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  1. ARM - SGP Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Operations Routine Operations SGP central facility offices. SGP central facility offices. The overwhelming majority of the measurements with the

  2. ARM - SGP Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Contacts Site Manager - Nicki Hickmon, Argonne National Laboratory Site Operations Manager - John Schatz, SGP Site Operations Office Central Facility

  3. ARM - SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration...

  4. ARM - Visiting the SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PlainsVisiting the SGP SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Visiting the SGP View a custom Google map with driving directions to the SGP Central Facility. View a custom Google map with driving directions

  5. ARM - SGP Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Science Overall Objectives The primary goal of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is to produce data adequate to support significant research addressing

  6. SGP Overview Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Map SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility...

  7. SGP Shipment Notification Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PlainsShipment Notification Form SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric...

  8. SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather

  9. ARM - SGP Extended Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Extended Facility For over 20 years, 23 extended facilities were distributed evenly throughout a 55,000-square-mile domain and at the corners of

  10. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermediate Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Intermediate Facility For over 20 years, 3 intermediate facilities, within 6.2 miles (10 km) of the Central Facility, provided a

  11. ARM - SGP Radiometric Calibration Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiometric Calibration Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Radiometric Calibration Facility The Radiometric Calibration Facility (RCF) provides shortwave radiometer calibrations traceable

  12. ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt

  13. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  14. ARM - SGP Geographic Information By Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic Information By Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Geographic Information By Facility Note: BF = Boundary Facility, EF = Extended Facility, and IF = Intermediate Facility Site

  15. ARM - SGP Boundary Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nearest Town Status B1 Hillsboro Removed 10212010 B5 Morris Removed 11172010 B6 Purcell Removed 1132010 B4 Vici Removed 2172010 *NOTE: Site designations are used in...

  16. ARM - VAP Product - gaeriprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data...

  17. ARM - VAP Product - lssonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data...

  18. ARM - VAP Product - sondewndcalc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data...

  19. ARM - VAP Product - aerilblclouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data Purcell, OK (Boundary) retired SGP C1 Browse Data...

  20. ARM - VAP Product - 5mwravg

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data...

  1. ARM - VAP Product - aeriprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plains SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data...

  2. ARM - Datastreams - sondewrpn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SGP B1 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Boundary) retired SGP B4 Browse Data Vici, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B5 Browse Data Morris, OK (Boundary) retired SGP B6 Browse Data Purcell...

  3. Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interpolation Uncertainties Across the ARM SGP Area J. E. Christy, C. N. Long, and T. R. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Interpolation Grids Across the SGP Network Area The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a network of surface radiation measurement sites across north central Oklahoma and south central Kansas. This Southern Great Plains (SGP) network consists of 21 sites unevenly spaced from 95.5 to 99.5

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - SGP99 IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSGP99 IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : SGP99 IOP 1999.07.07 - 1999.07.22 Lead Scientist : Richard Cederwall Summary The Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment (SGP97) successfully demonstrated the ability to map and monitor soil moisture using low frequency microwave radiometers (L band, 1.4 GHz). Soil moisture retrieval algorithms developed using higher resolution data were proven to be

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - SGP '97 (Hydrology) IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSGP '97 (Hydrology) IOP Campaign Links NASA Archive Model Initialization Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : SGP '97 (Hydrology) IOP 1997.06.18 - 1997.07.18 Lead Scientist : Richard Cederwall Abstract The main objective of this investigation was to establish that the retrieval algorithms for surface soil moisture developed at higher spatial resolution using truck- and aircraft-based sensors can be extended

  6. Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of Unusual Albedos in the SGP Domain Groff, David ARM SGP Duchon, Claude University Of Oklahoma Category: Atmospheric State and Surface We investigate the cause of unusually high albedos at an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) extended facility near Morris, OK. In a previous study, daily albedos were calculated at several SGP extended facilities for 1998 and 1999 using broadband (.28 to 3 microns) pyranometers. The average daily albedo during this

  7. Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting, 12 March 2008 Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry K. Berg, William I. Gustafson Jr., and Evgueni I. Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM Science Team Meeting, 12 March 2008 Where are We Going? Development Simulation Evaluation Observations ARM Science Team Meeting, 12 March 2008 Development: Coupling Clouds to the Convective Boundary Layer * Shallow cumuli are turbulently coupled to the planetary boundary layer 4 3 2 1 0 Height

  8. New Surface Meteorological Measurements at SGP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM, March 22 - 26, 2004 1 New Surface Meteorological Measurements at SGP, and Their Use for Assessing Radiosonde Measurement Accuracy L.M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado B.M. Lesht and M. Ritche Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction Several recent ARM investigations have been directed toward characterizing and improving the accuracy of ARM radiosonde water vapor measurements. Tobin et al. (2002) showed that calculating the downwelling

  9. Category:Wichita, KS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wichita KS ... 64 KB SVLargeHotel Wichita KS Westar Energy Inc.png SVLargeHotel Wichita K... 59 KB SVLargeOffice Wichita KS Westar Energy Inc.png SVLargeOffice Wichita ... 64 KB...

  10. Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Michael

    In early June 2014, a radiosonde intercomparison trial was undertaken at the SGP Central Facility site with the goal of quantifying the relative performance of the RS92-SGP/MW31 and RS41-SG/MW41 radiosondes/systems. The June time period at SGP represents a springtime mid-latitude convective environment where the extensive remote sensing observations at the SGP site were used to further quantify the environment during the intercomparison. Over the course of five days (3 - 8 June) a total of 20 balloon launches were completed with efforts to sample the entire diurnal cycle and a variety of cloud conditions

  11. An Overview of the SGP Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Overview of the SGP Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Collins, Don Texas A&M University Spencer, Chance Texas A&M University Category: Instruments A differential mobility...

  12. Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael

    2015-03-06

    In early June 2014, a radiosonde intercomparison trial was undertaken at the SGP Central Facility site with the goal of quantifying the relative performance of the RS92-SGP/MW31 and RS41-SG/MW41 radiosondes/systems. The June time period at SGP represents a springtime mid-latitude convective environment where the extensive remote sensing observations at the SGP site were used to further quantify the environment during the intercomparison. Over the course of five days (3 - 8 June) a total of 20 balloon launches were completed with efforts to sample the entire diurnal cycle and a variety of cloud conditions

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The SGP Aerosol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The SGP Aerosol Best-Estimate Value-Added Procedure and Its Impact on the BBHRP Project Turner, David Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest...

  14. Observed and Simulated Cirrus Cloud Properties at the SGP CART...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Three-minute mean retrievals are available at 8-minute intervals for isolated cirrus (i.e., no...

  15. Senator Myers Tours SGP CART Site Technical Contact: James C...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Senator Myers Tours SGP CART Site Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ANLERNL-03-06 www.arm.gov ARM...

  16. Category:Goodland, KS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KS Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Goodland, KS" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total....

  17. Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Relationship to Adiabacity Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences and Relationship to Adiabacity Kim, Byung-Gon Kangnung National University Schwartz, Stephen Brookhaven National Laboratory Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties The microphysical properties of continental stratus clouds observed over SGP appear to be substantially influenced by micrometeorological

  18. ARM - PI Product - Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM

  19. ARM Carbon Cycle Gases Flasks at SGP Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    Data from flasks are sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ARM, Southern Great Plains Site and analyzed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory ESRL. The SGP site is included in the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. The surface samples are collected from a 60 m tower at the ARM SGP Central Facility, usually once per week in the afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. The samples are collected by the ARM and LBNL Carbon Project.

  20. CIMEL Measurements of Zenith Radiances at the ARM SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CIMEL Measurements of Zenith Radiances at the ARM SGP Site W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland A. Marshak and K. Evans Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology University of Maryland Baltimore, Maryland Y. Knyazikhin Department of Geography Boston University Boston, Massachusetts H. W. Barker Environment Canada Downsview, Ontario, Canada C. F. Pavloski Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania

  1. Deployment of a New Shortwave Spectroradiometer (SWS) at the SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deployment of a New Shortwave Spectroradiometer (SWS) at the SGP Pommier, John NASA Ames Research Center Pilewskie, Peter University of Colorado Gore, Warren NASA Ames Research Center Category: Instruments A new Shortwave Spectroradiometer (SWS) will be deployed at the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility in early 2006. The SWS is a moderate resolution sensor which will measure the zenith spectral radiance with 1.4 field-of-view. The SWS is sensitive over the wavelength range from 350 -

  2. Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? D. D. Turner and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Low level haze is often observed during the night and early morning hours in many locations. This haze is typically formed during quiescent conditions by radiative cooling of the surface, which lowers the ambient temperature and consequently increases the near-surface relative humidity (RH). Many aerosols start to deliquesce around 75%

  3. ARM - PI Product - Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsSoundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Soundings from SGP, June 2014 Sonde Comparison Study [ ARM research ] The data set contains the measurements for 40 sondes launched at SGP in June 2014, for a radiosonde intercomparison. Purpose In early June 2014, a radiosonde intercomparison trial was undertaken at the SGP Central Facility site

  4. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  5. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  6. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  7. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaigns2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28 - 2013.07.01 Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract Instruments were deployed at the SGP Central Facility to investigate how

  9. Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

    2014-11-05

    The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

  10. Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

    2014-11-05

    The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

  11. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Clouds over the ARM SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Network area - 3D prospective Clouds over the ARM SGP Network area - 3D prospective Genkova, Iliana University of Illinois-Champaign Long, Chuck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Minnis, Patrick NASA Langley Research Center Heck, Patrick University of Wisconsin Khaiyer, Mandana Analytical Services and Material, Inc. The poster will present the final product of a 3-dimentional characterization of the clouds over the ARM SGP network area. We have aquired various ground-based and satellite

  12. ARM SGP and BN AERI Instrument Diagnostic Comparison and Preliminary Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM SGP and BN AERI Instrument Diagnostic Comparison and Preliminary Assessment D. Yuan, C. Golanics, M. Howard, and G. Williams Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory Las Vegas, Nevada Abstract A continuous collection for diagnostic instrumental comparison was conducted at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Lamont site from June 11 to the 13, 2003 using the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the site and the AERI owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear

  13. Characterization of Surface Albedo Over the ARM SGP CART and the NSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Surface Albedo Over the ARM SGP CART and the NSA Z. Li and M. C. Cribb Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko and Y. Luo Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Surface albedo is needed for satellite remote sensing of the surface radiation budget and for climate modelling. Determination of areal-mean surface albedo is challenging. Over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, a

