cell. The average rates of hydride generation were found to be 175 ..mu..g/min for stibine and 12.6 ..mu..g/min for arsine. The former rate proved to be the critical value in determining safe ventilation requirements for cell off-gases. The minimum airflow requirement was calculated to be 340 L/min per cell. Projections for a hypothetical 1-MWh Exide battery without an abatement system indicated that the normal ventilation capacity in the Battery Energy Storage Test facility provides nearly five times the airflow needed for safe hydride removal.

  6. Measurement of stibine and arsine generation from the Exide 3100-Ah lead-acid module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, J.J.; Smaga, J.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stibine and arsine evolution from lead-acid cells in a 36-kWh Exide load-leveling module was measured as this module approached 1900 cycles of operation. A specially prepared gas-collection apparatus enabled us to determine the maximum and average rates for evolution of both toxic hydrides. Hydride generation began once the cell voltage exceeded 2.4 V. The maximum rate for arsine occurred just above 2.5 V and consistently preceded the peak rate for stibine for each sampled cell. When adjusted for size effects, the degree of stibine and arsine evolution was greater than found in a continuous overcharge study conducted by Exide. The average rates of hydride generation were found to be 175 ..mu..g/min for stibine and 12.6 ..mu..g/min for arsine. The former rate proved to be the critical value in determining safe ventilation requirements for cell off-gases. The minimum airflow requirement was calculated to be 340 L/min per cell. Projections for a hypothetical 1-MWh Exide battery without an abatement system indicated that the normal ventilation capacity in the Battery Energy Storage Test facility provides nearly five times the airflow needed for safe hydride removal.

  7. Imagine Homes New Construction Occupied Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Rapport, A.; Allison, K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research findings of a long-term monitoring plan to evaluate the performance of an energy-efficient home constructed in 2010 in San Antonio, Texas. Monitoring of the energy use, energy generation, and temperature conditions for this project occurred between July 2010 and October 2011. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system effectively maintained acceptable temperatures and humidity levels in peak cooling and heating and non-peak operating periods. Discrepancies were found between modeled and actual energy use values, with actual space cooling energy use closest to the corresponding modeled value. Energy consumption predicted for lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous electrical loads was significantly higher than measured amounts, and energy consumption predicted for cooling was significantly lower than measured amounts. A high amount of the 1,600 kWh of PV-generated electricity produced annually was sent to the electric grid every month. The solar thermal DHW system was the main source of hot water for most of the year and performed well; during summer, electrical use by the backup system was rare.

  8. A reliability and availability sensitivity study of a large photovoltaic system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Granata, Jennifer E.; Mundt, Michael Joseph; Miller, Steven P.; Quintana, Michael A.; Collins, Elmer W.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reliability and availability model has been developed for a portion of the 4.6 megawatt (MWdc) photovoltaic system operated by Tucson Electric Power (TEP) at Springerville, Arizona using a commercially available software tool, GoldSim{trademark}. This reliability model has been populated with life distributions and repair distributions derived from data accumulated during five years of operation of this system. This reliability and availability model was incorporated into another model that simulated daily and seasonal solar irradiance and photovoltaic module performance. The resulting combined model allows prediction of kilowatt hour (kWh) energy output of the system based on availability of components of the system, solar irradiance, and module and inverter performance. This model was then used to study the sensitivity of energy output as a function of photovoltaic (PV) module degradation at different rates and the effect of location (solar irradiance). Plots of cumulative energy output versus time for a 30 year period are provided for each of these cases.

  9. FVB Energy Inc. Technical Assistance Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The request made by FVB asked for advice and analysis regarding the value of recapturing the braking energy of trains operating on electric light rail transit systems. A specific request was to evaluate the concept of generating hydrogen by electrolysis. The hydrogen would, in turn, power fuel cells that could supply electric energy back into the system for train propulsion or, possibly, also to the grid. To allow quantitative assessment of the potential resource, analysis focused on operations of the SoundTransit light rail system in Seattle, Washington. An initial finding was that the full cycle efficiency of producing hydrogen as the medium for capturing and reusing train braking energy was quite low (< 20%) and, therefore, not likely to be economically attractive. As flywheel energy storage is commercially available, the balance of the analysis focused the feasibility of using this alternative on the SoundTransit system. It was found that an investment in a flywheel with a 25-kWh capacity of the type manufactured by Beacon Power Corporation (BPC) would show a positive 20-year net present value (NPV) based on the current frequency of train service. The economic attractiveness of this option would increase initially if green energy subsidies or rebates were applicable and, in the future, as the planned frequency of train service grows.

  10. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  11. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLARK,NANCY H.; EIDLER,PHILLIP

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents Phase 2 of a project to design, develop, and test a zinc/bromine battery technology for use in utility energy storage applications. The project was co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Power Technologies through Sandia National Laboratories. The viability of the zinc/bromine technology was demonstrated in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the technology developed during Phase 1 was scaled up to a size appropriate for the application. Batteries were increased in size from 8-cell, 1170-cm{sup 2} cell stacks (Phase 1) to 8- and then 60-cell, 2500-cm{sup 2} cell stacks in this phase. The 2500-cm{sup 2} series battery stacks were developed as the building block for large utility battery systems. Core technology research on electrolyte and separator materials and on manufacturing techniques, which began in Phase 1, continued to be investigated during Phase 2. Finally, the end product of this project was a 100-kWh prototype battery system to be installed and tested at an electric utility.

