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  1. Governance for Sustainable Development in the Arab Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Type Guidemanual Website http:www.escwa.un.orginform Country Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  2. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-TP3.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  3. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background Membership "ESCWA comprises 14 Arab countries in Western Asia: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  4. Lebanon County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Energy Generation Facilities in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania Lebanon Methane Recovery Biomass Facility Places in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania Annville,...

  5. Oman Oil Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil Company (S.A.O.C.) Name: Oman Oil Company (S.A.O.C.) Place: Muscat, Oman Product: Oil exploration and production Year Founded: 1966 Phone Number: + 968 - 2457 3100 Website:...

  6. Kuwait Petroleum Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the world. The corporation brings all state-owned corporations under one corporate umbrella. References "Kuwait Petroeum Corporation" "About KPC" Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Lebanon, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Lebanon, Ohio OnPower Inc Ultimate Best Buy LLC References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division...

  8. U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Kuwait | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kuwait U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Kuwait November 15, 2005 - 2:30pm Addthis Stop included meeting with U.S. business leaders and military troops KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT - On Monday, November 14, 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman toured the EQUATE petrochemical plant and met with U.S. business representatives while visiting Kuwait, as part of his trip through the Middle East. The EQUATE petrochemical plant is a joint venture between Kuwait's Petrochemical Industries Company

  9. Kuwait: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Kuwait Population 2,213,403 GDP 173,438,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.19 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KW 3-letter ISO code KWT Numeric ISO...

  10. Lebanon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Lebanon Population 4,965,914 GDP 44,967,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.20 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LB 3-letter ISO code LBN Numeric ISO...

  11. Oman: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Oman Population 2,773,479 GDP 78,788,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.71 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code OM 3-letter ISO code OMN Numeric ISO...

  12. Successful operation of a large LPG plant. [Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shtayieh, S.; Durr, C.A.; McMillan, J.C.; Collins, C.

    1982-03-01

    The LPG plant located at Mina-Al Ahmadi, Kuwait, is the heart of Kuwait Oil Co.'s massive Gas Project to use the associated gas from Kuwait's oil production. Operation of this three-train plant has been very successful. A description is given of the three process trains consisting of four basic units: extraction, fractionation, product treating, and refrigeration. Initial problems relating to extraction, fractionation, product treating and, refrigeration are discussed. 1 ref.

  13. Lebanon, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Jersey's 7th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Lebanon, New Jersey MAK Technologies References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor...

  14. Lebanon, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lebanon, New Hampshire: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6422934, -72.2517569 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  15. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72015" ,"Release Date:","09302015"...

  16. New Lebanon, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. New Lebanon is a village in Montgomery County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 3rd congressional district.12 References ...

  17. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"01292016 9:45:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103MU2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas...

  18. LNG projects make progress in Oman and Yemen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-24

    Two LNG projects in the Middle East, one in Oman and the other in Yemen, are due on stream at the turn of the century--each the largest single project ever put together in its country. Officials described their projects at a yearend 1996 conference in Paris by Institut Francais du Petrole and Petrostrategies. The Oman project develops gas reserves, does gas processing, and transports the gas 360 km to a liquefaction plant to be built on the coast. The Yemen project involves a liquefaction plant and an export terminal.

  19. Petroleum Development Oman gas exploration unlocks major new reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.; Mozetic, A.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1985, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has been exploring for gas on behalf of the Government of Oman under a ten-year agreement signed in June 1984. The aim of the one-rig programme was to find additional non-associated gas reserves (3 TCF) to meet domestic energy requirements for a minimum of 40 years, for which the available reserves at that time (5.6 TCF) were insufficient. Initial results of the campaign, which principally targeted the Permian Khuff Formation, were disappointing, analogues to the major accumulations of the Arabian Gulf failing to materialise. During the second half of the programme, therefore, the strategy was revised to address the prospectivity of higher risk/higher reward plays recognised at greater depths. Well Saih Nihayda-24, drilled in 1989, found gas/condensate-bearing reservoirs in Cambro/Ordovician sandstones of the Andam Formation below 4000 metres. This discovery, in a seismically poorly defined anticline, sparked an intensive effort of 2D, and later 3D, long cable seismic acquisition. This led in 1991 to additional major gas/condensate finds in Saih Rawl and Barik, and a dedicated two-year two-rig appraisal campaign has since proven up sufficient reserves to support an LNG gas export scheme. The ten-year programme has more than tripled Oman`s non-associated gas expectation reserves to some 22 TCF, exceeding-the target more than five-fold. Significant potential for further gas discoveries identified in both North and South Oman provides encouragement for continued successful gas exploration in the future.

  20. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman Meets with U.S. Troops in Kuwait

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ARIFJAN, KUWAIT - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman and his wife Diane Bodman had dinner and conversed with Pfc. James Clark, Logistics Task Force 28, Capt. Zachary Lange, Headquarters and...

  1. NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

  2. Case studies from Oman for coiled tubing deployed completion techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-09-01

    Although the use of ultra-large coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. This paper will detail the equipment necessary to perform an operation of this type and will present information from several case studies in Oman in which an operator has successfully deployed completion equipment on 3-1/2-inch-OD coiled tubing. In addition to a discussion of the equipment required to perform the necessary operations, the trial parameters that were established by this operator will be given. The information presented has been selected to allow an initial evaluation to be made of coiled tubing completions in general and will help to determine whether this method can prove to be less expensive than traditional rig-based completions. The topics presented have been chosen to provide the reader with a thorough understanding of the techniques and preparation needed to execute a coiled tubing completion. The summary of experiences will conclude that this innovative completion technique can be a viable method for completing wells. Although long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, the operator`s experiences to date have confirmed his initial belief that use of coiled tubing in ultra-large continuous-pipe applications can be cost effective.