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-SGP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-SGP 2005.08.04 - 2006.04.19 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM conducted a special series of radiosonde launches in support of validation studies for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - SGP 2012.07.09 - 2017.12.31 Lead Scientist : Lori Borg For data sets, see below. Abstract This is a satellite validation project involving the use of satellite overpass coincident radiosonde launches. This is analogous to previous IOPs performed for AIRS on the NASA Aqua platform and

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Ground-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsGround-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Ground-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP 2009.05.26 - 2009.07.17 Lead Scientist : Dong Huang For data sets, see below. Abstract Knowledge of 3D cloud properties is pressingly needed in many research fields. One of the problems encountered when trying to represent 3D cloud fields in numerical

  17. ARM - PI Product - Merged MMCR-WSR88D Reflectivities at SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsMerged MMCR-WSR88D Reflectivities at SGP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Merged MMCR-WSR88D Reflectivities at SGP There are substantial attenuations of MMCR signals for very large LWP and during precipitation events. We have used the nearest precipitation radar (WSR-88D) to merge two measurements to better represent such selected cases. In the near future, we are going to provide

  18. ARM - VAP Product - 30baebbr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hillsboro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E4 Browse Data Plevna, KS (Extended) retired SGP E7 Browse Data Elk Falls, KS (Extended) retired SGP E8 Browse Data Coldwater, KS (Extended)...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - KS 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    KS 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO. (KS.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - an AEC licensed operation Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Jayhawk Works KS.0-01-1 Location: Pittsburg , Kansas KS.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 KS.0-01-2 Site Operations: Processed enriched uranium (UF-6) and scrap to produce primarily uranium dioxide (UO-2) under AEC licenses. KS.0-01-3 KS.0-01-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed

  20. The Effect of Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform Clouds Over ARM SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform Clouds Over ARM SGP Site Z. N. Kogan, D. B. Mechem, and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Metorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction Continental low stratiform clouds cover the sky about 23% of the time during the fall, winter, and spring months and play a significant role in the Earth' radiation budget. Information about cloud structure and variability is crucial in determining areal averages of cloud

  1. Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets J. Huang, M. M. Khaiyer, and P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and B. Lin Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T.-F. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Global information of cloud ice water path (IWP) is urgently needed for testing of

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband

  4. Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility R. O. Knuteson, R. G. Dedecker, W. F. Feltz, B. J. Osbourne, H. E. Revercomb, and D. C. Tobin Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) has developed, under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funding, a model for the infrared land surface emissivity (LSE) in the

  5. Measuring the Raindrop Size Distribution, ARM's Efforts at Darwin and SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measuring the Raindrop Size Distribution, ARM's Efforts at Darwin and SGP Bartholomew, Mary Jane Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Instruments ARM has purchased two impact disdrometers for indefinite deployment. One is currently installed at the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Darwin facility and the other will be deployed at the central facility of the Southern Great Plains Site this spring. The disdrometers make measurements of raindrop diameter in 20 size bins over the range of 0.3 to

  6. ARM - VAP Product - radflux1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility, Atqasuk AK Southern Great Plains SGP C1 Browse Data Central Facility, Lamont, OK SGP E1 Browse Data Larned, KS (Extended) SGP E2 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS (Extended) SGP...

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract Boundary layer turbulence is

  8. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  9. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  10. Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea...

  11. ARM - PI Product - AERIoe Thermodynamic Profile and Cloud Retrieval for SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CF during LABLE-2012 2 ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : AERIoe Thermodynamic Profile and Cloud Retrieval for SGP CF during LABLE-2012 [ ARM research ] The AERIoe algorithm retrieves profiles of temperature and water vapor mixing ratio, together with cloud properties for a single-layer cloud (i.e., LWP, effective radius), from AERI-observed infrared radiance spectrum. The method is a

  12. ARM - PI Product - AERIoe Thermodynamic Profile and Cloud Retrieval for SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CF during LABLE-2013 3 ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : AERIoe Thermodynamic Profile and Cloud Retrieval for SGP CF during LABLE-2013 [ ARM research ] The AERIoe algorithm retrieves profiles of temperature and water vapor mixing ratio, together with cloud properties for a single-layer cloud (i.e., LWP, effective radius), from AERI-observed infrared radiance spectrum. The method is a

  13. Surface Di-directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations Y. Luo, A. P. Trishchenko, and R. Latifovic Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Natural Resources Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is an important parameter in atmospheric radiation research. Good knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is

  14. Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a

  15. New Visible to Broadband Shortwave Conversions for Deriving Albedos from GOES-8 Over the ARM-SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Visible to Broadband Shortwave Conversions for Deriving Albedos from GOES-8 Over the ARM-SGP V. Chakrapani, D. R. Doelling, and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure

  16. Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large-Scale Forcing, Surface Fluxes, and Convective Inhibition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large-Scale Forcing, Surface Fluxes, and Convective Inhibition G. J. Zhang Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Atmospheric convection undergoes strong diurnal variation over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001; Nesbitt and Zipser 2003). Because of the nature of the diurnal variation of solar radiation, the phasing of convection with solar radiation has a

  17. ER2 Instrumentation and Measurements for CLASIC (Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign) June-2007 SGP {Author-Jimmy Voyles}

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER2 Desired Measurements for CLASIC June 2007 SGP May 31, 2007 1 MEASUREMENT SOURCE DESIRED MEASUREMENTS AND PRODUCTS INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS Cloud Radar System (CRS), W-Band (95 GHz) 1) Vertical profiles of calibrated radar reflectivity 2) Vertical profiles of Doppler velocity 3) Vertical profiles of estimated IWC 4) Vertical profiles of linear depolarization ratio 5) (ASCII files and quick look plots for all of the above quantities) Resolution: 5 sec resolution? Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) (1064,

  18. Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Introduction The cloud-resolving model (CRM) has recently emerged as a useful tool to develop improved representations of convections, clouds, and cloud-radiation interactions in general circulation models (GCMs).

  19. Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP 1bbhrpripbe1mcfarlane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

    2014-11-05

    The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

  20. ARM - VAP Product - 15swfanalsirs1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    albedo Locations Southern Great Plains SGP C1 Browse Data Central Facility, Lamont, OK SGP E1 Browse Data Larned, KS (Extended) retired SGP E2 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS...

  1. ARM - VAP Product - 1swfanalsirs1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    albedo Locations Southern Great Plains SGP C1 Browse Data Central Facility, Lamont, OK SGP E1 Browse Data Larned, KS (Extended) retired SGP E2 Browse Data Hillsboro, KS...

  2. ARM - VAP Product - siros1dutt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E11 Browse Data Byron, OK (Extended) retired SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) retired SGP E13 Browse...

  3. ARM - VAP Product - 30qcecor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E14 Browse Data Lamont, OK (Extended, secondary) SGP E16 Browse Data Vici, OK (Extended) retired SGP E21 Browse...

  4. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tyro KS No Instrument failed and was pulled from service in June 2001 SGP EF-11 Byron OK Yes ----- SGP EF-12 Pawhuska OK Yes ----- SGP EF-13 Lamont OK Yes ----- SGP EF-15...

  5. ARM - VAP Product - 15swfanalsiros1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E11 Browse Data Byron, OK (Extended) retired SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) retired SGP E13 Browse...

  6. ARM - VAP Product - 1swfanalsiros1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired SGP E10 Browse Data Tyro, KS (Extended) retired SGP E11 Browse Data Byron, OK (Extended) retired SGP E12 Browse Data Pawhuska, OK (Extended) retired SGP E13 Browse...

  7. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-KS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Kansas Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  8. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  9. ARM XDC Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (IDSG11) Phased-out on 2010-11-10 SGP-E9: Ashton, KS (IDSG04) SGP-E11: Byron, OK (IDSG10) SGP-E12: Pawhuska, OK (IDSG08) SGP-E13: ARM CF Lamont, OK (IDSG01) SGP-E15:...

  10. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  11. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO{sub 2} with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B.A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, G. B.

    2012-02-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  12. Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California W. P. Arnott Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada A. Bucholtz and J. Reid Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California P. Colarco Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center

  13. NREL Helps Greensburg, KS Launch GreenHome Partnership - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Helps Greensburg, KS Launch GreenHome Partnership KBIA's partnership with Greensburg is a model for communities needing to rebuild April 28, 2009 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the City Council of Greensburg, Kansas, and the Kansas Building Industry Association (KBIA), announce the launch of Greensburg GreenHome Residential Green Building Program. Greensburg GreenHome is a voluntary program with KBIA and supported

  14. ARM - VAP Product - qcrad1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired Southern Great Plains SGP C1 Browse Data Browse Plots Central Facility, Lamont, OK SGP E1 Browse Data Browse Plots Larned, KS (Extended) retired SGP E2 Browse Data Browse...

  15. ARM - VAP Product - sirs1dutt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    irradiance Locations Southern Great Plains SGP C1 Browse Data Central Facility, Lamont, OK retired SGP E1 Browse Data Larned, KS (Extended) retired SGP E2 Browse Data Hillsboro,...

  16. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations ofmore » the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.« less

  17. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  18. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  19. Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce,

    2013-07-12

    This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

  20. Effects of finite volume on the KL – KS mass difference

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christ, N.  H.; Feng, X.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C.  T.

    2015-06-24

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Lüscher and Lellouch and Lüscher, which determine the leading-order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second-order mixing of the K⁰ and K⁰⁻ states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda, and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KLmore » – KS mass difference ΔMK and the CP-violating parameter εK are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.« less

  1. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; McFarquhar, Greg; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, G.; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haf; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Donald R.; Diskin, G. S.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, Paul; Woods, Roy; Andrews, Elizabeth; Yang, Hee-Jung; Chiu, Christine J.; Hartsock, Daniel; Hubbe, John M.; Lo, Chaomei; Marshak, A.; Monroe, Justin; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami

    2012-06-30

    A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in-situ statistical characterization of boundary-layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that supports modeling studies and enables evaluating a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about two-thirds of the cloud flights occurred in May and June, boundary-layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 75% of the flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses show how these data are being used to analyze cloud-aerosol relationships, determine the aerosol sizes that are responsible for nucleating cloud drops, characterize the horizontal variability of the cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate air-borne and surface-based cloud property retrievals. We discuss how conducting an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

  2. Observation of a narrow structure in 1H(?,KS0)X via interference with phi-meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M J; Nepali, C; Polyakov, M V; Azimov, Ya; Briscoe, W J; Dodge, G E; Hyde, C E; Klein, F; Kuznetsov, V; Strakovsky, I

    2012-03-21

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ?1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width ? = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction ? + p ? pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the ?(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the ?-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3?.