  12. NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural Gas For Transportation or Electricity? Climate Change Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

    Projections of increased domestic supply, low prices, reduced reliance on foreign oil, and low environmental impacts are supporting the increased use of natural gas in the transportation and electricity sectors. For instance, a tax credit bill (H.R. 1380) introduced in the House earlier this year encourages natural gas use for transportation and anticipates reductions in greenhouse gases (GHGs) when it displaces gasoline and diesel. However, in reality, the amount of GHG emissions that can be reduced with natural gas is uncertain and depends on the end use. If natural gas displaces coal for electricity generation, GHG emissions are reduced by at least 45 % per kWh. But when natural gas is used as a transportation fuel there is up to a 35 % chance that emissions will increase and only a 3 % chance that it will even meet the emissions reductions mandated by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) for corn ethanol. Given that future natural gas supply is limited, despite forecasts of increased domestic production, if one wants to be certain of reducing GHG emissions, then using natural gas to replace coalfired electricity is the best approach. Investigators at Carnegie Mellon University have conducted an analysis in the attached study (1) that highlights the following important findings. 1. High risk of policy failure: The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) instead of gasoline in cars and instead of diesel in buses does not lower GHG emissions significantly. In fact there is a 10-

  13. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Peng; Zagreus, Leah

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. This project studied the potential of pre-cooling and demand limiting in a heavy mass and a light mass building in the Bay Area of California. The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling has the potential to improve the demand responsiveness of commercial buildings while maintaining acceptable comfort conditions. Results indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the shed capacity of a given building, all other factors being equal. Due to the time necessary for pre-cooling, it is only applicable to day-ahead demand response programs. Pre-cooling can be very effective if the building mass is relatively heavy. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling under hot weather conditions has not been tested. Further work is required to quantify and demonstrate the effectiveness of pre-cooling in different climates. Research is also needed to develop screening tools that can be used to select suitable buildings and customers, identify the most appropriate pre-cooling strategies, and estimate the benefits to the customer and the utility.

  14. Detailed cost estimate of reference residential photovoltaic designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.S.; Penasa, D.A.; Thomas, M.G.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated installation costs for four reference residential photovoltaic designs. Installation cost estimates ranged from $1.28 to $2.12/W/sub p/ for arrays installed by union labor (4.1 to 6.07 kW/sub p/-systems), and from $1.22 to $1.83 W/sub p/ for non-union installations. Standoff mounting was found to increase costs from $1.63/W/sub p/ to $2.12/W/sub p/ for a representative case, whereas 25 kWh of battery storage capacity increased installation costs from $1.44/W/sub p/ to $2.08/W/sub p/. Overall system costs (union-based were $6000 to $7000 for a 4.1 kW array in the northeast, to approx. $9000 for a 6.07 kW/sub p/ array in the southwest. This range of installation costs, approx. $1 to $2/W/sub p/ (in 1980 dollars), is representative of current installation costs for residential PV systems. Any future cost reductions are likely to be small and can be accomplished only by optimization of mounting techniques, module efficiencies, and module reliability in toto.

  15. The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley; Darghouth, Naim R.; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Net metering has become a widespread mechanism in the U.S. for supporting customer adoption of distributed photovoltaics (PV), but has faced challenges as PV installations grow to a larger share of generation in a number of states. This paper examines the value of the bill savings that customers receive under net metering, and the associated role of retail rate design, based on a sample of approximately two hundred residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities. We find that the bill savings per kWh of PV electricity generated varies by more than a factor of four across the customers in the sample, which is largely attributable to the inclining block structure of the utilities' residential retail rates. We also compare the bill savings under net metering to that received under three potential alternative compensation mechanisms, based on California's Market Price Referent (MPR). We find that net metering provides significantly greater bill savings than a full MPR-based feed-in tariff, but only modestly greater savings than alternative mechanisms under which hourly or monthly net excess generation is compensated at the MPR rate.

  16. Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ˘/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

  17. Energy Conservation Study on Darigold Fluid Milk Plant, Issaquah, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seton, Johnson & Odell, Inc.

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of an energy study done at Darigold dairy products plant in Issaquah, Washington. The study includes all electrical energy using systems at the plant, but does not address specific modifications to process equipment or the gas boilers. The Issaquah Darigold plant receives milk and cream, which are stored in large, insulated silos. These raw products are then processed into butter, cottage cheese, buttermilk, yogurt, sour cream, and powdered milk. This plant produces the majority of the butter used in the state of Washington. The Issaquah plant purchases electricity from Puget Sound Power and Light Company. The plant is on Schedule 31, primary metering. The plant provides transformers to step down the voltage to 480, 240, and 120 volts as needed. Based on utility bills for the period from July 1983 through July 1984, the Issaquah Darigold plant consumed 7,134,300 kWh at a total cost of $218,703.78 and 1,600,633 therms at a total cost of $889,687.48. Energy use for this period is shown in Figures 1.1 to 1.5. Demand charges account for approximately 23% of the total electrical bill for this period, while reactive charges account for less than 0.5%. The electrical usage for the plant was divided into process energy uses, as summarized in Figure 1.2. This breakdown is based on a 311-day processing schedule, with Sunday clean-up and holidays composing the 54 days of downtime.