  3. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Oman (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2000's 3.36 5.56 3.34 3.76 5.59 5.72 -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of

  4. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  5. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016"

  6. Petroleum prices and profits in the 90 days following the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    For the third in the past 20 years the world has experienced an interruption in the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and shut down of Kuwait oil production capacity followed by the United Nations boycott of Iraqi oil removed 8 percent of the world's oil supply. The result was a sharp increase in the process of crude oil and petroleum products. These events raised numerous questions about the performance of energy markets and energy firms. This report supplies a first answer for some of those questions. At the time this report was prepared the invasion has been in effect for 90 days. Not all the data is available to fully answer every question. Some issues can only be completely resolved after more time has passed in which the invasion and its effects have had an opportunity to be fully assimilated. This report was specifically requested by W. Henson Moore, Deputy Secretary of Energy as a way of supplying the American public with what could be said about the current situation. Rumors abound and mixconceptions have proliferated. This report strives to give a proper perspective on some of the more vexing issues which the invasion produced. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has addressed many questions in this report. By the way of summary these are the 10 most most frequently asked questions and EIA's quick answers. The page references tell the reader where to look in the report for further explanation. These are not the only issues addressed and EIA hopes that readers will be able to satisfy their curiosity about their own questions within the pages of this report.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Hannigan, R.V.; Thorp, J.M.; Tomich, S.D.; Warren, M.J. ); Al-Sunaid, A.A. ); Daum, P.H.; Mazurek, M. )

    1992-11-01

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  8. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  9. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  10. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  12. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  13. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  14. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  15. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  16. Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

  17. U.S. LNG Imports from Oman

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000-2016 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001

  18. Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE),...

  19. Lebanon, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7814571, -75.6476841 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - Kuwait Visitors Interested in NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to improve energy efficiency in their refining operations. KOC may also apply concentrated solar power technology to produce some of the steam needed in the company's operations...

  1. State of Kuwait Ministry of Oil | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the rules or laws organizing the drilling and exploring process simultaneously with production and export operations and to protect such wealth for the next generations....

  2. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  3. Oman Ministry of Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of oil and gas. Prepare legislation and regulations governing oil and gas. Oversee oil and gas exploration and production activities. Establish "Petroleum Agreements" with...

  4. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Global warming and the regions in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvi, S.H.; Elagib, N.

    1996-12-31

    The announcement of NASA scientist James Hansen made at a United States Senate`s hearing in June 1988 about the onset of global warming ignited a whirlwind of public concern in United States and elsewhere in the world. Although the temperature had shown only a slight shift, its warming has the potential of causing environmental catastrophe. According to atmosphere scientists, the effect of higher temperatures will change rainfall patterns--some areas getting drier, some much wetter. The phenomenon of warming in the Arabian Gulf region was first reported by Alvi for Bahrain and then for Oman. In the recent investigations, the authors have found a similar warming in other regions of the Arabian Gulf and in several regions of Sudan in Africa. The paper will investigate the observed data on temperature and rainfall of Seeb in Oman, Bahrain, International Airport in Kuwait as index stations for the Arabian Gulf and Port Sudan, Khartoum and Malakal in the African Continent of Sudan. Based on various statistical methods, the study will highlight a drying of the regions from the striking increase in temperature and decline of rainfall amount. Places of such environmental behavior are regarded as desertifying regions. Following Hulme and Kelly, desertification is taken to mean land degradation in dryland regions, or the permanent decline in the potential of the land to support biological activity, and hence human welfare. The paper will also, therefore, include the aspect of desertification for the regions under consideration.

  6. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  7. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's -- -- -- 2000's 3.36 5.56 3.34 3.76 5.59 5.72 -- -- -- -- 2010's -- -- -- --

  8. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 2000's 9,998 12,055 3,013 8,632 9,412 2,464 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0

  9. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 -- 8.70 -- 4.65 -- 3.99 4.65 4.99 4.65 -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.34 -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.52 3.52 -- 4.08 -- 2004 5.60 -- -- -- 5.76 -- 5.42 -- -- -- -- -- 2005 5.72 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2009 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

  10. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 2,464 2,461 2,740 2,333 2001 0 2,738 0 1,702 0 1,616 1,635 2,728 1,635 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,013 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,646 2,322 0 3,664 0 2004 3,041 0 0 0 3,203 0 3,167 0 0 0 0 0 2005 2,464 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  12. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  14. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Total OPEC Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar,...

  16. Linn County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Halsey, Oregon Harrisburg, Oregon Idanha, Oregon Lebanon, Oregon Lyons, Oregon Mill City, Oregon Millersburg, Oregon Scio, Oregon Sodaville, Oregon South Lebanon, Oregon...

  17. Planning and care mark repair of 14-year old leak in Kuwait Oil Co. LPG tank 95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shtayieh, S.

