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1

DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOR 100-KW ELECTRIC AND 400-KW HEAT CAPACITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptional design study was made of a lowpower ''package'' reactor plant for the production of 100 kw of electrical power and 400 kw of heat at remote Arctic installations. The power plant steam generator is proposed to be an unmanned, heterogeneous, boilingtype reactor capable of continuous operation for extended periods. The design is based on data derived from experiments with boiling-type reactors conducted by Argorne at the Reactor Testing Station, Arco, Idaho.

Treshow, M.; Snider, A.R.; Shaftman, D.H.

1955-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Tariff for Reactive Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reactive Power Compensator.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reactive power compensator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Reactive Power Compensating System.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reactive power compensating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

10 kW SOFC Power System Commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Power Generation (CPG) as the prime contractor and SOFCo-EFS Holdings LLC (SOFCo), as their subcontractor, teamed under the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program to develop 3-10kW solid oxide fuel cell systems for use in recreational vehicles, commercial work trucks and stand-by telecommunications applications. The program goal is demonstration of power systems that meet commercial performance requirements and can be produced in volume at a cost of $400/kW. This report summarizes the team's activities during the seventh six-month period (July-December 2005) of the four-year Phase I effort. While there has been significant progress in the development of the SOFC subsystems that can support meeting the program Phase 1 goals, the SOFCo ceramic stack technology has progressed significantly slower than plan and CPG consider it unlikely that the systemic problems encountered will be overcome in the near term. SOFCo has struggled with a series of problems associated with inconsistent manufacturing, inadequate cell performance, and the achievement of consistent, durable, low resistance inter-cell connections with reduced or no precious materials. A myriad of factors have contributed to these problems, but the fact remains that progress has not kept pace with the SECA program. A contributing factor in SOFCo's technical difficulties is attributed to their significantly below plan industry cost share spending over the last four years. This has resulted in a much smaller SOFC stack development program, has contributed to SOFCo not being able to aggressively resolve core issues, and clouds their ability to continue into a commercialization phase. In view of this situation, CPG has conducted an independent assessment of the state-of-the-art in planar SOFC's stacks and have concluded that alternative technology exists offering the specific performance, durability, and low cost needed to meet the SECA objectives. We have further concluded that there is insufficient evidence to reliably predict that SOFCo will be able to achieve the SECA performance and cost goals on a schedule consistent with SECA or CPG commercialization goals. CPG believes SOFCo have made a good faith effort consistent with the available resources, but have repeatedly fallen short of achieving the programs scheduled targets. CPG has therefore initiated a process of application for extension of Phase 1 of our SECA program with the intent of transitioning to an alternative stack supplier with more mature SOFC technology, and demonstrating a system meeting the SECA Phase 1 goals by the end of calendar 2006. We have identified an alternative supplier and will be reporting the progress on transition and program planning in monthly technical reports, reviews, and in the next semiannual report.

Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; John Budge; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Zhien Liu; Tom Morris; Keith Rackers; Gary Roman; Greg Rush; Liang Xue

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Grid Shunt Reactive Power Compensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides essential information on transmission grid shunt reactive power compensation, with particular focus on controllable reactive power sources such as the static var controller (SVC). Applying the information presented in this report can help electric utilities planning grid shunt reactive power compensation strategies or operating shunt reactive power compensation equipment to increase grid reliability, improve grid performance and prevent costly cascading outages. The report is intende...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

9

ACHIEVING 800 KW CW BEAM POWER AND CONTINUING ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS IN CEBAF*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACHIEVING 800 KW CW BEAM POWER AND CONTINUING ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS IN CEBAF* C. E. Reece Thomas, CEBAF at Jefferson Lab has demonstrated its full capacity of sustained 800 kW beam power. All systems the energy reach of CEBAF, we began a program of processing all installed cryomodules. This processing has

10

10 kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The program is organized into three developmental periods. In Phase 1 the team will develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype design and develop a manufacturing plan to substantiate potential producibility at a target cost level of $800/kW factory manufacturing cost. Phase 2 will further develop the design and reduce the manufacturing cost to a level of $600 kW. Depending on an assessment of the maturity of the technology at the end of Phase 1, Phase 2 may be structured and supplemented to provide a limited production capability. Finally, in Phase 3, a full Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program will be integrated into the SECA program to develop a mass-producible design at a factory cost of $400/kW with full cross-functional support for unrestricted commercial sales. The path to market for new technology products in the Cummins system involves two processes. The first is called Product Preceding Technology, or PPT. The PPT process provides a methodology for exploring potentially attractive technologies and developing them to the point that they can be reliably scheduled into a new product development program with a manageable risk to the product introduction schedule or product quality. Once a technology has passed the PPT gate, it is available to be incorporated into a Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program. VPI is the process that coordinates the cross-functional development of a fully supported product. The VPI Program is designed to synchronize efforts in engineering, supply, manufacturing, marketing, finance, and product support areas in such a way that the product, when introduced to the market, represents the maximum value to the customer.

Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Kurt Kneidel; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Tom Morris; Greg Rush

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

10 kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The program is organized into three developmental periods. In Phase 1 the team will develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype design and develop a manufacturing plan to substantiate potential producibility at a target cost level of $800/kW factory manufacturing cost. Phase 2 will further develop the design and reduce the manufacturing cost to a level of $600 kW. Depending on an assessment of the maturity of the technology at the end of Phase 1, Phase 2 may be structured and supplemented to provide a limited production capability. Finally, in Phase 3, a full Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program will be integrated into the SECA program to develop a mass-producible design at a factory cost of $400/kW with full cross-functional support for unrestricted commercial sales. The path to market for new technology products in the Cummins system involves two processes. The first is called Product Preceding Technology, or PPT. The PPT process provides a methodology for exploring potentially attractive technologies and developing them to the point that they can be reliably scheduled into a new product development program with a manageable risk to the product introduction schedule or product quality. Once a technology has passed the PPT gate, it is available to be incorporated into a Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program. VPI is the process that coordinates the cross-functional development of a fully supported product. The VPI Program is designed to synchronize efforts in engineering, supply, manufacturing, marketing, finance, and product support areas in such a way that the product, when introduced to the market, represents the maximum value to the customer.

Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Todd Romine; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Kurt Kneidel; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Greg Rush

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Trade Study on Aggregation of Multiple 10-KW Solid Ozide Fuel Cell Power Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

According to the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program guidelines, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) will be produced in the form of 3-10 kW modules for residential use. In addition to residential use, these modules can also be used in apartment buildings, hospitals, etc., where a higher power rating would be required. For example, a hospital might require a 250 kW power generating capacity. To provide this power using the SECA SOFC modules, 25 of the 10 kW modules would be required. These modules can be aggregated in different architectures to yield the necessary power. This report will show different approaches for aggregating numerous SOFC modules and will evaluate and compare each one with respect to cost, control complexity, ease of modularity, and fault tolerance.

Ozpineci, B.

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

13

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission  

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission Technology Summary ... The invention can transmit electrical power through the surface of the ...

14

Advanced Photovoltaic Inverter Functionality using 500 kW Power Hardware-in-Loop Complete System Laboratory Testing: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing penetration of distribution connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, more and more PV developers and utilities are interested in easing future PV interconnection concerns by mitigating some of the impacts of PV integration using advanced PV inverter controls and functions. This paper describes the testing of a 500 kW PV inverter using Power Hardware-in-Loop (PHIL) testing techniques. The test setup is described and the results from testing the inverter in advanced functionality modes, not commonly used in currently interconnected PV systems, are presented. PV inverter operation under PHIL evaluation that emulated both the DC PV array connection and the AC distribution level grid connection are shown for constant power factor (PF) and constant reactive power (VAr) control modes. The evaluation of these modes was completed under varying degrees of modeled PV variability.

Mather, B. A.; Kromer, M. A.; Casey, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

100kW Energy Transfer Multiplexer Power Converter Prototype Development Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Final Report for "100kW Energy Transfer Multiplexer Power Converter Prototype Development Project" prepared under DOE grant number DE-FG36-03GO13138. This project relates to the further development and prototype construction/evaluation for the Energy Transfer Multiplexer (ETM) power converter topology concept. The ETM uses a series resonant link to transfer energy from any phase of a multiphase input to any phase of a multiphase output, converting any input voltage and frequency to any output voltage and frequency. The basic form of the ETM converter consists of an eight (8)-switch matrix (six phase power switches and two ground power switches) and a series L-C resonant circuit. Electronic control of the switches allows energy to be transferred in the proper amount from any phase to any other phase. Depending upon the final circuit application, the switches may be either SCRs or IGBTs. The inherent characteristics of the ETM converter include the following: Power processing in either direction (bidirectional); Large voltage gain without the need of low frequency magnetics; High efficiency independent of output load and frequency; Wide bandwidth with fast transient response and; Operation as a current source. The ETM is able to synthesize true sinusoidal waveforms with low harmonic distortions. For a low power PM wind generation system, the ETM has the following characteristics and advantages: It provides voltage gain without the need of low frequency magnetics (DC inductors) and; It has constant high efficiency independent of the load. The ETM converter can be implemented into a PM wind power system with smaller size, reduced weight and lower cost. As a result of our analyses, the ETM offers wind power generation technology for the reduction of the cost and size as well as the increase in performance of low power, low wind speed power generation. This project is the further theoretical/analytical exploration of the ETM converter concept in relationship to PM wind power generator applications in the 100kW and under power range. The theoretical/analytical and bench scale work focuses on simplifying the basic ETM converter topology (in terms of parts count and complexity) for the specific application of the low power PM system. The project goals and objectives were for Spellman HV will develop a 100kW prototype ETM power converter based on paralleled lower ratings converters. The proposed configuration of this prototype is a 100kW rated converter comprised of four (4) 34kW rated modules connected in parallel (the fourth converter is included to demonstrate N+1 fault tolerance). This approach is more viable as there is lower technological risk involved in developing a 34kW-rated converter than a single 100kW unit. The modular system approach should have a lower deployment and service cost over a single unit system, because of the economics of scale (smaller units at a higher volume means lower manufacturing cost) and because of improved serviceability (a non-redundant power system with one failed module will still operate at a lower power level). There is also the added benefit that greater commercial application and acceptance should be achieved by having a modular system available in which fault tolerance (N+1 or 2N) is a feature. This modular approach would allow the output power to be increased by adding more paralleled converters. Thus, the maximum output power of the overall power system is a function of the interconnection medium (the hot swap connection subsystem), rather than the ratings of a single module. The project was implemented with Spellman HV acting as the program management and production assembly and test facility; The Baker Company acting as a technical consultant and resource when required; and dtm Associates acting as the design/development resource for the hardware development of the 100kW ETM converter prototype.

S. Merrill Skeist; Richard H. (Dick) Baker; Anthony G.P. Marini; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Definition: Reactive Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reactive Power Reactive Power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reactive Power The portion of electricity that establishes and sustains the electric and magnetic fields of alternating-current equipment. Reactive power must be supplied to most types of magnetic equipment, such as motors and transformers. It also must supply the reactive losses on transmission facilities. Reactive power is provided by generators, synchronous condensers, or electrostatic equipment such as capacitors and directly influences electric system voltage. It is usually expressed in kilovars (kvar) or megavars (Mvar).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In electric power transmission and distribution, volt-ampere reactive (var) is a unit used to measure reactive power in an AC electric

18

Reactive Power Measurement Using the Wavelet Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—This paper provides the theoretical basis for the measurement of reactive and distortion powers from the wavelet transforms. The measurement of reactive power relies on the use of broad-band phase-shift networks to create concurrent in-phase currents and quadrature voltages. The wavelet real power computation resulting from these 90 phase-shift networks yields the reactive power associated with each wavelet frequency level or subband. The distortion power at each wavelet subband is then derived from the real, reactive and apparent powers of the subband, where the apparent power is the product of the v; i element pair's subband rms voltage and current. The advantage of viewing the real and reactive powers in the wavelet domain is that the domain preserves both the frequency and time relationship of these powers. In addition, the reactive power associated with each wavelet subband is a signed quantity and thus has a direction associated with it. This permits tracking the reactive power flow in each subband through the power system. Index Terms—Digital signal processing, phase shift networks, measurement, power, RMS, subband, wavelets. I.

Weon-ki Yoon; Michael J. Devaney

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solar concentration of 50,000 achieved with output power approaching 1 kW  

SciTech Connect

The authors have achieved a 50,000 {+-} 3,000 times concentration of sunlight using a unique dielectric nonimaging concentrator in an experiment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The scale of the experiment is several times larger than that of previous experiments. Total output power approaching 1 kW passes through a 4.6 mm diameter aperture. An extractor tip is added to the concentrator profile which allows measurement of flux levels using an air calorimeter. This new device has the potential to allow the use of dielectric concentrators at larger scale for thermal electric power generation. The authors report on the implications of this experiment for the future use of dielectric concentrators.

Jenkins, D.; Winston, R.; Bliss, J.; O`Gallagher, J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Lewandowski, A.; Bingham, C. [National Renewal Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wind Turbinie Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Mariah Windspire 1-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the Mariah Windspire 1-kW wind turbine. During this test, two configurations were tested on the same turbine. In the first configuration, the turbine inverter was optimized for power production. In the second configuration, the turbine inverter was set for normal power production. In both configurations, the inverter experienced failures and the tests were not finished.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption - Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and Economics Research Title Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power...

23

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the Summer of 2009, LBNL researchers installed end-use sub-metering equipment and associated Energy Information System (EIS) tools to characterize energy use and comfort in Building 90. Seven of 40 key electric loads were measured using advanced meters that make sophisticated real-time measurements of dozens of power flow parameters, power disturbances, and harmonics. The talk will review some electrical engineering fundamentals, how use and interpret data measured in building 90 in real-time. The real-time data available includes power, volt-amps, VAR's, unbalance voltage and current, voltage and current distortion,

24

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.

Maru, H. C.; Singhal, S. C.; Stone, C.; Wheeler, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Review of the State-of-the-Art in Power Electronics Suitable for 10-KW Military Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the technological opportunities of integrating power electronics-based inverters into a TEP system, primarily in the 10-kW size range. The proposed enhancement offers potential advantages in weight reduction, improved efficiency, better performance in a wider range of generator operating conditions, greater versatility and adaptability, and adequate reliability. In order to obtain strong assurance of the availability of inverters that meet required performance and reliability levels, a market survey was performed. The survey obtained positive responses from several manufacturers in the motor drive and distributed generation industries. This study also includes technology reviews and assessments relating to circuit topologies, reliability issues, vulnerability to pulses of electromagnetic energy, potential improvements in semiconductor materials, and potential performance improvement through cryogenics.

Staunton, R.H.

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

NUCLEAR-CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT COST STUDY CONVENTIONAL COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS, 25,000 KW TO 325,000 KW, FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LEMONT, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish a basis for comparing the estimated cost of nuclear power plant designs, a set of general and detailed design considerations for conventional coal-fired power plants was established. Five preliminary designs of conventional coal-fired power plants ranging in size from 25to 325 mw were selected, and cost estimates were prepared. ( A.C.)

Chittenden, W.A.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Quality Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the power quality test on the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Independent Testing Project. In total five turbines are being tested as part of the project. Power quality testing is one of up to five test that may be performed on the turbines including power performance, safety and function, noise, and duration tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

Curtis, A.; Gevorgian, V.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Performance of 350kW photovoltaic power system for Saudi Arabian villages after 30 months  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The installation and checkout of the 350kW PV system was completed in September 1981. Since then this system has operated satisfactorily over the past two and half years and has experienced very little downtime. The system has a rather unique capability to operate in standalone or any of several cogeneration modes. This paper presents an update of the system performance with emphasis on the photovoltaic field. Research effort being implemented for the next two years are also briefly summarized.

Koshaim, B.; Al-Sani, A.; Huraib, F.; Imamura, M.S.; Salim, A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

1Â…10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat 1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-48265 November 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

32

Artificial bee colony algorithm solution for optimal reactive power flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent foraging behavior of honeybee swarm. Optimal reactive power flow (ORPF) based on ABC algorithm to minimize active power loss in power systems is studied in this ... Keywords: Artificial bee colony, Optimal reactive power flow, Penalty function, Power system

Kür?at Ayan; Ula? K?l?ç

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Differential evolution approach for optimal reactive power dispatch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential evolution based optimal reactive power dispatch for real power loss minimization in power system is presented in this paper. The proposed methodology determines control variable settings such as generator terminal voltages, tap positions ... Keywords: Differential evolution, Loss minimization, Optimal power flow, Penalty function, Reactive power dispatch

M. Varadarajan; K. S. Swarup

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Dynamic Reactive Power Control of Isolated Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents dynamic reactive power control of isolated power systems. Isolated systems include MicroGrids in islanded mode, shipboard power systems operating offshore, or any other power system operating in islanded mode intentionally or due to a fault. Isolated power systems experience fast transients due to lack of an infinite bus capable of dictating the voltage and frequency reference. This dissertation only focuses on reactive control of islanded MicroGrids and AC/DC shipboard power systems. The problem is tackled using a Model Predictive Control (MPC) method, which uses a simplified model of the system to predict the voltage behavior of the system in future. The MPC method minimizes the voltage deviation of the predicted bus voltage; therefore, it is inherently robust and stable. In other words, this method can easily predict the behavior of the system and take necessary control actions to avoid instability. Further, this method is capable of reaching a smooth voltage profile and rejecting possible disturbances in the system. The studied MicroGrids in this dissertation integrate intermittent distributed energy resources such as wind and solar generators. These non-dispatchable sources add to the uncertainty of the system and make voltage and reactive control more challenging. The model predictive controller uses the capability of these sources and coordinates them dynamically to achieve the voltage goals of the controller. The MPC controller is implemented online in a closed control loop, which means it is self-correcting with the feedback it receives from the system.

Falahi, Milad

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

150 kW PEM Stationary Power Plant Operating on Natural Gas -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reformate. Insights gained from these studies will be applied towards designing a power plant, such as described above, that meets the following 2015 DOE targets: Operating...

36

250-kW power plant construction plan - task 2.4. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

This work details the responsibilities of several contractors in the construction of a coal-fired power plant. The subcontractor bidding process is discussed in detail.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

40-kW field test power plant modification and development. Monthly technical status report No. 13, September 16, 1978-October 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The contract objective is to complete the design and development actions that upgrade the 40-kW fuel cell power plant to a configuration suitable for on-site demonstration testing. The modifications will improve operating capability, durability and maintenance interval and lead to reduced production costs. Equipment to recover and use the by-product heat of electric generation will be available on the power plant for field verification of on-site heat recovery. The 40-kW power plant will be compatible with the power characteristics required for conventional heat pumps and conventional 60 Hz, 120/208 volts electrically operated equipment. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Composite Thin-Disk Laser Scaleable to 100 kW Average Power Output and Beyond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By combining newly developed technologies to engineer composite laser components with state of the art diode laser pump delivery technologies, we are in a position to demonstrate high beam quality, continuous wave, laser radiation at scaleable high average powers. The crucial issues of our composite thin disk laser technology were demonstrated during a successful first light effort. The high continuous wave power levels that are now within reach make this system of high interest to future DoD initiatives in solid-state laser technology for the laser weapon arena.

Zapata, L.; Beach, R.; Payne, S.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

MARKETS FOR REACTIVE POWER AND RELIABILITY: A WHITE PAPER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 MARKETS FOR REACTIVE POWER AND RELIABILITY: A WHITE PAPER Engineering and Economics as efficient and optimal production and prices for real and reactive power. The purpose of this paper delivery of electric power. To accomplish this end, the paper opens with specification of an economic

40

Reactive Power Compensation Technologies, State-of-the-Art Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactors to provide or absorb the required reactive power have been developed [7], [8], [9]. Also, the use static VAR generators, using power electronic technologies have been proposed and developed [7 compensators (SVC) consist of standard reactive power shunt elements (reactors and capacitors) which

Rudnick, Hugh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

Maston, V.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Southern Company Photovoltaic Evaluation in Atlanta: Analysis of Field Data from Seven 4-kW PV Systems at Georgia Power Headquarters During 2010–2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven photovoltaic (PV) power systems using different module technologies were installed on the rooftop of Georgia Power’s headquarters in Atlanta. This report describes the output performance of these small-scale systems (about 4 kW each) relative to the available solar resource at the site. The main objective of this evaluation has been to assess performance characteristics of commercially available module technologies in a southeastern U.S. climate. To ensure a reliable comparison, all ...

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coordination of reactive power scheduling in a multi-area power system operated by independent utilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the problem of reactive power scheduling in a power system with several areas controlled by independent transmission system operators (TSOs). To design… (more)

Phulpin, Yannick

44

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Assessment of a Transportable 200-kW Fuel Cell in Rural Applications: Site 1: Central Georgia EMC/Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Jack son, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dispersed generation is particularly attractive to electric cooperatives in rural areas due to low customer densities and sometimes rapid load growth at the end of long lines. EPRI and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) are cosponsoring a project to demonstrate the use of transportable 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants in rural dispersed generation applications. This interim report details the project and describes the first year of operation of a transportable fuel c...

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Study on Reactive Power and Voltage Control of Power Grid with Small Hydropower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When it is in the wet season and the load is low, reactive power surplus and voltage rise are caused by high-efficiency power generation of small hydropower and load reduction in Linjiang region, Baishan city, JiLin province. These problems, which exist ... Keywords: small hydro power, vally load, reactive power balance, the rise in voltage, generator in leading power factor on operation

Yaopeng Bai; Lijie Xu; Wei Wang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Directional Reactive Power Ground Plane Transmission - Energy ...  

ORNL researchers have developed a pioneering power ... out-of-phase with respect to time. This phenomenon allows electrical transmission on a single ...

48

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Optimal Reactive Power Planning of Radial Distribution Systems with Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper analyzes reactive power optimization problem in distribution system with wind power and PV generators. Reactive power optimization mathematical model including the active power loss, reactive power compensation capacity and static voltage margin ... Keywords: Distributed generation, Distributed Generation, Immune Algorithm, Cluster Evolutionary

Li Shengqi, Zeng Lilin, Li Yongan, He Zhengping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onEconomic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supplyof creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive

Appen, Jan von

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

24 Hour Day-Ahead Reactive Power Forecasting and Optimal Scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive power management affects not only the system voltage profiles but also system efficiencies. Changes in the flow of reactive power have an influence on system losses. Reactive power forecasting and optimal scheduling of power system control elements can be conducted to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The tool discussed in this report optimizes the power system to produce a security-constrained case, reduce losses, increase reactive reserve, and securely maintain ...

2013-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Case Study of a 250-kW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell: LADWP Demonstration of a FuelCell Energy Power Plant: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2001, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) installed a 250-kW pre-commercial molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system manufactured by FuelCell Energy (FCE) at its headquarters building in downtown Los Angeles. At the time, the FCE Direct FuelCell 300A was only the second such system deployed in the United States, although several DFC systems had been deployed in Europe by FCE's partner, MTU. The purpose of the field trial was to gain experience with emerging fuel cell technolog...

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Development of a low cost integrated 15 kW A.C. solar tracking sub-array for grid connected PV power system applications  

SciTech Connect

Utility Power Group has achieved a significant reduction in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems. The two part technical approach focused on (1) The utilization of a large area factory assembled PV panel, and (2) The integration and packaging of all sub-array power conversion and control functions within a single factory produced enclosure. Eight engineering prototype 15kW ac single axis solar tracking sub-arrays were designed, fabricated, and installed at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District{close_quote}s Hedge Substation site in 1996 and are being evaluated for performance and reliability. A number of design enhancements will be implemented in 1997 and demonstrated by the field deployment and operation of over twenty advanced sub-array PV power systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G. [Utility Power Group, 9410 G De Soto Avenue, Chatsworth, California 91311 (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Application of Newton's optimal power flow in voltage/reactive power control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers an application of Newton's optimal power flow to the solution of the secondary voltage/reactive power control in transmission networks. An efficient computer program based on the latest achievements in the sparse matrix/vector techniques has been developed for this purpose. It is characterized by good robustness, accuracy and speed. A combined objective function appropriate for various system load levels with suitable constraints, for treatment of the power system security and economy is also proposed. For the real-time voltage/reactive power control, a suboptimal power flow procedure has been derived by using the reduced set of control variables. This procedure is based on the sensitivity theory applied to the determination of zones for the secondary voltage/reactive power control and corresponding reduced set of regulating sources, whose reactive outputs represent control variables in the optimal power flow program. As a result, the optimal power flow program output becomes a schedule to be used by operators in the process of the real-time voltage/reactive power control in both normal and emergency operating states.

Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S. (Electric Power Board of Serbia, Belgrade (YU)); Calovic, M.S. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (YU)); Ristanovic, P. (Institute Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (YU))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

ORNL/CP-97155 Instantaneous Reactive Power and Power Factor of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ORNL/CP-97155 ORNL/CP-97155 Instantaneous Reactive Power and Power Factor of Instantaneous Phasor s ' 4 . L;/, Oak Ridge National Laboratory* P f Senior Member &Eb "'ii Lf/ .. John S. Hsu 4- p d Post Office Box 2009, MS 8038 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3783 1-8038 Key wordr: Instantaneous reactive power, Symmetrical property, Instantaiteous phasors, Phasors of one phase, n r e e phases. Abstract The unique property of instantaneous phasors is that at any instant the instantaneous three-phase currents and voltages can be represented by a set of balanced phasors. The instantaneous reactive power and the concept of instantaneous power factor can be clearly understood from the instantaneous phasors. This provides a theoretical foundation for power quality monitoring, diagnostics,

56

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Development of a Low-Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Norman Bessette Acumentrics Corporation 20 Southwest Park Westwood, MA 02090 Phone: (781) 461-8251; Email: nbessette@acumentrics.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-03NT41838 Project Start Date: April 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The goal of the project is to develop a low-cost 3-10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generator capable of meeting multiple market applications. This is accomplished by: Improving cell power and stability * Cost reduction of cell manufacturing

58

Incorporation of plug in hybrid electric vehicle in the reactive power market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper incorporates plug in hybrid electric vehicle(PHEV) in the reactive power market. The PHEV capability curve is first extracted considering the operation limit of PHEV. In order to offer price in the reactive power market

H. Feshki Farahani; H. A. Shayanfar; M. S. Ghazizadeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Application of genetic algorithms for optimal reactive power planning of doubly fed induction generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes optimal reactive power control of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG), which is widely used in a distributed generating plant. Although its structure is similar to that of induction motors, its reactive power control is more ... Keywords: doubly fed induction generator, genetic algorithms, optimal reactive power planning, optimization

P. Sangsarawut; A. Oonsivilai; T. Kulworawanichpong

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Optimal reactive power planning of doubly fed induction generators using genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes optimal reactive power control of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG), which is widely used in a distributed generating plant. Although its structure is similar to that of an induction motor, its reactive power control is more ... Keywords: doubly fed induction generator, genetic algorithms, optimal reactive power planning, optimization

P. Sangsarawut; A. Oonsivilai; T. Kulworawanichpong

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply Jan von Appen1 , Chris. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power. Index Terms ­ microgrids

62

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption -- Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and Economic Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

need to establish real-time prices for reactive power toWe find that nodal real-time prices for reactive power willfind that non-zero real-time prices for reactive power will

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems. Final Report of the Princeton Power Systems Development of the 100kW Demand Response Inverter.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, electric utilities, academic institutions and the private sector. Recognizing the need to diversify the nation's energy portfolio, the SEGIS effort focuses on specific technologies needed to facilitate the integration of large-scale solar power generation into the nation's power grid Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) awarded a contract to Princeton Power Systems, Inc., (PPS) to develop a 100kW Advanced AC-link SEGIS inverter prototype under the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for near-term commercial applications. This SEGIS initiative emphasizes the development of advanced inverters, controllers, communications and other balance-of-system components for photovoltaic (PV) distributed power applications. The SEGIS Stage 3 Contract was awarded to PPS on July 28, 2010. PPS developed and implemented a Demand Response Inverter (DRI) during this three-stage program. PPS prepared a 'Site Demonstration Conference' that was held on September 28, 2011, to showcase the cumulative advancements. This demo of the commercial product will be followed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., certification by the fourth quarter of 2011, and simultaneously the customer launch and commercial production sometime in late 2011 or early 2012. This final report provides an overview of all three stages and a full-length reporting of activities and accomplishments in Stage 3.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Heavener, Paul (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Hammell, Darren (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Holveck, Mark (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems. Final Report of the Princeton Power Systems Development of the 100kW Demand Response Inverter.  