  18. Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. RTGs Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small spacecraft design for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) Mission is under study by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for a possible launch as early as 1998. JPL's 1992 baseline design calls for a power source able to furnish an energy output of 3963 kWh and a power output of 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. Satisfying those demands is made difficult because NASA management has set a goal of reducing the spacecraft mass from a baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for the power source. To support the ongoing NASA/JPL studies, the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA) commissioned Fairchild Space to prepare and analyze conceptual designs of radioisotope power systems for the PFF mission. Thus far, a total of eight options employing essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules were designed and subjected to thermal, electrical, structural, and mass analyses by Fairchild. Five of these - employing thermoelectric converters - are described in the present paper, and three - employing free-piston Stirling converters - are described in the companion paper presented next. The system masses of the thermoelectric options ranged from 19.3 kg to 10.2 kg. In general, the options requiring least development are the heaviest, and the lighter options require more development with greater programmatic risk. There are four duplicate copies

  20. Superefficient Refrigerators: Opportunities and Challenges for Efficiency Improvement Globally

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Nihar; Park, Won Young; Bojda, Nicholas; McNeil, Michael A.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an energy-intensive mainstream product, residential refrigerators present a significant opportunity to reduce electricity consumption through energy efficiency improvements. Refrigerators expend a considerable amount of electricity during normal use, typically consuming between 100 to 1,000 kWh of electricity per annum. This paper presents the results of a technical analysis done for refrigerators in support of the Super-efficient Equipment and Appliance Deployment (SEAD) initiative. Beginning from a base case representative of the average unit sold in India, we analyze efficiency improvement options and their corresponding costs to build a cost-versus-efficiency relationship. We then consider design improvement options that are known to be the most cost effective and that can improve efficiency given current design configurations. We also analyze and present additional super-efficient options, such as vacuum-insulated panels. We estimate the cost of conserved electricity for the various options, allowing flexible program design for market transformation programs toward higher efficiency. We estimate ~;;160TWh/year of energy savings are cost effective in 2030, indicating significant potential for efficiency improvement in refrigerators in SEAD economies and China.

  1. Commercialization of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies is to produce electricity at 15 cents/kilowatt-hour (kWh) with six hours of thermal storage in 2015 (intermediate power) and close to 10 cents/kWh with 12-17 hours of thermal storage in 2020 (baseload power). Cost reductions of up to 50% to the solar concentrator are targeted through technology advances. The overall solar-to-electric efficiency of parabolic-trough solar power plants can be improved and the cost of solar electricity can be reduced by improving the properties of the selective coating on the receiver and increasing the solar-field operating temperature to >450 degrees C. New, more-efficient selective coatings will be needed that have both high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance at elevated temperatures. Conduction and convection losses from the hot absorber surface are usually negligible for parabolic trough receivers. The objective is to develop new, more-efficient selective coatings with both high solar absorptance (..alpha.. > 0.95) and low thermal emittance (..epsilon.. < 0.08 @ 450 degrees C) that are thermally stable above 450 degrees C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

  2. Improving Energy Efficiency of Compressed Air System Based onSystem Audit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanghai, Hongbo Qin; McKane, Aimee

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial electric motor systems consume more than 600billion kWh annually, accounting for more than 50 percent of China selectricity use. The International Energy Agency estimates thatoptimizing motor systems results in an improvement of 20-25 percent,which is well-supported by experience in both the U.S. and China.Compressed air systems in China use 9.4 percent of all electricity.Compressed air use in China is growing rapidly, as new industrial plantsare built and the production processes of existing plants expand andchange. Most of these systems, whether existing or new, are not optimizedfor energy efficiency. This paper will present a practitioner'sperspective on theemergence of compressed air auditing services inChina, specifically as it pertains to Shanghai and surrounding areas.Both the methodology used and the market development of these compressedair system services will be addressed. Finally, the potential for energysaving opportunities will be described based on highlights from over 50compressed air system energy audits completed by Shanghai EnergyConservation Service Center, both during the United Nations IndustrialDevelopment Organization (UNIDO) China Motor System Energy ConservationProgram, and after this training program was completed.

  3. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmarker, Marc; Campbell, Mark

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Design, validate at prototype level, and then demonstrate a full size, 800 MWht Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system based on Phase Changing Material (PCM) TES modules with round trip efficiency in excess of 93%. The PCM TES module would be the building block of a TES system which can be deployed at costs inline with the DOE benchmark of 2020. The development of a reliable, unsophisticated, modular, and scalable TES system designed to be massmanufactured utilizing advanced automated fabrication and assembly processes and field installed in the most cost-effective configuration could facilitate the attainment of a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of $.07/kWh by 2015. It was believed that the DOE targets can be attained by finding the best combinationTES module size, its optimal integration in the power cycle, and readily available PCM. Work under this project ultimately focused on the development and performance evaluation of a 100kWht prototype heat exchanger. The design utilizes a commercially available heat exchanger product to create a unique latent heat PCM storage module. The novel ideal associated with this technology is the inclusion of an agitation mechanism that is activated during the discharge process to improve heat transfer. The prototype unit did not meet the performance goals estimated through modeling, nor did the estimated costs of the system fall in line with the goals established by DOE.

  4. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  5. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  6. Ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Rogers, R.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-source heat pump systems are one of the promising new energy technologies that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to consumers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school and commercial building applications. In order to verify the performance, information was collected for 253 case studies from mainly utilities throughout the United States. The case studies were compiled into a database. The database was organized into general information, system information, ground system information, system performance, and additional information. Information was developed on the status of demand-side management of ground-source heat pump programs for about 60 electric utility and rural electric cooperatives on marketing, incentive programs, barriers to market penetration, number units installed in service area, and benefits.

  7. A solar photovoltaic power system for use in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohout, L.L.; Merolla, A.; Colozza, A.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar photovoltaic power system was designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the NASA/NSF Antarctic Space Analog Program. The system was installed at a remote field camp at Lake Hoare in the Dry Valleys, and provided a six-person field team with electrical power for personal computers and printers, lab equipment, lighting, and a small microwave oven. The system consists of three silicon photovoltaic sub-arrays delivering a total of 1.5 kWe peak power, three lead-acid gel battery modules supplying 2.4 kWh, and an electrical distribution system which delivers 120 Vac and 12 Vdc to the user. The system was modularized for ease of deployment and operation. Previously the camp has been powered by diesel generators, which have proven to be both noisy and polluting. The NSF, in an effort to reduce their dependence on diesel fuel from both an environmental and cost standpoint, is interested in the use of alternate forms of energy, such as solar power. Such a power system also will provide NASA with important data on system level deployment and operation in a remote location by a minimally trained crew, as well as validate initial integration concepts.