    1983-01-10

    This paper points out that the leak, which had been present for such a long time, completely saturated the perlite insulation with hydrocarbons, thus rendering the entire operation of inspection, repair, and maintenance of the inner tank a hazardous operation. It emphasizes the safety aspects, which were complicated by the saturated perlite as well as by the fact that the tank is situated in the middle of the LPG storage area with LPG tanks on either side. Tank design, making preparations, inspection, and repair are discussed. The fact that the leaking flanges were originally installed damaged, indicated the future need of tighter company quality control of all contractors work.

  18. Smokes from the oil fires following the Gulf War: A review and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radke, L.F.

    1996-12-31

    Emissions resulting from the oil fires in Kuwait and environmental effects from those emissions are described.

  19. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  20. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  1. Word Pro - S11

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Production from the Neutral Zone between Kuwait and Saudi Arabia is included in "Per- sian Gulf Nations." Web Page:

  2. Mercer County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania Greenville, Pennsylvania Grove City, Pennsylvania Hermitage, Pennsylvania Jackson Center, Pennsylvania Jamestown, Pennsylvania Mercer, Pennsylvania New Lebanon,...

  3. Waupaca County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dupont, Wisconsin Embarrass, Wisconsin Farmington, Wisconsin Fremont, Wisconsin Harrison, Wisconsin Helvetia, Wisconsin Iola, Wisconsin Larrabee, Wisconsin Lebanon, Wisconsin...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oman " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. LNG Imports from Oman ...

  5. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, ... domestic natural gas production, reduced domestic ... to the chemical, plastics, steel, iron, aluminum, and ...

  6. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    table below indicates, Persian Gulf producers (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Iran) appear to have accounted for 80 percent of the overall cutback over...

  7. National Technology Enterprises Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Enterprises Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: National Technology Enterprises Co Place: Kuwait Sector: Services Product: Services & Support (Clean Energy) (...

  8. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  9. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  10. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  11. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  12. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No data reported. W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. 2 Includes...

  14. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria,...

  15. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 3 Free on Board. See Glossary. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  16. OnPower Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: OnPower Inc Place: Lebanon, Ohio Zip: 45036 Product: Assembling solid oxide fuel cell products, using Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems SOFC technology. Coordinates:...

  17. Ultimate Best Buy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ultimate Best Buy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ultimate Best Buy LLC Place: Lebanon, Ohio Country: United States Zip: 45036 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services,...

  18. EA-1721: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Johnson Controls, Inc. and ENTEK Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application Holland, Michigan, Lebanon, Oregon, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin

  19. MAK Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MAK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: MAK Technologies Place: Lebanon, New Jersey Zip: 8833 Sector: Solar Product: Designs and installs solar electric and solar...

  20. Russell County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Virginia Castlewood, Virginia Cleveland, Virginia Honaker, Virginia Lebanon, Virginia Raven, Virginia St. Paul, Virginia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  1. Kent County, Delaware: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Delaware Kenton, Delaware Leipsic, Delaware Little Creek, Delaware Magnolia, Delaware Milford, Delaware Rising Sun-Lebanon, Delaware Riverview, Delaware Rodney Village, Delaware...

  2. Sustainx Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainx Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sustainx Inc Place: West Lebanon, New Hampshire Zip: 3784 Product: New Hampshire-based manufacturer of above-ground, isothermal CAES...

  3. Microsoft Word - 91180786_2.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Australia, Bahrain, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Chile, Morocco, Canada, Mexico, Oman, Peru, Singapore, Republic of Korea, Jordan, ...

  4. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda...

  5. Category:Countries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway O Oman P Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Q Qatar R Republic of Macedonia...

  6. LUG 2015 | Registration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territory, Occupied Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian...

  7. Utility Rate Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territories Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Islands Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia...

  8. How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea and Singapore. ...

  9. How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    natural gas with Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru,...

  10. 52

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore); (3) A...

  11. DOE/EA-1976 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR PROPOSED CNG...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. ...

  12. Caledonian College of Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caledonian College of Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Caledonian College of Engineering Place: Oman Product: The College has many labs and workshops for various...

  13. Christopher Smith Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. There also are two countries - Israel and Costa Rica...

  14. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States. The United States imports natural gas from Canada, Mexico, Algeria, Australia, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Malaysia, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, and...

  15. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Suriname ...

  16. EM International Strategic Plan 2010-2015

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Japan, Jordan Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Lithuania, Morocco, Oman, Poland, Romania, the Russian Federation, Senegal, Slovenia, Ukraine, United Kingdom and the United States. ...

  17. Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... of Lebanon",2921,"Lebanon",22,4,1.2,1.3,1.3,,"IC","DFO",,12,2008 "OH","Hamilton",3542,"Duke Energy Ohio Inc",2832,"Miami Fort",22,5,100,80,80,,"ST","BIT",,1,2008 ...

  18. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ...... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ...

  19. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from September 2008 production levels. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Qatar accounted for about three-fourths of the 2.6 million bbld of actual...

  1. TABLE37.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  2. TABLE42.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  3. BPA-2014-00122-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a campaign or expedition for which a campaign medal has been authorized, such as El Salvador, Lebanon, Granada, Panama, Southwest Asia, Somalia, and Haiti. You must submit a copy...

  4. State Department's TechWomen 2012 Visit NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechWomen brought a total of 41 women working in the technology sector from Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, the Palestinian Territories, Tunisia and Yemen to the U.S....