SciTech Connect

Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, electric utilities, academic institutions and the private sector. Recognizing the need to diversify the nation's energy portfolio, the SEGIS effort focuses on specific technologies needed to facilitate the integration of large-scale solar power generation into the nation's power grid Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) awarded a contract to Princeton Power Systems, Inc., (PPS) to develop a 100kW Advanced AC-link SEGIS inverter prototype under the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for near-term commercial applications. This SEGIS initiative emphasizes the development of advanced inverters, controllers, communications and other balance-of-system components for photovoltaic (PV) distributed power applications. The SEGIS Stage 3 Contract was awarded to PPS on July 28, 2010. PPS developed and implemented a Demand Response Inverter (DRI) during this three-stage program. PPS prepared a 'Site Demonstration Conference' that was held on September 28, 2011, to showcase the cumulative advancements. This demo of the commercial product will be followed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., certification by the fourth quarter of 2011, and simultaneously the customer launch and commercial production sometime in late 2011 or early 2012. This final report provides an overview of all three stages and a full-length reporting of activities and accomplishments in Stage 3.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Heavener, Paul (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Hammell, Darren (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Holveck, Mark (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Test report on the Abacus 30 kW bimode{reg_sign} inverter and maximum power tracker (MPT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts the photovoltaic balance of systems (BOS) program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. Under this program, SNL lets commercialization contracts and conducts a laboratory program designed to advance BOS technology, improve BOS component reliability, and reduce the BOS life-cycle-cost. This report details the testing of the first large US manufactured hybrid inverter and its associated maximum power tracker.

Bonn, R.; Ginn, J.; Zirzow, J. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Distributed control for optimal reactive power compensation in smart microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of optimal reactive power compensation for the minimization of power distribution losses in a smart microgrid. We first propose an approximate model for the power distribution network, which allows us to cast the problem into the class of convex quadratic, linearly constrained, optimization problems. We also show how this model provides the tools for a distributed approach, in which agents have a partial knowledge of the problem parameters and state, and can only perform local measurements. Then, we design a randomized, gossip-like optimization algorithm, providing conditions for convergence together with an analytic characterization of the convergence speed. The analysis shows that the best performance can be achieved when we command cooperation among agents that are neighbors in the smart microgrid topology. Numerical simulations are included to validate the proposed model and to confirm the analytic results about the performance of the proposed algorithm.

Bolognani, Saverio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reactive Power Management to Address Short-Term Voltage Stability Using Optimal Reactive Power Allocation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage stability has attracted attention recently because power systems are increasingly operated under heavy loads and subjected to high levels of dynamic fast acting loads. Voltage instability under these conditions can be manifested as depressed voltage profiles, delayed voltage recovery at load buses following a major disturbance, and even fast voltage collapse. Single-phase, low-inertia induction motors can have adverse effect on voltage stability as they decelerate in the event of voltage ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage Control in Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER ACCEPTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, Nov. 2008 1 Reactive Power and Voltage) problem associated with reactive power and voltage control in distribution systems to minimize daily on the number of switching operations of transformer load tap changers (LTCs) and capacitors, which are modeled

Cañizares, Claudio A.

69

PEV-based Reactive Power Compensation for Wind DG Units: A Stackelberg Game Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine's inductive load to ensure a stable voltage profile in the system. Since reactive power can only from the load centers, DG units will speed up the revolution of providing power on site with little unit. Reactive power compensa- tion is needed since the load is not pure resistive and may include

Wu, Chenye

70

Study on reactive power optimization problem taking the line current as state variable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The math model of optimization problem is established by describing the electric power network equations as the hybrid form with node voltage and line current based on ? equivalence circuit of power equipment, there the objective function is performed ... Keywords: line current, node voltage, optimal power flow, power flow, reactive power optimization

Zhang Jinsong; Wang Chengmin; Zhang Gong; Hou Zhijian

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Local Dynamic Reactive Power for Correction of System Voltage Problems  

SciTech Connect

Distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as local voltage collapse. Local voltage collapse is occurring in part because modern air conditioner compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than 3 cycles (.05s) when a fault, such as on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage to sag to 70 to 60%. The reasons for this susceptibility are discussed in the report. During the local voltage collapse, voltages are depressed for a period of perhaps one or two minutes. There is a concern that these local events are interacting together over larger areas and may present a challenge to system reliability. An effective method of preventing local voltage collapse is the use of voltage regulation from Distributed Energy Resources (DER) that can supply or absorb reactive power. DER, when properly controlled, can provide a rapid correction to voltage dips and prevent motor stall. This report discusses the phenomenon and causes of local voltage collapse as well as the control methodology we have developed to counter voltage sag. The problem is growing because of the use of low inertia, high efficiency air conditioner (A/C) compressor motors and because the use of electric A/C is growing in use and becoming a larger percentage of system load. A method for local dynamic voltage regulation is discussed which uses reactive power injection or absorption from local DER. This method is independent, rapid, and will not interfere with conventional utility system voltage control. The results of simulations of this method are provided. The method has also been tested at the ORNL s Distributed Energy Communications and Control (DECC) Laboratory using our research inverter and synchronous condenser. These systems at the DECC Lab are interconnected to an actual distribution system, the ORNL distribution system, which is fed from TVA s 161kV sub-transmission backbone. The test results are also provided and discussed. The simulations and testing show that local voltage control from DER can prevent local voltage collapse. The results also show that the control can be provided so quickly, within 0.5 seconds, that is does not interfere with conventional utility methods.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cost of Providing Ancillary Services from Power Plants: Reactive Supply and Voltage Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a methodology for determining the variable costs of generating and supplying reactive power to a transmission system, via the generator step-up transformer, for system voltage control. The report examines the costs of additional energy losses, maintenance, repair, and plant aging associated with the generation of reactive power. TR-107270-V3SI contains System of International units.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

Multi-objective reactive power market clearing in competitive electricity market using HFMOEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an application of a hybrid fuzzy multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (HFMOEA) for solving a highly constraint, mixed integer type, complex multi-objective reactive power market clearing (RPMC) problem for the competitive electricity ... Keywords: Competitive electricity market, Fuzzy logic controller, Hybrid evolutionary algorithm, Multi-objective optimization, Pareto-optimal front, Reactive power market clearing

Ashish Saini; Amit Saraswat

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Optimal Allocation of Reactive Power Source in Wind Farms Using Sensitivity Analysis and Tabu Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering wind farms real operation characteristics, a novel method using sensitivity analysis and Tabu algorithm for reactive power compensation allocations is proposed. In this paper, the sensitivity coefficient is defined as partial derivative of ... Keywords: Wind farm, Sensitivity analysis, Reactive power compensation, SVC, Tabu algorithm

Ping Zhang; XiangJun Zeng; Ling Li

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optimal Planning of Reactive Power Compensators for Oil Field Distribution Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristic behavior of the loads of oil pumps is analyzed. An approach for low-voltage side reactive power compensators of oil field distribution networks is put forward. Based on the supplied loads of transformers, the index of maximum reduction ... Keywords: Genetic Algorithm, distribution network, oil field, reactive power compensation

Wu Xiaomeng; Yan Suli

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

300kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project Technical Overview Presented at: Annual Doe Peer Review Meeting 2008 DOE Energy Storage & Power Electronics Research Programs By Ib I....

77

Energy Storage and Reactive Power Compensator in a Large Wind Farm: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The size of wind farm power systems is increasing, and so is the number of wind farms contributing to the power systems network. The size of wind turbines is also increasing--from less than 1 MW a few years ago to the 2- to 3-MW machines being installed today and the 5-MW machines under development. The interaction of the wind farm, energy storage, reactive power compensation, and the power system network is being investigated. Because the loads and the wind farms' output fluctuate during the day, the use of energy storage and reactive power compensation is ideal for the power system network. Energy storage and reactive power compensation can minimize real/reactive power imbalances that can affect the surrounding power system. In this paper, we will show how the contribution of wind farms affects the power distribution network and how the power distribution network, energy storage, and reactive power compensation interact when the wind changes. We will also investigate the size of the components in relation to each other and to the power system.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.; Romanowitz, H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Identification of Critical Voltage Control Areas and Determination of Required Reactive Power Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to investigate and devise a methodology for identifying areas in power systems that are prone to voltage instability under particular operating conditions and contingencies. These areas, which are prone to instability due to their lack of reactive power reserves, are referred to as critical voltage control areas (VCAs). Once VCAs are identified, methods of determining their adequate reactive power reserve requirements to ensure secure system operation under all c...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Research and development of a 3 MW power plant from the design, development, and demonstration of a 100 KW power system utilizing the direct contact heat exchanger concept for geothermal brine recovery project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design phase for the 100 KW unit consumed the months of May through November 1978, with the final design selected as having a direct contact boiler and condenser, a single-stage radial inflow induction turbine-generator using isopentane as the working fluid, and a single cell ejector-type cooling tower. The unit was constructed on two, forty-foot flatbed trailers between the months of October 1978 and June 1979. Systems start-up testing, in-field modifications, unit operation, and performance testing were performed between July and December 1979. AP and L (Arkansas Power and Light) personnel assumed responsibility of the unit at that time and conducted further maintenance, operations, and testing through August 1980.

Huebner, A.W.; Wall, D.A.; Herlacher, T.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Joint optimization algorithm for network reconfiguration and reactive power control of wind farm in distribution system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of small size wind farms used as DG sources located within the distribution system are rapidly increasing. Wind farm made up with doubly fed induction generators (DFIG) is proposed in this paper as the continuous reactive ... Keywords: DFIG wind turbine, network reconfiguration, particle swarm optimization, reactive power control, wind farm

Jingjing Zhao; Xin Li; Jiping Lu; Congli Zhang

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any com...

Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Reactive Power Management using Firefly and Spiral Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Power System planning encompasses the concept of minimization of ... and transformer taps (vertical integration). Under stable running ..... AReview”, IEEE International Journal of Power and Energy systems,. 23(2), pp 81-89, 2003.

84

Optimization Online - Reactive Power Management using Firefly and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 4, 2013 ... Abstract: Power System planning encompasses the concept of ... variables being generator bus voltage, capacitor shunts and transformer taps.

85

Optimization Online - Reactive Power Management using Firefly and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 2, 2013 ... Abstract: Power System planning encompasses the concept of ... on Generator source voltage, shunt/series injection, transformer taps etc.

86

Lillgrund Wind Farm Modelling and Reactive Power Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The installation of wind power plant has significantly increased since several years due to the recent necessity of creating renewable and clean energy sources.… (more)

Boulanger, Isabelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Towards reactive scheduling for large-scale virtual power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerning distributed energy management, virtual power plants are a frequently discussed topic. Although there are several different approaches to the coordination of distributed energy resources in this context, the inherent dynamics of this complex ...

Martin Tröschel; Hans-Jürgen Appelrath

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

FirstEnergy Uses EPRI Interregional Reactive Power Management Framework to Help Improve Transmission Voltage Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FirstEnergy teamed with EPRI and Powertech Labs to develop a practical, automated method for identifying areas prone to voltage instability due to a lack of reactive power reserves. Power system designers and operational planning engineers can use the new method to evaluate the performance of various power system designs or configurations with regard to susceptibility to voltage instability, determine weak areas requiring special remediation, and maximize the efficient use of assets by determining the mi...

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Property:Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PVPbiFitMaxKW PVPbiFitMaxKW Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed PV capacity in kW that is eligible for the PBI or FIT. Ex: We Energies' FIT maximum eligible PV system size is 100 kW. Format: 100.0 [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alliant Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + 20 + Ameren Missouri - Solar Renewable Energy Credits + 100 + Anaheim Public Utilities - PV Buydown Program (California) + 1000 + Austin Energy - Commercial PV Incentive Program (Texas) + 20 + Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) + 20 +

90

EV/PHEV Bidirectional Charger Assessment for V2G Reactive Power Operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a summary of the available single-phase ac-dc topologies used for EV/PHEV, level-1 and -2 on-board charging and for providing reactive power support to the utility grid. It presents the design motives of single-phase on-board chargers in detail and makes a classification of the chargers based on their future vehicle-to-grid usage. The pros and cons of each different ac-dc topology are discussed to shed light on their suitability for reactive power support. This paper also presents and analyzes the differences between charging-only operation and capacitive reactive power operation that results in increased demand from the dc-link capacitor (more charge/discharge cycles and increased second harmonic ripple current). Moreover, battery state of charge is spared from losses during reactive power operation, but converter output power must be limited below its rated power rating to have the same stress on the dc-link capacitor.

Kisacikoglu, Mithat C [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

McDowell, Jason (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Walling, Reigh (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Peter, William (SunPower, Richmond, CA); Von Engeln, Edi (NV Energy, Reno, NV); Seymour, Eric (AEI, Fort Collins, CO); Nelson, Robert (Siemens Wind Turbines, Orlando, FL); Casey, Leo (Satcon, Boston, MA); Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris. (SunPower, Richmond, CA)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Preliminary Analysis of the Economics of Using Distributed Energy as a Source of Reactive Power Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major blackout affecting 50 million people in the Northeast United States, where insufficient reactive power supply was an issue, and an increased number of filings made to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by generators for reactive power has led to a closer look at reactive power supply and compensation. The Northeastern Massachusetts region is one such area where there is an insufficiency in reactive power compensation. Distributed energy due to its close proximity to loads seems to be a viable option for solving any present or future reactive power shortage problems. Industry experts believe that supplying reactive power from synchronized distributed energy sources can be 2 to 3 times more effective than providing reactive support in bulk from longer distances at the transmission or generation level. Several technology options are available to supply reactive power from distributed energy sources such as small generators, synchronous condensers, fuel cells or microturbines. In addition, simple payback analysis indicates that investments in DG to provide reactive power can be recouped in less than 5 years when capacity payments for providing reactive power are larger than $5,000/kVAR and the DG capital and installation costs are lower than $30/kVAR. However, the current institutional arrangements for reactive power compensation present a significant barrier to wider adoption of distributed energy as a source of reactive power. Furthermore, there is a significant difference between how generators and transmission owners/providers are compensated for reactive power supplied. The situation for distributed energy sources is even more difficult, as there are no arrangements to compensate independent DE owners interested in supplying reactive power to the grid other than those for very large IPPs. There are comparable functionality barriers as well, as these smaller devices do not have the control and communications requirements necessary for automatic operation in response to local or system operators. There are no known distributed energy asset owners currently receiving compensation for reactive power supply or capability. However, there are some cases where small generators on the generation and transmission side of electricity supply have been tested and have installed the capability to be dispatched for reactive power support. Several concerns need to be met for distributed energy to become widely integrated as a reactive power resource. The overall costs of retrofitting distributed energy devices to absorb or produce reactive power need to be reduced. There needs to be a mechanism in place for ISOs/RTOs to procure reactive power from the customer side of the meter where distributed energy resides. Novel compensation methods should be introduced to encourage the dispatch of dynamic resources close to areas with critical voltage issues. The next phase of this research will investigate in detail how different options of reactive power producing DE can compare both economically and functionally with shunt capacitor banks. Shunt capacitor banks, which are typically used for compensating reactive power consumption of loads on distribution systems, are very commonly used because they are very cost effective in terms of capital costs. However, capacitor banks can require extensive maintenance especially due to their exposure to lightning at the top of utility poles. Also, it can be problematic to find failed capacitor banks and their maintenance can be expensive, requiring crews and bucket trucks which often requires total replacement. Another shortcoming of capacitor banks is the fact that they usually have one size at a location (typically sized as 300, 600, 900 or 1200kVAr) and thus don't have variable range as do reactive power producing DE, and cannot respond to dynamic reactive power needs. Additional future work is to find a detailed methodology to identify the hidden benefit of DE for providing reactive power and the best way to allocate the benefit among customers, utilities, transmission companies or RTOs.

Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; King, Thomas F [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reactive Power Management using Firefly and Spiral Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 2, 2013 ... Hybridized market and congestion management have been invoked in. [17-19]. Voltage ... all possible regions of the search space for information. This algorithm .... bus voltages are calculated by means of a suitable load flow analysis. The ..... Electrical Power and Energy Systems 32: 368-374. 9. Liya G ...

94

1 MW Fuel Cell Project: Test and Evaluation of Five 200 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Units Configured as a 1 MW Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell technology can play a potentially significant role as a distributed generation resource at customer facilities. This report describes a demonstration of the new technology that is needed for utility management and control of multiple fuel cell power plants at a single location in an assured power application.

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condenser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .turbine output power. Condenser pressures were much highere d isobutane w i t h it. Condenser I s o b u t a n e v a p

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume III. Appendix. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the appendix to the Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design report on ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2). The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. Under this contract Stearns-Roger developed a conceptual design, which was site specific, containing the following major elements: System Requirements Analysis, Site Description, System Conceptual Design, Conceptual Test and Operating Plans, Development Plans, Procurement and Management Plans for Subsequent Phases, and Cost Estimates. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. Drawings, tables, and data sheets are included on hourly temperatures, displacement, utility rates, power conversion system, seasonal design load summary, average collector temperature optimization study, system operating temperature optimization study, power conversion system seasonal performance, thermal storage/fluid loop, system integration, and cost estimates. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Examination of a PHEV Bi-Directional Charger System for V2G Reactive Power Compensation  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) potentially have the capability to fulfill the energy storage needs of the electric grid by supplying ancillary services such as reactive power compensation. However, in order to allow bidirectional power transfer, the PHEV battery charger should be designed to manage such capability. While many different battery chargers have been available since the inception of the first electric vehicles (EVs), an on-board, conductive charger with bidirectional power transferring capability have recently drawn attention due to their inherent advantages in charging accessibility, ease of use and efficiency. In this study, a reactive power compensation case study using the inverter dc-link capacitor is given when a PHEV battery is under charging operation. Finally, the impact of providing these services on the batteries is also explained.

Kisacikoglu, Mithat C [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Real Power and Reactive Power Control of a Three-Phase Single-Stage-PV System and PV voltage Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems with power electronic interfaces can provide both real and reactive power to meet power system needs with appropriate control algorithms. This paper presents the control algorithm design for a three-phase single-stage grid-connected PV inverter to achieve either maximum power point tracking (MPPT) or a certain amount of real power injection, as well as the voltage/var control. The switching between MPPT control mode and a certain amount of real power control mode is automatic and seamless. Without the DC-to-DC booster stage, PV DC voltage stability is an important issue in the control design especially when the PV inverter is operating at maximum power point (MPP) with voltage/var control. The PV DC voltage collapse phenomenon and its reason are discussed. The method based on dynamic correction of the PV inverter output is proposed to ensure PV DC voltage stability. Simulation results of the single-stage PV system during system disturbances and fast solar irradiation changes confirm that the proposed control algorithm for single-stage PV inverters can provide appropriate real and reactive power services and ensure PV DC voltage stability during dynamic system operation and atmospheric conditions.

Li, Huijuan [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

SciTech Connect

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sule, Petr [NEW MEXICO CONSORTIUM

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Comparative study for EAF's reactive energy compensation methods and power factor improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper is analyzing the current operating conditions of one electric arc furnace (EAF) in order to evaluate the best option to solve the energy consumption problem. Experimental results show that EAFs represent a substantial source of electric ... Keywords: electric arc furnace, flicker, harmonic analysis, improvement, power factor, reactive compensator

Deaconu Sorin Ioan; Popa Gabriel Nicolae; Tihomir Latinovic

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration  

SciTech Connect

We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sule, Petr [NEW MEXICO CONSORTIUM

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM 200 kW - PC25C FUEL CELL POWER PLANT FOR THE ST.-AGNES-HOSPITAL, BOCHOLT, GERMANY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the Year 2001, the Saint-Agnes-Hospital in Bocholt, Germany, operates a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) to provide the base load of electrical power as well as heat in Winter and air conditioning in Summer. The project was made possible by federal funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a strategic alliance with the local utility company, the Bocholter Energie- und Wasserversorgung GmbH (BEW), and with the gas supplier of BEW, the Thyssengas GmbH. The fuel cell power plant is combined with an absorption chiller. It is highly efficient and has an excellent power to heat ratio. The operation during the first Year went smoothly and nearly free of trouble.

Dipl.-Ing. Knut Stahl

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

On-line reactive power compensation schemes for unbalanced three phase four wire distribution feeders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new reactive power compensation method is developed to reduce the negative and zero sequence components of load currents and to improve the load bus power factor of unbalanced three-phase four-wire distribution feeders. Negative and zero sequences currents may cause additional losses and damages to power systems. Load compensation at the load bus is an effective method to eliminate those undesired sequence currents. The compensation technique uses a Y-connected and a [Delta]-connected static reactive power compensators to give a different amount of reactive power compensation to each phase. The compensation formulas are very suitable for on-line control by measuring phase voltages and currents in the real time. The compensation effect can also be achieved even if one leg of the SVCs is out of service. In addition to balancing effect and power factor improvement at the load bus, the SVCs can also be used to support the load bus voltage and to maintain the substation feeder at unity powder factor. Digital simulations are made with the load data measured from an 11.4kV secondary substation feeder.

Sanyi Lee; Chijui Wu (National Taiwan Inst. of Tech., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

SOFCSOFC (10kW(10kW )) Stack Stack ( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Mitsubishi (band ) 150 kW module Rolls-Royce () 100kW SOFC TOTO, Kyushu () 20kW stack wet process #12;2 SOFC () Mitsubishi Heavy Ind. § SIS § 250kW § 55% Rolls-Royce § SIS § 250kW (micro GT-SOFC) § 53% (125 kW ) Tokyo Gas § SIS § kW (5kW ) / #12

Hong, Deog Ki

105

Reactive Power Laboratory: Synchronous Condenser Testing&Modeling Results - Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject report documents the work carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during months 5-7 (May-July 2005) of a multi-year research project. The project has the overall goal of developing methods of incorporating distributed energy (DE) that can produce reactive power locally and for injecting into the distribution system. The objective for this new type of DE is to be able to provide voltage regulation and dynamic reactive power reserves without the use of extensive communication and control systems. The work performed over this three-month period focused on four aspects of the overall objective: (1) characterization of a 250HP (about 300KVAr) synchronous condenser (SC) via test runs at the ORNL Reactive Power Laboratory; (2) development of a data acquisition scheme for collecting the necessary voltage, current and power readings at the synchronous condenser and on the distribution system; (3) development of algorithms for analyzing raw test data from the various test runs; and (4) validation of a steady-state model for the synchronous condenser via the use of a commercial software package to study its effects on the ORNL 13.8/2.4kV distribution network.

Henry, SD

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption --Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and EconomicResearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) began discussing regulatory policy for reactive-power procurement and pricing in competitive electricity markets. This paper summarizes findings from a unique, interdisciplinary program of public-interest research that lays a formal foundation for evaluating aspects of FERC staff recommendations and offers early insights that should be useful in guiding policy implementation, specifically by: (1) clarifying the consumers and economic characteristics of reactive power as a basis for creating incentives to appropriately price it, (2) defining specific challenges in creating a competitive market for reactive power as well as new tools needed to help ensure such a market functions efficiently, and (3) demonstrating the importance of accounting for the physical characteristics of the transmission network in planning for reactive power and avoiding the exercise of market power by suppliers.

Thomas, Robert J.; Mount, Timothy D.; Schuler, Richard; Schulze,William; Zimmerman, Ray; Alvarado, Fernando; Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Overholt, Philip N.; Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the 225-kW dynamometer for testing small wind turbine components.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reactivity estimation and validation for the control of reactor neutronic power. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

From July 1986 to July 1991, a joint MIT-SNL research team developed a controller capable of safely raising reactor power by approximately five orders of magnitude in a few seconds. This controller was experimentally demonstrated on the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) as well as on the 'Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). This controller's intended application is for the control of spacecraft nuclear reactors. However, it also has direct application for the control of military, commercial, and research reactors. This report is concerned with a method for enhancing the controller's performance through the development of an improved model to validate estimates of the magnitude of reactivity feedback effects. The focus is on the Doppler effect but the resulting model is applicable to other types of reactivity feedback such as that associated with the thermal effects of a hydrogen coolant.

Lasota, C.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices  

SciTech Connect

Herein is discussed the instrumentation and control requirements for achieving the goal of operating multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in parallel to regulate local voltage. The process for establishing the flexible laboratory control and data acquisition system that allows for the integration of multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in XXXX Laboratory's Distributed Energy - Communications and Controls Laboratory (DECC) is discussed. The DE devices control local distribution system voltage through dynamic reactive power production. Although original efforts were made to control the reactive power (RP) output using information from commercially available meters specifically designed for monitoring and analyzing electric power values, these "intelligent" meters did not provide the flexibility needed. A very flexible and capable real-time monitoring and control system was selected after the evaluation of various methods of data acquisition (DAQ) and control. The purpose of this paper is to describe the DAQ and controls system development. The chosen controller is a commercially available real-time controller from dSPACE. This controller has many excellent features including a very easy programming platform through Simulink and Matlab's Real Time Workshop. The dSPACE system proved to provide both the flexibility and expandability needed to integrate and control the RP producing devices under consideration. The desire was to develop controls with this flexible laboratory instrumentation and controls setup that could be eventually be included in an embedded controller on a DE device. Some experimental results are included that clearly show that some functional control strategies are currently being tested.