  8. Review of PV Inverter Technology Cost and Performance Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navigant Consulting Inc.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a major responsibility in the implementation of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has a major role in supporting inverter development, characterization, standards, certifications, and verifications. The Solar Energy Technologies Program recently published a Multiyear Technical Plan, which establishes a goal of reducing the Levelized Energy Cost (LEC) for photovoltaic (PV) systems to $0.06/kWh by 2020. The Multiyear Technical Plan estimates that, in order to meet the PV system goal, PV inverter prices will need to decline to $0.25-0.30 Wp by 2020. DOE determined the need to conduct a rigorous review of the PV Program's technical and economic targets, including the target set for PV inverters. NREL requested that Navigant Consulting Inc.(NCI) conduct a review of historical and projected cost and performance improvements for PV inverters, including identification of critical barriers identified and the approaches government might use to address them.

  9. I-SAVE conservation program. Implementing title II of NECPA residential conservation service. Final draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The I-SAVE (Iowa Saves America's Vital Energy) conservation plan provides comprehensive energy-conservation information and services to residential consumers served by large investor-owned electric and gas utilities and participating home-heating suppliers. The overall objective of the I-SAVE plan is to conserve energy by facilitating cost-effective retrofit of existing housing and promoting more-efficient energy use. The ultimate benefit available to the customer under the I-SAVE plan - reduction in energy use - is dependent upon the action he or she takes as a result of the program audit. Benefits to the utility and the ratepayers as a whole, however, will accrue only upon widespread customer acceptance and utilization of program services. This degree of program acceptance and the resulting benefits to ratepayers can be attained only through an aggressive educational and promotional effort by the covered utilities. All electric and gas utilities which have sales, other than resale, exceeding 750 million kWh of electricity or 10 billion cubic feet of gas and participating home-heating suppliers, shall provide a program announcement and shall offer conservation services to their customers who occupy a residential building containing at least one, but not more than four units, in a manner as provided by the rules. The text of the rules is presented. (MCW)

  10. Superconductivity for Large Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fair; W. Stautner; M. Douglass; R. Rajput-Ghoshal; M. Moscinski; P. Riley; D. Wagner; J. Kim; S. Hou; F. Lopez; K. Haran; J. Bray; T. Laskaris; J. Rochford; R. Duckworth

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design has been completed for a 10MW superconducting direct drive wind turbine generator employing low temperature superconductors for the field winding. Key technology building blocks from the GE Wind and GE Healthcare businesses have been transferred across to the design of this concept machine. Wherever possible, conventional technology and production techniques have been used in order to support the case for commercialization of such a machine. Appendices A and B provide further details of the layout of the machine and the complete specification table for the concept design. Phase 1 of the program has allowed us to understand the trade-offs between the various sub-systems of such a generator and its integration with a wind turbine. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) analysis have been completed resulting in the identification of high risk components within the design. The design has been analyzed from a commercial and economic point of view and Cost of Energy (COE) calculations have been carried out with the potential to reduce COE by up to 18% when compared with a permanent magnet direct drive 5MW baseline machine, resulting in a potential COE of 0.075 $/kWh. Finally, a top-level commercialization plan has been proposed to enable this technology to be transitioned to full volume production. The main body of this report will present the design processes employed and the main findings and conclusions.

  11. Advanced Gearless Drivetrain - Phase I Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandy Butterfield; Jim Smith; Derek Petch; Brian Sullivan; Peter Smith; Kirk Pierce

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Boulder Wind Power (���¢��������BWP���¢�������) collaborated with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the economics of scaling an advanced gearless drivetrain technology to 6MW (and larger) turbine applications. The project goal was to show that this advanced drivetrain technology enables a cost of energy of less than $0.10/kWH in offshore applications. This drivetrain technology achieves this Cost of Energy (���¢��������COE���¢�������) advantage via a 70% greater torque density versus current state-of-the-art drivetrain technologies. In addition, a new dynamically compliant design strategy is required to optimize turbine system-level COE. The BWP generator is uniquely suited for this new design strategy. This project developed a concept design for a 6MW drivetrain and culminated in a plan for a system-level test of this technology at 3MW scale. The project further demonstrated the advantage of the BWP drivetrain with increasing power ratings, with conceptual designs through 10 MW.

  12. Alternative energy sources in Iran: the state-of-the-art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabzevari, A.; Yaghoubi, M.A.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iran, the country well known for its enormous proven reserves of oil (fourth largest in the world), natural gas (second largest), and coal (considerable) is also one of the most favourable countries for utilization of solar, wind and other alternative energy sources. Depsite an average of 5 KWh/m/sup 2//day of solar energy over a large land area, and sites with frequent wind velocities of 7 m/s, very little attention has been paid to non-fossil fuels. Petroleum, on the other hand, has not only been the main fuel for Iran, but has also provided the country with its major revenue. Furthermore, the low cost of oil and gas has pushed the alternative energy sources into an unfavorable position. The main question is, for how long can such an energy picture go on. To answer this important question, the authors have attempted, firstly, to draw a concise energy picture (fuel and power production, distribution, demands and policies), and secondly, to list the potentials of the alternative energy sources. The paper also includes a critical review of the work done and the programs in connection with alternative energies in Iran.