  5. GSA GSA Office of Governmentwide Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with FAR 1.404 to use the new procurement thresholds for the Trade Agreements. Chile FTA Morocco FTA NAFTA -Canada -Mexico Oman FTA Peru FTA Singapore FTA Israeli Trade...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle East. Long-time Middle East exporters, Oman and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, have sent and continue to send most of their gas to Asia-Pacific customers, a...

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bcf from the Point Fortin plant. Algeria was the source of approximately 52 Bcf, while Egypt supplied 5.7 Bcf. Nigeria, Malaysia, Oman, and Qatar delivered the remaining 14 Bcf....

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Bcf from the Point Fortin plant. Algeria was the source of approximately 52 Bcf, while Egypt supplied 5.7 Bcf. Nigeria, Malaysia, Oman, and Qatar delivered the remaining 14 Bcf....

  9. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  10. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  11. CX-000759: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demonstration of Isothermal Compressed Air Energy Storage to Support Renewable Energy ProductionCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/09/2010Location(s): West Lebanon, New HampshireOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-000985: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Pennsylvania Green Energy Works! Targeted Grant - Biogas - Anergy Dairy Farm BiodigestersCX(s) Applied: B1.15, B5.1Date: 02/16/2010Location(s): Lebanon County, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Korea, South 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 0 0 819 0 502...

  14. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 2 0 147 0 147 Italy 0 0 74 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 Korea, South 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 0 0 1,043 0 383...

  15. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 2 0 220 0 220 Italy 0 0 74 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 9 0 2 5 7 Korea, South 0 0 126 0 1 13 14 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 1 0 10,916 0...

  16. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Ireland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 0 0 73 0 73 Italy 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 5 0 2 3 5 Korea, South 0 0 119 0 0 13 14 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 1 0 7,778 0...

  17. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Israel 0 0 2 0 220 0 220 Italy 0 0 74 0 0 0 0 Jamaica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Japan 0 0 9 0 2 5 7 Korea, South 0 0 126 0 1 13 14 Lebanon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico 0 0 10,916 0...

  18. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  19. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 1,726 37 20 0 (s) 41 -3 (s) 296 391 2,116 Algeria ...................................... 0 37 0 0 0 27 0 0 252 316 316 Iraq ........................................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Kuwait ....................................... 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) 252 Qatar ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0

  20. JPRS report: Arms control, [November 3, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-11-03

    This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on arms control. Titles include: 5-Power Defense Arrangement Exercise Opens; Paper Sees Growing Danger of Nuclear War; 3rd Round of Conventional Forces Talk; General Notes Inadequate Discipline in Army; Arianespace Assures Liquid Fuel Technology; King Hussain Warns of Nuclear Threat in Region; Kuwait Defense Minister on Weapons Development, GCC; Commentary on Change in NATO Count of Combat Aircraft; and others.

  1. East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia

  2. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News Release Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 November 17, 2015 New Geothermal Lab Manager Joins NREL Henry (Bud) Johnston joined NREL on October 12 as the new Laboratory Program Manager for the Geothermal Technologies Program. June 10, 2015 Geothermal Energy Association Honors Two NRELians with Top Recognition Dan Getman and Jordan Macknick were recognized by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) during its National Geothermal Summit on June 3, 2015, in Reno, Nevada. June 8, 2015 Kuwait Visitors Interested in NREL Solar and Geothermal

  3. ORISE: Radiation Emergency Training for Iraq, South Africa and Morocco

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Training REAC/TS Provides International Radiation Emergency Medical Response Training for Emergency Responders In support of the National Nuclear Security Administration's international approach to nuclear and radiological incident response, REAC/TS staff provide training to physicians, nurses and emergency responders in multiple countries each year. REAC/TS has conducted radiation emergency medical response training in Iraq, Kuwait, Morocco, Singapore, South Africa, and Thailand.

  4. Somebody better find some rigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries of the Middle East. Field development projects abound, as the larger exporting nations pursue ambitious policies of production expansion. However, their plans may be hampered by the growing worldwide shortage of rigs. Separate evaluations are given for Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Syria, Dubai, Turkey, Sharjah, and briefly for Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, UAE-Ajman, and UAE-Ras al-Khaimah.

  5. Concentrating Solar Power Projects by Country | Concentrating Solar Power |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Country In this section, you can select a country from the map or the following list of countries. You can then select a specific concentrating solar power (CSP) project and review a profile covering project basics, participating organizations, and power plant configuration data for the solar field, power block, and thermal energy storage. Javascript must be enabled to view Flash movie Algeria Australia Canada Chile China Egypt France Germany India Israel Italy Kuwait Mexico Morocco

  6. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, February 1, 1995--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing inexpensive and efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The steam generated is as follows: (1) Steam = 20,000 lb/hr, (2) Temperature = 353 F (saturated), (3) Pressure = 125 psig, and (4) Steam quality ={approximately}98.5%. On February 3, 1995 DONLEE notified Lebanon VA and DOE-METC that additional funding would be required to complete the project. This funding, in the amount of $1,140,127, is needed to complete the facility, start-up and shakedown the facility, perform the test program and write the final report. On March 7, 1995 the vendors were notified that the Lebanon VA Steam Plant Project was shut down and that all work outside DONLEE was stopped pending obtaining additional funding.