  3. Observation of a narrow structure in 1 H( γ , KS0 ) X via interference with φ -meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Nepali, C.; Polyakov, M. V.; Azimov, Ya.; Briscoe, W. J.; Dodge, G. E.; Hyde, C. E.; Klein, F.; Kuznetsov, V.; et al

    2012-03-01

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ≈1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width σ = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction γ + p → pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the φ(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the φ-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3σ.

  4. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  5. ARM XDC Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weather Service (NWS) atmospheric soundings for sites within the SGP area (Norman, OK, Topeka, KS, and Dodge City, KS), the NSA (Barrow, AK), and historical data for the TWP...

  6. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  7. Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (10) Modeling Need (10) Cloud Boundaries 9 9 Cloud Fraction Variance Skewness UpDowndraft coverage Dominant Freq. signal Dissipation rate ??? Observation-Modeling Interface...

  8. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  9. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  10. Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Alexandrov, Mikhail

    2008-01-15

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670 nm). Aerosols and Rayleigh scattering contribute atmospheric extinction in all MFRSR channels. Our recently updated MFRSR data analysis algorithm allows us to partition the spectral aerosol optical depth into fine and coarse modes and to retrieve the fine mode effective radius. In this approach we rely on climatological amounts of NO2 from SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals and use daily ozone columns from TOMS.

  11. SGP CART Site Affected by Ice Storm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Gulf of Mexico. A cold, shallow air mass already over Oklahoma and Kansas set up a temperature inversion in the atmosphere, with warmer air temperatures aloft than at ground...

  12. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  13. Boundary Layer Lubrication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubrication Boundary Layer Lubrication 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_01_ajayi.pdf More Documents & Publications Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms Overview of Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles

  14. Boundary effects on Zircaloy-4 cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longest, A.W.; Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding under simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions is being investigated in the Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) program in single rod and multirod tests. In these tests, internally-pressurized unirradiated Zircaloy-4 tubes containing internal electrical heaters are heated to failure in a low-pressure, superheated-steam environment (200 < Re < 800). The results provide a data base for evaluating deformation and blockage models employed with design-basis accident sequences to assess LWR core coolability for licensing purposes. Results of a recent 8 X 8 test indicate that models derived from smaller test arrays may not be representative of the behavior in large arrays, particularly for those temperature ranges in which large deformation can be expected. Two MRBT LOCA simulation tests conducted under the same nominal conditions (approx. 10 K/s heating rate from approx. 340/sup 0/C to failure at approx. 770/sup 0/C) were examined to determine the effects of array size and boundary conditions on deformation.

  15. ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will ...

  17. Environmental boundaries to energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Public concern about the environment, health and safety consequences of energy technology has been growing steadily for more than two decades in the United States. This concern forms an important boundary condition as the United States seeks to develop a new National Energy Strategy. Furthermore, the international aspects of the energy/environment interface such as acid rain global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion are very prominent in US thinking. In fact, the energy systems of the world are becoming more closely coupled environmentally and otherwise. Now where is this coupling more important than that between the industrialized and developing world; the choices made by each will have profound effects on the other. The development of energy technologies compatible with both economic growth and improving and sustaining environmental quality represents a major R D challenge to the US and USSR. Decision about adoption of new technology and R D priorities can be improved by better measurements of how energy sources and uses are changing throughout the world and better methods to project the potential consequences of these decisions. Such projection require understanding relative risks of alternating existing and evolving technologies. All of these R D areas, technology improvement energy system monitoring and projection and comparative risk assessment are the topics of this seminar. Progress in each may be enhanced by collaboration and cooperation between our two countries. 7 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkilev, V. P.

    2013-04-15

    The boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equations are formulated using the continuous-time random walk model, as well as several versions of the random walk model on an irregular lattice. It is shown that the boundary conditions for the same equation in different models have different forms, and this difference considerably affects the solutions of this equation.

  19. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  20. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss003_fenske_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms Boundary Layer Lubrication Low-Friction Engineered Surfaces

  1. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vss003_fenske_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms Overview of Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles Boundary Layer Lubrication

  2. PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) PDF icon PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) More Documents & Publications PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho

  3. Property:Building/Boundaries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "BuildingBoundaries" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + Several buildings + Sweden Building 05K0002 + Part of a building +...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

  5. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) ...

  6. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production More Documents & Publications Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to ...

  7. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  8. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of wall boundary condition ...

  9. A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection Neggers, Roel European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Category: Modeling A new convective boundary layer...

  10. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined FuchsSondheimer surface scattering model and MayadasShatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  11. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    1997-01-01

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  12. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-12-09

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

  13. Validation of Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LWP more completely, this paper compares it with LWP retrievals based on ARM's ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) at the SGP central and boundary facilities. The...

  14. 2009-ARMSTM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SGP long-term data to assess convection triggering and transition theories on stability, free- troposphere humidity and boundary layer inhomogeneity. Compared with clear-sky and...

  15. Thick diffusion limit boundary layer test problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, T. S.; Warsa, J. S.; Chang, J. H.; Adams, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    We develop two simple test problems that quantify the behavior of computational transport solutions in the presence of boundary layers that are not resolved by the spatial grid. In particular we study the quantitative effects of 'contamination' terms that, according to previous asymptotic analyses, may have a detrimental effect on the solutions obtained by both discontinuous finite element (DFEM) and characteristic-method (CM) spatial discretizations, at least for boundary layers caused by azimuthally asymmetric incident intensities. Few numerical results have illustrated the effects of this contamination, and none have quantified it to our knowledge. Our test problems use leading-order analytic solutions that should be equal to zero in the problem interior, which means the observed interior solution is the error introduced by the contamination terms. Results from DFEM solutions demonstrate that the contamination terms can cause error propagation into the problem interior for both orthogonal and non-orthogonal grids, and that this error is much worse for non-orthogonal grids. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of previous analyses. We conclude that these boundary layer test problems and their variants are useful tools for the study of errors that are introduced by unresolved boundary layers in diffusive transport problems. (authors)

  16. On the interaction of solutes with grain boundaries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Berbenni, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    Solute segregation to grain boundaries is considered by modeling solute atoms as misfitting inclusions within a disclination structural unit model describing the grain boundary structure and its intrinsic stress field. The solute distribution around grain boundaries is described through Fermi–Dirac statistics of site occupancy. The susceptibility of hydrogen segregation to symmetric tilt grain boundaries is discussed in terms of the misorientation angle, the defect type characteristics at the grain boundary, temperature, and the prescribed bulk hydrogen fraction of occupied sites. Through this formalism, it is found that hydrogen trapping on grain boundaries clearly correlates with the grain boundary structure (i.e.more » type of structural unit composing the grain boundary), and the associated grain boundary misorientation. Specifically, for symmetric tilt grain boundaries about the [001] axis, grain boundaries composed of both B and C structural units show a lower segregation susceptibility than other grain boundaries. A direct correlation between the segregation susceptibility and the intrinsic net defect density is provided through the Frank–Bilby formalism. Moreover, the present formulation could prove to be a simple and useful model to identify classes of grain boundaries relevant to grain boundary engineering.« less

  17. The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Vernon, Louis J.; Martinez, Enrique; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-03-13

    Nanocrystalline materials have received great attention due to their potential for improved functionality and have been proposed for extreme environments where the interfaces are expected to promote radiation tolerance. However, the precise role of the interfaces in modifying defect behavior is unclear. Using long-time simulations methods, we determine the mobility of defects and defect clusters at grain boundaries in Cu. We find that mobilities vary significantly with boundary structure and cluster size, with larger clusters exhibiting reduced mobility, and that interface sink efficiency depends on the kinetics of defects within the interface via the in-boundary annihilation rate of defects. Thus,more »sink efficiency is a strong function of defect mobility, which depends on boundary structure, a property that evolves with time. Further, defect mobility at boundaries can be slower than in the bulk, which has general implications for the properties of polycrystalline materials. Finally, we correlate defect energetics with the volumes of atomic sites at the boundary.« less

  18. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  19. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X.; Umansky, M.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  20. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow You are accessing a document from...

  1. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation. PDF icon Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production More Documents & Publications Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis

  2. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  3. ARM - Instrument - soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentssoil Documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Soil Measurement from the SGP (SOIL) Instrument Categories Surface/Subsurface Properties Locations Southern Great Plains SGP A4 Browse Data Smileyberg, KS (ABLE) retired retired = Originating instrument has been retired at this location

  4. Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations from the AL S-band Profiler and the ETL K-band Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during Nauru99 K. S. Gage and D. A. Carter National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Johnston and C. R. Williams Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado M. Ryan Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado D. Hazen and B. W. Orr National

  5. An Improved Cloud Classification Algorithm Based on the SGP CART...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the world. The millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) provides radar reflectivity and mean Doppler velocity profiles for most of clouds in the troposphere. Raman lidar provide not...

  6. Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the ARM SGP Central...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    varied noticeably within each day and between days, perhaps, because of bi-directional reflectance effects. Some preliminary calculations indicate that the differences that we...

  7. New Atmospheric Profiling Instrument Added to SGP CART Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to those required by computer models, over the years ARM has deployed several additional ground-based remote-sensing instruments to collect temperature and water vapor data....

  8. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan June 2007 Mark A. Miller, Principal Investigator and The CLASIC Steering Committee: Roni Avissar, Larry Berg,...

  9. sgp_stratus_poster_v1.0.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure and Persistence of Post-frontal Stratus in Numerical Models D. B. Mechem 1 and Y. L. Kogan 2 1 Department of Geography, University of Kansas, 2 CIMMS, The University of Oklahoma Mid-latitude synoptic systems are frequently accompanied by broad areas of low-altitude cloudiness located behind the cold front. Field and Wood (J. Clim. 2007) show that these clouds constitute a significant climatological signal. How different are postfrontal continental stratus from marine stratocumulus?

  10. New Eddy Correlation System for ARM SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    makes flux computations, prepares the data, and provides File Transfer Protocol (FTP) service for data transfer to the site communications computer. In a typical...

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Measuring Clouds at SGP with Stereo Photogramme...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the form of the Point Cloud of Cloud Points Product (PCCPP). The PCCPP will: provide context on life-cycle stage and cloud position for vertically pointing radars, lidars, and...

  12. Investigation of SGP Atmospheric Moisture Budget for CLASIC ?...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Budget for CLASIC - Recycling Study Contributors Peter Lamb, Diane Portis, Daniel Hartsock Background * Motivation: to provide larger-scale background for the interpretation of...