  13. Replacement of Lighting Fixtures with LED Energy Efficient Lights at the Parking Facility, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Brien

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC or Tribe) owns a six-story parking facility adjacent to its Potawatomi Bingo Casino (the Casino) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as well as a valet parking facility under the Casino (collectively, the Parking Facility). The Parking Facility contained 205-watt metal halide-type lights that, for security reasons, operated 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Starting on August 30, 2010, the Tribe replaced these fixtures with 1,760 state-of-the-art, energy efficient 55-Watt LED lights. This project resulted in an immediate average reduction in monthly peak demand of 238 kW over the fourth quarter of 2010. The average reduction in monthly peak demand from October 1 through December 31, 2010 translates into a forecast annual electrical energy reduction of approximately 1,995,000 kWh or 47.3% of the pre-project demand. This project was technically effective, economically feasible, and beneficial to the public not only in terms of long term energy efficiency and associated emissions reductions, but also in the short-term jobs provided for the S.E. Wisconsin region. The project was implemented, from approval by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to completion, in less than 6 months. The project utilized off-the-shelf proven technologies that were fabricated locally and installed by local trade contractors.

  14. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

  15. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office. The goals are: (1) Reduce the levelized cost of generating geothermal power to 3-5 cents per kWh by 2007; (2) Double the number of States with geothermal electric power facilities to eight by 2006; and (3) Supply the electrical power or heat energy needs of 7 million homes and businesses in the United States by 2010. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy. balanced strategy for the Geothermal Program.

  16. Thinking Like a Whole Building: Whole Foods Market New Construction Summary, U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole Foods Market participates in the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) to identify and develop cost-effective, readily deployed, replicable energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for commercial buildings. Whole Foods Market is working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on a retrofit and a new construction CBP project. Whole Foods Market's CBP new construction project is a standalone store in Raleigh, North Carolina. Whole Foods Market examined the energy systems and the interactions between those systems in the design for the new Raleigh store. Based on this collaboration and preliminary energy modeling, Whole Foods Market and NREL identified a number of cost-effective EEMs that can be readily deployed in other Whole Foods Market stores and in other U.S. supermarkets. If the actual savings in the Raleigh store - which NREL will monitor and verify - match the modeling results, each year this store will save nearly $100,000 in operating costs (Raleigh's rates are about $0.06/kWh for electricity and $0.83/therm for natural gas). The store will also use 41% less energy than a Standard 90.1-compliant store and avoid about 3.7 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

  17. Development of a demand defrost controller. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borton, D.N. [Power Kinetics, Troy, NY (United States); Walker, D.H. [Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop and commercialize a demand defrost controller that initiates defrosts of refrigeration systems only when required. The standard method of control is a time clock that usually defrosts too often, which wastes energy. The controller developed by this project uses an algorithm based on the temperature difference between the discharge and return of the display case air curtain along with several time settings to defrost only when needed. This controller was field tested in a supermarket where it controlled defrost of the low-temperature display cases. According to test results the controller could reduce annual energy consumption by 20,000 and 62,000 kWh for hot gas and electric defrost, respectively. The controller saves electric demand as well as energy, is adaptable to ambient air conditions, and provides valuable savings throughout the year. The savings are greatest for low-temperature systems that use the most energy. A less tangible benefit of the demand controller is the improvement in food quality that results from fewer defrosts.

  18. Thinking Like a Whole Building: A Whole Foods Market New Construction Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Bonnema, E.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.; McIntyre, M.; Scheib, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole Foods Market participates in the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) to identify and develop cost-effective, readily deployed, replicable energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for commercial buildings. Whole Foods Market is working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on a retrofit and a new construction CBP project. Whole Foods Market's CBP new construction project is a standalone store in Raleigh, North Carolina. Whole Foods Market examined the energy systems and the interactions between those systems in the design for the new Raleigh store. Based on this collaboration and preliminary energy modeling, Whole Foods Market and NREL identified a number of cost-effective EEMs that can be readily deployed in other Whole Foods Market stores and in other U.S. supermarkets. If the actual savings in the Raleigh store - which NREL will monitor and verify - match the modeling results, each year this store will save nearly $100,000 in operating costs (Raleigh's rates are about $0.06/kWh for electricity and $0.83/therm for natural gas). The store will also use 41% less energy than a Standard 90.1-compliant store and avoid about 3.7 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

  19. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The goals are: (1) Double the number of States with geothermal electric power facilities to eight by 2006; (2) Reduce the levelized cost of generating geothermal power to 3-5 cents per kWh by 2007; and (3) Supply the electrical power or heat energy needs of 7 million homes and businesses in the United States by 2010. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2002. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy. balanced strategy for the Geothermal Program.

  20. High Efficiency Solar Power via Separated Photo and Voltaic Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Naughton

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrates a novel nanostructured solar cell architecture capable of achieving high efficiency levels that is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The high efficiency will be achieved by the novel structure that separates the path of the photons from the path of the generated charge carriers. In this way, the photon path can be long for maximum light absorption, while the path for carriers can be short for maximum electronic energy harvesting. The combination of maximum light absorption coupled with maximum carrier harvesting is the basis for the expected high efficiency. The project will develop high efficiency solar cell prototypes utilizing this unique nanostructured architecture. The project addresses the fundamental limitation inherent in all current solar cell designs, and which opens a pathway to development for high efficiency solar cells at low cost. Realizing this goal will result in a levelized cost of electricity in the range of 10˘/kWh, which would achieve the long-sought goal of making photovoltaic electricity cost competitive with fossil-fuel generated electricity without any governmental subsidies. This breakthrough would spur the already rapid growth in the photovoltaic industry to an explosive pace, with significant, widespread benefit to the national economy and the nation’s energy security. The initial target of the program is to develop single-junction solar cells using ultrathin amorphous silicon with the performance approaching that of single crystal silicon cells.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  2. Beluga Coal Gasification - ISER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Colt

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ISER was requested to conduct an economic analysis of a possible 'Cook Inlet Syngas Pipeline'. The economic analysis was incorporated as section 7.4 of the larger report titled: 'Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study, DOE/NETL-2006/1248, Phase 2 Final Report, October 2006, for Subtask 41817.333.01.01'. The pipeline would carry CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} from a synthetic gas plant on the western side of Cook Inlet to Agrium's facility. The economic analysis determined that the net present value of the total capital and operating lifecycle costs for the pipeline ranges from $318 to $588 million. The greatest contributor to this spread is the cost of electricity, which ranges from $0.05 to $0.10/kWh in this analysis. The financial analysis shows that the delivery cost of gas may range from $0.33 to $0.55/Mcf in the first year depending primarily on the price for electricity.