Foster, Jason [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandReactivePowerCharge DemandReactivePowerCharge Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 00b7ccdc-c7e0-40d2-907f-acb6ae828292 + 0.25 + 00e0b930-90c6-43c2-971a-91dade33f76a + 0.32 + 00e2a43f-6844-417a-b459-edf32d33b051 + 0.0092 + 00fb7dca-d0a6-4b11-b7de-791c2fb9f2e1 + 2.7 + 01a64840-7edc-4193-8073-ed5604e098ca + 0.83 + 035f3d22-3650-47cc-a427-bb35170db128 + 0.3 + 042f06f4-6a5b-424f-a31f-8e1c5a838700 + 0.27 + 0479cd85-894d-412b-b2ce-3b96912e9014 + 0.2 + 04bab597-fe1e-4507-8d90-144980aeba73 + 0.3 + 05211bd7-b6d3-425c-9f96-0845b7828c3c + 0.27 + 052fbe23-ac02-4195-b76d-e572cc53f669 + 0.68 + 05490683-8158-4d2f-ad96-66d5e4980890 + 0.25 +

112

Test #3, natural gas, HRR=400 KW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Reduced Scale Enclosure Fire Images (NIST TN1483). Test #3, Natural Gas, HRR-400 kW.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Voltage/Pitch Control for Maximization and Regulation of Active/Reactive Powers in Wind Turbines with Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of controlling a variable-speed wind turbine with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), modeled as an electromechanically-coupled nonlinear system with rotor voltages and blade pitch angle as its inputs, active and reactive powers as its outputs, and most of the aerodynamic and mechanical parameters as its uncertainties. Using a blend of linear and nonlinear control strategies (including feedback linearization, pole placement, uncertainty estimation, and gradient-based potential function minimization) as well as time-scale separation in the dynamics, we develop a controller that is capable of maximizing the active power in the Maximum Power Tracking (MPT) mode, regulating the active power in the Power Regulation (PR) mode, seamlessly switching between the two modes, and simultaneously adjusting the reactive power to achieve a desired power factor. The controller consists of four cascaded components, uses realistic feedback signals, and operates without knowledge of the C_p-...

Guo, Yi; Jiang, John N; Tang, Choon Yik; Ramakumar, Rama G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

20-kW solar photovoltaic flat-panel power system for an uninterruptible power-system load in El Paso, Texas. Phase II. System fabrication. Final report October 1, 1979-May 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system plans, construction, integration and test, and performance evaluation are discussed for the photovoltaic power supply at the Newman Power Station in El Paso, Texas. The system consists of 64 parallel-connected panels, each panel containing nine series-connected photovoltaic modules. The system is connected, through power monitoring equipment, to an existing DC bus that supplies uninterruptible power to a computer that controls the power generating equipment. The site is described and possible environmental hazards are assessed. Site preparation and the installation of the photovoltaic panels, electrical cabling, and instrumentation subsystems are described. System testing includes initial system checkout, module performance test, control system test. A training program for operators and maintenance personnel is briefly described, including visual aids. Performance data collection and analysis are described, and actual data are compared with a computer simulation. System drawings are included. (LEW)

Risser, V.V.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Using Distributed Energy Resources to Supply Reactive Power for Dynamic Voltage Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed energy (DE) resources are power sources located near load centers and equipped with power electronics converters to interface with the grid, therefore it is feasible for DE to provide reactive power (along with active power) locally for dynamic voltage regulation. In this paper, a synchronous condenser and a DE source with an inverter interface are implemented in parallel in a distribution system to regulate the local voltage. Developed voltage control schemes for the inverter and the synchronous condenser are presented. Experimental results show that both the inverter and the synchronous condenser can regulate the local voltage instantaneously although the dynamic response of the inverter is much faster than the synchronous condenser. In a system with multiple DEs performing local voltage regulation, the interaction of multiple DE at different locations under different load levels may have an impact to the control parameter setting for each individual DE control system. Future research is needed to find out the interaction of DEs to identify the optimal control parameter settings with the consideration of many factors such as system configuration, load variation, and so on

Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparison of Distributed Generation Technology Options, 250-400 kW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts own and operate biogas-fueled generating plants at a number of sites. Included in their portfolio are a 250 kW carbonate fuel cell, a 250 kW microturbine, a 400 kW internal combustion engine, and a cluster of ten (10) 30-kW microturbines. This afforded a unique opportunity to compare the power generation technologies. All of these systems use bio-gas that would otherwise be flared and generate power in parallel with the local utility to offset site electrical p...

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 17, NO. 2, MAY 2002 283 Unbundled Reactive Support Service: Key  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

61801 USA (e-mail: gross@uiuc.edu). S. Tao is with ABB Energy Information Systems, Santa Clara, CA USA their implications in acquiring VAr support as one of the ancillary services. The paper provides an analysis markets by providing reactive support instead of real power. We illustrate the combined effects

Gross, George

118

Generator set, 100kW frequency converter. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The Contractor shall furnish all engineering labor, tools, services, supplies, materials, equipment, and facilities necessary to perform an investigation and study of means to extend the capability of the contractor's existing Power Center Inverter System to the 100 kW level. This 100 kW Inverter System shall meet the basic performance parameters of the frequency converter.

Corry, T.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Photo of the Week: Argonne's 10 kW Wind Turbine | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: Argonne's 10 kW Wind Turbine Photo of the Week: Argonne's 10 kW Wind Turbine Photo of the Week: Argonne's 10 kW Wind Turbine November 9, 2012 - 11:57am Addthis At Argonne National Laboratory, the power generated by this 10 kW wind turbine helps scientists and engineers study the interaction of wind energy, electric vehicle charging and grid technology. The turbine is also estimated to offset more than 10 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually. Learn more about renewable energy research at Argonne. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. At Argonne National Laboratory, the power generated by this 10 kW wind turbine helps scientists and engineers study the interaction of wind

120

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group, October 2010. [7] Microgrid Symposiums, Berkeley (compensation ranges from a microgrid cost perspective forsystem wide impacts of microgrid participation in reactive

Appen, Jan von

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reactivation or expansion of Hotel Baker Hydro plant. Feasibility assessment report  

SciTech Connect

The Hotel Baker Hydroelectric Power plant, built in 1928 at St. Charles, IL., has two generating units which until 1970 supplied the hotel with 100 kW output at 6 ft. head. The feasibility of reactivating, upgrading, or replacing these units to again supply power for the hotel was evaluated considering installation and operating costs, financing requirements, environmental impacts, and regulatory requirements. It was concluded that the reactivation project is marginally attractive only with full use of the power output by an expanded hotel and if electric utility rates increase at 8% per year. (LCL)

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm...

123

Integration of reactive polymeric nanofilms into a low-power electromechanical switch for selective chemical sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the fabrication and demonstration of an ultrathin microelectromechanical chemical sensing device. Microcantilevers are etched from 100-nm-thick silicon nitride, and a 75-nm-thick reactive copolymer film ...

Arora, William J.

124

300kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kW Energy Storage Demonstration kW Energy Storage Demonstration Project Technical Overview Presented at: Annual Doe Peer Review Meeting ─ 2008 DOE Energy Storage & Power Electronics Research Programs By Ib I. Olsen September 29, 2008 116 John Street - Suite 2320 New York, New York 10038 (p) 1.212.732.5507 (f) 1.212.732.5597 www.gaiapowertech.com This project is part of the Joint Energy Storage Initiative between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/ESS), and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

125

Resonant Power Conditioning and Compact Pulse Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (FEEDBACK) HV RECTIFIER AND FILTER NETWORK ... Los Alamos High Frequency “Polyphase Resonant Power Conditioning” ... 30 KW Loss ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of a low-cost integrated 20-kW ac solar tracking sub- array for grid-connected PV power system applications. Phase 1, Annual technical report, 11 July 1995--31 July 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the installed cost of utility scale grid connected photovoltaic power systems. The focus of the effort is on ``BOS`` (Balance-Of-System) component manufacturing technology, which essentially involves all PV power system engineering, manufacturing, assembly and construction tasks from the receipt of a PV module to the deliver of grid connected electricity.

Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G. [Utility Power Group, Chatsworth, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption Â… Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and Economic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

82 82 Efficient and Reliable Reactive Power Supply and Consumption - Insights from an Integrated Program of Engineering and Economic Research Robert J. Thomas, Timothy D. Mount, Richard Schuler, William Schulze, Ray Zimmerman, Fernando Alvarado, Bernard C. Lesieutre, Philip N. Overholt, and Joseph H. Eto Preprint version of paper Electricity Journal Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720-8136 Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2008 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html The work described in this report was coordinated by the Consortium for Electric Reliability, Technology Solutions and was funded under the Office of Electricity

128

Solar Total Energy System: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume I. Section 1. Conclusions and recommendations. Section 2. Systems requirements. [1. 72-MW thermal and 383. 6-kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is described. The various LSE's are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power (both space heating and process heat) and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The section on conclusions and recommendations described the baseline design recommendation, facility requirements, the solar system, power conversion system, schedules and cost, and additional candidate systems. The systems requirements analysis includes detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: load analysis, energy displacement, local laws and ordinances, life cycle cost, health and safety, environmental assessment, reliability assessment, and utility interface. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Integrated Control of Active and Reactive Power Flow Controllers to Optimize Transmission System Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized power system control requires oversight of numerous control elements to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The objective of this project was to minimize losses in the Consolidated Edison Electric power system via modification of control variables available to the system operator. These variables include generator voltages, transformer voltage/phase angle tap set points, and switched shunt status. System constraints include bus voltages, branch/interface flow limits, ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ris-R-1480(EN) Stand-alone version of the 11kW Gaia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of the reporting done as part of the project "The Gaia wind turbine applied in wind diesel or all the diesel power. The requirement is that the wind power system in manyRisø-R-1480(EN) Stand-alone version of the 11kW Gaia wind turbine Henrik Bindner Pedro A.C. Rosas

131

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Property:Incentive/WindResMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentiveWindResMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed residential wind capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. Ex: The maximum...

133

Property:Incentive/PVComDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentivePVComDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a commercial PV system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: MN's...

134

Property:Incentive/PVResDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentivePVResDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a residential PV system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: MD's...

135

Property:Incentive/WindComMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentiveWindComMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed commercial wind capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. This also applies...

136

Property:Incentive/PVComMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentivePVComMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed commercial PV capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. This also applies to...

137

Property:Incentive/PVResMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentivePVResMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed residential PV capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. CT's maximum...

138

Property:Incentive/WindResDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentiveWindResDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a residential wind system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex:...

139

Property:Incentive/WindComDolKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name IncentiveWindComDolKW Property Type String Description The amount per kW of installed capacity of a commercial wind system disbursed as an upfront incentive. Ex: OR's...

140

Identification of Critical Voltage Control Areas and Determination of Required Reactive Power Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update reports on the development of a highly automated method for identifying Voltage Control Areas (VCAs), areas prone to voltage instability in practical power system models. For a wide range of system conditions and contingencies, the technique can identify the buses in each VCA and identify VCAs that are common for a set of contingencies and/or conditions. In addition, the method identifies the generators that are critical to maintaining stability for a given VCA. The methods develope...

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Design considerations of a 15kW heat exchanger for the CSPonD Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to develop a 15 kW heat exchanger model for the CSPonD molten salt receiver that will shuttle the molten salt's thermal energy for conversion to electric power. A heat extraction system ...

Adames, Adrian A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

50 kW Power Block for Distributed Energy Applications  

Distributed energy (DE) systems have begun to make a significant impact on energy supply and will certainly affect energy needs in the future. These systems include, but are not limited to, photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines, micro-turbines, fuel ...

144

Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

Huskey, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Molten carbonate fuel cell technology improvement. [25 kW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed under Department of Energy Contract AC21-87MC23270 during the period March 1, through May 30, 1990. The overall objective of this program is to define a competitive CG/MCFC power plant and the associated technology development requirements and to develop an improved cell configuration for molten carbonate fuel cells which has improved performance, has reduced cell creep and electrolyte management consistent with 40,000 hour projected life, reduces existing cell cost, and is adaptable to a range of power plant applications. The 8-ft{sup 2} 20-cell, 25-kW stack assembly and installation in the test facility were completed. Testing of the stack was started and 896 hours of test time were reached. Manifold seal development focused on a seal to reduce electrolyte transport and test rigs were initiated for shunt current and seal leakage evaluation. Development on sheet metal parts was initiated with focus on improved aluminization for separator plate corrosion protection and nickel clad stainless steel for the anode current collector. Development of porous parts was initiated with focus on an alternative binder for the electrodes. Design of a laboratory scale continuous debinding oven was completed. Development of an improved material blend for the matrix was also initiated. 19 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase II report presents a description of the Enertech 15 kW prototype wind system hardware fabrication; results of component tests; and results of preliminary testing conducted at Norwich, VT and the RF Wind Energy Research Center. In addition, the assembly sequence is documented. During testing, the unit experienced several operational problems, but testing proved the design concept and demonstrated the system's ability to meet the contract design specifications for power output.

Zickefoose, C.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

50 kW PEM Fuel Cell System Design, Fabrication, and Test: System Design -- Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a development program funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Arthur D. Little, and EPRIsolutions. The effort was aimed at the conceptual design and optimization of a 50 kW commercial power system, using advanced proton exchange (or polymer electrolyte) membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology and the verification of key design parameters. (Note: This design effort addresses some of the key technical issues faced by the developers of commercial-scale PEMFC...

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

power module - High temperature operation - Size reduction - 3-kW 120V single-phase inverter (250 C+) Input Power Output Power > 90% efficiency (estimated) Phase I: Very High...

149

5-kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report chronicles, as a case study, a project in which an Acumentrics 5-kW solid oxide fuel cell was installed at Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio.

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of a low-cost, light-weight, efficient, 1. 5 kW inverter. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The effective use of low-voltage dc power sources, such as fuel cells and batteries, requires efficient power conversion equipment to provide ac voltages. The development of a silent, light-weight inverter is discussed in this paper. The inverter is capable of delivering 1.5 kW into a 0.8-1.0 power factor load at 120 or 240 Vac and at 60 or 400 Hz. (GRA)

Suelzle, L.R.; Suelzle, J.S.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kW Waukesha Packaged System kW Waukesha Packaged System < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Des Plaines, Illinois Site Description Testing Laboratory Study Type Laboratory Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Waukesha VGF 36GLD Heat Recovery Systems Sondex PHE-Type SL140-TM-EE-190, Sondex PHE-Type SL140-TM-EE-150, Cain UTR1-810A17.5SSP Fuel Natural Gas System Installer GTI System Enclosure Outdoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 615 kW0.615 MW 615,000 W 615,000,000 mW 6.15e-4 GW 6.15e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 2500000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) 90 Origin of Controller 3rd Party Off-the-Shelf Component Integration Factory Integrated

152

United Technologies Research Center 8-kW prototype wind system. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center 8 kW prototype wind system underwent testing at the Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center from April 1980 through August 1980. During atmospheric testing, the machine survived wind speeds of 30.8 m/s (69 mph) without incurring damage and proved it was capable of meeting the design specification for power production (8 kW at 9 m/s - 20 mph). Erratic cycling of the generator speed detector was the only operational problem encountered. Vibration tests indicated the first and second bending modes of the tower were excited during actual machine operation, but modifications were not required. Noise measurements revealed that sound pressure levels of the UTRC are within an acceptable range and should pose no barriers to machine use.

Higashi, K. K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

200 kW, 800 MHz transmitter system for lower hybrid heating  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new rf heating system which has just been completed and is now operational on the ATC machine. The system utilizes four UHF TV klystrons to generate at least 200 kW of power at a frequency of 800 MHz. Pulse widths can be varied from 20 $mu$sec up to 20 msec. A radar type floating deck modulator along with photo-optical transmitting and receiving devices have been incorporated into the system to provide the pulse fidelity and versatility which characterizes this equipment. Modular construction was emphasized in the design, when possible, to reduce maintenance and down time in the advent of component falilure. Hybrid combining techniques are utilized in order to provide two 100 kW feeds into the machine. (auth)

Deitz, A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Development and Demonstration of a New Generation High Efficiency 10kW Stationary Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

The overall project objective is to develop and demonstrate a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell combined heat and power (PEMFC CHP) system that provides the foundation for commercial, mass produced units which achieve over 40% electrical efficiency (fuel to electric conversion) from 50-100% load, greater than 70% overall efficiency (fuel to electric energy + usable waste heat energy conversion), have the potential to achieve 40,000 hours durability on all major process components, and can be produced in high volumes at under $400/kW (revised to $750/kW per 2011 DOE estimates) capital cost.

Howell, Thomas Russell

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Columbia Power System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System System Jump to: navigation, search Name Columbia Power System Place Tennessee Utility Id 3855 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL POWER RATE From 51 kW to 1,000 kW Commercial GENERAL POWER RATE Up to 50 kW Commercial GENERAL POWER RATE(Demand greater than 1,000 kW not exceeding 5000kW) Commercial General Power Rate(Demand 5001-15000kW) Commercial MANUFACTURING SERVICE POWER RATE DEMAND 5,001-15,000 kW Commercial OUTDOOR LIGHTING STREET, PARKS, & ATHLETIC FIELDS Lighting

156

4-County Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric Power Assn 4-County Electric Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name 4-County Electric Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 6641 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power GSA (50 kW - 1000 kW) Commercial General Power GSA (Over 1000 kW) Industrial General Power GSA (Under 50 kW) Commercial General Power GSB (5000 kW - 15000 kW) Industrial Manufacturing Service Rates (5000 kW - 15000 kW) Industrial Residential Residential

157

Otter Tail Power Company - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Commercial Water Heaters: $5,000 Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Demand Control: $300/unit Water Heaters: $150 - $300 Commercial Water Heaters: $20/kW RDC Thermal Storage Units: $20/kW, up to 100 kW Deferred-load Thermal Storage Units: $20/kw, up to 200 kW, plus $10/kW for up to 1,000 additional kW Fixed-time-of-delivery Thermal Storage Units: $40/kw, up to 200 kW, plus $20/kW for up to 1,000 additional kW AC Controls: $7/month seasonally

158

64 kW concentrator Photovoltaics Application Test Center. Volume. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kaman Sciences Corporation has designed a 64 kW Concentrating Photovoltaic Applications Test Center (APTEC). The APTEC employs a combined concentrating photovoltaic array in a total energy system application for load sharing the electric and thermal demands of a large computer center with the interfaced electric and natural gas utility. The photovoltaic array is composed of two-axis tracking heliostats of Fresnel lens concentrating, silicon solar cell modules. The modules are cooled with a fluid which transfers heat to a ground coupled heat sink/storage unit for subsequent use in meeting the computer center's thermal load demand. The combined photovoltaic power system shares basic components - a power conditioning unit, batteries and thermal conditioning equipment - with the electric and natural gas utility service, improving the computer center's operating availability time and displacing a portion of the fossil fuel required to power the computer center with solar energy. The detailed system design is reported.

Jardine, D.M.; Jones, D.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Dixie Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Assn Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 5175 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial/Industrial (100 kW - 1000 kW) Industrial Commercial/Industrial (100kW - 1000kW) - Primary Voltage Commercial Commercial/Industrial (Over 1000 kW) Industrial Commercial/Industrial (Over 1000 kW) - Primary Voltage Commercial Commercial/Industrial (Under 100 kW) Commercial Commercial/Industrial (Under 100 kW) - Primary Voltage Commercial Commercial/Industrial No Demand Industrial

160

Georgia Power - Solar Buyback Program (Georgia) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

100 kW Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits RECs transfer to Georgia Power along with electricity Terms 5-year contract Program Administrator Georgia Power Company Website...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of Phase I of an SBIR to develop a Pulsed Inductive Output Tube (IOT) with 140 kW at 400 MHz for powering H-proton beams. A number of sources, including single beam and multiple beam klystrons, can provide this power, but the IOT provides higher efficiency. Efficiencies exceeding 70% are routinely achieved. The gain is typically limited to approximately 24 dB; however, the availability of highly efficient, solid state drivers reduces the significance of this limitation, particularly at lower frequencies. This program initially focused on developing a 402 MHz IOT; however, the DOE requirement for this device was terminated during the program. The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and collector. Significant improvement was achieved in modeling capability and simulation accuracy.

R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read, Robert Jackson

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

Pontotoc Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pontotoc Electric Power Assn Pontotoc Electric Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Pontotoc Electric Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 15211 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Flood Light MH 400 W Lighting Flood Light MH 400 W 30' pole Lighting Flood Light MH 400 W 35' pole Lighting Flood Light MH 400 W 40' pole Lighting General Power Service GSA (1001 kW - 5000 kW) Industrial General Power Service GSA (51 kW -1000 kW) Multi-Phase Commercial General Power Service GSA (51 kW -1000 kW) Single-Phase Commercial

163

Assessment of a Transportable 200-kW Fuel Cell in Rural Distributed Generation Applications: Final Report: Georgia, Colorado, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation is particularly attractive to electric cooperatives in rural areas because of their low customer densities and the rapid load growth that often occurs at the end of long radial distribution lines. EPRI and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) Cooperative Research Network cosponsored this project to demonstrate the use of transportable 200-kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants in rural distributed generation applications. This final report details the proj...

2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Test and Evaluation of a 6 kW Microgenerator Aisin G-60 Phase-1 Field Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 6 kW microgenerator in a field demonstration operating on natural gas at an end-user site. The microgenerator uses a novel internal combustion engine and generator packaged for combined heat and power applications. The test and evaluation case study is one of several distributed generation project case studies under research by EPRI's Distributed Energy Resources Program. This case study was designed to help utilities and ...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

205 kW Photovoltaic (PV) System Installed on the U.S. Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

205 kW Photovoltaic (PV) System Installed on the U.S. Department of Energy's Forrestal Building 205 kW Photovoltaic (PV) System Installed on the U.S. Department of Energy's...

167

Minnesota Power - Power Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Power Grant Program Minnesota Power - Power Grant Program Minnesota Power - Power Grant Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate 0 to 100 kW: $10,000 101 to 300 kW: $25,000 Over 300 kW: $50,000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount $200/kW rebate Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power Grant Program offers grants of up to $50,000 to its commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers who use innovative technologies, improve manufacturing processes, undertake renewable electric energy projects or who need project design assistance. Eligible projects include renewable energy products, new electro-technologies that lower energy costs per unit of production in a manufacturing process, innovative

168

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Characteristics of the four major power sources for induction heating...state 180 Hz to 50 kHz 1 kW to 2 MW 75â??95 No standby current; high efficiency; no moving parts;

169

A 350 MHz, 200 kW CW, Multiple Beam Inductive Output Tube - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This program developed a 200 kW CW, 350 MHz, multiple beam inductive output tube (MBIOT) for driving accelerator cavities. The MBIOT operates at 30 kV with a gain of 23 dB. The estimated efficiency is 70%. The device uses seven electron beams, each transmitting 1.4 A of current. The tube is approximately six feet long and weighs approximately 400 lbs. The prototype device will be evaluated as a potential RF source for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Because of issues related to delivery of the electron guns, it was not possible to complete assembly and test of the MBIOT during the Phase II program. The device is being completed with support from Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., Communications & Power Industries, LLC. and the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) in Dahlgren, VA. The MBIOT will be initially tested at NSWC before delivery to ANL. The testing at NSWC is scheduled for February 2013.

R.Lawrece Ives; George Collins; David Marsden Michael Read; Edward Eisen; Takuchi Kamura, Philipp Borchard

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing  

SciTech Connect

A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

Cordes, J.A.; Johnson, B.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rf power systems for the national synchrotron light source  

SciTech Connect

The booster synchrotron and the two storage rings at the NSLS are provided with rf power systems of 3 kW, 50 kW, and 500 kW nominal output power, all at 53 MHz. This power is supplied by grounded grid tetrode amplifiers designed for television broadcast service. These amplifiers and associated power supplies, control and interlock systems, rf controls, and computer interface are described.

Dickinson, T.; Rheaume, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Status of the Advanced Stirling Conversion System Project for 25 kW dish Stirling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial Solar Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by Sandia as one of the most promising heat engines for terrestrial applications. The Stirling engine also has the potential to meet DOE's performance and cost goals. The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting technology development for Stirling convertors directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power requirements include high reliability with very long life, low vibration and high system efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. NASA Lewis is providing management of the Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) Project through an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with the DOE. Parallel contracts continue with both Cummins Engine Company (CEC), Columbus, Indiana, and Stirling Technology Company (STC), Richland, Washington for the designs of an ASCS. Each system'' design features a solar receiver/liquid metal heat transport system, and a free-piston Stirling convertor with a means to provide nominally 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's performance and long-term'' cost goals. The Cummins free- piston Stirling convertor incorporates a linear alternator to directly provide the electrical output, while the STC design generates electrical power indirectly through a hydraulic pump/motor coupled to an induction generator. Both the Cummins and STC ASCS designs will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the early 1990's. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Shaltens, R.K.; Schreiber, J.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Test results from the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500 kW power plant utilizing direct contact heat exchange (DCHX) between the geothermal brine and the isobutane (IC/sub 4/) working fluid is being operated at the East Mesa test facility. The power plant incorporates a 40-inch-diameter direct-contactor approximately 35 feet tall. The purpose of the pilot plant is to determine the feasibility of large-scale direct-contact heat exchange and power plant operation with the DCHX. The binary cycle offers higher conversion factors (heat energy transformed to electrical energy) than the flashed steam approach for geothermal brines in the 300 to 400/sup 0/F range and preliminary results indicate the DCHX system may have higher performance than the conventional tube-and-shell binary approach. This performance advantage results from the absence of any fouling and the very close pinch temperatures achieved in the DCHX itself. The baseline performance tests for the plant were completed in January 1980. The results of these tests and follow-on testing are covered.

Nichols, K.E.; Olander, R.G.; Lobach, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Characterization of Settler Tank and KW Container Sludge Simulants  

SciTech Connect

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has specified base formulations for non-radioactive sludge simulants for use in the development and testing of equipment for sludge sampling, retrieval, transport, and processing. In general, the simulant formulations are based on the average or design-basis physical and chemical properties obtained by characterizing sludge samples. The simulants include surrogates for uranium metal, uranium oxides (agglomerates and fine particulate), and the predominant chemical phases (iron and aluminum hydroxides, sand). Specific surrogate components were selected to match the nominal particle-size distribution and particle-density data obtained from sludge sample analysis. Under contract to CHPRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed physical and rheological characterization of simulants, and the results are reported here. Two base simulant types (dry) were prepared by STP staff at the Maintenance and Storage Facility and received by PNNL on February 12, 2009: Settler Tank Simulant and KW Container Sludge Simulant. The objectives of this simulant characterization effort were to provide baseline characterization data on simulants being used by STP for process development and equipment testing and provide a high-level comparison of the simulant characteristics to the targets used to formulate the simulants.