  7. Specialized equipment enabled completions with large coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-02-19

    Specialized equipment enabled successful well completions in Oman with large 3{1/2}-inch coiled tubing. Conventional drilling or completion rigs were not needed. Although the use of 3{1/2}-inch coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. One Middle East operating company felt that if downhole completion equipment could be successfully run using coiled tubing, greater cost efficiency, both in initial deployment and in maintenance, could be derived. The paper lists some of the technical considerations for these assumptions. The long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, but experience in Oman has confirmed the belief that large coiled tubing completions can be technically achieved.

  8. Closing Statement to the GNEP Ministerial | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement to the GNEP Ministerial Closing Statement to the GNEP Ministerial October 1, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Minister Borloo . . . and many thanks to the French government for hosting this meeting and for your leadership within GNEP. I also want to acknowledge the four newest members of our Partnership: Armenia, Estonia, Morocco and Oman, each of which signed our Statement of Principles today. As Minister Borloo indicated, today the GNEP

  9. Community College Highlights Paducah Site Groundwater Model | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement to the GNEP Ministerial Closing Statement to the GNEP Ministerial October 1, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Minister Borloo . . . and many thanks to the French government for hosting this meeting and for your leadership within GNEP. I also want to acknowledge the four newest members of our Partnership: Armenia, Estonia, Morocco and Oman, each of which signed our Statement of Principles today. As Minister Borloo indicated, today the GNEP

  10. LNG Observer: Second Qatargas train goes onstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The January-February, 1997 issue of the LNG Observer is presented. The following topics are discussed: second Qatargas train goes onstream; financing for the eighth Indonesian liquefaction train; Koreans take stakes in Oman LNG; US imports and exports of LNG in 1996; A 60% increase in proved reserves on the North West Shelf; proposals for Indian LNG terminal CEDIGAZ forecasts world LNG trade by 2010; growth for North African gas production and exports; and new forecast sees strong growth for Asian gas.

  11. The slowdown continues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The author reviews the oil market in the Middle East. Some of the highlights are: Aramco activity in Saudi Arabi seems to be struck at a historically low level; Iran is maintaining production rates despite persistent Iraqi, U.S. attacks; Iraq plans ambitious 5-year drilling program, development of eight new fields; and Oman set reserves record with any finds, remains the area's biggest driller.

  12. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oman Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  13. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other

  14. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0

  15. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 294 1,174 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ........................................ 5,270 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 33,431 0 1,084 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 41,555 0 1,652 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria

  16. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia

  17. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON

  18. Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechWomen2013 Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013 Mentoring program brought more than 70 women from 16 Middle Eastern and African countries to the U.S. November 26, 2013 Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov For Aseel Honein, an architect, teacher and design activist from Lebanon, spending a month collaborating with scientists at Berkeley Lab was a dream come true. She got the opportunity to do so through the TechWomen 2013 program, which brought 76 women from

  19. 28. annual offshore technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 4: Field drilling and development systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The 88 papers in this volume cover the following topics: Small operator implementation of subsea technology; Control system umbilicals, components and ROV interfacing; DeepStar--Results and plans; Deepwater subsea manifold systems; Drilling technology; Limit state design criteria for pipelines; Liuhua project; Mobile offshore drilling units; Offshore coiled tubing operations; Oman-India gas pipeline; Paraffin and hydrate control; Pompano--A deepwater subsea development; Severe operating conditions; Subsea production systems; and Well completions technology. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Frequently Requested Methodology Assessed resource basin map Summary tables (2015) Recent Updates Chad Kazakhstan Oman United Arab Emirates Previous Full Reports April 5, 2011 (16.8 mb) June 13, 2013 (64.9 mb) World Shale Resource Assessments Last updated: September 24, 2015 This series of reports provides an initial assessment of world shale oil and shale gas resources. The first edition was released in 2011 and updates are released on an on-going basis. Four countries were added in 2014: Chad,

  2. Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars 1) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Colombia Mexico Norway United Kingdom Total Non-OPEC 4 1973 1,729,733 W 1,486,278 904,979 753,195 5,237,483 1,947,422 W – 0 0 2,351,931 7,589,414 1974 4,419,410 W 3,347,351 1,858,788 1,309,916 11,581,515 3,314,999 0 W – 0 4,054,475 15,635,990 1975 5,169,811 W 3,457,766

  3. Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 9,441 8,450 7,393 6,237 5,065 4,651 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,705 1,842 2,149 1,988 1,861 1,496 1993-2015 OPEC* 4,787 4,429 4,093 3,483 2,996 2,652 1993-2015 Algeria 510 355 241 108 109 105 1993-2015 Angola 393 346 233 215 154 136 1993-2015 Ecuador 135 147 117 153 116 104 1993-2015 Indonesia 37 20 6 23 24 37 1993-2015 Iran 0 0 1993-2014 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1996-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311 206 1993-2015 Libya 70 15 60 58 5

  4. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  5. East Coast (PADD 1) Distillate Fuel Oil Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 942 1,260 1,471 1,990 2000's 2,114 1,896 1,914 1,969 2,258 2,132 2,118 1,955 1,695 1,237 2010's 1,471 2,114 2,970 2,608 3,801 4,282