  3. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds. Several new sensing technologies were added to the existing MMT platform: (1) air contamination (corrosion) sensors, (2) power monitoring, and (3) a wireless environmental sensing network. All three technologies are built on cost effective sensing solutions that increase the density of sensing points and enable high resolution mapping of DCs. The wireless sensing solution enables Air Conditioning Unit (ACU) control while the corrosion sensor enables air side economization and can quantify the risk of IT equipment failure due to air contamination. Validation data for six test sites demonstrate that leveraging MMT energy efficiency solutions combined with industry best practices results in an average of 20% reduction in cooling energy, without major infrastructure upgrades. As an illustration of the unique MMT capabilities, a data center infrastructure efficiency (DCIE) of 87% (industry best operation) was achieved. The technology is commercialized through IBM System and Technology Lab Services that offers MMT as a solution to improve DC energy efficiency. Estimation indicates that deploying MMT in existing DCs can results in an 8 billion kWh savings and projection indicates that constant adoption of MMT can results in obtainable savings of 44 billion kWh in 2035. Negotiations are under way with business partners to commercialize/license the ACU control technology and the new sensor solutions (corrosion and power sensing) to enable third party vendors and developers to leverage the energy efficiency solutions.

  4. Addressing an Uncertain Future Using Scenario Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has had a longstanding goal of introducing uncertainty into the analysis it routinely conducts in compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and for strategic management purposes. The need to introduce some treatment of uncertainty arises both because it would be good general management practice, and because intuitively many of the technologies under development by EERE have a considerable advantage in an uncertain world. For example, an expected kWh output from a wind generator in a future year, which is not exposed to volatile and unpredictable fuel prices, should be truly worth more than an equivalent kWh from an alternative fossil fuel fired technology. Indeed, analysts have attempted to measure this value by comparing the prices observed in fixed-price natural gas contracts compared to ones in which buyers are exposed to market prices (see Bolinger, Wiser, and Golove and (2004)). In addition to the routine reasons for exploring uncertainty given above, the history of energy markets appears to have exhibited infrequent, but troubling, regime shifts, i.e., historic turning points at which the center of gravity or fundamental nature of the system appears to have abruptly shifted. Figure 1 below shows an estimate of how the history of natural gas fired generating costs has evolved over the last three decades. The costs shown incorporate both the well-head gas price and an estimate of how improving generation technology has gradually tended to lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to explore scenario analysis as a method for introducing uncertainty into EERE's forecasting in a manner consistent with the preceding observation. The two questions are how could it be done, and what is its academic basis, if any. Despite the interest in uncertainty methods, applying them poses some major hurdles because of the heavy reliance of EERE on forecasting tools that are deterministic in nature, such as the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the source of the influential Annual Energy Outlook whose business-as-usual (BAU) case, the Reference Case, forms the baseline for most of the U.S. energy policy discussion. NEMS is an optimizing model because: 1. it iterates to an equilibrium among modules representing the supply, demand, and energy conversion subsectors; and 2. several subsectoral models are individually solved using linear programs (LP). Consequently, it is deeply rooted in the recent past and any effort to simulate the consequences of a major regime shift as depicted in Figure 1 must come by applying an exogenously specified scenario. And, more generally, simulating futures that lie outside of our recent historic experience, even if they do not include regime switches suggest some form of scenario approach. At the same time, the statistical validity of scenarios that deviate significantly outside the ranges of historic inputs should be questioned.

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  6. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study highlighting the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. In constructing a new research facility for its campus, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) project team identified the opportunity to design a world-class, energy-efficient data center to support its operations. NREL's efforts resulted in a highly efficient data center that demonstrated considerable energy savings in its first 11 months of operations. Using legacy data center performance as a baseline, the new facility cut energy use by nearly 1,450,000 kWh, delivering cost savings of approximately $82,000. The data center's average total load was 165 kW less than the legacy center's average total load, resulting in a 60% reduction in overall power. Finally, the limited use of cooling and fan energy enabled the new data center to achieve a 1.16 average power utilization effectiveness (PUE) rating, compared to the legacy data center's PUE of 2.28. The laboratory had been relying on individual servers with an energy utilization rate of less than 5%. NREL employed building best practices, innovative design techniques and energy-efficient technologies to support its energy goals for the new data center. To counteract the extensive heat generated by data center equipment, the laboratory implemented a cooling system using outdoor air and evaporative cooling to meet most of the center's needs. Inside the data center, NREL replaced much of its legacy equipment with new, energy-efficient technology. By exchanging this infrastructure for virtualized blade servers, NREL reduced its server energy footprint by 96%. Additionally, NREL replaced its 80%-efficient uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with a UPS that is 95% efficient; deployed ultra efficient power distribution units (PDU) to handle higher UPS voltages; and implemented vacancy sensors to drive down lighting loads. Using best practices and energy-efficient technology, NREL was able to successfully design an optimized data center with a minimal energy footprint. At 958,000 kWh, the annual energy use for the RSF data center is approximately 60% less than the legacy data center's annual energy use, surpassing the laboratory's project goal. As specified, the building is equipped with enough onsite renewable energy generation to offset annual energy consumption. The facility has achieved a PUE of 1.16 and ERE of 0.91 in its first 11 months of operation and is using PUE to as a metric to gauge success towards its ultimate goal. Based on the status of its RSF data center project, NREL is advising other government organizations on data center efficiency. The laboratory places great emphasis on the use of key metrics - such as PUE and ERE - to track performance. By carefully monitoring these metrics and making adjustments, NREL is able to continuously improve the performance of its data center operations.