Burns, Carolyn A.; Luna, Maria; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Test #6.5, natural gas, HRR=400 kW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Reduced Scale Enclosure Fire Images (NIST TN1483). Test #6.5, natural gas, HRR=400 kW.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Mallow, Anne M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of a 75-kW heat-pipe receiver for solar heat-engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program is now underway to develop commercial power conversion systems that use parabolic dish mirrors in conjunction with Stirling engines to convert solar energy to electric power. In early prototypes, the solar concentrator focused light directly on the heater tubes of the Stirling engine. Liquid-metal heat-pipes are now being developed to transfer energy from the focus of the solar concentrator to the heater tubes of the engine. The dome-shaped heat-pipe receivers are approximately one-half meters in diameter and up to 77-kW of concentrated solar energy is delivered to the absorber surface. Over the past several years, Sandia National Laboratories, through the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, has conducted a major program to explore receiver designs and identify suitable wick materials. A high-flux bench-scale system has been developed to test candidate wick designs, and full-scale systems have been tested on an 11-meter test-bed solar concentrator. Procedures have also been developed in this program to measure the properties of wick materials, and an extensive data-base on wick materials for high temperature heat pipes has been developed. This paper provides an overview of the receiver development program and results from some of the many heat-pipe tests.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates Florida Power and Light - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Chillers: $99/kW reduced Thermal Energy Storage: $580/kW shifted DX AC: $165/kW reduced (Unitary); $495/kW reduced (Room Unit) Energy Recovery Ventilators: $415/kW reduced Demand Control Ventilation: $600/kW reduced ECM Motors for DX Systems: $100/kW reduced

180

Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Testing of a 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system at the National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To further the development of commercial hybrid power systems, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the New World Village Power Corporation (NWVP), tested a NWVP 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system connected to a 15/50 Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) wind turbine. Testing was conducted from October 1995 through March 1996 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). A main objective of the testing was to better understand the application of wind turbines to weak grids typical of small villages. Performance results contained in this paper include component characterization, such as power conversion losses for the rotary converter systems and battery round trip efficiencies. In addition, systems operation over this period is discussed with special attention given to dynamic issues. Finally, future plans for continued testing and research are discussed.

Corbus, D.A.; Green, J.; Allderdice, A.; Rand, K.; Bianchi, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Linton, E. [New World Village Power, Waitsfield, VT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermoelectric Applications to Truck Essential Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The subjects covered in this report are: thermoelectrics, 1-kW generator for diesel engine; self-powered heater; power for wireless data transmission; and quantum-well thermoelectrics.

John C. Bass; Norbert B. Elsner

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of selected aspects of the 105-KW Basin Final Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. HSS's review of the K-West Basin FSAR found it to be generally adequate with respect to the scope of this review. However, some aspects of the FSAR accident analyses of two events may warrant further review: MCO transport cask drop into the K-Basin, and the fire accident event involving the cask

184

Coast Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coast Electric Power Assn Coast Electric Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Coast Electric Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 3841 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Churches Commercial Churches Time of Use Commercial Commercial (Over 25 kW) Commercial Commercial (Over 25 kW) Time of Use Commercial Industrial (Over 1000 kW) Industrial Industrial (Over 1000 kW) Time of Use Industrial Large Power (Over 2500 kW) Industrial Light Service HPS 100 W - Rural Lighting

185

Frequency-Domain Synthesis Of The Fatigue Load Spectrum For The Nps 100-Kw Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* The LIFE2 code is a fatigue/fracture mechanics code that is specialized to the analysis of wind turbine components. Two frequency-domain stress spectra techniques contained in this code are used to analyze the measured frequency loads spectra from the Northern Power Systems 100-kW turbine. Results of the two techniques are compared to cycle counts obtained directly from time series data. These results provide the wind turbine designer with two techniques for determining the cycle-counts from frequency data and illustrate the accuracy that the designer can expect from various cycle-counting techniques. INTRODUCTION The LIFE2 code is a fatigue/fracture mechanics code that is specialized to the analysis of wind turbine components. 1 This code permits the analysis of both time series 2 and frequency domain data. 3 In the case of the former, a "rainflow counting" algorithm is used to convert time series data into a cycle count matrix suitable for fatigue analysis. For the latter,...

Herbert J. Sutherland; Richard M. Osgood

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Design of a 3 kW wind turbine generator with thin airfoil blades  

SciTech Connect

Three blades of a 3 kW prototype wind turbine generator were designed with thin airfoil and a tip speed ratio of 3. The wind turbine has been controlled via two control methods: the variable pitch angle and by regulation of the field current of the generator and examined under real wind conditions. The characteristics of the thin airfoil, called ''Seven arcs thin airfoil'' named so because the airfoil is composed of seven circular arcs, are analyzed with the airfoil design and analysis program XFOIL. The thin airfoil blade is designed and calculated by blade element and momentum theory. The performance characteristics of the machine such as rotational speed, generator output as well as stability for wind speed changes are described. In the case of average wind speeds of 10 m/s and a maximum of 19 m/s, the automatically controlled wind turbine ran safely through rough wind conditions and showed an average generator output of 1105 W and a power coefficient 0.14. (author)

Ameku, Kazumasa; Nagai, Baku M.; Roy, Jitendro Nath [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Mississippi Power - EarthCents Commercial Incentives Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Power - EarthCents Commercial Incentives Program Mississippi Power - EarthCents Commercial Incentives Program Mississippi Power - EarthCents Commercial Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boilers/Resistance Heat Conversions: 15/kW Heat Pump Conversions: 20/ton Infrared Heat (New Construction, Additions, Conversions): 5/kW Electric Water Heater (New, Addition): 8 - 12/kW Electric Water Heater (Conversion): 16 - 24/kW Electric Cooking Equipment (New): 5/kW Electric Cooking Equipment (Conversion): 15/kW Provider Efficiency Programs Mississippi Power offers rebates to commercial customers to help offset the

188

A 55 kW Three-Phase Inverter With Si IGBT s and SiC Schottky Diodes  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) power devices are expected to have an impact on power converter efficiency, weight, volume, and reliability. Currently, only SiC Schottky diodes are commercially available at relatively low current ratings. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has collaborated with Cree and Semikron to build a Si insulated-gate bipolar transistor-SiC Schottky diode hybrid 55-kW inverter by replacing the Si p-n diodes in Semikron's automotive inverter with Cree's made-to-order higher current SiC Schottky diodes. This paper presents the developed models of these diodes for circuit simulators, shows inverter test results, and compares the results with those of a similar all-Si inverter.

Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Kashyap, Avinash S [ORNL; Mantooth, Homer A [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A 55-kW Three-Phase Inverter with Si IGBTs and SiC Schottky Diodes  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) power devices are expected to have an impact on power converter efficiency, weight, volume, and reliability. Currently, only SiC Schottky diodes are commercially available at relatively low current ratings. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has collaborated with Cree and Semikron to build a Si insulated-gate bipolar transistor-SiC Schottky diode hybrid 55-kW inverter by replacing the Si p-n diodes in Semikron's automotive inverter with Cree's made-to-order higher current SiC Schottky diodes. This paper presents the developed models of these diodes for circuit simulators, shows inverter test results, and compares the results with those of a similar all-Si inverter.

Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Mantooth, Homer A [ORNL; Kashyap, Avinash S [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical methods, described in this report, are used to systematically determine experimental fuel sub-batch reactivities as a function of burnup. Fuel sub-batch reactivities are inferred using more than 600 in-core pressurized water reactor (PWR) flux maps taken during 44 cycles of operation at the Catawba and McGuire nuclear power plants. The analytical methods systematically search for fuel sub-batch reactivities that minimize differences between measured and computed reaction rates, using Studsvik ...

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tests with a line-commutated converter as a variable inductive load on the Bonneville Power Administration transmission system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A twelve-pulse, line-commutated converter, with a steady-state rating of 2.5 kV and 5.5 kA, formerly used for charging and discharging a superconducting magnet, was reconfigured as a static reactive power load. Tests staged at the Tacoma, WA, substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) revealed that the converter could be used as a variable inductive load, provided a stable current controller was installed. The unit was modulated as a variable VAR load following a sinusoidal VAR demand signal with an amplitude up to 14.8 MVAR. The total losses at maximum VAR output were 370 kW. This paper explains the necessary modifications of the converter to operate as a variable reactive load. Measured current waveshapes are analyzed. The effects of such a load on the BPA transmission system are presented.

Boenig, H.J.; Hauer, J.F.; Nielsen, R.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Testing of a 50-kW Wind-Diesel Hybrid System at the National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In remote off-grid villages and communities, a reliable power source is important in improving the local quality of life. Villages often use a diesel generator for their power, but fuel can be expensive and maintenance burdensome. Including a wind turbine in a diesel system can reduce fuel consumption and lower maintenance, thereby reducing energy costs. However, integrating the various components of a wind-diesel system, including wind turbine, power conversion system, and battery storage (if applicable), is a challenging task. To further the development of commercial hybrid power systems, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the New World Village Power Corporation (NWVP), tested a NWVP 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system connected to a 15/50 Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) wind turbine. Testing was conducted from October 1995 through March 1996 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). A main objective of the testing was to better understand the application of wind turbines to weak grids typical of small villages. Performance results contained in this report include component characterization, such as power conversion losses for the rotary converter system and battery round trip efficiencies. In addition, system operation over the test period is discussed with special attention given to dynamic issues. Finally, future plans for continued testing and research are discussed.

Corbus, D. A.; Green, H. J.; Allderdice, A.; Rand, K.; Bianchi, J.; Linton, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Proceedings: Fossil Plant Layup and Reactivation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the layup and reactivation of fossil-fired power plants has become more important as increasing numbers of utilities develop a need for retaining capacity not currently needed. A 1992 EPRI conference highlighted key technical issues, focusing on proven layup procedures, descriptions of layup equipment and preservation methods, layup and reactivation case studies, and summaries of regulatory issues.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

110 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for SOFC-based mCHP system is presented. January 2013 Keywords: micro-CHP SOFC Anode gas recycle Ejector Energy System Simulation a b s t r a c Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for small-scale residential applications is presented. A novel detailed pro

196

Design and implementation of a low cost grid-connected 10 kw hydro power system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The world is increasingly being faced with the challenge of effectively exploiting available renewable energy resources, not only to meet an ever growing… (more)

Lombard, Adriaan Cornelius Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These systems are fueled using reformate from natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and even kerosene in some demonstrations being conducted in Japan. LT-PEM fuel cell...

198

3,000 kW Suginoi Hotel geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

The Suginoi Hotel is located 200 m above sea level, in Beppu City, which is one of the largest hot spring resort area in Japan. In this hotel, there are some unique hot spring baths, which are interesting to visitors. In Beppu, there are numerous hot springs, some are call {open_quotes}Jigoku{close_quotes} (Hells). The main attraction in Beppu are the hell-like spots created by hot springs such as the Torando Hell, which erupt to a heights of more than 50 meters, The Blood Pond Hell which is bloody red due to red clay content. In yield, these hot springs rank second in the world next to those of Yellowstone National Park in the USA.

Kudo, Kisumi [Beppu Suginoi Hotel, Beppu (Japan)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Power Scaling of Tm:fiber Lasers to the kW Level Peter F. Moulton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(arb.units) LO data broadband Double exponential fit 633 usec lifetime 281 usec lifetime #12;Initial portion of 3

Kik, Pieter

200

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes NREL's new 225-kW dynamometer facility that is suitable for testing a variety of components and subsystems for small wind turbines and discusses opportunities for industry partnerships with NREL for use of the facility.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ingersoll Rand VSD Oil Injected Screw Air Compressor (37-75kW ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ingersoll Rand VSD Oil Injected Screw Air Compressor (37-75kW / 50-100HP VSD),Kunshan CompAirs Machinery Plant Co.,Ltd is the leading air compressor ...

202

Transient Stability Analysis of Power Systems with Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power systems can effectively damp power system oscillations through appropriate management of real or reactive power. This thesis addresses some problems in power system stability… (more)

WENG, CHIYUAN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to accept a varying dc voltage source. The study will also look at technical issues pertaining to the interconnection and coordinated/compatible operation of multiple microturbines. It is important to know today if modifications to provide improved operation and additional services will entail complete redesign, selected component changes, software modifications, or the addition of power storage devices. This project is designed to provide a strong technical foundation for determining present technical needs and identifying recommendations for future work.

Staunton, R.H.

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Reactive Reserve Requirements and Optimal Allocation Among Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage stability is a major concern in power system operation, and the need to maintain it limits power transfers in the prevailing open access environment. In a power system with significant induction motor loads, voltage instability can be manifested either in the form of delayed voltage recovery or voltage collapse. Inadequate reactive supply is a major factor in causing these problems. Reactive supply is an important ingredient in maintaining healthy power system voltages and facilitating power tran...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

205 kW Photovoltaic (PV) System Installed on the U.S. Department of Energy's Forrestal Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Description Project Description The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), and Presidential Executive Order 13423 all contain requirements for Federal facilities to decrease energy consumption and increase the use of renewable energy by the year 2015. To provide leadership in meeting these requirements, DOE, in partnership with the General Services Administration (GSA), has installed a rooftop solar electric, or PV, system on the roof of DOE's headquarters in Washington, D.C. The 205 kilowatt (kW) installation is one of the largest of its kind in the Nation's capital. A display in the For- restal building will show the power output of the PV system during the day and the energy produced over

206

Analysis of Loads and Wind Energy Potential for Remote Power Stations in Alaska University of Massachusetts Amherst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Loads and Wind Energy Potential for Remote Power Stations in Alaska Mia Devine Electric Use (kWh/year) 2,173,400 1,032,800 2,520,500 Average Load 300 kW 140 kW 280 kW Peak Load 600 k load profile. Villages usuall

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

207

Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects over 250 kW (Payment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects over 250 kW Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects over 250 kW (Payment in Lieu) Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects over 250 kW (Payment in Lieu) < Back Eligibility Commercial Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% property tax exemption; payment in lieu of tax required Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Ohio's Renewable and Advanced Energy Project Property Tax Exemption, enacted with the passage of Ohio S.B. 232 in the summer of 2010, exempts qualified energy projects in Ohio from public utility tangible personal

208

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY KENETECH WINDPOWER, INC. (KW) FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KENETECH WINDPOWER, INC. (KW) FOR AN KENETECH WINDPOWER, INC. (KW) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER NREL SUBCONTRACT NO: AAA-5-13320-02 UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO: DE-AC36-83CH10093 W(A)-95-003; CH-0849 Kenetech Windpower, Inc. (KW) has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arisg from the above referenced subcontract entitled "Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project." The objective of the work to be performed under this subcontract is to design and develop an advanced next generation wind turbine capable of producing electricity for $0.04/kWh or less at 5.8 m/s(13mph) sites in the 1998-2000 time period. The work is to proceed in two stages. In the first stage, which is the subject of this waiver, the work comprises a concept study to develop

209

Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less Qualified Energy Property Tax Exemption for Projects 250 kW or Less < Back Eligibility Commercial Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Ohio's Renewable and Advanced Energy Project Property Tax Exemption, enacted with the passage of Ohio S.B. 232 in the summer of 2010, exempts qualified energy projects in Ohio from public utility tangible personal property taxes and real property taxes*. Before passage of S.B. 232, a renewable energy facility in Ohio that sold electricity to a third-party

210

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

North Wind 4-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Phase II (testing and fabrication) of a program funded by the US Department of Energy to design, fabricate, and test a cost-effective wind system in the 3 to 6 kW class. During Phase II, using the design developed during Phase I, a prototype 4 kW machine was fabricated and tested in Waitsfield, Vermont. Several problems were encountered and subsequently analyzed. Design modifications, including the use of a larger alternator, are described. Test performed by North Wind and by Rockwell International (which monitored the program) demonstrated the predicted performance characteristics and the validity of the North Wind design.

Lynch, J.; Coleman, C.; Mayer, D.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High Plains Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Plains Power Inc High Plains Power Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 8566 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png IRRIGATION Industrial LARGE POWER 500kW OR GREATER TIME OF USE Industrial LARGE POWER DISTRIBUTION SUBSTATION GREATER THAN 500kW LEVEL SERVICE Industrial LARGE POWER DISTRIBUTION SUBSTATION LESS THAN 500kW LEVEL SERVICE Industrial LARGE POWER THREE PHASE DISTRIBUTION PRIMARY LEVEL SERVICE Industrial LARGE POWER THREE PHASE DISTRIBUTION PRIMARY LEVEL SERVICE V2 Industrial

213

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 2

214

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 2

215

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes NREL's new 225-kW dynamometer facility that is suitable for testing a variety of components and subsystems for small wind turbines and discusses opportunities for industry partnerships with NREL for use of the facility.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

100 kW CC-OTEC Plant and Deep Ocean water Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examine multiple usage of DSW Yokogawa Electric Produce & set up electricity & control system Plant the electric grid for the first time in 15 years in the world. #12;IOES (Institute of Ocean Energy, Saga Univ.) Experiments and Demonstration by IOES (Institute of Ocean Energy, Saga University) 30 kW Electricity

217

System for reactivating catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KW Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as a Notice of Construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96, for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KW Basin. The purpose of the activities described in this NOC is to enable the eventual retrieval and transport of the fuel for processing. The fuel retrieval and transport will require an integrated water treatment system for which performance specifications have been developed. These specifications are currently in the procurement process. Following procurement (and before installation of this system and the handling of fuel) design details will be provided to Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The 105-K West Reactor (105-KW) and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. Although the 105-KW Basin has not been known to leak, the discharge chute and associated construction joint have been isolated from the rest of the basin by metal isolation barriers. This was a precautionary measure, to mitigate the consequences of a seismic event. The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

Hays, C.B.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Black Hills Energy - Solar Power Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Black Hills Energy - Solar Power Program Black Hills Energy - Solar Power Program Black Hills Energy - Solar Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 7/1/2006 State Colorado Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Systems up to 10 kW: $0.1267/kWh (only for first 5 kW) Systems larger than 10 kW up to 100 kW: $0.16/kWh Provider Black Hills Energy Black Hills Energy has a performance-based incentive (PBI) for photovoltaic (PV) systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. In exchange for these incentives, Black Hills Energy earns the right to the renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the PV-generated electricity for a period of

220

Alcorn County Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Assn Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Alcorn County Elec Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 276 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service (1001 kW-5000 kW) Industrial General Service (50 kW and Under) Commercial General Service (51 kW-1000 kW) Industrial Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 250 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting MH 400 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting MV 175 W Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0959/kWh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 13227 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service (1001 kW-5000kW) Industrial General Service (50 kW and Under) Commercial General Service (51 kW-1000 kW) Commercial Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Pole Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Pole & Transformer Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Transformer Lighting

222

NC GreenPower Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NC GreenPower Production Incentive NC GreenPower Production Incentive NC GreenPower Production Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Varies by technology and system size PV up to 5 kW: $0.06/kWh PV larger than 5 kW: must enter bid process Wind up to 10 kW: $0.09/kWh Wind larger than 10 kW: must enter bid process Provider NC GreenPower NC GreenPower, a statewide green power program designed to encourage the use of renewable energy in North Carolina, offers production payments for grid-tied electricity generated by solar, wind, small hydro (10 megawatts

223

DESIGN OF THE ARGONNE LOW POWER REACTOR (ALPR)  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the design of a prototype "packaged" nuclear power plant. The purpose of the plant is to alleviate fuel oil logistics and storage problems posed by remote auxiliary DEW Line radar statibns north of the Arctic Circle. The ALPR (redesignated SL-1) is a 3 Mwt, heterogeneous, highly enriched uranium- fueled, naturalcirculation boiling water reactor, ccoled and moderated with light water. Steam at 300 psig, dry and saturated (421 deg F) is passed directly from the reactor to a conventional turbine-generator to produce electric power (300 kw nominal) and space-heating (400 kw) requirements consistent with rigid mechanical and structural specifications prescribed by the military, and dictated by the extreme geophysics prevailing at the ultimate site. The over all design criteria emphasize: simplicity and reliability of operation and maintenance, with minimum supervision; minimum on-site construction; maximum use of standard components; limited water supply; utilization of local gravel for biological shielding; transportability by air lift; and nominal 3-year fuel operating lifetime per core loading. The "packaged" concept is incorporated for the initial erection. The plant is not designed for relocation. The design criteria for the prototype necessitate special features. The fuel plates are clad with an alurninurn-nickel alloy (X8001). Burnable-poison (BIO) strips are mechancally attached to the fuel assemblies to compensate the excess reactivity required for a nominal 3-year core operating lifetime. The control rods are actuated by rackand-pinion drive extensions which incorporate rotary seals. Fuel exchange is accomplished without the removal of the pressure vessel head. The electrical power generated is used to operate plant auxiliaries; the "net electric power" is dissipated by resistors. The hot water for space heating is heated in a heat exchanger by 20-psig steam, use being made of the latent heat of vaporization, and all the heat is dissipated by a finned-tube, air-cooled heat exchanger. (auth)

Grant, N.R.; Hamer, E.E.; Hooker, H.H.; Jorgensen, G.L.; Kann, W.J.; Lipinski, W.C.; Milak, G.C.; Rossin, A.D.; Shaftman, D.H.; Smaardyk, A.; Treshow, M.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

226

Lessons Learned: Planning and Operating Power Systems with Large  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 2008 2009 Year kW 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 No. Installed kW No. Systems #12;2 Most to their systems powered by as-available renewable energy sources (primarily wind and solar). The Big Island also and controlled to the extent as combustion turbines, diesels or steam generators. The geothermal units on the Big

227

SUPPORTING SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GREEN POWER MARKETS Blair Swezey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kW* 1997 17.6¢/kWh Austin Energy GreenChoice 153 kW 1997 1.08¢/kWh Salt River Project EarthSUPPORTING SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GREEN POWER MARKETS Blair Swezey Lori Bird Christy Herig National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 blair

228

Acceptance test report: Backup power system  

SciTech Connect

Acceptance Test Report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 Backup Power System. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. Backup power includes a single 125 KW diesel generator, three 10-kva uninterruptible power supply units, and all necessary control.

Cole, D.B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Powering Up With Space-Time Wind Forecasting Amanda S. HERING and Marc G. GENTON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to harvest electricity from wind energy is now advanced enough to make entire cities powered by it a reality of a kilowatt (kW) of wind-powered electricity is now nearly the same as a kW produced by coal or nuclear energy

Genton, Marc G.

230

MHK Projects/Evopod E35 35kW grid connected demonstrator | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

E35 35kW grid connected demonstrator E35 35kW grid connected demonstrator < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.3028,"lon":-5.59772,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Field Evaluation of the 200 kW PAFC Unit at the Pittsburgh International Airport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation, particularly in combination with the benefits of fuel cells, is attracting increasing utility industry interest. This report details more than 20,000 hours of automatic, unattended operation of an ONSI 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell at the Pittsburgh International Airport. Also included are installation, operation, and performance data on more than twenty other units in the U.S. ONSI fleet.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems up to 30 kW have the option of receiving an expected performance based buydown (EPBB) or a performance based incentive (PBI). Systems larger than 30 kW are only eligible for the PBI. EPBB (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $1.40/watt AC Commercial and all PPAs: $0.85/watt AC Non-profits and Government: $1.60/watt AC Income-qualified residential: $4.00/watt PBI (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $0.212/kWh Commercial and all PPAs: $0.129/kWh

233

40 kW of solar cell modules for the Large Scale Production Task, a Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Forty kilowatts of solar cell modules was produced in this program. This is equivalent to 4123 modules. The average power output per module was 9.7 watts at 16.5 volts, 60/sup 0/C and 100 mW/cm/sup 2/. The peak production rate was 200 modules per week which is equal to 1.9 kW per week. This rate was sustained for over four and one-half months and is equivalent to 100 kW per year. The solar cell module design, electrical and power performance, module preproduction environmental test results, production and shipping schedule, program summary, and delivery are described. A cost analysis section is written. Particular emphasis on the percentage of labor and material utilized in constructing a solar cell module is presented. Also included are cost reduction recommendations. It was concluded from this program that volume production on the order of hundreds of kilowatts per year per company as a minimum is required to significantly reduce the price per watt for solar cell modules. Sensor Technology more than doubled its solar cell module manufacturing facilities since the completion of the JPL Block II procurement. Plans are being made for large scale expansion of our facilities to meet growing JPL/DOE procurements.

Jones, G.T.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Catalysis and Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

understanding of basic principles of surface reactivity and its control by surface modification, on identification of active sites and full characterization of their electronic...

235

Optimal reactive power compensation in microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Questa tesi considera il problema di minimizzare i flussi di potenza reattiva in una microrete intelligente. Vengono proposti un modello approssimato per la microrete, che… (more)

Cerruti, Federico

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A test case for implementing feedback control in a micro hydro power plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Micro-hydro turbines generate power for small villages and industries in Afghanistan. They usually produce less than 100 kW of power. Currently the flow into the… (more)

Suliman, Ahmad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ingersoll Rand I-R PowerWorks 70 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingersoll Rand I-R PowerWorks 70 Jump to: navigation, search Manufacturer Ingersoll Rand Technology Type Microturbine Engine Type Inverter Power Output 70 kW0.07 MW 70,000 W...