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History All Countries 76 92 133 130 137 187 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 23 1995-2016 OPEC* 10 23 1993-2016 Algeria 1994-2010 Angola 1995-2003 Indonesia 1995-2008 Kuwait 1995-2012 Libya 2013-2013 Nigeria 10 1993-2015 Qatar 23 1995-2016

  6. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 9,441 8,450 7,393 6,237 5,065 4,651 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,705 1,842 2,149 1,988 1,861 1,496 1993-2015 OPEC* 4,787 4,429 4,093 3,483 2,996 2,652 1993-2015 Algeria 510 355 241 108 109 105 1993-2015 Angola 393 346 233 215 154 136 1993-2015 Ecuador 135 147 117 153 116 104 1993-2015 Indonesia 37 20 6 23 24 37 1993-2015 Iran 0 0 1993-2014 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1996-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311 206 1993-2015 Libya 70 15 60 58 5

  7. TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation 2 WHO IS PERFORMANCE RESULTS CORPORATION? * Incorporated i n A pril 2 000 * SBA C er4fied S mall, W oman---Owned C orpora4on * Kathy C linton O wner a nd P resident * Located a t 6 C anyon R oad, M organtown, W V * Employs o ver 2 30 p ersonnel l ocated a cross 1 6 ci4es a nd 1 3 s tates * 2010 r evenue w as $ 25M, p rojected t o e xceed $30M i n 2 011 * Primary c lients a re t he D OE, D OJ, C DC, a nd A

  8. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-15

    This August 15, 1991, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1991, through June 30, 1991. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities development program is proceeding on schedule. The Reserve's capacity is currently 726 million barrels. A total of 5.5 million barrels of new gross cavern volume was developed at Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw during the quarter. There were no crude oil deliveries to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the calendar quarter ending June 30, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of June 30, 1991, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory was 568.5 million barrels. The reorganization of the Office of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve became effective June 28, 1991. Under the new organization, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office in Louisiana will report to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program Office in Washington rather than the Oak Ridge Field Office in Tennessee. 2 tabs.

  9. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16,669 220,747 221,117 244,915 237,910 229,402 1920-2016 Persian Gulf 38,247 47,365 49,210 54,496 46,853 44,701 1993-2016 OPEC* 78,078 84,447 86,981 95,282 87,302 85,862 1993-2016 Algeria 1,064 1993-2016 Angola 5,467 5,598 5,725 4,761 5,154 3,463 1993-2016 Ecuador 7,729 7,139 5,721 6,097 10,350 7,133 1993-2016 Indonesia 1,297 1,727 1,329 1,348 1,955 1,004 1993-2016 Iraq 6,079 11,622 8,064 13,844 7,810 7,092 1996-2016 Kuwait 6,337 5,263 4,193 5,972 6,369 8,389 1993-2016 Libya 159 189 2004-2015

  10. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    80,042 272,798 273,770 301,517 301,768 290,577 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 38,707 47,680 49,847 54,969 47,129 45,649 1993-2016 OPEC* 85,626 90,481 95,080 101,480 94,605 93,098 1993-2016 Algeria 4,364 2,341 3,707 2,282 3,896 5,042 1993-2016 Angola 5,467 5,974 6,930 5,137 5,154 3,844 1993-2016 Ecuador 7,925 7,139 5,721 6,097 10,350 7,133 1993-2016 Indonesia 1,467 1,846 1,330 1,441 1,956 1,004 1993-2016 Iraq 6,079 11,622 8,064 13,844 7,810 7,092 1996-2016 Kuwait 6,337 5,263 4,193 5,972 6,369 8,389

  11. Domestic petroleum-product prices around the world. Survey: free market or government price controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-27

    In this issue, Energy Detente draws from their regular Western and Eastern Hemisphere Fuel Price/Tax Series, each produced monthly, and adds other survey data and analysis for a broad view of 48 countries around the world. They find that seven Latin American nations, including OPEC members Venezuela and Ecuador, are among the ten countries with lowest gasoline prices. In this Fourth Special Price Report, Energy Detente provides a first-time presentation of which prices are government-controlled, and which are free to respond to market forces. South Korea, with fixed prices since 1964, has the highest premium-grade gasoline price in our survey, US $5.38 per gallon. Paraguay, with prices fixed by PETROPAR, the national oil company, has the second highest premium gasoline price, US $4.21 per gallon. Nicaragua, also with government price controls, ranks third highest in the survey, with US $3.38 per gallon for premium gasoline. Kuwait shows the lowest price at US $0.55 per gallon. Several price changes from the previous survey reflect changes in currency exchange as all prices are converted to US dollars. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series is presented for Western Hemisphere countries.

  12. The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, L.J. ); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. . Energy Systems Div.)