  13. Merged MMCR-WSR88D Reflectivities at SGP

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    2008-03-05

    There are substantial attenuations of MMCR signals for very large LWP and during precipitation events. We have used the nearest precipitation radar (WSR-88D) to merge two measurements to better represent such selected cases. In the near future, we are going to provide all the cumulus cases from Jan. 1997 to present whenever the two datasets are available. The original 2 data sets:

  14. Surface Albedo at ARM SGP from Helicopter Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site from Helicopter ... Radiant Energy System) ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Radiation Experiment (CARE) ...

  15. Grain boundary energy in 5 degrees of freedom space

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-21

    GB5DOF is a program written in MatLab for computing excess energy of an arbitrary grain boundary defined by its 5 geometrical degrees of freedom. The program is written in the form of a single self-contained function callable from within commercially available MatLab software package. The function takes a geometric description of the boundary and material identity as input parameters and returns the predicted boundary energy.

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    development and ensemble large-scale forcings (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2016 Title: RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary

  17. Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    non-Abelian topological states (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles in non-Abelian topological states Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles in non-Abelian topological states We explain how (perturbed) boundary conformal field theory allows us to understand the tunneling of edge quasiparticles in non-Abelian topological states. The coupling between a

  18. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures | Department of Energy of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures This study was conducted to understand how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while maintaining engine durability. PDF icon

  19. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in

  20. [Perovskite and Fluorite Grain Boundary Properties]. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, N. D.

    2004-02-24

    One of the main areas of research in the last two years in this program has been the properties of grain boundaries in perovskite and fluorite structure materials.

  1. Effects of tricritical points and morphotropic phase boundaries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the piezoelectric properties of ferroelectrics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of tricritical points and morphotropic phase boundaries on the piezoelectric ...

  2. Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured Mn-Cu(111) Surface Authors: Chen, Wei ; Chen, Hua ; Lan, Haiping ; Cui, Ping ; Schulze, Tim P. ; Zhu, ...

  3. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to...

  4. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parallel to the boundary, which is just what seismologists observe. These results open new possibilities for modeling anisotropy evolution at extreme conditions, linking...

  5. ARM - PI Product - Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsPlanetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of

  6. Evolution of Grain Boundary Networks in Extreme Radiation Environments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Through our research we have elucidated that this optimal network requires a balance between two populations of grain boundaries: low free volume (low free energy) special ...

  7. Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget Method over the Southern Great Plains Williams, Ian University of Chicago Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory...

  8. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The boundary entropy log(g) can therefore increase during appropriate bulk flows. This is demonstrated explicitly in flows between minimal models. We discuss the applications of ...

  9. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This study was conducted to understand how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while ...

  10. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  11. Compressional boundaries in the Earth's foreshock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Castillo, D.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Omidi, N.

    2013-06-13

    The terrestrial foreshock is a highly dynamic region populated by particles, waves and non-linear structures such as shocklets, SLAMS, hot flow anomalies, cavities and cavitons. Recently a new structure named foreshock compressional boundary (FCB) was reported in global hybrid simulations by Omidi et al. (2009). This structure represents a transition region that separates the highly disturbed foreshock plasma from pristine solar wind or from the region of field-aligned ion beams. The FCB is associated with a strong compression of magnetic field and density. Besides the enhancements in the field and density, the FCB also shows a region where these two quantities decrease below the ambient solar wind (SW) values. Here, we study a FCB observed by Cluster-1. This FCB shows that although sometimes FCBs are transition regions between the pristine solar wind plasma and the foreshock plasma, in this case the FCB separates a region with large amplitude waves from regions with high frequency (f{approx}1.7 Hz) small amplitude waves. We analyze the FCB properties, ion distributions inside them, and the waves near the structure.

  12. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  13. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with the Immersed Boundary Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with the immersed boundary method is an extension of the open-source WRF Model available for wwww.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the gridding procedure and boundary conditions in the WRF model to improve WRF's ability to simutate the atmosphere in environments with steep terrain and additionally at high-resolutions.

  14. ARM - Guest Instrument Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PlainsGuest Instrument Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Guest Instrument Facility ARM's Guest Instrument Facility at the SGP site near Lamont, Oklahoma. ARM's Guest Instrument Facility at

  15. ARM - Information for Guest Scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PlainsInformation for Guest Scientists SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Information for Guest Scientists As an example of the ACRF capability, SGP technicians installed this temporary 10-meter

  16. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters The Southern

  17. Free boundary, high beta equilibrium in a large aspect ratio tokamak with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nearly circular plasma boundary (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Free boundary, high beta equilibrium in a large aspect ratio tokamak with nearly circular plasma boundary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Free boundary, high beta equilibrium in a large aspect ratio tokamak with nearly circular plasma boundary An analytic solution is obtained for free-boundary, high-beta equilibria in large aspect ratio tokamaks with a nearly circular plasma boundary. In the absence of surface

  18. A boundary-value problem in weighted Hlder spaces for elliptic equations which degenerate at the boundary of the domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazalii, B V; Degtyarev, S P

    2013-07-31

    An elliptic boundary-value problem for second-order equations with nonnegative characteristic form is investigated in the situation when there is a weak degeneracy on the boundary of the domain. A priori estimates are obtained for solutions and the problem is proved to be solvable in some weighted Hlder spaces. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Atmospheric Modes of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drizzling Stratus at the ARM SGP Site Atmospheric Modes of Drizzling Stratus at the ARM SGP Site Kollias, Pavlos RSMAS/University of Miami Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami The representation of boundary layer clouds in GCMs remains a source of uncertainty in climate simulations. The cloud amount in the boundary layer is sensitive to the boundary layer scheme. Furthermore, little is known on the climatology of drizzling or precipitating boundary layer clouds, their seasonal variability and

  20. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Condition Parameters for Gas-Solids

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of Wall Boundary Condition Parameters for Gas-Solids Fluidized-Bed Simulations Tingwen Li 1,2 , Sofiane Benyahia 1 1. National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507, U.S.A. 2. URS Corporation, Morgantown, WV 26505, U.S.A. Abstract Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the

  1. Evolution of Grain Boundary Networks in Extreme Radiation Environments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent Publications Evolution of Grain Boundary Networks in Extreme Radiation Environments Recent Publications J. K. Mason, O. K. Johnson, B. W. Reed, S. F. Li, J. S. Stolken, and M. Kumar; "Statistics of twin related domains and the grain boundary network," Acta Materialia, in press (2013) Y. M. Wang, F. Sansoz, T. LaGrange, R. T. Ott, J. Marian, T. W. Barbee Jr and A. V. Hamza; "Defective twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals", Nature Materials, 12, pp. 697 (2013).

  2. Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid M.; Clark, Blythe B.; Olmsted, David L.; Medlin, Douglas L.

    2009-09-01

    Interfaces are a critical determinant of the full range of materials properties, especially at the nanoscale. Computational and experimental methods developed a comprehensive understanding of nanograin evolution based on a fundamental understanding of internal interfaces in nanocrystalline nickel. It has recently been shown that nanocrystals with a bi-modal grain-size distribution possess a unique combination of high-strength, ductility and wear-resistance. We performed a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the structure and motion of internal interfaces in nanograined metal and the resulting grain evolution. The properties of grain boundaries are computed for an unprecedented range of boundaries. The presence of roughening transitions in grain boundaries is explored and related to dramatic changes in boundary mobility. Experimental observations show that abnormal grain growth in nanograined materials is unlike conventional scale material in both the level of defects and the formation of unfavored phases. Molecular dynamics simulations address the origins of some of these phenomena.

  3. The Puzzling Boundaries of Topological Quantum Matter | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Puzzling Boundaries of Topological Quantum Matter January 8, 2016 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Michael Levin, University of Chicago Location Building 203 Type Colloquium Series...

  4. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have...

  5. Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, M. Leuthold, J.; Peterlechner, M.; Divinski, S. V.; Song, X.; Wilde, G.

    2014-09-07

    Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline Cu samples with grain sizes, ?d?, of ?35 and ?44?nm produced by spark plasma sintering were investigated by the radiotracer method using the {sup 63}Ni isotope. The measured diffusivities, D{sub eff}, are comparable with those determined previously for Ni grain boundary diffusion in well-annealed, high purity, coarse grained, polycrystalline copper, substantiating the absence of a grain size effect on the kinetic properties of grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material at grain sizes d???35?nm. Simultaneously, the analysis predicts that if triple junction diffusion of Ni in Cu is enhanced with respect to the corresponding grain boundary diffusion rate, it is still less than 500?D{sub gb} within the temperature interval from 420?K to 470?K.

  6. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  7. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  8. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  9. Effects of tricritical points and morphotropic phase boundaries on the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    piezoelectric properties of ferroelectrics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effects of tricritical points and morphotropic phase boundaries on the piezoelectric properties of ferroelectrics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of tricritical points and morphotropic phase boundaries on the piezoelectric properties of ferroelectrics Authors: Porta, Marcel ; Lookman, Turab Publication Date: 2011-05-13 OSTI Identifier: 1099369 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  10. Evidence of ion mixing increasing the thermal boundary conductance across

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aluminum/silicon interfaces. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evidence of ion mixing increasing the thermal boundary conductance across aluminum/silicon interfaces. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence of ion mixing increasing the thermal boundary conductance across aluminum/silicon interfaces. Abstract not provided. Authors: Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel ; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin ; Ihlefeld, Jon F. ; Biedermann, Laura Butler ; Piekos, Edward Stanley ; Medlin, Douglas L. [1] ;

  11. Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries Fast and accurate reconstruction of imaging-derived geometries and subsequent quality mesh generation for biomedical computation are enabling technologies for

  12. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  13. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  14. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  15. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  16. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  17. Flavor twisted boundary conditions in the Breit frame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-08-01

    We use a generalization of chiral perturbation theory to account for the effects of flavor twisted boundary conditions in the Breit frame. The relevant framework for two light flavors is an SU(6|4) partially quenched theory, where the extra valence quarks differ only by their boundary conditions. Focusing on the pion electromagnetic form factor, finite volume corrections are calculated at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion and are estimated to be small on current lattices.