239

A consideration of cycle selection for meso-scale distributed solar-thermal power .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic aspects of 12.5 kW residential solar-thermal power generating systems suitable for distributed, decentralized power generation paradigm are presented in this thesis. The… (more)

Price, Suzanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * November 2010 3 * November 2010 Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat Natural Gas or Biogas Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Hydrogen Natural Gas Converted to hydrogen on site via steam-methane reforming electrolyzer peak burner heat sink FC SYSTEM + H 2 Renewables H 2 -FC H 2 -storage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) * Grid electricity (hourly) * Fuel prices * Water price 0 2 4

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241

Florida Power and Light - Solar Rebate Program (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Solar Rebate Program (Florida) Florida Power and Light - Solar Rebate Program (Florida) Florida Power and Light - Solar Rebate Program (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solar Water Heater (Residential): $1,000/system Solar Water Heater (Business): $30/1,000 BTUh per day Solar PV (Residential): $2/DC Watt Solar PV (Commercial): $2/DC Watt (Up to 10kW), $1.50/DC Watt (10kW - 25kW), $1/DC Watt (25kW or larger) Provider Customer Service Note:The Florida Power and Light (FPL) 2013 solar PV rebate program is fully subscribed and the limited "standby list" is full. Customers on the

242

INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR AN ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that ln conventlOnal power transformers .. However , se~eralpower per passenger car: 20 kW Source conductor current: 1000 A Core Material: Transformerpower. This is in contrast to situations in which a transformer

Bolger, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Kansas City Power & Light Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power & Light Co Power & Light Co (Redirected from KCP&L) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kansas City Power & Light Co Place Kansas Utility Id 10000 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule LGS Large Secondary Service >1000kW Commercial Schedule LGS Large Secondary Service <1000kW Commercial Schedule LPS Large Power Service Industrial Schedule MGS Medium General Service Commercial Schedule R Residential Service Residential Schedule RTOD Residential Time of Day Service Residential Schedule SGS Small General Service >25kW Commercial Schedule SGS Small General Service <24kW Commercial

244

Proceedings of NIST/DOD Workshop on Power Conditioning ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pumped Hydro • Compressed Air Energy ... Basic GIV/V2G Math • US car used 1 hour/ day, parked 23 h/ d ... kW • Cars as significant power capacity? ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

245

Performance Assessment of the 6kW Ultra Capacitor Based Bonitron Ride-Through System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe and document the operation and performance of the Bonitron adjustable speed drive voltage sag protection device. This report will describe the different tests that were conducted and their results to characterize the Bonitron. The tests that were conducted include voltage sag and swell protection, interruption, re-closure, and life cycle tests. Additional characterization tests will also be discussed. The Bonitron was tested at 100% load using a 7.5kW/10Hp ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

High Temperature Electrolysis 4 kW Experiment Design, Operation, and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of long-term stack testing completed in the new high-temperature steam electrolysis multi-kW test facility recently developed at INL. The report includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This facility has provided a demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis operation at the 4 kW scale with advanced cell and stack technology. This successful large-scale demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

West Penn Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Penn Power Co West Penn Power Co Place Pennsylvania Utility Id 20387 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 10 (Residential Service) Residential 20 (General Service) Commercial 30 (General Power Service >500kW) Commercial 30 (General Power Service 100kW-500kW) Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0291/kWh Commercial: $0.0110/kWh Industrial: $0.0058/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

248

Renewable Energy in China: Xiao Qing Dao Village Power Wind/Diesel Hybrid Pilot Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000, DOE/NREL and the State Power Corporation of China (SPCC) developed a pilot project to electrify Xiao Qing Dao, a small island located in China's Yellow Sea. The project demonstrates the practicality of renewable energy systems for medium-scale, off-grid applications. It consists of four 10 k-W wind turbines connected to a 30-kW diesel generator, a 40-kW inverter and a battery bank.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Renewable Energy in China: Xiao Qing Dao Village Power Wind/Diesel Hybrid Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, DOE/NREL and the State Power Corporation of China (SPCC) developed a pilot project to electrify Xiao Qing Dao, a small island located in China's Yellow Sea. The project demonstrates the practicality of renewable energy systems for medium-scale, off-grid applications. It consists of four 10 k-W wind turbines connected to a 30-kW diesel generator, a 40-kW inverter and a battery bank.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Kansas City Power & Light Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City Power & Light Co City Power & Light Co Place Kansas Utility Id 10000 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule LGS Large Secondary Service >1000kW Commercial Schedule LGS Large Secondary Service <1000kW Commercial Schedule LPS Large Power Service Industrial Schedule MGS Medium General Service Commercial Schedule R Residential Service Residential Schedule RTOD Residential Time of Day Service Residential Schedule SGS Small General Service >25kW Commercial Schedule SGS Small General Service <24kW Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0980/kWh Commercial: $0.0784/kWh

251

Design, Fabrication, and Test of a 5-kWh/100-kW Flywheel Energy Storage Utilizing a High-Temperature Superconducting Bearing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The summaries of this project are: (1) Program goal is to design, develop, and demonstrate a 100 kW UPS flywheel electricity system; (2) flywheel system spin tested up to 15,000 RPM in a sensorless, closed loop mode; (3) testing identified a manufacturing deficiency in the motor stator--overheats at high speed, limiting maximum power capability; (4) successfully spin tested direct cooled HTS bearing up to 14,500 RPM (limited by Eddy current clutch set-up); (5) Testing confirmed commercial feasibility of this bearing design--Eddy Current losses are within acceptable limits; and (6) Boeing's investment in flywheel test facilities increased the spin-test capabilities to one of the highest in the nation.

Dr. Michael Strasik, Philip E Johnson; A. C. Day; J. Mittleider; M. D. Higgins; J. Edwards; J. R. Schindler; K. E. McCrary; C.R. McIver; D.; J. F. Gonder; J. R. Hull

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of an 8 kW wind turbine generator for residential type applications. Phase I: design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This Phase I summary report contains a description of the 8 kW wind energy conversion system developed by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for the Department of Energy. The wind turbine employs the UTRC Bearingless Rotor Concept in conjunction with a passive pendulum control system which controls blade pitch for start-up, efficient power generation, and high-speed survivability. The report contains a summary of the experimental and analytical programs in support of design efforts. These supporting programs include materials tests, a wind tunnel program, and aeroelastic analyses to evaluate system stability. An estimate is also made of the projected manufacturing cost of the system if produced in quantity.

Cheney, M.C.

1979-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE: T-O-D rates shift kWh and kW  

SciTech Connect

Technical report:In 1975, FEA, in cooperation with state and local utility authorities, initiated a series of field projects that collected electricity usage data under new electric utility rate designs and load management techniques. Individual projects included a wide range of load-management and electricity rate design alternatives, with emphasis on several forms of time-of-day rates. The program is now funded by the U.S. Dept. of Energy. Objectives of the program, kWh usage effects, kw demand effects, and sources of the load changes are discussed. Initial results indicate actual or effective shifts in electricity consumption from peak to off-peak periods, and reductions in diversified demand coincident with system peaks. (10 graphs)

Johnson, C.R.; Mintz, S.

1978-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Management Of Hanford KW Basin Knockout Pot Sludge As Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) and AREVA Federal Services, LLC (AFS) have been working collaboratively to develop and deploy technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 10S-K West Reactor Fuel Storage Basin on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, WA, USA. Two disposal paths exist for the different types of sludge found in the K West (KW) Basin. One path is to be managed as Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) with eventual disposal at an SNF at a yet to be licensed repository. The second path will be disposed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This paper describes the systems developed and executed by the Knockout Pot (KOP) Disposition Subproject for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as SNF, (i.e., KOP material).

Raymond, R. E. [CH2M HIll Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Evans, K. M. [AREVA, Avignon (France)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Verification test of a 25kW class SOFC cogeneration system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Osaka Gas and Tokyo Gas have high expectations for natural-gas-fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) cogeneration systems. SOFC offers many advantages for on-site cogeneration systems, such as high electrical efficiency, high quality by-product heat and low emissions. They are now executing a joint development program with Westinghouse Electric Corporation (hereinafter called as WELCO). This program is aimed to verify a 25kW class SOFC cogeneration system. This system, which was modified by replacing previous zirconia porous support tube cells (PST cells) with newly designed air electrode supported cells (AES cells), commenced operation on March 21, 1995. The system has been successfully operated for 13,100 hours as of February 7, 1997. This paper presents the performance evaluation of the new AES cells and the results of system operation at WELCO.

Yokoyama, H. [Osaka Gas Company Limited (Japan). Fuel Cell Development Dept.; Miyahara, A. [Tokyo Gas Company Limited (Japan). Duel Cell R& D Dept.; Veyo, S.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Westinghouse Science & Technology Center

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

Torrey, David A.

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Tower Design Load Verification on a 1-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has been done to characterize both tower top loads and thrust loads for small wind turbines, which is part of an ongoing effort to model and predict small wind turbine behavior and the resulting stresses imposed on the supporting tower. To these ends, a 1-kW furling wind turbine mounted on a 10-meter tower was instrumented and monitored via a data acquisition system for nearly a year. This test was conducted to verify the design loads as predicted by the simple design equations provided in the draft revision of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Small Wind Turbine Safety Standard 61400-02 CDV (hereafter called ''the draft Standard''). Data were captured for several operating conditions covered by the draft Standard. This paper addresses the collected data and what conclusions can be made from it.

Prascher, D.; Huskey, A.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Technical Review Report for the Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum No. 1, through Revision b  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the 'Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Addendum No. 1, Revision b', dated May 2007 (Addendum 1). The Mound 1KW Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) number USA/9516/B(U)F-85 for the transportation of Type B quantities of plutonium heat source material. The safety analysis of the package is documented in the 'Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1KW Package' (i.e., the Mound 1KW SARP, or the SARP). Addendum 1 incorporates a new fueled capsule assembly payload. The following changes have been made to add this payload: (1) The primary containment vessel (PCV) will be of the same design, but will increase in height to 11.16 in.; (2) A new graphite support block will be added to support up to three fueled capsule assemblies per package; (3) The cutting groove height on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) will be heightened to accommodate the taller PCV; and (4) A 3.38 in. high graphite filler block will be placed on top of the PCV. All other packaging features, as described in the Mound 1KW SARP [3], remain unchanged. This report documents the LLNL review of Addendum 1[1]. The specific review for each SARP Chapter is documented herein.

DiSabatino, A; West, M; Hafner, R; Russell, E

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Feasibility determination of low-head hydroelectric power development at existing sites. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the feasibility study, economic analysis, and information relevant to reactivation of the dam in Bethelehem, NH. It outlines a plan of development which calls for sale of the power to a local utility for the first few years of the project and then predominately on-site use of the power in an innovative plan for controlled-environment agriculture. The economic analyses indicate that reactivation of the dam would be a successful venture based on the present market value of 4.5 cents/kWh. The success of the second phase in the dam's use rests on the increasing financial attractiveness of locally grown produce in a state that currently imports over 90% of its food and is experiencing the spiraling costs of food, energy, and inflation. The best-suited turbine package for the site is an Ossberger 750-kW unit which would provide 4,014,000 kWh per year with a plant factor of 61%. The total capital costs of the project are $827,935.

Polonsky, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Oxyferryl Heme Reactivity Using both Radiation and Photochemical Techniques A. M. English, T. Fox, G. Tsaprailis, C. W. Fenwick, J. F. Wishart, J. T. Hazzard, and G. Tollin Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 6, pp. 81-98 Abstract: Flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate reductants in situ to study the electron-transfer (ET) reactivity of the FeIV=O heme centers in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. Reduction of a5RuIII groups covalently bound to surface histidines allowed intramolecular RuII --> FeIV=O ET rates to be measured. Protonation of the oxene ligand was found to be largely rate determining in myoglobin, consistent with the lack of proton donors in its heme pocket. The large distance (21-23 Ã…) between surface histidines and the heme in wild-type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

262

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 HINS R&D: a possible Project X Front End Frequency 325 MHz Total length ~ 55 m SSR1 (β=0.22) SSR2 (β=0.4) RT -CHSR MEBT RFQ IS W (MeV) 2.5 0.050 60 30 10 Beam Line Elements: 19 Conventional RT Cavities 29 SC Spoke Cavities and 3 Cryomodules 42 SC Focusing Solenoids RF Power Elements: one 325 MHz Klystron/Modulator one 400 kW RFQ FVM 19 ~20 kW FVM/Fast Tuning for RT Section 29 ~20-120 kW FVM/Fast Tuning for SC Section Power Supplies, quench protection, beam diagnostic,.. Fermilab 2 * HINS R&D Phase: Proof of innovative approach to high intensity beam acceleration ! - 2007-2011/12 R&D period - Prove, Develop & Bui ld Front-End in Meson Bldg. at 325 MHz (0-60 MeV) since much of the technical complexity is in the FE Mechanical/RF Systems * Demonstrate for the first time

263

Regulated Emissions from a High Efficiency Spark-Ignition with Maximum Engine Power at or Below 19 KW.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous research has developed a set of high efficiency generator engines converted from a stock automobile engine. These all employed different variations of squish and… (more)

Mackey, Travis J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Research on the Hybrid Clean Energy Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to design a hybrid clean energy power system with 3kW by utilizing the complementarities between the clean energies, or with and other energies. It unites the solar photovoltaic (PV) , the wind power, batteries and the diesel generator ... Keywords: clean energy, DC-DC controller, power management, BMS

Chun Wang, Zuhua Fang, Tingting Hong, Wen Lv, Ying Sun, Hongbing Xu, Jiajia Li, Younan Wang, Peiying Han

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Green Power Network: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports News Archive Subscribe to Green Power News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is increasing the capacity of its renewable energy power purchase programs by 7 peercent over 2013, with a total capacity of 126 megawatts (MW) being offered. The increase in capacity is being spread across two of TVA's three power purchase programs - Green Power Providers, Solar Solutions Initiative, and the Renewable Standard Offer. The Green Power Providers program has 10 MW of available capacity for the development of small-scale solar, wind, biomass and hydro generation systems that are 50 kilowatts (kW) or less. Within the Green Power Providers program TVA has doubled the residential capacity from 2 MW to 4 MW and will be paying all power providers a total of 14¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The Solar Solutions Initiative program, which focuses on installations between 50 kW and 1 MW, has been expanded from 10 MW of capacity to 16 MW and now pays a premium of 6¢/kWh. TVA's third power purchase program, the Renewable Standard Offer continues to have 100 MW of available capacity for projects between 1 MW and 20 MW. Prior to these program expansions TVA's renewables portfolio consisted of 128 MW of operating or committed solar, 1,500 MW of wind, and 60 MW of biomass.

266

150,000 r/min-1.5 kW PM Efficiency Improvement by Means of Permeance Coefficient Optimization of 150,000-r/min, 1.5-kW PM Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Technology) This paper describes an ultra high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor design. Configuration of ultra high-speed PM motor. Core Coil (Winding) Air Permanent Magnet Shaft Stator Air 2 FEM Optimization of 150,000-r/min, 1.5-kW PM Motor Masaru Kano, Student Member, Toshihiko Noguchi, Member (Nagaoka

Fujimoto, Hiroshi

267

Reactivity of Nanoparticle Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These, in turn, will provide a sustainable source of clean energy with applications in transportation and portable power generation. ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Data:05bb19d0-ec86-4b6b-8861-de6804030c57 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Demand Window: Comments kW kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Flat Energy Usage...

269

Data:01e0acc3-f880-4e61-9f25-e8f654ef88a7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Demand Window: Comments kW kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Flat Energy Usage...

270

Data:66503e1b-b3ec-4b78-b36d-91e4df5f87e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Demand Window: Comments kW kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Flat Energy Usage...

271

Data:05d6b780-db63-49f5-8d11-11567e75fe08 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Demand Window: Comments kW kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Flat Energy Usage...

272

Characterization of Settler Tank, KW Container and KE Container Sludge Simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has specified base formulations for non-radioactive sludge simulants for use in the development and testing of equipment for sludge sampling, retrieval, transport, and processing. In general, the simulant formulations are based on the average or design-basis physical and chemical properties obtained by characterizing sludge samples. The simulants include surrogates for uranium metal, uranium oxides (agglomerates and fine particulate), and the predominant chemical phases (iron and aluminum hydroxides, sand). Specific surrogate components were selected to match the nominal particle-size distribution and particle-density data obtained from sludge sample analysis. Under contract to CHPRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed physical and rheological characterization of simulants, and the results are reported here. Two base simulant types (dry) were prepared by STP staff at the Maintenance and Storage Facility and received by PNNL in February 2009: Settler Tank Simulant and KW Container Sludge Simulant. A third simulant, KE Container Sludge Simulant was received by PNNL in December 2010. The objectives of this simulant characterization effort were to provide baseline characterization data on simulants being used by STP for process development and equipment testing and provide a high-level comparison of the simulant characteristics to the targets used to formulate the simulants.

Burns, Carolyn A.; Luna, Maria L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

FLOATING PRESSURE CONVERSION AND EQUIPMENT UPGRADES OF TWO 3.5KW, 20K, HELIUM REFRIGERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5 KW at 20 K, are used at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryogenic-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. New changes to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the control issues that necessitated the controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle “floating pressure” control technology. The controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology was the first application on a helium gas refrigeration system. Previous implementations of the floating pressure technology have been on 4 K liquefaction and refrigeration systems, which have stored liquid helium volumes that have level indications used for varying the pressure levels (charge) in the system for capacity modulation. The upgrades have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e. at various loads in the vacuum chambers). The performance data of the two systems, pre and post upgrading are presented.

J. Homan, V. Ganni, A. Sidi-Yekhlef, J. Creel, R. Norton, R. Linza, G. Vargas, J. Lauterbach, J. Urbin, D. Howe

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Field Test and Demonstration of 5-kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cell power systems have very high fuel efficiencies and low environmental emissions. They can be used to serve local end-use loads as distributed generators, thus helping to relieve distribution system constraints. As the cost of new central power generation systems continue to rise, delivered electricity and retail energy rates are also likely to rise, making electricity generated by fuel cell systems potentially as efficient and cost-effective as electricity delivered from large central power stat...

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

160,000-r/min, 2.7-kW Electric Drive of Supercharger for Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000-r/min, 2.7-kW permanent-magnet synchronous motor drive is discussed and its experimental test-supercharger; centrifugal compressor; ultra high- speed permanent magnet synchronous motor; pseudo-current- source inverter, Nagasaki, Nagasaki 851-0392, Japan Abstract--This paper describes an ultra high-speed permanent- magnet

Fujimoto, Hiroshi

276

220,000-r/min, 2-kW Permanent Magnet Motor Drive for Turbocharger Toshihiko Noguchi, Yosuke Takata *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

220,000-r/min, 2-kW Permanent Magnet Motor Drive for Turbocharger Toshihiko Noguchi, Yosuke Takata-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor drive, which is embedded in a turbocharger of an internal permanent magnet. Also, it is indispensable to reduce the motor inductance less than 10 (µH) because dc bus

Fujimoto, Hiroshi

277

Assessment of a 200-kW Fuel Cell at the U.S. Army Natick Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry is showing renewed interest in distributed generation, with a particular interest in fuel cells. This on-going project will provide long-term data on performance and operating characteristics of an ONSI 200-kW phosphoric acid fuel cell at the U.S. Army RD&E Center in Natick, Massachusetts.

1997-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling and Implementation of a 1 kW, Air Cooled HTPEM Fuel Cell in a Hybrid Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Implementation of a 1 kW, Air Cooled HTPEM Fuel Cell in a Hybrid Electrical Vehicle engine vehicles (1). Hybrid systems of many kinds, combining a primary energy source having a high energy://www.ecsdl.org/terms_use.jsp #12;article, a model of a hybrid vehicle, including a HTPEM with lead acid batteries, is de- veloped

Nielsen, Mads Pagh

279

TY JOUR T1 Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources A1 Eric R Masanet A1 Yuan Chang A1 Anand R Gopal A1 Peter H Larsen A1 William R Morrow A1 Roger Sathre A1 Arman Shehabi A1 Pei Zhai KW electricity KW energy policy KW environmental analysis KW life cycle impact KW life cycle inventory AB p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy

280

Reactive Air Aluminization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The WEI6K, a 6-kW 7-m Small Wind Turbine: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This project was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy under a DOE solicitation “Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development.” The objective of this project has been to design a new small wind turbine with improved cost, reliability and performance in grid-connected residential and small business applications, in order to achieve the overall DOE goal of cost effectiveness in Class 3 wind resources that can now be achieved in Class 5 resources. The scope of work for this project has been to complete the preliminary design of an improved small wind turbine, including preliminary loads and strength analyses; analysis and design of all major components; systems integration and structural dynamic analysis; estimation of life-cycle cost of energy; and design documentation and review. The project did not entail hardware fabrication or testing. The WEI6K Turbine resulting from this project is an upwind horizontal-axis wind turbine rated at 6 kW. It features a 3-blade 7-m diameter rotor. The generator is a direct-drive permanent magnet synchronous machine generating 3-phase power at 240 VAC. The turbine is maintained oriented in to the wind via active yaw control using electromechanical servos. Power is regulated with active blade pitch control. The turbine is presently designed to be placed on a 100-foot (30m) tower. The turbine is predicted to generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy (COE) between 7.3 and 8.9 ¢/kWh at an IEC Class II site, with an average wind speed of 8.5 m/s at hub height, depending upon whether the customer uses a guyed truss tower (the lower figure) or a monopole tower. For the NREL Reference Site, with a mean wind speed of 5.35 m/s at 10 m height, the turbine would generate at a levelized cost of energy of between 9.7 and 11.9 ¢/kWh. The lowest of these numbers is presently competitive with retail electricity rates in most of the country. The 8.9 ¢/kWh is still competitive with retail rates in many regions of the country with high electricity costs. The study further concludes that several design changes could shave 10-14% from the cost of energy determined in the preliminary design. These changes include a new tower design that offers tilt-up capability without guy wires and takes better advantage of the lowered loads produced by pitch control; design a family of airfoils more appropriate for pitch regulation on a turbine of this size; tune the pitch controller properly to minimize shedding of power during turbulent operation in the transition from Region 2 to 3; value engineer the pitch system to shave costs, including consideration of a collective pitch system; and refine the design of the hub and main frame castings to minimize weight and cost. We are generally encouraged by the results. These preliminary numbers show that we can produce a turbine that is competitive with retail electric rates at relatively windy IEC Class II sites. With further improvements in the design, we believe the turbine could be competitive at sites with lesser wind resource.

Wetzel, Kyle K.; McCleer, Patrick J.; Hahlbeck, Edwin C.; DOE Project Office - Keith Bennett

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Rocky Mountain Power - Solar Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - Solar Incentive Program Rocky Mountain Power - Solar Incentive Program Rocky Mountain Power - Solar Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $5,000 Small Non-Residential (up to 25 kW): $25,000 Large Non-Residential (greater than 25 kW, up to 1,000 kW): $800,000 Program Info Funding Source Rate-payer funds Start Date 9/1/2007 Expiration Date 12/31/2017 State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program Year 2012/2013 (application period is closed): Residential: $1.25/W-AC Small Non-Residential (up to 25 kW): $1.00/W-AC Large Non-Residential (greater than 25 kW, up to 1,000 kW): $0.80/W-AC '''''Note: Applications for 2013 were accepted during a two-week period

283

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Membrane for CO 2 Capture and Power Generation DE-FE0007634 Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh FuelCell Energy, Inc. 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 10, 2013 Pittsburgh, PA FuelCell Energy, Inc. 1.4 MW plant at a municipal building 2.4 MW plant owned by an Independent power producer 600 kW plant at a food processor 11.2 MW plant - largest fuel cell park in the world Delivering ultra-clean baseload distributed generation globally Premier developer of stationary fuel cell products, with >40 years of experience Headquarters in Danbury, CT (USA), international presence in USA, Canada, Germany (Fraunhofer, IKTS) and South Korea (Posco) Delivering Direct FuelCell ® (DFC ® ) power plants for On-Site Power and Utility Grid

284

Reactivity Control Schemes for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different reactivity control schemes are considered for future space nuclear reactor power systems. Each of these control schemes uses a combination of boron carbide absorbers and/or beryllium oxide reflectors to achieve sufficient reactivity swing to keep the reactor subcritical during launch and to provide sufficient excess reactivity to operate the reactor over its expected 7–15 year lifetime. The size and shape of the control system directly impacts the size and mass of the space reactor's reflector and shadow shield

Aaron E. Craft; Jeffrey C. King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PQMII POWER QUALITY METER INSTRUCTION MANUAL 11 PQMII Power Quality Meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;PQMII POWER QUALITY METER ­ INSTRUCTION MANUAL 1­1 PQMII Power Quality Meter Chapter 1 Multilin PQMII Power Quality Meter is an ideal choice for continuous monitoring of a single or three-phase system. It provides metering for current, voltage, real power, reactive power, apparent power, energy use

Meyers, Steven D.

286

An Analysis of One-Second Wind Power Plant Power Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of one-second power data from a group of fifteen 600-kW turbines installed in Hawaii shows that the operation of a wind power plant tends to smooth out the power fluctuations caused by individual turbines. As this EPRI project demonstrates, any change in power over a one-second period results in power levels within plus or minus 5% of the original power level of the original power level of the wind plant, though much larger variations occur in individual turbine output.

1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 p ($/kW) Regulated tariff for energy purchases during hourthe Tariff scenario installed capacity is high, while energytariff type, a monthly- ratcheted power charge and an energy

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DESIGN STUDY OF SMALL BOILING REACTORS FOR POWER AND HEAT PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

A design study has been made of a small "Package" nuclear power plant for the production of electric power and heat in remotely located, inaccessible areas devoid of natural fuels. The design utilizes a horizontal boiling reactor as a steam generator consistent with safe and simple equipment and a minimum building height. A reactor design of 51/2 Mw capacity, with a combined net electric power output of 750 kw and a heat plant output of 4500 kw, was studied in detail. Tertative cost estimates are presented on the basis of this combination. General comparisons have been made between different systems designed for either independent or combined production of 425 kw net electric power and 2500 kw available heat. (auth)

Treshow, M.

1954-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tombigbee Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Assn Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 19007 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power - Commercial - GSA-2 (51 - 1000 KW) Commercial General Power - Commercial GSA-1 (less than 50 KW) Commercial General Power - Commercial GSA-3 Commercial Outdoor Lighting - 100 HPS Lighting Outdoor Lighting - 175 MV Lighting Outdoor Lighting - 250 HPS Cobrahead Lighting Outdoor Lighting - 400 HPS Cobrahead Lighting Outdoor Lighting - 400 Watt Flood Lighting Residential Residential

290

Comparison between the measured and calculated reactivity in measuring the effectiveness of the emergency protection at the stage of physical start-up of unit no. 3 at the Kalinin nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents comparisons between the effectiveness of the emergency protection under both stationary and nonstationary formulations calculated with the use of the RADUGA-7.5 package and experimental data obtained in measuring the 'weight' of the emergency protection in the process of physical start-up of the VVER-1000 reactor of unit no. 3 of the Kalinin NPP. On the basis of the results obtained, recommendations are given on comparing the measured and calculated reactivity and parameters determined by using its value.

Kavun, O. Yu.; Popykin, A. I.; Shevchenko, R. A., E-mail: rshevchenko@secnrs.ru; Shevchenko, S. A. [Scientific and Engineering Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Centralized wind power plant voltage control with optimal power flow algorithm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a method of controlling the reactive power injected into a medium-voltage collection system by multiple wind turbine generators such that the voltage… (more)

Kline, Jared Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

High power gas transport laser  

SciTech Connect

Continuous wave output power from a gas transport laser is substantially increased by disposing a plurality of parallel cylindrically tubular cathodes in the main stream transversely of the direction of gas flow and spaced above a coextensive segmented anode in the opposite wall of the channel. Ballast resistors are connected between the cathodes, respectively, and the power supply to optimize the uniform arcless distribution of current passing between each cathode and the anode. Continuous output power greater than 3 kW is achieved with this electrode configuration.

Fahlen, T.S.; Kirk, R.F.