    1992-09-01

    The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

  13. The motor gasoline industry: Past, present, and future. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Motor gasoline constitutes the largest single component of US demand for petroleum products and is the Nation's most widely used transportation fuel. Because of its importance as a transportation fuel, motor gasoline has been the focus of several regulatory and tax policy initiatives in recent years. Much of the US refining capacity is specifically geared toward maximizing motor gasoline production, and future investments by the petroleum industry in refining infrastructure are likely to be made largely to produce larger volumes of clean motor gasoline. This report addresses major events and developments that have had an impact on motor gasoline supply, distribution, prices, and demand. The report provides historical perspective as well as analyses of important events from the 1970's and 1980's. Long-term forecasts are provided for the period from 1990 to 2010 in an effort to present and analyze possible future motor gasoline trends. Other forecasts examine the near-term impact of the invasion of Kuwait. 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  15. State companies dominate OGJ100 list of non-U. S. oil producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-20

    State owned oil and gas companies dominate the OGJ100 list of non-U.S. producers. Because many of them report only operating information, companies on the worldwide list cannot be ranked by assets or revenues. The list, therefore, is organized regionally, based on location of companies' corporate headquarters. The leading nongovernment company in both reserves and production is Royal Dutch/Shell. It ranks sixth in the world in liquids production and 11th in liquids reserves, as it has for the past 2 years. British Petroleum is the next largest nongovernment company. BP ranks 11th in liquids production and 16th in liquids reserves. Elf Aquitaine, 55.8% government-controlled, ranked 17th in liquids production. AGIP was 20th in liquids production. Kuwait Petroleum returned to the list of top 20 producers, ranking 12th, as it restored production shut in by facilities damage sustained during the Persian Gulf crisis. New to the top 20 reserves list is Petroleo Brasileiro, which moved to 20th position. The top 20 companies in the OGJ100 held reserves estimated at 869.3 billion bbl in 1992 vs. 869.5 billion bbl in 1991 and 854.2 billion bbl in 1990.

  16. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-03-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The State permitting process required for construction will be completed in early November to allow installation and construction to be completed. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed. A request for proposal for stack sampling and biospore tests was released to four (4) vendors in mid-October. The proposals shall be reviewed during November and the stack sampler will be selected. Funding was approved as of August 1, 1995. Construction and installation resumed on August 21, 1995 at the LVAMC. Construction and installation continues and will be completed by late December 1995.

  17. Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

    2002-09-29

    This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report reiterates the presentation made to DOE/NETL in Morgantown, WV on August 1st, 2002 with the addition of accomplishments made from that time forward until the issue date. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: {sm_bullet} Specifications for both 5-1/2'' and 1-5/8'' composite drill pipe have been finalized. {sm_bullet} Full scale testing of Short Radius (SR) CDP has been conducted. {sm_bullet} Successful demonstration of metal to composite interface (MCI) connection. {sm_bullet} Preparations for full scale manufacturing of ER/DW CDP have begun. {sm_bullet} Manufacturing facility rearranged to accommodate CDP process flow through plant. {sm_bullet} Arrangements to have the 3 3/8'' CDP used in 4 separate drilling applications in Oman, Oklahoma, and Texas.

  18. A General Investigation of Optimized Atmospheric Sample Duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-11-28

    ABSTRACT The International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of up to 80 aerosol and xenon monitoring systems spaced around the world that have collection systems sensitive enough to detect nuclear releases from underground nuclear tests at great distances (CTBT 1996; CTBTO 2011). Although a few of the IMS radionuclide stations are closer together than 1,000 km (such as the stations in Kuwait and Iran), many of them are 2,000 km or more apart. In the absence of a scientific basis for optimizing the duration of atmospheric sampling, historically scientists used a integration times from 24 hours to 14 days for radionuclides (Thomas et al. 1977). This was entirely adequate in the past because the sources of signals were far away and large, meaning that they were smeared over many days by the time they had travelled 10,000 km. The Fukushima event pointed out the unacceptable delay time (72 hours) between the start of sample acquisition and final data being shipped. A scientific basis for selecting a sample duration time is needed. This report considers plume migration of a nondecaying tracer using archived atmospheric data for 2011 in the HYSPLIT (Draxler and Hess 1998; HYSPLIT 2011) transport model. We present two related results: the temporal duration of the majority of the plume as a function of distance and the behavior of the maximum plume concentration as a function of sample collection duration and distance. The modeled plume behavior can then be combined with external information about sampler design to optimize sample durations in a sampling network.

  19. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  20. Political dynamics of economic sanctions: a case study of Arab oil embargoes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daoudi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The general question is considered of the effectiveness of economic sanctions in international politics, in terms of the Arabs' use of oil as a political weapon in 1956, 1967, and 1973. Chapter 3 focuses on the impact of the interruption of oil supplies to Western Europe throughout the 1956 Suez crisis. By 1967, pressure on the conservative governing elites of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Libya, and the Gulf Sheikdoms obliged these states to join Iraq and Algeria in imposing production cutbacks and an embargo. Yet the conservative regimes' ties to the West, and the control exerted by multinational oil corporations over all phases of their oil industry, insured that the embargo was not enforced. Chapter 4 explains historically how, by the late 1960s, relinquishment of old concessions, nationalization acts, and participation agreements had caused a decline in the multinationals' domination of the oil industry. The rise of OPEC and OAPEC, which by 1970 had united and organized the producing governments, channeled their demands, and created an international forum for their political grievances, is discussed. Chapter 5 considers how by 1973 international and Arab political developments had forced states like Saudi Arabia, which had sought to dissociate oil and politics, to unsheathe the oil weapon and wave it in the faces of their Western allies. The author concludes from analysis of these complex cases that scholarship has exaggerated the inefficacy of sanctions. The effectiveness of sanctions is seen to depend upon how the demands are formulated and presented and to what extent they can be negotiated, as well as upon the sociopolitical, cultural, and psychological characteristics of the target population.