  7. Building a 40% Energy Saving House in the Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Bonar, Jacob [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a home that uses 40% less energy than the energy-efficient Building America standard - a giant step in the pursuit of affordable near-zero-energy housing through the evolution of five near-zero-energy research houses. This four-bedroom, two-bath, 1232-ft2 house has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index of 35 (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100), which qualifies it for federal energy efficiency and solar incentives. The house is leading to the planned construction of a similar home in Greensburg, Kansas, and 21 staff houses in the Walden Reserve, a 7000-unit "deep green" community in Cookville, Tennessee. Discussions are underway for construction of similar houses in Charleston, South Carolina, Seattle, Washington, Knoxville and Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and upstate New York. This house should lead to a 40% and 50% Gate-3, Mixed-Humid-Climate Joule for the DOE Building America Program. The house is constructed with structurally-insulated-panel walls and roof, raised metal-seam roof with infrared reflective coating, airtight envelope (1.65 air changes per hour at 50 Pascal), supply mechanical ventilation, ducts inside the conditioned space, extensive moisture control package, foundation geothermal space heating and cooling system, ZEHcor wall, solar water heater, and a 2.2 kWp grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system. The detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 compared to all the houses in this series are shown in Tables 1 and 2. Based on a validated computer simulation of ZEH5 with typical occupancy patterns and energy services for four occupants, energy for this all-electric house is predicted to cost only $0.66/day ($0.86/day counting the hookup charges). By contrast, the benchmark house would require $3.56/day, including hookup charges (these costs are based on a 2006 residential rates of $0.07/kWh and solar buyback at $0.15/kWh). The solar fraction for this home located in Lenoir City, Tennessee, is predicted to be as high as 41%(accounting for both solar PV and the solar water heater). This all-electric home is predicted to use 25 kWh/day based on the one year of measured data used to calibrate a whole-building simulation model. Based on two years of measured data, the roof-mounted 2.2 kWp PV system is predicted to generate 7.5 kWh/day. The 2005 cost to commercially construct ZEH5, including builder profit and overhead, is estimated at about $150,000. This cost - for ZEH5's panelized construction, premanufactured utility wall (ZEHcor), foundation geothermal system, and the addition of the walkout lower level, and considering the falling cost for PV - suggests that the construction cost per ft2 for a ZEH5 two-story will be even more cost-competitive. The 2005 construction cost estimate for a finished-out ZEH5 with 2632 ft2 is $222,000 or $85/ft2. The intention of this report is to help builders and homeowners make the decision to build zero-energy-ready homes. Detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data from about 100 sensors monitoring thermal performance for a one-year period are presented. This information should be specifically useful to those considering structural insulated panel walls and roof, foundation geothermal space heating and cooling, solar water heater and roof-mounted, photovoltaic, grid-tied systems.

  8. Exergy Analysis and Operational Efficiency of a Horizontal Ground Source Heat Pump System Operated in a Low-Energy Test House under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents data, analyses, measures of performance, and conclusions for a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) providing space conditioning to a 345m2 house whose envelope is made of structural insulated panels (SIP). The entire thermal load of this SIP house with RSI-3.7 (RUS-21) walls, triple pane windows with a U-factor of 1.64 W/m2 K (0.29 Btu/h ft2 oF) and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of 0.25, a roof assembly with overall thermal resistance of about RSI-8.8 (RUS-50) and low leakage rates of 0.74 ACH at 50Pa was satisfied with a 2.16-Ton (7.56 kW) GSHP unit consuming negligible (9.83kWh) auxiliary heat during peak winter season. The highest and lowest heating COP achieved was 4.90 (October) and 3.44 (February), respectively. The highest and lowest cooling COP achieved was 6.09 (April) and 3.88 (August). These COPs are calculated on the basis of the total power input (including duct, ground loop, and control power losses ). The second Law (Exergy) analysis provides deep insight into how systemic inefficiencies are distributed among the various GSHP components. Opportunities for design and further performance improvements are identified. Through Exergy analysis we provide a true measure of how closely actual performance approaches the ideal, and it unequivocally identifies, better than energy analysis does, the sources and causes of lost work, the root cause of system inefficiencies.

  9. Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

  10. Transportation Electrification Load Development For a Renewable Future Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, Tony; Mai, Trieu; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrification of the transportation sector offers the opportunity to significantly reduce petroleum consumption. The transportation sector accounts for 70% of US petroleum consumption. The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. In support of a recent US Department of Energy funded activity that analyzed a future generation scenario with high renewable energy technology contributions, a set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles were developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. These load profiles with their underlying assumptions will be presented in this paper. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Two market saturation scenarios of 30% of sales and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average {approx}6 kWh per day were considered. Results were generated for 3109 counties and were consolidated to 134 Power Control Areas (PCA) for the use NREL's's regional generation planning analysis tool ReEDS. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across 4 daily time slices under optimal control from the utility perspective. No other literature has addressed the potential flexibility in energy delivery to electric vehicles in connection with a regional power generation study. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios. EVS25 Copyright.