1978-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reactive Maintenance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance Reactive Maintenance October 7, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis Reactive maintenance follows a run-it-until-it-breaks strategy where no actions or efforts are taken to maintain equipment as intended by the manufacturer. Studies indicate this is still the predominant mode of maintenance for Federal facilities. Advantages Reactive maintenance advantages are a double-edged sword. Federal agencies following a purely reactive maintenance strategy can expect little expenditures for manpower or system upkeep until something breaks. However, systems do break. With new equipment, Federal agencies can expect minimal incidents of failure. However, older equipment often experiences higher failure incidents and costlier repairs. Other advantages of reactive maintenance are:

294

OPF for reactive pricing studies on the NGC system  

SciTech Connect

Retail transmission services like those being provided by the National Grid Company (NGC) in England and Wales pose new challenges for the pricing of reactive power supply. A reactive power market approach has been proposed by NGC and continues to be evaluated. Such an approach includes a novel requirement for transmission constrained economic dispatch of VArs, a problem in the security constrained optimal power flow (OPF) class. The problem formulations handled by the OPF package in use could not accommodate NGC`s requirements. This paper describes the reactive pricing problem being addressed, the modeling requirements, and the resulting extensions made to the OPF formulation and package. It discusses the test results obtained to date on the NGC system.

Dandachi, N.H.; Rawlins, M.J. [National Grid Co., Sindlesham (United Kingdom). Control Technology Centre; Alsac, O.; Prais, M.; Stott, B. [PCA Corp., Mesa, AZ (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Laboratory Evaluation of a 25-kW Pre-Commercial Stirling Engine-Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New electric generation technologies and combined heat and power products are being introduced to the North American market. Utilities want to know more about these systems and how they may impact their customers. Both field and laboratory testing is crucial to gaining a better understanding for the operating criteria, compatibility, and performance characteristics of these systems. Heat engines that generate power based on the Stirling thermodynamic cycle have recently reached the pre-commercial stage i...

2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

A 200 000 rpm, 2 kW Slotless Permanent Magnet Pierre-Daniel Pfister, Student Member IEEE and Yves Perriard, Senior Member IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 200 000 rpm, 2 kW Slotless Permanent Magnet Motor Pierre-Daniel Pfister, Student Member IEEE high speed (200 krpm, 2 kW) slotless permanent magnet motor, using an analytical model that reached 200 krpm. Index Terms--Very high speed, Slotless permanent magnet motor, Multiphysics analytical

Psaltis, Demetri

297

Power Efficiency in High Performance Computing Shoaib Kamil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 192 cores per cabinet. The power feed to each cabinet is 208 VAC 3-phase and is capable of handling 25 KW per rack. Each cabinet has a single 92 percent efficient power supply at the bottom of the rack system performance (ssp) metric. LBNL Tech Report 58868, 2005. [13] L. Oliker, A. Canning, J. Carter, J

298

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical progress report summarizes the objectives and progress on the following tasks associated with the project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Testing facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. The project will demonstrate a 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant based on the IMHEX stack design concept.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

James R. Boyce

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Liquid-lithium cooling for 100-kW ISOL and fragmentation targets.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced exotic beam facilities that are currently being developed will use powerful driver accelerator for the production of short-lived rare isotopes. Multi-beam-drivers capable of producing high power beams from very light to very heavy ions are now technically feasible. A challenge for such facilities is the development of production targets to be used for a variety of reaction mechanisms with beam powers of about 100 kilowatts. This paper presents engineering concepts that have been developed recently for using liquid lithium coolant for two types of targets, one for use with light-ion beams on high atomic number (Z) targets and the other for heavy-ion beams on low-Z targets.

Nolen, J. A.; Reed, C. B.,Hassanein, A.,Gomes, I. C.

2000-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Economic and Environmental Analysis of Fuel Cell Powered Materials Handling Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes an analysis of the economic and environmental attributes of forklift fleets powered by battery and fuel cell power plants. The report first provides background on the fuel cell forklift technology. The fuel cell forklift is then compared to three other technology options: conventional battery-powered forklifts, fast-charge forklifts at 15 kW of charging power, and fast-charge forklifts at 20 kW of charging power. This study develops models of the infrastructure and equipme...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells for Critical Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power Greg Moreland SENTECH, Inc. Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy August 6, 2008 APCO Annual Conference and Expo 2 2 Fuel cells use hydrogen to create electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts Fuel Cell Overview * An individual fuel cell produces about 1 volt * Hundreds of individual cells can comprise a fuel cell stack * Fuel cells can be used to power a variety of applications -Bibliographic Database * Laptop computers (50-100 W) * Distributed energy stationary systems (5-250 kW) * Passenger vehicles (80-150 kW) * Central power generators (1-200 MW) 3 3 Stationary/ Backup Power Transportation Specialty Markets Nuclear Natural Gas (for transition period only) Coal (with carbon sequestration) Renewable

303

Development of a 70-kW Gas Turbine System as Prime Mover for Multiple Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, natural-gas-fueled microturbine has been developed for powering cogeneration, cooling systems, and other commercial and light-industrial applications. Compared to internal combustion (reciprocating) engines of similar size, the new microturbine offers customers attractive economics by reducing installation and maintenance costs. This report discusses market forces behind development of this technology and current performance and economics.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Operation of a 200-kW PAFC Unit on Anaerobic Digestor Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anaerobic digestor process used by over 90% of wastewater treatment plants generates methane-rich gas as a byproduct. This report describes the initial phases of a twelve-month demonstration project in which a fuel cell power plant in Yonkers, New York, is being successfully run on anaerobic digestor gas (ADG).

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting: $0.05/kWh saved + $50/kW saved Custom Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning: $0.10/kWh saved + $100/kW saved Custom Other: $0.08/kWh saved + $100/kW saved New Construction Rebates: Custom

306

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging  

SciTech Connect

Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

East Kentucky Power Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky Power Coop, Inc Kentucky Power Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name East Kentucky Power Coop, Inc Place Kentucky Utility Id 5580 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cogeneration and Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule,Less Than 100 kW Cogeneration and Small Power Production Power Purchase Rate Schedule,over 100 kW Section A

309

Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER ELECTRONICS AND POWER ELECTRONICS AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT BREAKOUT SESSION July 24, 2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Burak Ozpineci Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilitator Vehicle Technologies Program - Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors eere.energy.gov Key DOE Technical Targets Power Electronics ($/kW) (kW/kg) (kW/l) 7.9 10.8 8.7 7 11.2 10 5 12 12 3.3 14.1 13.4 Electric Motors ($/kW) (kW/kg) (kW/l) 11.1 1.2 3.7 10 1.24 4 7 1.3 5 4.7 1.6 5.7 Traction Drive System Impacts  Reduce Cost Reduce Weight Reduce Volume Reduce Energy Storage Requirements Year Cost ($/kW) Specific Power (kW/kg) Power Density (kW/l) Efficiency 2010* 19 1.08 2.60 >90% 2012 17 1.12 2.86 >91% 2015 12 1.17 3.53 >93% 2020 8 1.44 4.00 >94%

310

Fixed and variable speed induction generators for real power loss minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of induction generators in the wind power industry is standard practice. An induction generator draws reactive power from the network depending on its real power output, such that the greater the real power exported to the network, the ... Keywords: doubly- fed induction generator, induction generator, line loss, reactive power

S. Durairaj; D. Flynn; B. Fox

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Costa de Cocos 11-kW wind-diesel hybrid system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Costa de Cocos is a small resort located in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Using the existing diesel generator, the resort`s power system was retrofitted to a wind-hybrid diesel system. The reason for this retrofit was to supply 24-hour power, to reduce diesel fuel by using wind energy, and to reduce diesel air and noise emissions in order to promote ecotourism. The wind system was installed in October 1996 with cost-shared funding from the U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Agency for International Development renewable energy program in Mexico. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) supplied technical assistance to the project. Discussed in this paper are the system design, installation, and initial performance.

Corbus, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, M. [Bergey Windpower Co., Norman, OK (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Compatibility Analysis on Existing Reactivity Devices in CANDU 6 Reactors for DUPIC Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of reactivity devices for a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) 6 reactor loaded with Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel In CANDU reactors (DUPIC) fuel is assessed. The reactivity devices studied are the zone controller units, the adjuster rods, and the mechanical control absorbers. For the zone controller system, the bulk reactivity control, spatial power control, and damping capability for spatial oscillation are investigated. For the adjusters, the xenon override, restart after a poison-out, shim operation, and power step-back capabilities are confirmed. The mechanical control absorber is assessed for the function of compensating temperature reactivity feedback following a power reduction. This study shows that the current reactivity device system of a CANDU 6 reactor is compatible with DUPIC fuel for normal and transient operations.

Jeong, Chang-Joon; Choi, Hangbok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reactive rules on the web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive rules are used for programming rule-based, reactive systems, which have the ability to detect events and respond to them automatically in a timely manner. Such systems are needed on the Web for bridging the gap between the existing, passive ...

Bruno Berstel; Philippe Bonnard; François Bry; Michael Eckert; Paula-Lavinia P?trânjan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Market Monitoring Tools Bernie Lesieutre - LBNL Bob Thomas - Cornell October 18, 2006 Washington, D.C. OE Visualization and Controls Peer Review Market Monitoring Tools: Overview Approach: Use dispatch, profit, revenue/offer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some participants market power potential. 2006 Technical Work: Extend prior results to large, RTO-scale systems. Initiate large-scale analysis with RTO (PJM). Evaluate reactive power effects on energy markets. Publication and presentation of results. Market Power: Substitutability Market power boils down to the issue of substitutability Locational Advantage: "Load Pockets" Physical network constraints limit supply to certain loads, so that the incremental demand

315

Geothermal Power Plants in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine small experimental geothermal power plants are now operating at six sites in the People's Republic of China. These range in capacity from 50 kW to 3MW, and include plants of the flash-steam and binary type. All except two units utilize geofluids at temperatures lower than 100 C. The working fluids for the binary plants include normal- and iso-butane, ethyl chloride, and Freon. The first geothermal plant came on-line in 1970, the most recent ones in 1979. Figure 1 shows the location of the plants. Major cities are also shown for reference. Table 1 contains a listing of the plants and some pertinent characteristics. The total installed capacity is 5,186 kW, of which 4,386 kW is from flash-steam units. In the report, they given an example of the results of exploratory surveys, and show system diagrams, technical specifications, and test results for several of the power plants.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Reactive Maintenance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Reactive Maintenance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types

317

Power systems and requirements for integration of smart structures into aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the requisite electrical power, usually in the 50 to 100 kW range for a modern tactical aircraft, and a lower and results ­ highlighting wind tunnel power measurements from shape memory alloy and piezoelectric ultrasonic specification of MIL-STD-7041 . The upper loop in the diagram provides emergency power through an air turbine

Lindner, Douglas K.

318

ALPR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY (ARGONNE LOW POWER REACTOR). PHASE I  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study, Phase I of the ALPR . project, has been made in accordance with the Army Reactors Branch specifications for a nuclear ''package'' power plant with a 200 to 260 kw electric and 400 kw heating capacity..The plant is to be installed at the Idaho Reactor Testing Station as a prototype for remote arctic installations. The ''conventiornl'' power plant as well as the exterior reactor components are described, and cost estimates are given. ''Nuclear'' components of the reactor are described. (auth)

Treshow, M.; Hamer, E.; Pearlman, H.; Rossin, D.; Shaftman, D.

1956-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Depletion Reactivity Benchmark for the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute– (EPRI-) sponsored depletion reactivity benchmarks documented in reports 1022909, Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty, and 1025203, Utilization of the EPRI Depletion Benchmarks for Burnup Credit Validation, have been translated to an evaluated benchmark for incorporation in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE), published by the Organisation for Economic ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells for Portable Power Fuel Cells for Portable Power JoAnn Milliken Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-2480 JoAnn.Milliken@ee.doe.gov January 15-17, 2002 Phoenix, AZ Presentation Outline * Why are we here? * DOE Transportation Fuel Cell Program * Workshop Objectives * Guidelines for Workshop Product * What have past DOE workshops achieved? Why are we here? Goal 300 10,000 Cost in $/kW 50kW system Today's low volume cost (1 unit) 2002 2010 Gasoline System Cost 50 Today's high volume cost (500,000 units) 1990 3,000 Government: Cost - the primary barrier to commercialization of PEMFCs for automobiles Industry: Business plans include fuel cells or fuel cell powered products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Small geothermal electric systems for remote powering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes conditions and costs at which quite small (100 to 1,000 kilowatt) geothermal systems could be used for off-grid powering at remote locations. This is a first step in a larger process of determining locations and conditions at which markets for such systems could be developed. The results suggest that small geothermal systems offer substantial economic and environmental advantages for powering off-grid towns and villages. Geothermal power is most likely to be economic if the system size is 300 kW or greater, down to reservoir temperatures of 100{degree}C. For system sizes smaller than 300 kW, the economics can be favorable if the reservoir temperature is about 120{degree}C or above. Important markets include sites remote from grids in many developing and developed countries. Estimates of geothermal resources in many developing countries are shown.

Entingh, Daniel J.; Easwaran, Eyob.; McLarty, Lynn

1994-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

Five kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration Project: Case Study: Exit Glacier Nature Center Acumentrics Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 5 kW solid oxide fuel cell system operating on propane at the Kenai Fiords National Park at the Exit Glacier Visitor Center, Seward, Alaska. The case study is one of several fuel cell project case studies under research by EPRI's Distributed Energy Resources Program. This case study is designed to help utilities and other interested parties understand the early applications of fuel cell systems to help them in their resour...

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Combining thorium with burnable poison for reactivity control of a very long cycle BWR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of utilizing thorium together with gadolinium, erbium, or boron burnable absorber in BWR fuel assemblies for very long cycle is investigated. Nuclear characteristics such as reactivity and power distributions ...

Inoue, Yuichiro, 1969-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solar Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Power Purchase Agreements Solar Power Purchase Agreements Brian Millberg | Energy Manager, City of Minneapolis Direct Ownership * Financial: Even at $3/kW installed cost, simple payback is 18 years (initial electricity cost of $0.10/kWh and 3%/year electricity cost inflation) * Politics: How to justify expense with such a long payback * If RECS begin to have some real value, this would be a positive for ownership. 2 PPA Advantages * No/low up-front costs * City can take advantage of Investment Tax Credits (ITCs) - This leads to low electricity costs * Predictable electricity cost for length of contract * Avoid direct design/rebate/permitting work * No maintenance/operation headaches 3 PPA Financial Case (1 MW system) * PPA allows a developer to reduce system cost through:

325

Alabama Power - UESC Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Power - UESC Alabama Power - UESC Activities FUPWG 10-16-12 UESC Projects * Anniston Army Depot - Re-conductor / New Poles - Substation / Switchyard Upgrade - Solar Water Heating * USDA - Auburn - Lighting Retrofit - Heat Recovery * FDA - Investment Grade Audit * Lighting / Controls / Heat Recovery UESC Projects * GSA - Lighting Upgrades * Mobile and Montgomery Court Houses * Fort Rucker - Generator / Photo Voltaic Project - Investment Grade Audit * Energy Efficiency Projects * Renewables - Lighting Sensor - Lighting / Controls / Boiler Replacement Fort Rucker Heat Pump / Boiler Piggyback System 50 Ton HPWH 240 kW Electric Boiler Heat Recovery Questions to Consider... * What is the most efficient boiler you have installed? * If you were going to reduce Greenhouse gas emissions would you focus on the Heating or

326

City of Boulder - Green Power Purchasing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Boulder - Green Power Purchasing City of Boulder - Green Power Purchasing City of Boulder - Green Power Purchasing < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Colorado Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider City of Boulder The City of Boulder purchases a portion of its electricity supply from wind power through Xcel Energy's Windsource program and Renewable Choice Energy, headquartered in Colorado. Boulder purchases approximately 470,000 kWh annually to provide clean power for its municipal buildings. Boulder also installed a solar water heating system with 128 thermal panels on one of its city-owned pools. The city now has 1,955 kilowatts (kW) of photovoltaics installed with an additional 349 kW planned. These efforts

327

Reactivity of heat treated chars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reactivities of a number of chars produced from American coals varying in rank from lignite to anthracite have been measured in air, CO/sub 2/, steam and H/sub 2/. The variables chosen for the study were: rank of the parent coal, inorganic matter content, particle size, reaction temperature and pressure as well as heat treatment conditions used during char preparation. In all gasification atmospheres studied, reactivity plots for different chars are essentially of the same general shape and have three distinct regions. The reaction rate first increases slowly with time. The plot then goes through a maximum in slope, followed by a lengthy region of decreasing slope as burn-off approaches 100 percent. The shape of the burn-off curves can be explained on the basis of what is known about the development of porosity and surface area in microporous chars as they undergo gasification. Using an adjustable time parameter, equations have been developed which successfully correlate the reactivity data. Char reactivity decreases, in general, with increase in rank of the parent coal. Reactivities of chars in air, CO/sub 2/ and steam increase over 150-fold in going from a low volatile bituminous to a lignite parent coal; the spread in char reactivities in H/sub 2/ is only 30-fold. Removal of inorganic matter from coal precursors prior to their charring or from chars produced from the raw coals has a marked effect on char reactivity and surface area. Removal of inorganic matter (by acid washing) decreases, in general, reactivity of chars produced from lower rank coals, whereas reactivities of chars derived from higher rank coals increase.

Mahajan, O. P.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Advanced, High-Reliability, System-Integrated 500kW PV Inverter Development: Final Subcontract Report, 29 September 2005 - 31 May 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Xantrex Technology accomplished subcontract goals of reducing parts cost, weight, and size of its 500-kW inverter by 25% compared to state-of-the-art PV inverters, while extending reliability by 25%.

West, R.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Data:Ddfc54de-17e5-40ea-84ba-1e6ee2fed8e3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

330

Data:5012b824-1c04-4b29-92cb-41bda71e415d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

331

Data:D610725d-d2eb-4e07-ab79-391f4be77d32 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

332

Data:81cf3593-816f-471d-8c82-2fd7c0673e4e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

333

Data:33760940-77e0-4d11-ad68-d61f66389817 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

334

Data:946b18bc-83b0-42d6-9ff4-76074c6a33e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

335

Data:455b0061-4bd3-43c5-a716-93fc55424c5d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

336

Data:D452148e-b6c5-41be-bcf0-e0a5b4f5edef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

337

Data:4b15a78e-708f-45ce-8d08-bd8db9fa5fc6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

338

Data:D8c7b735-0d63-4bfc-9753-907d9764138f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

339

Data:E0832893-cfce-4894-a353-c95d5e0b6902 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered...

340

Data:58e46dab-78ef-4b8c-9237-52b8284ee487 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Data:C63262f5-356e-481e-a115-494a7b0c4f8e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy Usage...

342

Data:D07a7e33-d568-4204-99dd-3238e5a5683d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

343

Data:3f9b3927-bf1f-4c99-9c5a-068008cbaff4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

344

Data:3db2b7f3-598e-4df6-b8ec-aa85d412ac06 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered...

345

Data:5451d4b9-fc10-470e-91b1-d49f992aeb14 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

346

Data:35de6a0b-1d73-49c2-9bca-eb4596ccad3e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

347

Data:43dd315b-a5a0-4301-ae20-b2a38f5237ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy Usage...

348

Data:D273fb04-0387-4281-a977-27633aeb3872 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

349

Data:43a99971-a1c3-4764-b094-54eba03b44bb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered Energy...

350

Data:32afeb92-63fc-4386-98ec-6d7447936346 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Reactive Power Charge Reactive Power Charge (kVAR): Demand Ratchet Percentage: 0.0000 Comments kW << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Tiered...

351

Unidentifiable Attacks in Electric Power Systems Zhengrui Qin, Qun Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactive capacity of generator g QGg,max: max reactive capacity of generator g PLmin ij : min line capacity between bus i and bus j PLmax ij : max line capacity between bus i and bus j PDk,i: real demand on bus i injections on buses and real and reactive power flows on transmission lines. Such data is then fed

Li, Qun

352

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Case History of Reapplication of a 2500 KW Steam Turbine/Gear Drive Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In today' s equipment market more and more projects are turning toward existing equipment to justify a project. New equipment's delivery time and/or capital cost can keep a good project "grounded". In the turbomachinery industry, a few companies have developed the expertise to identify candidates of existing machines that can be adopted for many new applications. These companies can inspect, modify, recondition and rerate the equipment as needed, which helps bring in a project within budget and on time. This paper is the history of such an application. The delivery schedule requirements and limited capital made the project feasible only through the technology of reapplying existing machines to a new service. The project involves a plant that extracts landfill gas and converts it to diesel fuel, naphtha and a high grade of wax. The plant requires a steam turbine generator set to produce electrical power for its base load operation. This paper covers the history of how the turbine, gear and generator were selected, along with the highlights of the engineering work required to insure the mechanical operation of the string of equipment.

Smith, S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Lee Hot Springs power project. First topical report management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lee Hot Springs Project ({open_quotes}the Project{close_quotes}) will use binary cycle turbine-generators supplied by geothermal hot water to make electricity. Two clusters of three (3) 1,000 kilowatt ({open_quotes}kw{close_quotes}) projects, each cluster comprising a {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} will use the pumped output of one geothermal well. The plants will tie into Sierra Pacific Power Company`s ({open_quotes}Sierra`s{open_quotes}) transmission system. The Project objectives are designed to demonstrate that geothermal energy is a non-polluting, non-CO{sub 2} emitting form of generation, which if used in larger increments, will significantly reduce the emissions of greenhouse gasses. The Project will also demonstrate the use of modular, {open_quotes}non-grid{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}village{close_quotes} units which can be used throughout the world where geothermal energy is present in remote locations and power is not. The Project was conceived as a 20,000 kw Qualifying Facility, divided into two phases, a 5,000 kw phase one followed by a 15,000 kw phase two. The first phase of the Project now consists of two (2) 3,000 kw plants to generate 6,000 kws.

NONE

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Var Coordinated Control of DFIG Impact on Small Signal Stability of Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind farm based on Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is built. Not only it can be as active power source to provide active power to network, but also as reactive power source to stabilize voltage or supply Var compensation (reactive power absorbed ... Keywords: Doubly Fed Induction Generator, Var coordinated control, low-frequency oscillation, small signal stability

Lei Wang; Hongjie Jia

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development and application of a high-speed, high-resolution data acquisition system for monitoring power at the service entrance to buildings  

SciTech Connect

A non-intrusive load monitoring system (NILMS) was developed and tested to determine its capabilities and examine ways that the system can supplement the understanding of how energy is used in a building. The investigation of the system as a method for obtaining short-term building energy use and demand data faster, as less cost, with less complexity, and less intrusively than from conventional submetering is described in this report. Data acquisition hardware and software, a power transducer, and current transformers were assembled into a system that could be used to sample the instantaneous real and reactive power coming into a building. The system was used to collect power profiles at a commercial and a residential building. The NILMS can sample power at low speeds (one sample per hour or less) and at speeds exceeding 100 Hz. Large changes in building power such as those due to central heating and cooling systems, water heaters, or banks of lights can easily be discriminated from total building power profiles collected by the system. Smaller loads, less than 1 or 2 kW, can be resolved when there is little ``noise`` in the power profile. Very small loads, less than 100 W, can be resolved in a residential application. Resolution becomes more difficult as larger and more frequent fluctuations occur. The ability of the system to easily collect valuable, short-term building power profiles, which permit individual loads to be determined (resolved), makes the system attractive for a number of applications. The system could prove very useful for measuring short-term energy use and demand, assisting building energy auditors in assessing building deficiencies, providing short-term performance data for validating engineering-based savings estimates and calibrating computer-based building performance models, and for validating, developing, and/or improving building and building system operating strategies.

Sharp, T.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the installed cost of the project Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $400/kW - $500/kW up to 50% of the installed cost of the project Provider Southwest Gas Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on-site power and heat which can be used in a variety of ways. Incentives vary based upon the efficiency

359

Autonomous wind power systems are economically competitive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomous wind power systems, i.e. electric conversion systems utilizing the wind as the only energy source, are especially useful for isolated applications (telecommunications, measuring stations, pumps, ...) and for remote individual domestic applications (direct feed of electrical energy into household mains, space and water heating, ...) or in the farm (greenhouse heating, milk cooling, ...). The power rating of autonomous systems can range from a few 100 W to about 50 kW. Usually a storage is incorporated in the form of electric batteries or standard night storage heaters, improving considerably the ability of the system to sustain the average power and ameliorate the reliability.

Van Leuven, J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Sessions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER ELECTRONICS AND THERMAL POWER ELECTRONICS AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT EV Everywhere Workshop July 24, 2012 Breakout Session #1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the Targets * Performance: Is achievable with these assumptions * Production Cost: $8/KW is achievable for PHEV40 and BEV300, $14/KW is okay for BEV100 * Production Efficiency: 95% system efficiency might be achievable * It is easier to achieve performance than cost targets * Integration of the different functionalities can help with achieving the targets * What is efficiency worth? What price do we place on it? Barriers Interfering with Reaching the Targets * Capacitors and magnetics (materials, performance, temperature, size, frequency, packaging) * Material cost, capacitors and magnetics are the priority

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development: Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility interfaced wind machine rated for 15 kW at 9 m/s (20.1 mph) has been designed to be cost effective in 5.4 m/s (12 mph) average wind sites. Approximately 18 months into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract specifications was submitted to the buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down wind machine which features three fixed pitch wood-epoxy blades and free yaw. Rotor diameter is 44 feet (13.4 meters). Unit shutdown is provided by an electrohydraulic brake. Blade tip brakes provide back-up rotor overspeed protection. Design merits have been verified through dynamic truck testing of a prototype unit.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase I. Design and Analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

A utility interfaced wind machine rated for 15 kW at 9 m/s (20.1 mph) has been designed to be cost effective in 5.4 m/s (12 mph) average wind sites. Approximately 18 months into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract specifications was submitted to the buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down wind machine which features three fixed pitch wood-epoxy blades and free yaw. Rotor diameter is 44 feet (13.4 meters). Unit shutdown is provided by an electrohydraulic brake. Blade tip brakes provide back-up rotor overspeed protection. Design merits have been verified through dynamic truck testing of a prototype unit.

Dodge, D.M. (ed.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ATF2 High Availability Power Supplies  

SciTech Connect

ATF2 is an accelerator test facility modeled after the final focus beamline envisioned for the ILC. By the end of 2008, KEK plans to commission the ATF2 [1]. SLAC and OCEM collaborated on the design of 38 power systems for beamline magnets. The systems range in output power from 1.5 kW to 6 kW. Since high availability is essential for the success of the ILC, Collaborators employed an N+1 modular approach, allowing for redundancy and the use of a single power module rating. This approach increases the availability of the power systems. Common power modules reduces inventory and eases maintenance. Current stability requirements are as tight as 10 ppm. A novel, SLAC designed 20-bit Ethernet Power Supply Controller provides the required precision current regulation. In this paper, Collaborators present the power system design, the expected reliability, fault immunity features, and the methods for satisfying the control and monitoring challenges. Presented are test results and the status of the power systems.