  1. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africas most successful mobile network operators, will talk about Mobile phones and Africa: a success story. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss Citizen Problem Solving. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africas most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continents population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Londons School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairmans Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greate

  2. Three Blind Men and the Elephant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J S

    2007-02-13

    Just like the blind men in the popular story of perceiving the elephant, the three major constituencies participating in the energy debate have greatly different perceptions of the problem. The constituency that is worried about climate change believes the energy problem is caused by profligate use of fossil fuel that has dramatically changed our atmosphere. The energy security group sees dangerous reliance on foreign sources of oil increasingly held by countries hostile to the US. The economic vitality group sees high energy prices and their effect on the economy and our life-style. Just like the blind men, each of the three constituencies perceives a different problem. And just as with the blind men, while each perspective is right as a piece of the elephant, it takes all the perspectives together to actually solve the problem. Environmentalists focus on solutions responding to the scientific consensus that greenhouse gases are creating rapid climate change. The tipping point has come: it is now a consensus position among scientists the global warming is being affected by anthropogenic activity to 90% certainty according to the last IPCC report. Although they still struggle with the prediction of how much global temperatures will rise if we do nothing--is it 5 deg or 10 under BAU? This group believes that we cannot afford to take a chance because we get only one chance. We can not afford to do this kind of experiment with the Earth. Any choice which decreases our CO{sub 2} footprint is favored, even if it means a decrease in standard of living. The energy security constituency sees the geo-politics of oil becoming increasingly dire. They look at oil money being used to fund anti-American activities of groups such as the Wahabis in Saudi Arabia, Hezbollah in Lebanon and the infamous Al Qaeda. They quip that the Iraq war is the first war where we are paying for both sides. They note Iran and the Shia throughout the Middle East seeing the possibility of controlling 2/3 of the world's oil. They see oil and gas being used by Russia to exert political power using the gas tap and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela clearly anti-American and now a virtual dictator who controls 15% of our oil imports. Conflicts in Nigeria over oil wealth and corruption affected our oil supply. Countries such as China are at best unwilling to join political action against countries such as Sudan that supply them oil, and at worst, selling them arms in order to cement their relationships with respect to importing oil. This security constituency favors ending our vulnerability by ending our ''addiction to foreign oil''. This group thinks that there is no domestic source of energy that is bad. They will be happy to see our corn turned into ethanol; our coal turned into liquid fuel for transportation. No matter that the price of tortillas doubles in Mexico, we expand corn farming at the expense of the environment, our tanks and pipes in gas stations corrode and leak, or we make liquid fuel from coal, thus increasing the carbon footprint by 30% per unit of energy. The economic vitality group sees increasing international demand for oil occurring simultaneously with a peaking supply of light sweet crude. They see an oil market where higher prices drive more production of oil which is heavier and more sour (supply follows demand). However, fast growth in world-wide demand increases even faster and prices will go up. For example, China adds 10,000 cars per month, and there is an uncanny correlation between the price of oil and the amount of oil imported by China. The security contingent also worries about reliability of supply as affected by pipeline leaks in Alaska or hurricanes or potential terrorism. This constituency thinks the problem is one of capacity and favors solutions that will increase oil production, reservoirs, pipelines and refineries. They believe that the energy system will be determined by the market and want solutions that favor investment in capacity. What the environmentalists don't seem to get is climate change by itself will fail to gather b

  3. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa?s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about ?Mobile phones and Africa: a success story?. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss ?Citizen Problem Solving?. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa?s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continent?s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London?s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman?s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greatest probability of solution lies in the "long tail" of the function rather than in the head representing formally vetted 'experts.' Insight into a problem is often the intersection of training, experience, metaphor and provocation (think Archimedes). Examples of "citizens" outside a targeted field of expertise providing uniques solutions will illustrate the principles involved. Bio Dr. Alph Bingham is a pioneer in the field of open innovation and an advocate of collaborative approaches to research and development. He is co-founder, and former president and chief executive officer of InnoCentive Inc., a Web-based community that matches companies facing R&D; challenges with scientists who propose solutions. Through InnoCentive, a platform that leverages the ability to connect to a whole planet of people through the Internet, organizations can access individuals ? problem solvers ? who might never have been found. Alph spent more than 25 years with Eli Lilly and Company, and offers deep experience in pharmaceutical research and development, research acquisitions and collaborations, and R&D; strategic planning. During his career he was instrumental in creating and developing Eli Lilly's portfolio management process as well as establishing the divisions of Research Acquisitions, the Office of Alliance Management and e.Lilly, a business innovation unit, from which various other ventures were spun out that create the advantages of open and networked organizational structures, including: InnoCentive, YourEncore, Inc., Coalesix, Inc., Maaguzi, Inc., Indigo Biosystems, Seriosity, Chorus and Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of InnoCentive, Inc., and Collaborative Drug Discovery, Inc.; the advisory boards of the Center for Collective Intelligence (MIT), and the Business Innovation Factory, as well as a member of the board of trustees of the Bankinter Foundation for Innovation in Madrid. He has lectured extensively at both national and international events and serves as a Visiting Scholar at the National Center for Supercomputing Application at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. He is also the former chairman of the Board of Editors of the Research Technology Management Journal. Dr. Bingham was the recipient of the Economist's Fourth Annual Innovation Summit "Business Process Award" for InnoCentive. He was also named as one of Project Management Institute's "Power 50" leaders in October 2005. Dr. Bingham received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University.