  18. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production (2009) | Department of Energy Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Presentation by Brian James, Strategic Analysis Inc., at the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. PDF icon bio_h2_workshop_james.pdf More Documents & Publications Technoeconomic

  19. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Idaho | Department of Energy 3: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to restore portions of the Kootenai River near the town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed project involves installing structures on the river banks, excavating areas

  20. DYNA3D Non-reflecting Boundary Conditions - Test Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zywicz, E

    2006-09-28

    Two verification problems were developed to test non-reflecting boundary segments in DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann, 1993). The problems simulate 1-D wave propagation in a semi-infinite rod using a finite length rod and non-reflecting boundary conditions. One problem examines pure pressure wave propagation, and the other problem explores pure shear wave propagation. In both problems the non-reflecting boundary segments yield results that differ only slightly (less than 6%) during a short duration from their corresponding theoretical solutions. The errors appear to be due to the inability to generate a true step-function compressive wave in the pressure wave propagation problem and due to segment integration inaccuracies in the shear wave propagation problem. These problems serve as verification problems and as regression test problems for DYNA3D.

  1. Explicit Expressions for 3D Boundary Integrals in Potential Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On employing isoparametric, piecewise linear shape functions over a flat triangular domain, exact expressions are derived for all surface potentials involved in the numerical solution of three-dimensional singular and hyper-singular boundary integral equations of potential theory. These formulae, which are valid for an arbitrary source point in space, are represented as analytic expressions over the edges of the integration triangle. They can be used to solve integral equations defined on polygonal boundaries via the collocation method or may be utilized as analytic expressions for the inner integrals in the Galerkin technique. Also, the constant element approximation can be directly obtained with no extra effort. Sample problems solved by the collocation boundary element method for the Laplace equation are included to validate the proposed formulae.

  2. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Boundary Facilities Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available

  3. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  4. Edge Plasma Boundary Layer Generated By Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2010-11-22

    This paper describes the structure of the electric current generated by external kink modes at the plasma edge using the ideally conducting plasma model. It is found that the edge current layer is created by both wall touching and free boundary kink modes. Near marginal stability, the total edge current has a universal expression as a result of partial compensation of the ?-functional surface current by the bulk current at the edge. The resolution of an apparent paradox with the pressure balance across the plasma boundary in the presence of the surface currents is provided.

  5. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  6. Subjective surfaces: a geometric model for boundary completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarti, Alessandro; Malladi, Ravi; Sethian, J.A.

    2000-06-01

    We present a geometric model and a computational method for segmentation of images with missing boundaries. In many situations, the human visual system fills in missing gaps in edges and boundaries, building and completing information that is not present. Boundary completion presents a considerable challenge in computer vision, since most algorithms attempt to exploit existing data. A large body of work concerns completion models, which postulate how to construct missing data; these models are often trained and specific to particular images. In this paper, we take the following, alternative perspective: we consider a reference point within an image as given, and then develop an algorithm which tries to build missing information on the basis of the given point of view and the available information as boundary data to the algorithm. Starting from this point of view, a surface is constructed. It is then evolved with the mean curvature flow in the metric induced by the image until a piecewise constant solution is reached. We test the computational model on modal completion, amodal completion, texture, photo and medical images. We extend the geometric model and the algorithm to 3D in order to extract shapes from low signal/noise ratio medical volumes. Results in 3D echocardiography and 3D fetal echography are presented.

  7. Continuous Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 SGP 31700 SGP 5400 SGP 71900 SGP 92500 NSA 5304 PYE 7605 LW CIRC GSFC SFC CAM SFC GSFC TOA CAM TOA model error(%) -10 -5 0 5 10 SGP 31700 SGP 5400 SGP 71900...

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of grain boundaries in thin nanocrystalline silicon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, G.P.; Doolen, G.D.; Mainieri, R.; Campbell, D.K.; Luchnikov, V.A. |

    1997-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the grain boundaries in thin polycrystalline silicon films (considered as promising material for future nanoelectronic devices) are investigated. It is shown that in polysilicon film with randomly oriented grains the majority of grain boundaries are disordered. However, some grains with small mutual orientation differences can form extended crystalline patterns. The structure of the grain boundaries satisfies the thermodynamical criterion. The majority of atoms in the grain boundaries are tetrahedrally coordinated with the nearest neighbors, even though the grain boundaries are disordered. The grain boundary matter is characterized as an amorphous phase with a characteristic tetragonality value.

  9. Shock wave convergence in water with parabolic wall boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanuka, D.; Shafer, D.; Krasik, Ya.

    2015-04-28

    The convergence of shock waves in water, where the cross section of the boundaries between which the shock wave propagates is either straight or parabolic, was studied. The shock wave was generated by underwater electrical explosions of planar Cu wire arrays using a high-current generator with a peak output current of ?45?kA and rise time of ?80?ns. The boundaries of the walls between which the shock wave propagates were symmetric along the z axis, which is defined by the direction of the exploding wires. It was shown that with walls having a parabolic cross section, the shock waves converge faster and the pressure in the vicinity of the line of convergence, calculated by two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled with the equations of state of water and copper, is also larger.

  10. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  11. Flavor twisted boundary conditions and the nucleon vector current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    Using flavor twisted boundary conditions, we study nucleon matrix elements of the vector current. We twist only the active quarks that couple to the current. Finite volume corrections due to twisted boundary conditions are determined using partially twisted, partially quenched, heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, which we develop for the graded group SU(7|5). Asymptotically these corrections are exponentially small in the volume, but can become pronounced for small twist angles. Utilizing the Breit frame does not mitigate volume corrections to nucleon vector current matrix elements. The derived expressions will allow for better controlled extractions of the isovector magnetic moment and the electromagnetic radii from simulations at zero lattice momentum. Our formalism, moreover, can be applied to any nucleon matrix elements.

  12. Intergranular degradation assessment via random grain boundary network analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Mukul (San Ramon, CA); Schwartz, Adam J. (Pleasanton, CA); King, Wayne E. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the resistance of polycrystalline materials to intergranular degradation or failure (IGDF), by analyzing the random grain boundary network connectivity (RGBNC) microstructure. Analysis of the disruption of the RGBNC microstructure may be assess the effectiveness of materials processing in increasing IGDF resistance. Comparison of the RGBNC microstructures of materials exposed to extreme operating conditions to unexposed materials may be used to diagnose and predict possible onset of material failure due to

  13. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2016 Title: RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus Climatically

  14. Vegetation Loblolly Pine N Site Boundary N Streams Roads

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loblolly Pine N Site Boundary N Streams Roads [2J Other Set-Asides 6£] Hy~ric Soils < ____ n ____ ** __ ._ ** _______ 300 0 - L " " " " , 300 781 .3a 600 Meters Soils Soil Series and Phase _TrB Figure 4-1. Plant CO/lllllllllties and soils associated with the Loblolly Pine Stand Set-Aside Area. sc 4-5 Set-Aside 4: Loblolly Pine Stand

  15. Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between

  16. Approximations of very weak solutions to boundary-value problems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Martin Olof

    2003-03-01

    Standard weak solutions to the Poisson problem on a bounded domain have square-integrable derivatives, which limits the admissible regularity of inhomogeneous data. The concept of solution may be further weakened in order to define solutions when data is rough, such as for inhomogeneous Dirichlet data that is only square-integrable over the boundary. Such very weak solutions satisfy a nonstandard variational form (u, v) = G(v). A Galerkin approximation combined with an approximation of the right-hand side G defines a finite-element approximation of the very weak solution. Applying conforming linear elements leads to a discrete solution equivalent to the text-book finite-element solution to the Poisson problem in which the boundary data is approximated by L{sub 2}-projections. The L{sub 2} convergence rate of the discrete solution is O(h{sub s}) for some s {element_of} (0,1/2) that depends on the shape of the domain, asserting a polygonal (two-dimensional) or polyhedral (three-dimensional) domain without slits and (only) square-integrable boundary data.

  17. Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Ruiyu N.; Han, J.

    2014-09-23

    The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistent with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2D video disdrometer is collecting precipitation data at Kessler Farm, near the SGP's Purcell Boundary Facility. In late April, an NCAR 2D video disdrometer was installed at...

  19. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.

  20. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to themore » strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.« less

  1. PERCOLATION ON GRAIN BOUNDARY NETWORKS: APPLICATION TO FISSION GAS RELEASE IN NUCLEAR FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul C. Millett

    2012-02-01

    The percolation behavior of grain boundary networks is characterized in two- and three-dimensional lattices with circular macroscale cross-sections that correspond to nuclear fuel elements. The percolation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries, and the subsequent percolation of grain boundary networks is the primary mechanism of fission gas release from nuclear fuels. Both radial cracks and radial gradients in grain boundary property distributions are correlated with the fraction of grain boundaries vented to the free surfaces. Our results show that cracks surprisingly do not significantly increase the percolation of uniform grain boundary networks. However, for networks with radial gradients in boundary properties, the cracks can considerably raise the vented grain boundary content.

  2. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bed simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open

  3. The Kastler-Kalau-Walze type theorem for six-dimensional manifolds with boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong E-mail: wangy581@nenu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we define lower dimensional volumes of spin manifolds with boundary. We compute the lower dimensional volume V ol{sub 6}{sup (1,3)} for 6-dimensional spin manifolds with boundary and derive the gravity on boundary from the noncommutative residue associated with Dirac operators. For 6-dimensional manifolds with boundary, we also get a Kastler-Kalau-Walze type theorem for a general fourth order operator.

  4. Uranium vacancy mobility at the ?5 symmetric tilt and ?5 twist grain boundaries in UO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered a simple tilt and a simple twist boundary the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.

  5. Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb[subscript

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1-x]Dy[subscript x]Fe[subscript 2] Alloys (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Tb[subscript 1-x]Dy[subscript x]Fe[subscript 2] Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb[subscript 1-x]Dy[subscript x]Fe[subscript 2] Alloys Authors: Bergstrom, Jr., Richard ; Wuttig, Manfred ; Cullen, James ; Zavalij, Peter ; Briber, Robert ; Dennis, Cindi ; Garlea, V. Ovidiu ; Laver, Mark [1] ; NIST) [2] ; ORNL) [2] ; Maryland) [2] + Show Author

  6. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2016 Title: RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations A

  7. Crystallographic Characteristics of Grain Boundaries in Dense Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam Helmick; Shen J. Dillon; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; Gregory S. Rohrer; Sridhar Seetharaman; Paul A. Salvador

    2010-04-01

    Grain-boundary plane, misorientation angle, grain size, and grain-boundary energy distributions were quantified using electron backscatter diffraction data for dense polycrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia, to understand interfacial crystallography in solid oxide fuel cells. Tape-cast samples were sintered at 14501C for 4 h and annealed for at least 100 h between 8001C and 16501C. Distributions obtained from both three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and stereological analyses of 2D sections demonstrated that the (100) boundary planes {(111)} have relative areas larger {smaller} than expected in a random distribution, and that the boundary plane distribution is inversely correlated to the boundary energy distribution.