  11. China power - thermal coal and clean coal technology export. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binsheng Li

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    China is the world`s fourth largest electric power producer, and is expected to surpass Japan within the next two years to become the third largest power producer. During the past 15 years, China`s total electricity generation more than tripled, increasing from about 300 TWh to about 1,000 TWh. Total installed generating capacity grew at an average of 8.2 percent per year, increasing from 66 to 214 GW. The share of China`s installed capacity in Asia increased from 21 to 31 percent. The Chinese government plans to continue China`s rapid growth rate in the power sector. Total installed capacity is planned to reach 300 GW by 2000, which will generate 1,400 TWh of electricity per year. China`s long-term power sector development is subject to great uncertainty. Under the middle scenario, total capacity is expected to reach 700 GW by 2015, with annual generation of 3,330 TWh. Under the low and high scenarios, total capacity will reach 527-1,005 GW by 2015. The high scenario representing possible demand. To achieve this ambitious scenario, dramatic policy changes in favor of power development are required; however, there is no evidence that such policy changes will occur at this stage. Even under the high scenario, China`s per capita annual electricity consumption would be only 3,000 kWh by 2015, less than half of the present per capita consumption for OECD countries. Under the low scenario, electricity shortages will seriously curb economic growth.

  12. Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott; Jacob, Paul; Copping, Andrea; Willits, Steve; Fontaine, Arnold; Brefort, Dorian; Gordon, Margaret Ellen; Copeland, Robert; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040 for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour (%24/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.

  13. Performance of a two-cycle refrigerator/freezer using HFC refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskin, E.; Delafield, F.R.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-cycle 18 ft{sup 3} (0.51 m{sup 3}) refrigerator/freezer was tested utilizing American National Standards Institute/Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (ANSI/AHAM) standards for energy consumption testing. A 34.9% energy consumption reduction was realized for a 1984 model refrigerator/freezer (1020 kWh original energy use). This paper presents a proven method of reducing the current Department of Energy (DOE) minimum energy-efficiency standards for refrigerator/freezers to the proposed year 2001 standards utilizing existing technology. For a top-mount, frost-free refrigerator/freezer having the above volume, the current DOE minimum energy standard is 770 kWh/year, and the proposed DOE year 2001 standard is 530 kWh/year (a 31% reduction). Therefore, some significant reductions may be obtained by implementing the modifications discussed in this paper into newer refrigerator/freezer models. The paper gives an overview of the modifications implemented by a Danish university on a US refrigerator/freezer and presents experimental performance testing results of the refrigerator/freezer. The modifications will cause the refrigerator/freezer to be more expensive, but the performance enhancements should offset cost. No cost analysis is presented in this paper, but a detailed cost analysis of a two-cycle refrigerator/freezer is contained in a 1993 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report (EPA 1993). The refrigerator/freezer was tested using four refrigerants and compressors. Two compressors and refrigerants were tested in the freezer cycle, and four were tested in the fresh food cycle.

  14. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  15. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K. [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

  16. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013: ? 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered. ? 797 new participants installed a HAN. ? Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components. ? Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program. ? On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly. ? An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  17. Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

  18. Real Time Pricing and the Real Live Firm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moezzi, Mithra; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, Osman; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Hopper, Nicole

    2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy economists have long argued the benefits of real time pricing (RTP) of electricity. Their basis for modeling customers response to short-term fluctuations in electricity prices are based on theories of rational firm behavior, where management strives to minimize operating costs and optimize profit, and labor, capital and energy are potential substitutes in the firm's production function. How well do private firms and public sector institutions operating conditions, knowledge structures, decision-making practices, and external relationships comport with these assumptions and how might this impact price response? We discuss these issues on the basis of interviews with 29 large (over 2 MW) industrial, commercial, and institutional customers in the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation service territory that have faced day-ahead electricity market prices since 1998. We look at stories interviewees told about why and how they respond to RTP, why some customers report that they can't, and why even if they can, they don't. Some firms respond as theorized, and we describe their load curtailment strategies. About half of our interviewees reported that they were unable to either shift or forego electricity consumption even when prices are high ($0.50/kWh). Reasons customers gave for why they weren't price-responsive include implicit value placed on reliability, pricing structures, lack of flexibility in adjusting production inputs, just-in-time practices, perceived barriers to onsite generation, and insufficient time. We draw these observations into a framework that could help refine economic theory of dynamic pricing by providing real-world descriptions of how firms behave and why.

  19. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  20. Recovery Act: Federspiel Controls (now Vigilent) and State of California Department of General Services Data Center Energy Efficient Cooling Control Demonstration. Final technical project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federspiel, Clifford; Evers, Myah

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight State of California data centers were equipped with an intelligent energy management system to evaluate the effectiveness, energy savings, dollar savings and benefits that arise when powerful artificial intelligence-based technology measures, monitors and actively controls cooling operations. Control software, wireless sensors and mesh networks were used at all sites. Most sites used variable frequency drives as well. The system dynamically adjusts temperature and airflow on the fly by analyzing real-time demands, thermal behavior and historical data collected on site. Taking into account the chaotic interrelationships of hundreds to thousands of variables in a data center, the system optimizes the temperature distribution across a facility while also intelligently balancing loads, outputs, and airflow. The overall project will provide a reduction in energy consumption of more than 2.3 million kWh each year, which translates to $240,000 saved and a reduction of 1.58 million pounds of carbon emissions. Across all sites, the cooling energy consumption was reduced by 41%. The average reduction in energy savings across all the sites that use VFDs is higher at 58%. Before this case study, all eight data centers ran the cooling fans at 100% capacity all of the time. Because of the new technology, cooling fans run at the optimum fan speed maintaining stable air equilibrium while also expending the least amount of electricity. With lower fan speeds, the life of the capital investment made on cooling equipment improves, and the cooling capacity of the data center increases. This case study depicts a rare technological feat: The same process and technology worked cost effectively in eight very different environments. The results show that savings were achieved in centers with diverse specifications for the sizes, ages and types of cooling equipment. The percentage of cooling energy reduction ranged from 19% to 78% while keeping temperatures substantially within the limits recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for data center facilities.