Bellomo, A; Lira, C.de; Lam, B.; MacNair, D.; White, G.; /SLAC

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

HIGH AVERAGE POWER UV FREE ELECTRON LASER EXPERIMENTS AT JLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Having produced 14 kW of average power at {approx}2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

Douglas, David; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The unitary theory of the electrical powers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General physics approach is applied to analysis of power components in electrical systems under sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal conditions. Physical essence of active, reactive and distorting powers are determinate. It is shown that the all three powers are the different aspects of the same physical phenomenon: mechanical action per time of Coulomb forces or inertial forces.

Gheorghe Mihai

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

The unitary theory of the electrical powers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General physics approach is applied to analysis of power components in electrical systems under sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal conditions. Physical essence of active, reactive and distorting powers are determinate. It is shown that the all three powers are the different aspects of the same physical phenomenon: mechanical action per time of Coulomb forces or inertial forces.

Mihai, Gheorghe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Distribution Power Flow in IRW Group Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PQ, SWING, PV) Maximum voltage error Busflag : HASSOURCE to indicates that this node can have.0; } Measurement: Energy, power, demand, real and reactive power 3 phase voltage and current Note: measured_demand is the watts measurement of the peak power demand of downstream objects. #12;Case study: IEEE 4 nodes test

Tesfatsion, Leigh

368

DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

Dessauer, G.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evaluation of global wind power Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

height of modern, 77-m diameter, 1500 kW turbines. Since relatively few observations are available at 80Evaluation of global wind power Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson Department of Civil the world's wind power potential for the first time from data. Wind speeds are calculated at 80 m, the hub

Archer, Cristina Lozej

371

Development of an Enhanced GenVARR™ (Generator Volt Ampere Reactive Reserve) System  

SciTech Connect

Transmission system operators require near real time knowledge of reactive power capability to reliably operate large electric power transmission systems. Reactive power produced by, or capable of being produced by, a power generator is often estimated based on a series of mega volt amperes (MVA) capability curves for the generator. These curves indicate the ability of the generator to produce real and reactive power under a variety of conditions. In transmission planning and operating studies, it is often assumed, based on estimates for these capability curves, that the generator can provide its rated MVA capability output when needed for system stability However, generators may not always operate at levels depicted by the maximum MVA capability curve due to present constraints. Transmission system operators utilizing the generators’ capability curves for operation decisions regarding transmission system stability or for planning horizons may overestimate the capability of the generators to supply reactive power when required. Southern Company has enhanced GenVARR(TM), the system of plant data query, retrieval, and analysis and calculates the actual – not estimated -- remaining reactive power output capability. The remaining reactive output is considered spinning reserve and is displayed graphically to transmission control center and generating plant operators to identify real time VAR limits. GenVARR is capable of aggregating generators from a defined region, or other user selectable combinations, to represent the available reserves that the operators are specifically interested in. GenVARR(TM) has been put into live production operation and is expected to significantly improve the overall visibility of the reactive reserve capability of the system. This new version of GenVARR(TM) significantly enhances the products structure and performance, and enables links to other key transmission system operation tools.

Schatz, Joe E.

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Standard Offer Program Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Nonresidential Energy Efficiency Standard Offer Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Solutions, SCORE, and CitySmart Peak Energy Reduction Standard Offer: $165/kW Provider Texas New Mexico Power Texas-New Mexico Power's Commercial Solutions Program provides incentives

373

Map of Solar Power Plants/Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power Plants/Data Solar Power Plants/Data < Map of Solar Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search Download a CSV file of the table below: CSV FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate HeatRate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant Photovoltaics NextLight Renewable Power Antelope Valley, California 230 MW230,000 kW 230,000,000 W 230,000,000,000 mW 0.23 GW 2.3e-4 TW Agua Caliente Solar Power Plant Photovoltaics NextLight Renewable Power Yuma County, Arizona 280 MW280,000 kW 280,000,000 W 280,000,000,000 mW 0.28 GW 2.8e-4 TW Agua Caliente Solar Project Utility scale solar First Solar Yuma County, Arizona 290 MW290,000 kW 290,000,000 W 290,000,000,000 mW

374

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heater: $75 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $1.50 - $3 /gallon, plus $50 Tri-State G&T incentive Resistive Heat: $8 /kW Electric Thermal Storage: $50 /unit or $12 /kW Air-Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150 /ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150 /ton Terminal Unit: $85 Motors: $8 - $13 /hp (CPL and Tri-State Combined Rebate) Provider Carbon Power and Light, Inc.

375

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Treating water-reactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

High-power testing of PEP-II RF cavity windows  

SciTech Connect

We describe the high power testing of RF cavity windows for the PEP-II B factory. The window is designed for continuous operation at 476 MHz with up to 500 kW throughput and has been tested to full power using a modified PEP Klystron. The windows use an anti-multipactor coating on the vacuum side and the application and processing of this layer is discussed. The high power test configuration, RF processing history and high power performance are described.

Neubauer, M.; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Rimmer, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Capacitive charging system for high power battery charging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes a project to design, build, demonstrate, and document a Level 3 capacitive charging system, and it will be based on the existing PEZIC prototype capacitive coupler. The capacitive coupler will be designed to transfer power at a maximum of 600 kW, and it will transfer power by electric fields. The power electronics will transfer power at 100 kW. The coupler will be designed to function with future increases in the power electronics output power and increases in the amp/hours capacity of sealed batteries. Battery charging algorithms will be programmed into the control electronics. The finished product will be a programmable battery charging system capable of transferring 100 kW via a capacitive coupler. The coupler will have a low power loss of less than 25 watts when transferring 240 kW (400 amps). This system will increase the energy efficiency of high power battery charging, and it will enhance mobility by reducing coupler failures. The system will be completely documented. An important deliverable of this project is information. The information will be distributed to the Army`s TACOM-TARDEC`s Advanced Concept Group, and it will be distributed to commercial organizations by the Society of Automotive Engineers. The information will be valuable for product research, development, and specification. The capacitive charging system produced in this project will be of commercial value for future electric vehicles. The coupler will be designed to rapid charge batteries that have a capacity of several thousand amp/hours at hundreds of volts. The charging system built here will rapid charge batteries with several hundred amp/hours capacity, depending on the charging voltage.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

kW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will discussed the delaminating superficial failure of a low wear coating (SnSb12Cu6Pb following DIN-ISO-4381) under emergency working ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

GE Energy Coupled Microgirid Project -University of Notre Dame -April 7, 2011 Distributive Reactive Control in Coupled Microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive Control in Coupled Microgrids Task Objectives and Approach simPower Model of MV Network CERTS Microgrid Models Reactive Control of Voltage Rise Deliverables Schedule Distributed Event-Triggered Control of Coupled Microgrids #12;Task Objectives and Approach Task will develop distributed methods to maximize

Lemmon, Michael

382

A high-power switch-mode dc power supply for dynamic loads  

SciTech Connect

High-voltage dc power supplies are often required to operate with highly dynamic loads, such as arcs. A switch-mode dc power supply can offer significant advantages over conventional thyristor-based dc power supplies under such conditions. It can quickly turn off the supply to extinguish the arc, and it can quickly recover after the arc. It has a relatively small output filter capacitance, which results in small stored energy available to the arc. A 400-kW, 50-kV switch-mode dc power supply for an electron-beam gun that exploits these advantages was designed and tested. It uses four 100-kW, current-source-type dc-dc converters with inputs in parallel and outputs in series. The dc-dc converters operate at 20 kHz in the voltage regulator part and 10 kHz in the inverter, transformer, and output rectifier part of the circuit. Insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) are used as the power switches. Special techniques are used to protect the power supply and load against arcs and hard shorts. The power supply has an efficiency of 93%, an output voltage ripple of 1%, and fast dynamic response. In addition, it is nearly one-third the size of conventional power supplies.

Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bombay, J.N. [Kaiser Engineers, Oakland, CA (United States)

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids, Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANNL) is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Application of Reactive Power Compensation in the Mining Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage on high-tire businesses and networks. 2. .... to Assess Misclassification of Ore and Waste in a High Nugget, Low Continuity Gold/Copper Deposit.

385

Protection and Control for Grid Connected Photovoltaic Power Generation System Based on Instantaneous Power Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable protection and reasonable control run an important role in grid connected PV power generation system. The detection and calculation of real and reactive power are the bases of many inverter resident passive and active islanding detection method ... Keywords: Distributed generation, photovoltaic system, grid connected, protection and control, power theory

Fei Wang; Chengcheng Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Final phase testing and evaluation of the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing performed during the last phase of the geothermal direct contact heat exchanger program utilizing the 500 kW pilot plant provided more insight into the capabilities and limits of the direct contact approach and showed that more work needs to be done to understand the inner workings of a large direct contact heat exchanger if they are to be modeled analytically. Testing of the column demonstrated that the performance was excellent and that the sizing criteria is conservative. The system operated smoothly and was readily controlled over a wide range of operating conditions. Performance evaluation showed pinch differentials of 4/sup 0/F or less and better than predicted heat transfer capability. Testing during this final phase was directed towards establishing the limits of the column to transfer heat. The working column height was shortened progressively to approximately 16 feet from a design length of 28 feet. The short column performed as well as a full length column and there are indications that the column could have been shortened even more without affecting its ability to transfer heat. The column's ability to perform as well with shortened lengths indicates that the heat transfer coefficients and criteria derived from the small scale tests are very conservative.

Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Nichols, K.; Werner, D.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Final report on the development of a 250-kW modular, factory-assembled battery energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A power management energy storage system was developed for stationary applications such as peak shaving, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve. Project activities included design, manufacture, factory testing, and field installation. The major features that characterize the development are the modularity of the production, its transportability, the power conversion method that aggregates power on the AC side of the converter, and the use of commonly employed technology for system components. 21 figs.

Porter, D. [Omnion Power Engineering Corp., East Troy, WI (United States); Nerbun, W. [AC Battery Corp., East Troy, WI (United States); Corey, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

SOLERAS - Photovoltaic Power Systems Project. Photovoltaic power seminar, February 20-23, 1983. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 350 kW concentrator photovoltaic system has been developed in Saudi Arabia. This system is described, both as an overall facility and for the major components related to solar energy collection, conversion, storage, and delivery. Components include the array subsystem, power conditioning, and energy storage. The theory of operation is discussed for the system, as well as system control and data acquisition and solar data collection. The plan for compiling data to evaluate the system's performance is given. (LEW)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reactive and Catalytic Air Purification Materials - Energy ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; ... Target selectivity can be controlled through selection of reactive components.

390

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Reactive NanoTechnologies Inc.: Temperature-controlled Precision Bonding

391

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

392

Demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach on SNL's annual core research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the initial demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach and its implementing algorithm, the MIT-CSDL Non-Linear Digital Controller, on the annual core research reactor (ACCR) that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. This demonstration constituted the first use of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power on a facility other than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) research reactor (MITR-II). Also, because the ACRR and the MITR-II are of very different design, these trials established the generic nature of the reactivity constraint approach.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Wyant, F.J.; Thome, F.V.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Testing and Evaluation of a Power Factor Correction for Power-Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power factor correction (PFC) is an important technology that can be used to enhance power quality. It was noted that the power factor was low for packaged air-conditioning (PAC) units utilized in residential buildings in Kuwait. To study the impact of PFC units, a PAC unit was selected, a PFC unit was installed,and three cases were developed to assess their energy-saving potential. It was found that the PFC unit was able to correct the power factor from 0.61 to 0.96. The reactive power was then reduced from 13.9 to 3.0 kVAR (kilo volts amps reactive), the apparent power was decreased from 17.5 to 11.0 kVA (kilo volts amps). and the current was reduced from 23.4 to 14.5 amps. The Ministry of Electricity & Water (MEW) in Kuwait is expected to be the major beneficiary of installing PFC units since MEW does not charge consumers for the cost of reactive power.. Key words: PFC unit, power factor, reactive power, active power and apparent power.

Alotaibi, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Power Performance Testing Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program, Global Energy Concepts (GEC) is engaged in planning and conducting power performance tests for wind turbines in Searsburg, Vermont; Glenmore, Wisconsin; Algona, Iowa; Springview, Nebraska; Kotzebue, Alaska; and Big Spring, Texas. The turbines under investigation include a 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS, a 600-kW Tacke 600e, two 750-kW Zond Z-50s, a 66-kW AOC 15/50, a 660-kW Vestas V-47, and a 1.65-MW Vestas V-66. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions from arid to arctic. Because one goal of this testing program is to gain experience with the new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-12 standard, all of the measurements are being performed in accordance with this new standard. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing at each site, the methodologies employed, test results available, and lessons learned from the application of the IEC standard. Any sources of uncertainty are discussed, and attention is given to the relative importance of each aspect of the IEC standard in terms of its contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty.

VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following figures are included: Westinghouse (W.) SOFC pilot manufacturing facility; cell scale-up plan; W. 25 kW SOFC unit at the utility`s facility on Rokko Island; pressure effect on SOFC power and efficiency; SureCELL{trademark} vs conventional gas turbine plants; SureCELL{trademark} product line for distributed power applications; 20 MW pressurized SOFC/gas turbine power plant; 10 MW SOFT/CT power plant; SureCELL{trademark} plant concept design requirements; and W. SOFC market entry.

Morehead, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

EVSE Features Power Button for Zero Consumption Auto-restart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Button for Zero Consumption Auto-restart Button for Zero Consumption Auto-restart Multi Colored Charge Indicator Led Power Indicator EVSE Specifications Grid connection Plug and cord NEMA 6-50 Connector type J1772 Test lab certifications ETL Listed Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 16 x 24 x 6 Charge level AC Level 2 Input voltage 208-240 VAC Maximum input current 30 Amp Circuit breaker rating 40 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 10/29/2012 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 208.38 Supply frequency (Hz) 59.99 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 64 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state charge power (AC kW) 3.07 Maximum charge power (AC kW) 3.32 EVSE Test Results

397

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum payment of 400,000 per year for performance-based incentives Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2016 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV rebates will be awarded via lottery on August 12, 2013 Residential PV: $1.28/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (less than 30 kW): $0.97/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (30 kW or larger): ineligible at this time Solar Water Heaters (residential domestic hot water only; not pools):

398

Consumers Power, Inc. - Solar Energy System Rebate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc. - Solar Energy System Rebate Inc. - Solar Energy System Rebate Consumers Power, Inc. - Solar Energy System Rebate < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate $3,000 for PV Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount SWH: $500/system PV: $500/kW Provider Consumers Power, Inc. Consumers Power, Inc. (CPI) offers rebates to its residential customers who install solar water heating systems or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. The rebate for solar water heaters is $500 for systems with a collector area greater than 31 square feet. Systems used for hot tubs or swimming pools are not eligible. The rebate for solar PV systems is $500 per kilowatt-DC (kW), with a maximum rebate

399

Silicon Valley Power - Solar Electric Buy Down Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Electric Buy Down Program Solar Electric Buy Down Program Silicon Valley Power - Solar Electric Buy Down Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $20,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentives step down over time as installed capacity goals are met. Check program web site for current incentive level. '''Rebate levels as of 9/20/12:''' Residential: $2.00/watt AC Commercial (up to 100 kW): $1.10/watt AC Commercial (>100 kW to 1 MW): $0.15/kWh for 5 years Provider Silicon Valley Power Silicon Valley Power (SVP) offers incentives for the installation of new grid-connected solar electric (photovoltaic, or PV) systems. Incentive levels will step down over the life of the program as certain installed

400

Dominion Virginia Power - Solar Purchase Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominion Virginia Power - Solar Purchase Program Dominion Virginia Power - Solar Purchase Program No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Quantitative Data Last modified on June 21, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Virginia Name Dominion Virginia Power - Solar Purchase Program Incentive Type Performance-Based Incentive Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial, Fed. Government, Institutional, Local Government, Multi-Family Residential, Nonprofit, Residential, State Government Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Amount $0.15/kWh Eligible System Size Residential: 20 kW Nonresidential: 50 kW Start Date 6/20/2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PEP-II Large Power Supplies Rebuild Program at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

Seven large power supplies (LGPS) with output ratings from 72kW to 270kW power PEP-II quad magnets in the electron-positron collider region. These supplies have posed serious maintenance and reliability problems since they were installed in 1997, resulting in loss of accelerator availability. A redesign/rebuild program was undertaken by the SLAC Power Conversion Department. During the 2004 summer shutdown all the control circuits in these supplies were redesigned and replaced. A new PWM control board, programmable logic controller, and touch panel have been installed to improve LGPS reliability, and to make troubleshooting easier. In this paper we present the details of this rebuilding program and results.

Bellomo, P.; Lipari, J.J.; de Lira, A.C.; Rafael, F.S.; /SLAC

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Overview of M-C Power`s MCFC power generation system  

SciTech Connect

The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power generation system is a skid mounted power plant which efficiently generates electricity and useful thermal energy. The primary benefits are its high electric generation efficiency (50% or greater), modular capacities (500 kW to 3 MW per unit) and minimal environmental impacts (less than 1 ppM NO{sub x}). A cost effective, modular capacity fuel cell power plant provides the industry with an attractive alternative to large central station facilities, and its advantages have the potential to optimize the way electric power is generated and distributed to the users. Environmental issues are becoming the single most uncertain aspect of the power business. These issues may be manifested in air emissions permits or allowances for NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2}, energy taxes, CO{sub 2} limits, ``carbon taxes,`` etc. and may appear as siting permits for generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Utilities are ``down-sizing`` with the goal of becoming the lowest cost supplier of electricity and are beginning to examine the concepts of ``energy service`` to improve their economic competitiveness. These issues are leading utilities to examine the benefits of distributed generation. Siting small capacity generation near the customer loads or at distribution substations can improve system efficiency and quality while reducing distribution system costs. The advantages that fuel cell power plants have over conventional technologies are critical to the success of these evolving opportunities in the power generation marketplace.

Benjamin, T.G.; Woods, R.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deposits to occur in the turbine rotor and nozzles reducingdesign parameters for the turbine rotor and the nozzles. Theto Samples of scale were turbine rotor w e r e de check the

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fuel Cell Demonstration Project - 200 kW - Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Power Plant Located at the National Transportation Research Center: FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researches and develops distributed generation technology for the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Distributed Energy Program. This report describes installation and operation of one such distributed generation system, a United Technology Corporation fuel cell located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee. Data collected from June 2003 to June of 2004, provides valuable insight regarding fuel cell-grid compatibility and the cost-benefit of the fuel cell operation. The NTRC fuel cell included a high-heat recovery option so that use of thermal energy improves project economics and improves system efficiency to 59% year round. During the year the fuel cell supplied a total of 834MWh to the NTRC and provided 300MBtu of hot water. Installation of the NTRC fuel cell was funded by the Distributed Energy Program with partial funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy Down Program, administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. On-going operational expenses are funded by ORNL's utility budget and are paid from operational cost savings. Technical information and the benefit-cost of the fuel cell are both evaluated in this report and sister reports.

Berry, JB

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Contact Heat Exchanger . . . . . . . . . .DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER TEST LOOP . . . . . . . . TestCALIBRATION . CONVENTIONAL HEAT EXCHANGER . . . Subcritical

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i t h e r l i q u i d iso- butane or brine. The c o n s t rand thermometers located in d butane temperatures and , and-e t o t h e DCHX 330 + 5OF Butane o u t l e t t e m p e r a

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LOOPCALIBRATION TESTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENDURANCE TEST . . . . . . . . . . . .

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Development program for 3. 0 kW inverter. Militarized inverter for use with fuel cell or battery power plants. Final report, December 1976--December 1978  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design, construction and testing of a static inverter rated at 3.0 kilowatts. Circuit techniques were evaluated to obtain desired results with considerations to cost, reliability, maintainability, weight, size and efficiency. The application of this portable, rugged inverter is to replace mechanical alternating generators used in the field.

Rance, J.E.

1979-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Permeable Reactive Barriers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barriers Permeable Reactive Barrier Field Projects Durango, Colorado DOE installed a PRB in October 1995 to treat ground water from a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Durango, Colorado Read more Cañon City, Colorado ESL personnel conduct tests and help evaluate performance at other PRB sites, such as Cotter Corporation's Cañon City site in Colorado. Read more Monticello, Utah Installation of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello, Utah, millsite was completed June 30, 1999, as an Interim Remedial Action. Read more A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a zone of reactive material placed underground to intercept and react with a contaminant plume in ground water. Typically, PRBs are emplaced by replacing soils with reactive

410

RF Power Upgrade for CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently upgrading the 6GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12GeV. As part of the upgrade, RF systems will be added, bringing the total from 340 to 420. Existing RF systems can provide up to 6.5 kW of CW RF at 1497 MHZ. The 80 new systems will provide increased RF power of up to 13 kW CW each. Built around a newly designed and higher efficiency 13 kW klystron developed for JLab by L-3 Communications, each new RF chain is a completely revamped system using hardware different than our present installations. This paper will discuss the main components of the new systems including the 13 kW klystron, waveguide isolator, and HV power supply using switch-mode technology. Methodology for selection of the various components and results of initial testing will also be addressed. Notice: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

Andrew Kimber,Richard Nelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

High Level Power Estimation based on a functional analysis for Embedded DSP Johann LAURENT Nathalie JULIEN Eric SENN Eric MARTIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the telecommunication sector, mobile telephony is responsible for half of its consumption [2]. Detailed insight the average power consumption of equipment dating before the year 2000 as 1.1 kW. From this time forward modeling we will presume this num- ber as an average power consumption of a state-of-the-art BS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

power with stationary andmotor vehicle PEM fuel cell systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigation examines the economics of producing electricity from proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems under various conditions, including the possibility of using fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to produce power when they are parked at office buildings and residences. The analysis shows that the economics of both stationary fuel cell and FCV-based power vary significantly with variations in key input variables such as the price of natural gas, electricity prices, fuel cell andreformer system costs, andfuel cell system durability levels. The ‘‘central case’ ’ results show that stationary PEM fuel cell systems can supply electricity for offices andhomes in California at a net savings when fuel cell system costs reach about $6000 for a 5 kW home system ($1200/kW) and $175,000 for a 250 kW commercial system ($700/kW) andassuming somewhat favorable natural gas costs of $6/GJ at residences and $4/GJ at commercial buildings. Grid-connected FCVs in commercial settings can also potentially supply electricity at competitive rates, in some cases producing significant annual benefits. Particularly attractive is the combination of net metering along with timeof-use electricity rates that allow power to be suppliedto the utility gridat the avoidedcost of central power plant generation. FCVbased power at individual residences does not appear to be as attractive, at least where FCV power can only be used directly or banked with the utility for net metering and not sold in greater quantity, due to the low load levels at these locations that provide a

Timothy Lipman; Jennifer L. Edwards; Daniel M. Kammen; Timothy E. Lipman; Jennifer L. Edwards; Daniel M. Kammen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evaluation of Plug Power Gensys 5C Fuel Cell System in Mesa, AZ: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pre-commercial Plug Power Gensys 5C fuel cell was installed at the Arizona State University - Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory (ASU-PTL). The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is fueled with natural gas and exports up to 5 kW to the local electrical grid. The overall performance and maintenance history over 18 months of operation is chronicled. PEM fuel cells are being positioned by Plug Power and other vendors as residential power generators.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Power Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations Power Operations Western's Sierra Nevada Region...

415

Method for controlling power flow between an electrochemical cell and a power grid  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for controlling a force-commutated inverter coupled between an electrochemical cell and a power grid for adjusting the magnitude and direction of the electrical energy flowing therebetween. Both the real power component and the reactive power component of ac electrical energy flow can be independently VARied through the switching waveform presented to the intermediately coupled inverter. A VAR error signal is derived from a comparison of a var command signal with a signal proportional to the actual reactive power circulating between the inverter and the power grid. This signal is presented to a voltage controller which essentially varies only the effective magnitude of the fundamental voltage waveform out of the inverter , thereby leaving the real power component substantially unaffected. In a similar manner, a power error signal is derived by a comparison of a power command signal with a signal proportional to the actual real power flowing between the electrochemical cell and the power grid. This signal is presented to a phase controller which varies only the phase of the fundamental component of the voltage waveform out of the inverter relative to that of the power grid and changes only the real power in proportion thereto, thus leaving the reactive power component substantially unaffected.

Coleman, A. K.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ontario Power Generation's 250 kWe Class Atmospheric Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC): Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 250 kW solid oxide fuel cell system in a combined heat and power demonstration operating on natural gas. The project was a collaboration initiative between Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to install and test a first-of-a-kind SOFC system at OPG site in Toronto, Canada. This test and evaluation case study is one of several distributed generation project case studies under res...

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Net Metering Provider SaskPower Residents, farms and businesses with approved Environmental Preferred Technologies of up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of nominal (nameplate) generating capacity can deliver their excess electricity to our electrical grid. SaskPower will pay a one-time rebate, equivalent to 20% of eligible costs to a maximum payment of $20,000, for an approved and grid interconnected net metering project. The Net Metering Rebate is available to SaskPower, Saskatoon Light and Power and City of Swift Current electricity customers

418

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power Losses Speaker(s): Mark D. Galperin Date: December 18, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diana Morris In a new, magnetically controlled reactor (MCR), in which DC pulsing through a special winding controls inductive susceptance, high saturation of the magnetic circuit steel with optimal magnetic and electrical circuit parameters ensures less than 2-3% main harmonic distortion even without special filters. Transformer-like construction ensures reliable operation. MCR's increase power quality through automatic voltage regulation, reduced fluctuation, and smoothing of reactive power surges at 1/2 the cost of thyristor-controlled reactors (TCR's). Damping of voltage-oscillation

419

Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the reaction of room-temperature silane and disilane on a hot polycrystalline silicon surface using both a collision-free molecular beam and a very low pressure CVD cell. Reactive sticking coefficients were obtained from deposition rate data over a wide range of temperatures and silane (disilane) fluxes. The RSCs are substantially less than one, ranging from 6 x 10/sup -5/ to 4 x 10/sup -2/. For silane we observed curved Arrhenius plots with slopes decreasing from approx.60 kcal mol/sup -1/ at low temperatures to approx.2 kcal mol/sup -1/ at higher temperatures. The RSCs are independent of flux (pressure) at 1040/sup 0/C, but vary as flux to the approx.-1/2 power at 710/sup 0/C. A model comprised of a dissociative adsorption mechanism with competing associative desorption and reaction was found to give reasonable agreement. For disilane, we observed RSCs that were roughly ten times higher than those for silane. We also observed a curved Arrhenius plot and a flux dependence at 710/sup 0/C for disilane. 22 refs., 5 figs.

Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device  

SciTech Connect

The project conducted under DOE contract DE?EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven?stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy? technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling?up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke? unlimited Power Take?Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager] [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact] [Business Point of Contact

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Carrier Corporation. Fabrication, testing and installation report: 53 kW solar absorption cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 53 kW water cooled packaged solar absorption chiller was fabricated and tested. The generator shell and absorber shell had sight glasses added as a diagnostic device. The unit was modified so that a base suitable for mounting pumps, valves and associated piping was cantilevered from one end of the unit. The installation and start-up of the cooling system is outlined.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low-cost light-weight efficient 1. 5 kW inverters with and without output transformers. Final report, January 1976--June 1977  

SciTech Connect

Optimization efforts were completed on the 1.5 kW inverter described in report DECC-61098-003 (September 1975). A second inverter design was developed; in the second design the output transformer was eliminated. Tests were performed on both the optimized transformer-output inverter and the transformerless-output inverter. Tests included environmental tests on the transformer-output inverter. (Author)

Suelzle, L.R.; Suelzle, J.S.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic power systems. Volume III(1). Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual designs were made and analyses were performed on three types of solar photovoltaic power systems. Included were Residential (1 to 10 kW), Intermediate (0.1 to 10 MW), and Central (50 to 1000 MW) Power Systems to be installed in the 1985 to 2000 time period. Subsystem technology presented here includes: insolation, concentration, silicon solar cell modules, CdS solar cell module, array structure, battery energy storage, power conditioning, residential power system architectural designs, intermediate power system structural design, and central power system facilities and site survey.

Pittman, P.F.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

425

ENGINE COMBUSTION CONTROL VIA FUEL REACTIVITY ...  

A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a ...

426

Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry ...

427

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel ... Building Energy Efficiency; ...

428

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel cells and other high temperature electrochemical devices.

429

HYPERION KW SERIES SPECIFICATION DATA SHEET-PRELIMINARY2 Hyperion C pre-industrial prototype (Casing, isolations and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

110 home power 99 / february & march 2004 code corner Common Mistakes & How to Avoid Them John Handbook are available from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), 11 Tracy Dr., Avon, MA 02322 · 800-344-3555 or 508-895-8300 · Fax: 800-593-6372 or 508-895-8301 · custserv@nfpa.org · www.nfpa

Chaitin, G. J.

430

Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adiabats Stirling engines The SES solar Stirling system isotherms the Stirling cycle 1 2 3 4 #12;6 Power less work than -Ws, because when the gas cooled its pressure also dropped. Stirling Engine (Beta1 Heat engine Device that transforms heat into work. It requires two energy reservoirs at different

Sanders, Seth

431

Analysis of Reactivity Induced Accident for Control Rods Ejection with Loss of Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding of the time-dependent behavior of the neutron population in nuclear reactor in response to either a planned or unplanned change in the reactor conditions, is a great importance to the safe and reliable operation of the reactor. In the present work, the point kinetics equations are solved numerically using stiffness confinement method (SCM). The solution is applied to the kinetics equations in the presence of different types of reactivities and is compared with different analytical solutions. This method is also used to analyze reactivity induced accidents in two reactors. The first reactor is fueled by uranium and the second is fueled by plutonium. This analysis presents the effect of negative temperature feedback with the addition positive reactivity of control rods to overcome the occurrence of control rod ejection accident and damaging of the reactor. Both power and temperature pulse following the reactivity- initiated accidents are calculated. The results are compared with previous works and...

Saad, Hend Mohammed El Sayed; Wahab, Moustafa Aziz Abd El

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Analysis of Reactivity Induced Accident for Control Rods Ejection with Loss of Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding of the time-dependent behavior of the neutron population in nuclear reactor in response to either a planned or unplanned change in the reactor conditions, is a great importance to the safe and reliable operation of the reactor. In the present work, the point kinetics equations are solved numerically using stiffness confinement method (SCM). The solution is applied to the kinetics equations in the presence of different types of reactivities and is compared with different analytical solutions. This method is also used to analyze reactivity induced accidents in two reactors. The first reactor is fueled by uranium and the second is fueled by plutonium. This analysis presents the effect of negative temperature feedback with the addition positive reactivity of control rods to overcome the occurrence of control rod ejection accident and damaging of the reactor. Both power and temperature pulse following the reactivity- initiated accidents are calculated. The results are compared with previous works and satisfactory agreement is found.

Hend Mohammed El Sayed Saad; Hesham Mohammed Mohammed Mansour; Moustafa Aziz Abd El Wahab

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Parametric cost analysis of a HYLIFE-II power plant  

SciTech Connect

The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code was adapted to model a power plant using a HYLIFE-II reactor chamber. The code was then used to examine the dependence of the plant capital costs and busbar cost of electricity (COE) on a variety of design parameters (type of driver, chamber repetition rate, and net electric power). The results show the most attractive operating space for each set of driver/target assumptions and quantify the benefits of improvements in key design parameters. The base case plant was a 1,000 MWe plant containing a reactor vessel driven by an induction linac heavy ion accelerator run at 7.3 Hz with a driver energy of 5 MJ and a target yield of 370 MJ. The total direct cost for this plant was 2,800 M$ (where all $ in this paper are 1988$s), and the COE was 9 {cents}/KW*hour. The COE and total capital costs for the base plant assumptions for a 1,000 MWe plant are approximately independent of chosen repetition rate for all repetition rates between 4 and 10 Hz. For comparison, the COE for a coal or future fission plant would be 4.5--5.5 {cents}/KW*hour. The COE for a 1,000 MWe plant could be reduced to 7.6 {cents}/KW*hour by using advanced targets and could be cut to 6.8 {cents}/KW*hour with conventional targets if the driver cost could be cut in half. There is a large economy of scale with heavy ion driven ICF plants; a 5,000 MWe plant with one heavy ion driver and either one or two HYLIFE-II chambers would have a COE of only 4.4 {cents}/KW*hour.

Bieri, R.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA) Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Installation of 200 kW UTC PC-25 Natural Gas Fuel Cell At City of Anaheim Police Station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Anaheim Public Utilities Department (Anaheim) has been providing electric service to Anaheim residents and businesses for over a century. As a city in a high-growth region, identifying sources of reliable energy to meet demand is a constant requirement. Additionally, as more power generation is needed, locating generating stations locally is a difficult proposition and must consider environmental and community impacts. Anaheim believes benefits can be achieved by implementing new distributed generation technologies to supplement central plants, helping keep pace with growing demand for power. If the power is clean, then it can be delivered with minimal environmental impact. Anaheim started investigating fuel cell technology in 2000 and decided a field demonstration of a fuel cell power plant would help determine how the technology can best serve Anaheim. As a result, Anaheim completed the project under this grant as a way to gain installation and operating experience about fuel cells and fuel cell capabilities. Anaheim also hopes to help others learn more about fuel cells by providing information about this project to the public. Currently, Anaheim has hosted a number of requested tours at the project site, and information about the project can be found on Anaheim Public Utilities RD&D Project website. The Anaheim project was completed in four phases including: research and investigation, purchase, design, and construction. The initial investigative phase started in 2000 and the construction of the project was completed in February 2005. Since acceptance and startup of the fuel cell, the system has operated continuously at an availability of 98.4%. The unit provides an average of about 4,725 kilowatthours a day to the Utilities' generation resources. Anaheim is tracking the operation of the fuel cell system over the five-year life expectancy of the fuel stack and will use the information to determine how fuel cells can serve Anaheim as power generators.

Dina Predisik

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine  

SciTech Connect

Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

Hamaguchi, Satoshi [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Garland Power and Light - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $500 per home Lighting: $20,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Lighting: $100/kW reduced Small Commercial Central Air Conditioning: $400 - $600 per unit, depending on efficiency Central Heat Pump: $500 - $700 per unit, depending on efficiency

439

Operational results from the Saudi Solar Village Photovoltaic power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's largest photovoltaic power system was carried into the operation phase a few months ago. This system was developed and fabricated in the United States and it is providing electrical energy to three remote villages in Saudi Arabia. The facility includes a 350 kW photovoltaic array, 1-MW diesel powered generator, 1100 kWH lead acid batteries, a 300 KVA inverter and a solar weather data monitoring station. The photovoltaic power system is capable of completely automatic operation. It is designed to operate in stand-alone and cogeneration modes of operation.

Huraib, F.; Al-Sani, A.; Khoshami, B.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

PM-1 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PROGRAM PARAMETRIC STUDY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study deals with narrowing the range of parameters prior to preliminary design of the PM-1, a factory prepackaged, air-transportable, pressurized water nuclear power plant. The plant is to produce 1000 kw of net electrical power and 7 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr of space heat that is suitable for use with a central heating system. The data and conclusions resulting from the parametric study will provide the basis for the preliminary design of the PM-1 power plant. (W.D.M.)

Sieg, J.S.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Battalion Center Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story Utilities Hardening Project Joe Bosco May 5, 2009 May 5, 2009 * Naval Construction Battalion Center * Established 1942 - Gulfport * Home of Atlantic Fleet Seabees Home of Atlantic Fleet Seabees * Mission: Prepare for & support all facets of the mobilization of construction forces * Naval Construction Battalion Center * 1,100 Acres * 9+ MVA; $3M/yr in Electricity 9+ MVA; $3M/yr in Electricity * One of two Battalion Centers in U.S. * Economic Impact - $500M Mississippi Power Company * Headquartered - Gulfport * Subsidiary y of Southern Comp pany y * Serves 23 counties Southeast Mississippi * 192,000 retail customers * * Generating capacity: 3 166 192 kW Generating capacity: 3,166,192 kW

442

Monroe County Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Assn Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 40303 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Over 50 KW Commercial Commercial Rate Under 50 KW Commercial Demand Rate Outdoor Lights -100 watt Sodium Lighting Outdoor Lights 175 watt Mercury Vapor Lighting Outdoor Lights 400 watt Sodium Lighting Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0916/kWh Commercial: $0.1110/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

443

Implications of high efficiency power cycles for fusion reactor design  

SciTech Connect

The implications of the High Efficiency Power Cycle for fusion reactors are examined. The proposed cycle converts most all of the high grade CTR heat input to electricity. A low grade thermal input (T approximately 100$sup 0$C) is also required, and this can be supplied at low cost geothermal energy at many locations in the U. S. Approximately 3 KW of low grade heat is required per KW of electrical output. The thermodynamics and process features of the proposed cycle are discussed. Its advantages for CTR's are that low Q machines (e.g. driven Tokamaks, mirrors) can operate with a high (approximately 80 percent) conversion of CTR fusion energy to electricity, where with conventional power cycles no plant output could be achieved with such low Q operation. (auth)

Powell, J.R.; Usher, J.; Salzano, F.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

THE SNAP-II POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM. TOPICAL REPORT NO. 4. TURBINE DESIGN AND TESTING  

SciTech Connect

SNAP II is the designation for a 3 kw nuclear auxiliary power unit to be used in a satellite vehicle. The SNAP II system consist of a reactor heat source, a mercury Rankine engine, and an alternator. A two stage, full admission, axial flow turbine was chosen for this APU application. Design details and test results are presented. (auth).

Poulos, E.N.; Furman, E.R.

1960-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Customer Sited Combined Heat and Power on Maui: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the experience of Maui Electric Company (MECO) in developing and operating a 150 kW combined heat and power (CHP) project at a resort on Maui. Tests conducted during the project evaluated the heat rate and performance of the packaged CHP system, which had been originally designed for natural gas fueling but was fueled by commercial propane in this application.

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Analysis on DFIG Wind Power System Low-Voltage Ridethrough  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the double fed induction generator’s (DFIG) advantage of controlling active and reactive power independently and partial power converter, DFIG is becoming a popular type of wind power generation system. Nowadays, the grid code demands that ... Keywords: VSCF, DFIG, LVRT, Crowbar, Voltage sags

Yulong Wang; Jianlin Li; Shuju Hu; Honghua Xu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Case Studies of 250-kW Carbonate Fuel Cells: Demonstration of Three FuelCell Energy Systems at LADWP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from the purchase, installation, and operation of three carbonate fuel cell systems built by FuelCell Energy and deployed by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). These projects are among several fuel cell project case studies under research by EPRI's Distributed Energy Resources Program. They are designed to help utilities and other interested parties understand the early applications of carbonate fuel cells to ...

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ALLOCATION OF REACTIVE SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the voltage setting point s kV of each bus Qk and the voltage profile for the buses c j Q . Recall that Q for these transactions so that all bus voltages meet the specified voltage profile requirements. Consequently load is locally met at the bus. In other words, we assume that at each load bus the power factor is 1

Gross, George

450

REACTIVITY LIFETIME. TEST RESULTS DL-S-225(T-612118A). Section I, Second Performance  

SciTech Connect

The performance, reliability, stability, and reactivity lifetime variations of the Shippingport PWR are determined under normal steady state conditions. These characteristics are studied over a period of 758 EFPH, at a power level of about 60 Mw(e). Flux-tilt corrections and plant operations during this time are described. (T.F.H.)

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.  

SciTech Connect

Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Power Line Calculator for DOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Power Line Calculator (PLC) for DOS, version 1.0, is a program that describes the electrical characteristics of a transmission or distribution system given user-defined input. This input may consist of a combination of operating currents and phases, symmetric components, power factor, and real or reactive power. The program also allows the user to designate whether currents are present on the system neutral or in the ground. The PLC assumes that any value entered by the user remains fixed (e.g., phase current, power factor), and for underdetermined systems, basic default assumptions are incorporated: the power factor is held at or near 1.0, the net phase current is kept at or near zero, and the phase conductor currents are kept balanced. The program operates under PC/MS-DOS version 3.3 or later, and the output is available in both tabular and graphic formats.

Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

SUMMARY OF HRE-2 RUN 13 (INITIAL POWER OPERATION)  

SciTech Connect

The first power operation of the HRE-2, referred to as Run 13, occurred in February 1958. In five days of power operation, the maximum sustained power was 1.5 Mw and the total power generated was 4B Mw-hr. During the first part of the power operation, the fuel solution contained very little internal recombination catalyst. This part of the run was characterized by high concentrations of radiolytic gas and significant loss of reactivity at very low powers. After an addition of copper and acid, reactivity losses were observed only nt higher powers. Power operation was terminated after samples showed high nickel concentrations in the fuel solution, indicating a very high stainless steel corrosion rate. Subsequent subcritical operation ended because of power wiring insulation failures. (auth)

Engel, J.R.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Hernandez-Fragoso, J.; Richardson, D.M.

1958-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

High-Power Rf Load  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Vlieks, Arnold E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Simulations of highly reactive fluids  

SciTech Connect

We report density functional molecular dynamics simulations to determine the early chemical events of hot (T = 3000 K) and dense (1.97 g/cm{sup 3}, V/V{sub 0} = 0.68) nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}). The first step in the decomposition process is an intermolecular proton abstraction mechanism that leads to the formation of CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}H and the aci ion H{sub 2}CNO{sub 2}{sup -}, in support of evidence from static high-pressure and shock experiments. An intramolecular hydrogen transfer that transforms nitromethane into the aci acid form, CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}H, accompanies this event. This is the first confirmation of chemical reactivity with bond selectivity for an energetic material near the condition of fully reacted specimen. We also report the decomposition mechanism followed up to the formation of H{sub 2}O as the first stable product.

Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Reed, E J

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic power systems. Final report. Volume III(2). Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual designs were made and analyses were performed on three types of solar photovoltaic power systems. Included were Residential (1 to 10 kW), Intermediate (0.1 to 10 MW), and Central (50 to 1000 MW) Power Systems to be installed in the 1985 to 2000 time period. The following analyses and simulations are covered: residential power system computer simulations, intermediate power systems computer simulation, central power systems computer simulation, array comparative performance, utility economic and margin analyses, and financial analysis methodology.

Pittman, P.F.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Using a Balun Transformer Combiner for High Power Microwave Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel coaxial power combiner design has been duplicated that has distinct advantages over other combiner geometries that can handle high power. This design is being applied to combine four 3 kW power supplies to obtain a 10 kW, 5 MHz system for an ICRF antenna on HSX. In the past, Wilkinson type combiners have had limited application to high power systems because of the lack of non-inductive, high power, 100 Omega balance loads. With this new design, standard 50 Omega dummy loads can be used instead for the balance load. The cost is considerably lower than lumped element combiner designs which are dominated by capacitor costs. At such a relatively low frequency, a 3-dB quarter-wave coupled-line coupler becomes impractically long, and a conventional branch-line hybrid requires 35 Omega-line, which is commercially unavailable. The balun combiner uses less transmission line than a ring hybrid and has good bandwidth characteristics even away from its best line impedance. Theoretical calculations and modeling were performed for line impedances from 65 Omega to 75 Omega. Measurements from a low-power test device show excellent agreement with theory, and construction of the high power system is underway.

Kaufman, Michael C [ORNL; Pesavento, Philip V [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Norris Public Power District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Norris Public Power District Norris Public Power District Place Nebraska Utility Id 13664 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png IRRIGATION SERVICE: RATE 10 - FULL SERVICE Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE: RATE 12 - STANDBY Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE: RATE 13 - ANYTIME INTERRUPTIBLE Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE: RATE 14 - THREE DAYS ON/FOUR DAY INTERRUPTIBLE Commercial SCHEDULE 1 - FARM AND RURAL RESIDENTIAL Residential SCHEDULE 15 - LARGE POWER - BETWEEN 2,500 - 7,500 kW Industrial

460

UTC Power/Delphi SECA CBS Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject report summarizes the results of solid oxide fuel cell development conducted by UTC Power in conjunction with Delphi Automotive Systems under a cost-share program with from October 2008 through March of 2013. Over that period Delphi Automotive Systems developed a nearly four times larger area solid oxide fuel cell stack capable of operating on pre-reformed natural gas and simulated coal gas with durability demonstrated to 5,000 hours and projected to exceed 10,000 hours. The new stack design was scaled to 40-cell stacks with power output in excess of 6.25kW. Delphi also made significant strides in improving the manufacturability, yield and production cost of these solid oxide fuel cells over the course of the program. Concurrently, UTC Power developed a conceptual design for a 120 MW Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) operating on coal syngas with as high as 57% Higher Heating Value (HHV) efficiency as a measure of the feasibility of the technology. Subsequently a 400 kW on-site system preliminary design with 55% Lower Heating Value (LHV) efficiency operating on natural gas was down-selected from eighteen candidate designs. That design was used as the basis for a 25kW breadboard power plant incorporating four Delphi cell stacks that was tested on natural gas before the program was discontinued due to the sale of UTC Power in early 2013. Though the program was cut short of the endurance target of 3,000 hours, many aspects of the technology were proven including: large-area, repeatable cell manufacture, cell stack operation on simulated coal gas and natural gas and integrated power plant operation on natural gas. The potential of the technology for high efficiency stationary electric power generation is clear. Acceptable production costs, durability, and reliability in real world environments are the remaining challenges to commercialization.

Gorman, Michael; Kerr, Rich

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kw reactive power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $15,000 per account Program Info Start Date 01/23/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500/kW Provider City Water Light and Power '''''Note: Funding for the Solar Rewards program has been exhausted. Check the program web site for more information regarding additional funding, expected March 2013.''''' City Water, Light and Power (CWLP) is now offering residential and commercial customers a $1,500 per kilowatt (kW) rebate for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per customer

462

EVSE Features Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Eight-segment Progress Indicator Auto-restart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Eight-segment Progress Indicator Auto-restart EVSE Specifications Grid connection Plug and cord NEMA 6-50 Connector type J1772 Test lab certifications UL Listed Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 10 x 13 x 4 Charge level AC Level 2 Input voltage 240 VAC Maximum input current 30 Amp Circuit breaker rating 40 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 10/30/2012 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 209.04 Supply frequency (Hz) 59.99 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 64 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state charge power (AC kW) 3.09 Maximum charge power (AC kW) 3.20 EVSE Test Results 1,2,4

463

The effect of component efficiency and operating conditions on the 50-kW dish Stirling system in Riyadh, Saudia Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the development of a weather data base and the performance prediction of a 50-kW dish Stirling system. An analysis of direct solar insolation data for 1985 from the site in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was made to determine the available solar energy. A parameter study was done of the effects of component efficiencies and operating conditions on instantaneous and yearly average system efficiency using the prepared weather data. The system performance was found to be most affected by wind, mirror reflectivity, and exact placement of the receiver in the focal point of the mirror.

Noyes, G.W. (Deutsche Forshungsanstait fur Luft-und Raumfahrt, Inst. fur Technische Thermodynamik, Pfaffenwaldrign 38-40, 7000 Stuttgart 80 (DE))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Comparison of biomass and coal char reactivities  

SciTech Connect

Char combustion is typically the rate limiting step during the combustion of solid fuels. The magnitude and variation of char reactivity during combustion are, therefore, of primary concern when comparing solid fuels such as coal and biomass. In an effort to evaluate biomass` potential as a sustainable and renewable energy source, the reactivities of both biomass and coal chars were compared using Sandia`s Captive Particle Imaging (CPI) apparatus. This paper summarizes the experimental approach used to determine biomass and coal reactivities and presents results from CPT experiments. The reactivity of six types of char particles, two high-rank coal chars, two low-rank coal chars, and two biomass chars, were investigated using the CPT apparatus. Results indicate that both of the high-rank coal chars have relatively low reactivities when compared with the higher reactivities measured for the low-rank coal and the biomass chars. In addition, extinction behavior of the chars support related investigations that suggest carbonaceous structural ordering is an important consideration in understanding particle reactivity as a function of extent of burnout. High-rank coal chars were found to have highly ordered carbon structures, where as, both low-rank coal and biomass chars were found to have highly disordered carbon structures.

Huey, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.A. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hurt, R.H. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

FEL options for power beaming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demand for the output power of communication satellites has been increasing exponentially. The satellite power is generated from solar panels which collect the sunlight and convert it to electrical power. The power per satellite is limited due to the limit in the practical size of the solar panel. One way to meet the power demand is to employ multiple satellites (up to 10) per the internationally agreed-upon ``slot`` in the geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). However, this approach is very expensive due to the high cost of sending a satellite into a GEO orbit. An alternative approach is power beaming, i.e., to illuminate the solar panels with high power, highly-directed laser beams from earth. The power beaming generates more power per satellite for the same area of the solar panel. The minimum optical beam power, interesting for power beaming application, is P{sub L} = 200kW. The wavelength is chosen to be {lambda} = 0.84 {micro}m, so that it is within one of the transmission windows of the air, and at the same time near the peak of the photo-voltaic conversion efficiency of Si, which is the commonly used material for the solar panels. Free electron lasers (FELs) are well suited for the power beaming application because they can provide high power with coherent wavefront, but without high energy density in media. In this article the authors discuss some principal issues, such as the choice of accelerator and electron gun, the choice of beam parameters, radiation hazards, technological availability, and overall efficiency and reliability of the installation. They also attempt to highlight the compromise between the cost of the primary installation, the operation cost, and the choice of technology, and its maturity. They then present several schemes for the accelerator-FEL systems based on RF accelerators. The initial electron beam accelerator up to the energy of a few MeV is more or less common for all these schemes.

Kim, K.J.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Vinokurov, N.A. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, reactive chemicals may proceed into uncontrolled chemical reaction pathways with rapid and significant increases in temperature, pressure, and/or gas evolution. Reactive chemicals have been involved in many industrial incidents, and have harmed people, property, and the environment. Evaluation of reactive chemical hazards is critical to design and operate safer chemical plant processes. Much effort is needed for experimental techniques, mainly calorimetric analysis, to measure thermal reactivity of chemical systems. Studying all the various reaction pathways experimentally however is very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, it is essential to employ simplified screening tools and other methods to reduce the number of experiments and to identify the most energetic pathways. A systematic approach is presented for the evaluation of reactive chemical hazards. This approach is based on a combination of computational methods, correlations, and experimental thermal analysis techniques. The presented approach will help to focus the experimental work to the most hazardous reaction scenarios with a better understanding of the reactive system chemistry. Computational methods are used to predict reaction stoichiometries, thermodynamics, and kinetics, which then are used to exclude thermodynamically infeasible and non-hazardous reaction pathways. Computational methods included: (1) molecular group contribution methods, (2) computational quantum chemistry methods, and (3) correlations based on thermodynamic-energy relationships. The experimental techniques are used to evaluate the most energetic systems for more accurate thermodynamic and kinetics parameters, or to replace inadequate numerical methods. The Reactive System Screening Tool (RSST) and the Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC) were employed to evaluate the reactive systems experimentally. The RSST detected exothermic behavior and measured the overall liberated energy. The APTAC simulated near-adiabatic runaway scenarios for more accurate thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The validity of this approach was investigated through the evaluation of potentially hazardous reactive systems, including decomposition of di-tert-butyl peroxide, copolymerization of styrene-acrylonitrile, and polymerization of 1,3-butadiene.

Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive chemicals are presented widely in the chemical and petrochemical process industry. Their chemical reactivity hazards have posed a significant challenge to the industries of manufacturing, storage and transportation. The accidents due to reactive chemicals have caused tremendous loss of properties and lives, and damages to the environment. In this research, three classes of reactive chemicals (unsaturated hydrocarbons, self-reacting chemicals, energetic materials) were evaluated through theoretical and experimental methods. Methylcyclopentadiene (MCP) and Hydroxylamine (HA) are selected as representatives of unsaturated hydrocarbons and self-reacting chemicals, respectively. Chemical reactivity of MCP, including isomerization, dimerization, and oxidation, is investigated by computational chemistry methods and empirical thermodynamic–energy correlation. Density functional and ab initio methods are used to search the initial thermal decomposition steps of HA, including unimolecular and bimolecular pathways. In addition, solvent effects are also examined using water cluster methods and Polarizable Continuum Models (PCM) for aqueous solution of HA. The thermal stability of a basic energetic material, Nitroethane, is investigated through both theoretical and experimental methods. Density functional methods are employed to explore the initial decomposition pathways, followed by developing detailed reaction networks. Experiments with a batch reactor and in situ GC are designed to analyze the distribution of reaction products and verify reaction mechanisms. Overall kinetic model is also built from calorimetric experiments using an Automated Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). Finally, a general evaluation approach is developed for a wide range of reactive chemicals. An index of thermal risk is proposed as a preliminary risk assessment to screen reactive chemicals. Correlations are also developed between reactivity parameters, such as onset temperature, activation energy, and adiabatic time to maximum rate based on a limited number, 37 sets, of Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) data. The research shows broad applications in developing reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. The methodology of reaction modeling in combination with molecular modeling can also be used to study other reactive chemical systems.

Wang, Qingsheng

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z