  8. Frictional anisotropy under boundary lubrication: effect of surface texture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erck, R. A.; Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2009-06-15

    The friction coefficient was measured under boundary lubrication with a ball-on-flat contact configuration in unidirectional sliding. The ball was smooth and hardened 52100 steel. Discs were made from case-carburized and hardened 4620, annealed 1080, and 1018 steels with directionally ground surfaces. A synthetic lubricant of stock polyalphaolefin was used for testing. During testing with each material, a frictional spike was observed whenever the ball slid parallel to the grinding ridge on the disc surface. The average friction coefficient for all tests was about 0.1, which is typical for the boundary lubrication regime. The magnitude of the frictional spikes, which reached as high as a friction coefficient of 0.25, and their persistence depended on the hardness of the disc surface. On the basis of elastohydrodynamic theory, coupled with the observation of severe plastic deformation on the ridges parallel to the sliding direction, the frictional spike could be due to localized plastic deformation on the disc surface at locations of minimal thickness for the lubricant fluid film. This hypothesis was further supported by lack of frictional spikes in tests using discs coated with a thin film of diamond-like carbon, in which plastic deformation is minimal.

  9. Plasma Transport at the Magnetospheric Flank Boundary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otto, Antonius

    2012-04-23

    Progress is highlighted in these areas: 1. Model of magnetic reconnection induced by three-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes at the magnetospheric flank boundary; 2. Quantitative evaluation of mass transport from the magnetosheath onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 3. Comparison of mass transfer by cusp reconnection and Flank Kelvin Helmholtz modes; 4. Entropy constraint and plasma transport in the magnetotail - a new mechanism for current sheet thinning; 5. Test particle model for mass transport onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 6. Influence of density asymmetry and magnetic shear on (a) the linear and nonlinear growth of 3D Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes, and (b) three-dimensional KH mediated mass transport; 7. Examination of entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail; 8. Entropy change and plasma transport by KH mediated reconnection - mixing and heating of plasma; 9. Entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail - tail reconnection; and, 10. Wave coupling at the magnetospheric boundary and generation of kinetic Alfven waves.

  10. Optimized boundary driven flows for dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Cooper, C. M.; Weisberg, D. B.; Forest, C. B. [Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    We perform numerical optimization of the axisymmetric flows in a sphere to minimize the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr} required for dynamo onset. The optimization is done for the class of laminar incompressible flows of von Karman type satisfying the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation. Such flows are determined by equatorially antisymmetric profiles of driving azimuthal (toroidal) velocity specified at the spherical boundary. The model is relevant to the Madison plasma dynamo experiment, whose spherical boundary is capable of differential driving of plasma in the azimuthal direction. We show that the dynamo onset in this system depends strongly on details of the driving velocity profile and the fluid Reynolds number Re. It is found that the overall lowest Rm{sub cr} Almost-Equal-To 200 is achieved at Re Almost-Equal-To 240 for the flow, which is hydrodynamically marginally stable. We also show that the optimized flows can sustain dynamos only in the range Rm{sub cr}

  11. Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedele, Francesco; Eppstein, Margaret J. . E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu; Laible, Jeffrey P.; Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2005-11-20

    The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

  12. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  13. THE HELIOTAIL REVEALED BY THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D. J.; Dayeh, M. A.; Livadiotis, G.; Funsten, H. O.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2013-07-10

    Recent combined observations from the first three years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) data allow us to examine the heliosphere's downwind region-the heliotail-for the first time. In contrast to a preliminary identification of a narrow ''offset heliotail'' structure, we find a broad slow solar wind plasma sheet crossing essentially the entire downwind side of the heliosphere at low to mid-latitudes, with fast wind tail regions to the north and south. The slow wind plasma sheet exhibits the steepest ENA spectra in the IBEX sky maps, appears as a two-lobed structure (lobes on the port and starboard sides), and is twisted in the sense of (but at a smaller angle than) the external magnetic field. The overall heliotail structure clearly demonstrates the intermediate nature of the heliosphere's interstellar interaction, where both the external dynamic and magnetic pressures strongly affect the heliosphere.

  14. The boundary effects of the shock wave dispersion in discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2008-03-15

    Interaction of shock waves with a weakly ionized gas generated by discharges has been studied. An additional thermal mechanism of the shock wave dispersion on the boundary between a neutral gas and discharge has been proposed [A. Markhotok, S. Popovic, and L. Vuskovic, Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Atomic Processes in Plasmas, March 19-22, 2007 (NIST, Gaitersburg, MD, 2007)]. This mechanism can explain a whole set of thermal features of the shock wave-plasma interaction, including acceleration of the shock wave, broadening or splitting of the deflection signals and its consecutive restoration. Application has been made in the case of a shock wave interacting with a laser induced plasma. The experimental observations support well the results of calculation based on this model.

  15. The growth mechanism of grain boundary carbide in Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin; Peng, Jianchao

    2013-07-15

    The growth mechanism of grain boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in nickel base Alloy 690 after aging at 715 C was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundary carbides have coherent orientation relationship with only one side of the matrix. The incoherent phase interface between M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and matrix was curved, and did not lie on any specific crystal plane. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide transforms from the matrix phase directly at the incoherent interface. The flat coherent phase interface generally lies on low index crystal planes, such as (011) and (111) planes. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide transforms from a transition phase found at curved coherent phase interface. The transition phase has a complex hexagonal crystal structure, and has coherent orientation relationship with matrix and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}: (111){sub matrix}//(0001){sub transition}//(111){sub carbide}, <112{sup }>{sub matrix}//<21{sup }10>{sub transition}//<112{sup }>{sub carbide}. The crystal lattice constants of transition phase are c{sub transition}=?(3)a{sub matrix} and a{sub transition}=?(6)/2a{sub matrix}. Based on the experimental results, the growth mechanism of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the formation mechanism of transition phase are discussed. - Highlights: A transition phase was observed at the coherent interfaces of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and matrix. The transition phase has hexagonal structure, and is coherent with matrix and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} transforms from the matrix directly at the incoherent phase interface.

  16. Computer simulation study of the structure of vacancies in grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brokman, A.; Bristowe, P.D.; Balluffi, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of vacancies in grain boundaries has been investigated by computer molecular statics employing pairwise potentials. In order to gain an impression of the vacancy structures which may occur generally, a number of variables was investigated including: metal type, boundary type, degree of lattice coincidence and choice of boundary site. In all cases the vacancies remained as distinguishable point defects in the relatively irregular boundary structures. However, it was found that the vacancy often induced relatively large atomic displacements in the core of the boundary. These displacements often occurred only in the direct vicinity of the vacancy, but in certain cases they were widely distributed in the boundary, sometimes at surprisingly large distances.

  17. Consideration of Grain Size Distribution in the Diffusion of Fission Gas to Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul C. Millett; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

    2013-09-01

    We analyze the accumulation of fission gas on grain boundaries in a polycrystalline microstructure with a distribution of grain sizes. The diffusion equation is solved throughout the microstructure to evolve the gas concentration in space and time. Grain boundaries are treated as infinite sinks for the gas concentration, and we monitor the cumulative gas inventory on each grain boundary throughout time. We consider two important cases: first, a uniform initial distribution of gas concentration without gas production (correlating with post-irradiation annealing), and second, a constant gas production rate with no initial gas concentration (correlating with in-reactor conditions). The results show that a single-grain-size model, such as the Booth model, over predicts the gas accumulation on grain boundaries compared with a polycrystal with a grain size distribution. Also, a considerable degree of scatter, or variability, exists in the grain boundary gas accumulation when comparing all of the grain boundaries in the microstructure.

  18. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    1996-11-08

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  19. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  20. Surface relief produced by diffusion induced boundary migration in Cu-Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Y.S.; Meyrick, G.; Shewmon, P.G.

    1984-03-01

    Experimental observations are presented that demonstrate that diffusion induced grain boundary migration in copper foils exposed to zinc vapor, from a Cu-15 pct Zn alloy, can be studied directl after treatment without etching. The general characteristics of migration are in accord with previous investigations, but novel changes in the surface topography are described. Pits were formed on the surface of areas swept by boundary migration; also, the surface was often converted into a series of corrugations. The formation of pits suggests that the grain boundary diffusivity of zinc exceeds that of copper. The corrugations are believed to indicate that boundaries sometimes move in an intermittent manner.

  1. Grain Boundary Percolation Modeling of Fission Gas Release in Oxide Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul C. Millett; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

    2012-05-01

    We present a new approach to fission gas release modeling in oxide fuels based on grain boundary network percolation. The method accounts for variability in the bubble growth and coalescence rates on individual grain boundaries, and the resulting effect on macroscopic fission gas release. Two-dimensional representa- tions of fuel pellet microstructures are considered, and the resulting gas release rates are compared with traditional two-stage Booth models, which do not account for long-range percolation on grain boundary net- works. The results show that the requirement of percolation of saturated grain boundaries can considerably reduce the total gas release rates, particularly when gas resolution is considered.

  2. Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and rhombohedral lead zirconate titanate films Citation Details In-Document Search This content will...

  3. Grain boundary chemistry effects on environment-induced crack growth of iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.H.

    1992-11-01

    Relation between grain boundary chemistry and environment-induced crack growth of Fe-based alloys is reviewed. The importance of the cleanliness of steels is clearly demonstrated by direct relations between grain boundary chemistry and crack growth behavior for both H and anodic dissolution-induced crack growth. Relationships between strain to failure, work of fracture, K[sub ISCC], crack velocity and fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry are presented. Only results in which the grain boundary chemistry has been measured directly by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) on intergranular surfaces exposed by in situ fracture have been considered in this review.

  4. Grain boundary chemistry effects on environment-induced crack growth of iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.H.

    1992-11-01

    Relation between grain boundary chemistry and environment-induced crack growth of Fe-based alloys is reviewed. The importance of the cleanliness of steels is clearly demonstrated by direct relations between grain boundary chemistry and crack growth behavior for both H and anodic dissolution-induced crack growth. Relationships between strain to failure, work of fracture, K{sub ISCC}, crack velocity and fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry are presented. Only results in which the grain boundary chemistry has been measured directly by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) on intergranular surfaces exposed by in situ fracture have been considered in this review.

  5. Inflow/Outflow Boundary Conditions for Particle-Based Blood Flow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY CrossMark click for updates RESEARCH ARTICLE InflowOutflow Boundary ... Finally, we demon- strated the effectiveness of the new methodology in simulations of ...

  6. Effect of the pre-existing carbides on the grain boundary network during grain boundary engineering in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhou, Bangxin; Bai, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out on an aging-treated nickel based Alloy 690, which has precipitated carbides at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction technique was used to investigate the grain boundary networks. Results show that, compared with the solution-annealed samples, the aging-treated samples with pre-existing carbides at grain boundaries need longer duration or higher temperature during annealing after low-strain tensile deformation for forming high proportion of low-? coincidence site lattice grain boundaries (more than 75%). The reason is that the primary recrystallization is inhibited or retarded owing to that the pre-existing carbides are barriers to grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: Study of GBE as function of pre-existing GB carbides, tensile strain and annealing Recrystallization of GBE is inhibited or retarded by the pre-existing carbides. Retained carbides after annealing show the original GB positions. More than 80% of special GBs were formed after the modification of GBE processing. Multiple twinning during recrystallization is the key process of GBE.

  7. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  8. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  9. Boundary uniqueness theorems for functions whose integrals over hyperbolic discs vanish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochakovskaya, Oksana A

    2013-02-28

    Sharp conditions are found describing the admissible rate of decrease of a nontrivial function whose integrals over all hyperbolic discs with fixed radius vanish. For the first time, the boundary behaviour of the function is investigated in a neighbourhood of a single point on the boundary of the domain of definition. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  10. Cooperative chemical rebonding in the segregation of impurities in silicon grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, A.; Chisholm, M.F.; Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T.

    1996-12-01

    With ab initio calculations the authors show that the experimentally observed large segregation energies of As at Si grain boundaries can be explained by the formation of isolated dimers or ordered chains of dimers of threefold-coordinated As along the cores of grain boundary dislocations. They also find the intriguing possibility that As segregation may drive structural transformation of certain grain boundaries. Recently, they have obtained the first atomic-resolution STEM images of As in a Si grain boundary, consistent with the formation of As dimers. Segregation energy of As dimers was found to be significantly higher in isolated dislocation cores, where larger site-variation in strain than in grain boundaries lead to further lowering of the electronic levels of As deep into the bandgap.

  11. Further development and testing of a second-order bulk boundary layer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasner, R.D.

    1993-05-03

    A one-layer bulk boundary layer model is developed. The model predicts the mixed layer values of the potential temperature, mixing ratio, and u- and v-momentum. The model also predicts the depth of the boundary layer and the vertically integrated turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). The TKE is determined using a second-order closure that relates the rate of dissipation to the TKE. The fractional area covered by rising motion sigma and the entrainment rate (E) are diagnostically determined. The model is used to study the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) using data from the Wangara, Australia boundary layer experiment. The Wangara data is also used as an observation base to validate model results. A further study is accomplished by simulating the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over an ocean surface. This study is designed to find the steady-state solutions of the prognostic variable.

  12. Geometric multigrid for an implicit-time immersed boundary method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guy, Robert D.; Philip, Bobby; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2014-10-12

    The immersed boundary (IB) method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses Lagrangian variables to describe the deformations and resulting forces of the structure and Eulerian variables to describe the motion and forces of the fluid. Explicit time stepping schemes for the IB method require solvers only for Eulerian equations, for which fast Cartesian grid solution methods are available. Such methods are relatively straightforward to develop and are widely used in practice but often require very small time steps to maintain stability. Implicit-time IB methods permit the stable use of large time steps, but efficient implementations of such methodsmore » require significantly more complex solvers that effectively treat both Lagrangian and Eulerian variables simultaneously. Moreover, several different approaches to solving the coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian equations have been proposed, but a complete understanding of this problem is still emerging. This paper presents a geometric multigrid method for an implicit-time discretization of the IB equations. This multigrid scheme uses a generalization of box relaxation that is shown to handle problems in which the physical stiffness of the structure is very large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the algorithms described herein. Finally, these tests show that using multigrid as a preconditioner for a Krylov method yields improvements in both robustness and efficiency as compared to using multigrid as a solver. They also demonstrate that with a time step 100–1000 times larger than that permitted by an explicit IB method, the multigrid-preconditioned implicit IB method is approximately 50–200 times more efficient than the explicit method.« less

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  14. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available

  15. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Extended Facilities Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available

  16. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PlainsInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Southern Great Plains Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through

  17. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; T Jackson; B.Kustas; PJ Lamb; GM McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Turner

    2007-06-30

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign is a field experiment designed to collect a comprehensive data set that can be used to quantify the interactions that occur between the atmosphere, biosphere, land surface, and subsurface. A particular focus will be on how these interactions modulate the abundance and characteristics of small and medium size cumuliform clouds that are generated by local convection. These interactions are not well understood and are responsible for large uncertainties in global climate models, which are used to forecast future climate states. The campaign will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations.

  18. Searching for Global Dimming Evidence at SGP and Update of ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    frequency. A recent news article on global dimming in the web-based newspaper the Guardian Unlimited seems to have brought this issue to the...

  19. Preliminary Analysis of ARM SGP Area Sky Cover and Downwelling SW Irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clarifying and Implementing a Stricter DOD Definition Across Datastreams C. Sivaraman, B. Ermold, M. Macduff Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Definition of DOD: All dimension, attribute and variable types and names are considered part of a DOD. A change in any part of the DOD is considered a version change. Outcomes: ACRF enforces greater consistency in data Downstream users benefit (DQ, VAPs, scientists) Identify inconsistencies across datastreams Datastream development is more efficient

  20. ARM - PI Product - SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    removed, however a multi-layer flag is included. Data Details Contact Heike Kalesse Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research kalesse@tropos.de Permoserstr. 15 Leipzig, 04318...

  1. Calculation of grain boundary normals directly from 3D microstructure images

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lieberman, E. J.; Rollett, A. D.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Kober, E. M.

    2015-03-11

    The determination of grain boundary normals is an integral part of the characterization of grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. These normal vectors are difficult to quantify due to the discretized nature of available microstructure characterization techniques. The most common method to determine grain boundary normals is by generating a surface mesh from an image of the microstructure, but this process can be slow, and is subject to smoothing issues. A new technique is proposed, utilizing first order Cartesian moments of binary indicator functions, to determine grain boundary normals directly from a voxelized microstructure image. In order to validate the accuracymore » of this technique, the surface normals obtained by the proposed method are compared to those generated by a surface meshing algorithm. Specifically, the local divergence between the surface normals obtained by different variants of the proposed technique and those generated from a surface mesh of a synthetic microstructure constructed using a marching cubes algorithm followed by Laplacian smoothing is quantified. Next, surface normals obtained with the proposed method from a measured 3D microstructure image of a Ni polycrystal are used to generate grain boundary character distributions (GBCD) for Σ3 and Σ9 boundaries, and compared to the GBCD generated using a surface mesh obtained from the same image. Finally, the results show that the proposed technique is an efficient and accurate method to determine voxelized fields of grain boundary normals.« less

  2. Response to Comment on Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-09-15

    A response is given to Comment on Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall? [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)].

  3. Uranium vacancy mobility at the Σ5 symmetric tilt and Σ5 twist grain boundaries in UO₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Andersson, David A.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic transport at grain boundaries in oxides dictates a number of important phenomena, from ionic conductivity to sintering to creep. For nuclear fuels, it also influences fission gas bubble nucleation and growth. Here, using a combination of atomistic calculations and object kinetic Monte Carlo (okMC) simulations, we examine the kinetic pathways associated with uranium vacancies at two model grain boundaries in UO2. The barriers for vacancy motion were calculated using the nudged elastic band method at all uranium sites at each grain boundary and were used as the basis of the okMC simulations. For both boundaries considered – a simplemore » tilt and a simple twist boundary – the mobility of uranium vacancies is significantly higher than in the bulk. For the tilt boundary, there is clearly preferred migration along the tilt axis as opposed to in the perpendicular direction while, for the twist boundary, migration is essentially isotropic within the boundary plane. These results show that cation defect mobility in fluorite-structured materials is enhanced at certain types of grain boundaries and is dependent on the boundary structure with the tilt boundary exhibiting higher rates of migration than the twist boundary.« less

  4. H.R.S. 205-3.1 - Amendments to District Boundaries | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: H.R.S. 205-3.1 - Amendments to District BoundariesLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  5. Identification of sub-grains and low angle boundaries beyond the angular resolution of EBSD maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, L.; Kratsch, D.; Salib, M.; Gey, N.

    2014-12-15

    A new method called ALGrId (Anti-Leak GRain IDentification) is proposed for the detection of sub-grains beyond the relative angular resolution of Electron Backscatter Diffraction maps. It does not use any additional information such as Kikuchi Pattern Quality map nor need data filtering. It uses a modified Dijkstra algorithm which seeks the continuous set of boundaries having the highest average disorientation angle. - Highlights: ALGrId is a new method to identify sub-grains and low angle boundaries in EBSD maps. Unlike classical methods, ALGrId works even beyond the relative angular resolution. If the orientation noise peaks at 0.7, ALGrid detects 0.4-boundaries correctly. In the same example, the classical algorithm identifies 1.1-boundaries only.

  6. Boundary Layer The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    layer is the atmosphere between the Earth's surface and an altitude of about 1 to 2 kilometers. In a marine environment, boundary-layer clouds passively filter the sun, but also...

  7. Role of {Sigma}5, (210), [001] CSL boundary on displacement cascade in bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandi, Prithwish K.; Dholakia, Manan; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2012-06-05

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to understand the role of grain boundaries (GB) on radiation damage in bcc Fe bicrystal. The calculations were performed for a {Sigma}5, (210), [001] symmetric tilt grain boundary for different cases where the primary knock-on atom (PKA) is placed at distances of a{sub csl}, to 15a{sub csl}, from the grain boundary plane. Here, a{sub csl}, is lattice parameter of the coincidence site lattice. Present study shows that the influence of GB on the numbers of surviving defects within a grain is confined within a distance, d{sub opt} < 9a{sub csl}. Our studies also indicate that the grain boundary acts as a reservoir for defects.

  8. Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb 1 - x Dy x Fe 2 Alloys

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb 1 - x Dy x Fe 2 Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb 1 - x Dy x Fe 2 Alloys Authors: Bergstrom, Richard ; Wuttig, Manfred ; Cullen, James ; Zavalij, Peter ; Briber, Robert ; Dennis, Cindi ; Garlea, V. Ovidiu ; Laver, Mark Publication Date: 2013-07-03 OSTI Identifier: 1103738 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review

  9. Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and rhombohedral

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lead zirconate titanate films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and rhombohedral lead zirconate titanate films Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 26, 2016 Title: Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and rhombohedral lead zirconate titanate films Authors: Marincel, D. M. ; Zhang, H. R. ; Britson, J. ; Belianinov, A. ; Jesse, S. ; Kalinin, S. V. ; Chen, L. Q. ;

  10. Evolution of an interfacial crack on the concrete-embankment boundary

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Evolution of an interfacial crack on the concrete-embankment boundary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evolution of an interfacial crack on the concrete-embankment boundary Authors: Glascoe, L ; Antoun, T ; Kanarska, Y ; Lomove, I ; Hall, R ; Woodson, S ; Smith, J Publication Date: 2013-07-10 OSTI Identifier: 1119958 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-645956 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Technical Report Research

  11. Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics N. Kitova and M. A. Mikhalev Institute of Electronics Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Sofia 1784, Bulgaria K. Ivanova Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania M. Ausloos Institute of Physics University of Liège Liège, Belgium T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud dynamics is

  12. Determination of surface recombination velocity at a grain boundary using electron-beam-induced current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burk, D.E.; Kanner, S.; Muyshondt, J.E.; Shaulis, D.S.; Russell, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine the surface recombination velocity at a grain boundary surface, computer-aided calculations of the theoretical electron-beam-induced-current response to a point source excitation are fitted to data taken as a function of distance from the grain boundary. It is demonstrated that the data is in good agreement with this theoretical response for distances greater than two maximum penetration depths of the incident electron beam.

  13. Quantifying the influence of twin boundaries on the deformation of nanocrystalline copper using atomistic simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Garritt J.; Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2014-09-22

    Over the past decade, numerous efforts have sought to understand the influence of twin boundaries on the behavior of polycrystalline materials. Early results suggested that twin boundaries within nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals have a considerable effect on material behavior by altering the activated deformation mechanisms. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the role of twin boundaries on the deformation of <100> columnar nanocrystalline copper at room temperature under uniaxial strain. We leverage non-local kinematic metrics, formulated from continuum mechanics theory, to compute atomically-resolved rotational and strain fields during plastic deformation. These results are then utilized tomore » compute the distribution of various nanoscale mechanisms during straining, and quantitatively resolve their contribution to the total strain accommodation within the microstructure, highlighting the fundamental role of twin boundaries. Our results show that nanoscale twins influence nanocrystalline copper by altering the cooperation of fundamental deformation mechanisms and their contributed role in strain accommodation, and we present new methods for extracting useful information from atomistic simulations. The simulation results suggest a tension–compression asymmetry in the distribution of deformation mechanisms and strain accommodation by either dislocations or twin boundary mechanisms. In highly twinned microstructures, twin boundary migration can become a significant deformation mode, in comparison to lattice dislocation plasticity in non-twinned columnar microstructures, especially during compression.« less

  14. Spatially Resolved Mapping of Electrical Conductivity around Individual Domain (Grain) Boundaries in Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Clark, Kendal W [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; He, Guowei [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Feenstra, Randall [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

    2013-01-01

    Graphene films can now be produced on the scale of up to meters. However, all large-scale graphene films contain topological defects that can significantly affect the characteristic transport behaviors of graphene. Here, we spatially map the structures and electronic transport near specific domain and grain boundaries in graphene, and evaluate effects of different types of defect on the electronic conductivity in epitaxial graphene grown on SiC and CVD graphene on Cu subsequently transferred to a SiO2 substrate. We use a combined approach with a multi-probe scanning tunneling potentiometry to investigate both structures and transport at individual grain boundaries and domain boundaries that are defined by coalesced grains, surface steps, and changes in layer thickness. It is found that the substrate step on SiC presents a significant potential barrier for electron transport of epitaxial graphene due to the reduced charge transport from the substrate at the step edges, monolayer-bilayer boundaries exhibit a high resistivity that can change depending on directions of the current across the boundary, and the resistivity of grain boundaries changes with the transition width of the disordered region between two adjacent grains in graphene. The detailed understanding of graphene defects will provide the feedback for controlled engineering of defects in large-scale graphene films.

  15. Multiscale simulation of xenon diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO₂

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andersson, David A.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Vyas, Shyam; Nerikar, Pankaj; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2015-07-01

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. The segregation rate is controlled by diffusion of fission gas atoms through the grains and interaction with the boundaries. Based on the mechanisms established from earlier density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, diffusion models for xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO₂ have been derived for both intrinsic (no irradiation) and irradiation conditions. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model formore » the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO₂ (Σ5 tilt, Σ5 twist and a high angle random boundary), as derived from atomistic calculations. The present model does not attempt to capture nucleation or growth of fission gas bubbles at the grain boundaries. The point defect and Xe diffusion and segregation models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as to simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures.« less

  16. Uranium vacancy mobility at the sigma 5 symmetric tilt grain boundary in UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2012-05-02

    An important consequence of the fissioning process occurring during burnup is the formation of fission products. These fission products alter the thermo-mechanical properties of the fuel. They also lead to macroscopic changes in the fuel structure, including the formation of bubbles that are connected to swelling of the fuel. Subsequent release of fission gases increase the pressure in the plenum and can cause changes in the properties of the fuel pin itself. It is thus imperative to understand how fission products, and fission gases in particular, behave within the fuel in order to predict the performance of the fuel under operating conditions. Fission gas redistribution within the fuel is governed by mass transport and the presence of sinks such as impurities, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Thus, to understand how the distribution of fission gases evolves in the fuel, we must understand the underlying transport mechanisms, tied to the concentrations and mobilities of defects within the material, and how these gases interact with microstructural features that might act as sinks. Both of these issues have been addressed in previous work under NEAMS. However, once a fission product has reached a sink, such as a grain boundary, its mobility may be different there than in the grain interior and predicting how, for example, bubbles nucleate within grain boundaries necessitates an understanding of how fission gases diffuse within boundaries. That is the goal of the present work. In this report, we describe atomic level simulations of uranium vacancy diffusion in the pressence of a {Sigma}5 symmetric tilt boundary in urania (UO{sub 2}). This boundary was chosen as it is the simplest of the boundaries we considered in previous work on segregation and serves as a starting point for understanding defect mobility at boundaries. We use a combination of molecular statics calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to determine how the mobility of uranium vacancies is altered at this particular grain boundary. Given that the diffusion of fission gases such as Xe are tied to the mobility of uranium vacancies, these results given insight into how fission gas mobility differs at grain boundaries compared to bulk urania.

  17. Effect of Grain Boundaries on Krypton Segregation Behavior in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valderrama, Billy; He, Lingfeng; Henderson, Hunter B.; Pakarinen, Janne; Jaques, Brian; Gan, Jian; Butt, Darryl P.; Allen, Todd R.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2014-11-01

    Fission products, such as krypton (Kr), are known to be insoluble within UO2, segregating towards grain boundaries, eventually leading to a lowering of the thermal conductivity and fuel swelling. Recent computational studies have identified that differences in grain boundary structure have a significant effect on the segregation behavior of fission products. However, experimental work supporting these simulations is lacking. Atom probe tomography was used to measure the Kr distribution across grain boundaries in UO2. Polycrystalline depleted-UO2 samples was irradiated with 0.7 and 1.8 MeV Kr-ions and annealed to 1000C, 1300C, and 1600C for 1 hour to produce a Kr-bubble dominated microstructure. The results of this work indicate a strong dependence of Kr concentration as a function of grain boundary structure. Temperature also influences grain boundary chemistry with greater Kr concentration evident at higher temperatures, resulting in a reduced Kr concentration in the bulk. While Kr migration is active at elevated temperatures, no changes in grain size or texture were observed in the irradiated UO2 samples.

  18. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  19. Testing thermal gradient driving force for grain boundary migration using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Strong thermal gradients in low-thermal-conductivity ceramics may drive extended defects, such as grain boundaries and voids, to migrate in preferential directions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study thermal gradient driven grain boundary migration and to verify a previously proposed thermal gradient driving force equation, using uranium dioxide as a model system. It is found that a thermal gradient drives grain boundaries to migrate up the gradient and the migration velocity increases under a constant gradient owing to the increase in mobility with temperature. Different grain boundaries migrate at very different rates due to their different intrinsic mobilities. The extracted mobilities from the thermal gradient driven simulations are compared with those calculated from two other well-established methods and good agreement between the three different methods is found, demonstrating that the theoretical equation of the thermal gradient driving force is valid, although a correction of one input parameter should be made. The discrepancy in the grain boundary mobilities between modeling and experiments is also discussed.

  20. All bulk and boundary unitary cubic curvature theories in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guellue, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram

    2011-01-15

    We construct all the bulk and boundary unitary cubic curvature parity invariant gravity theories in three dimensions in (anti)-de Sitter spaces. For bulk unitarity, our construction is based on the principle that the free theory of the cubic curvature theory reduces to one of the three known unitary theories which are the cosmological Einstein-Hilbert theory, the quadratic theory of the scalar curvature, or the new massive gravity (NMG). Bulk and boundary unitarity in NMG is in conflict; therefore, cubic theories that are unitary both in the bulk and on the boundary have free theories that reduce to the other two alternatives. We also study the unitarity of the Born-Infeld extensions of NMG to all orders in curvature.

  1. Negative plasma potential in a multidipole chamber with a dielectric coated plasma boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2012-05-15

    Negative plasma potentials with respect to a grounded wall that was coated with a dielectric have been achieved in an electropositive plasma confined by a multidipole device. A Langmuir probe was used to measure the density and temperatures of the bi-Maxwellian distribution electrons and an emissive probe was used to measure the plasma potential profile near the plasma boundary. For many discharge parameters, the potential profile was that of a typical electropositive sheath, but it was shifted negative due to negative charge accumulated on the plasma-surface boundary. A virtual cathode was observed near the boundary when the neutral pressure, primary electron energy, and/or discharge current were low ({approx}2 x 10{sup -4} Torr, {approx}60 eV, and 80 mA, respectively). The behavior of the sheath potential was shown to be consistent with that predicted by particle balance and a qualitative mechanism for wall charging is presented.

  2. Phase transitions in a reaction-diffusion model on a line with boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khorrami, Mohammad Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2014-03-15

    A one-dimensional model on a line of length L is investigated, which involves particle diffusion as well as single particle annihilation. There are also creation and annihilation at the boundaries. The static and dynamical behaviors of the system are studied. It is seen that the system could exhibit a dynamical phase transition. For small drift velocities, the relaxation time does not depend on the absorption rates at the boundaries. This is the fast phase. For large velocities, the smaller of the absorption rates at boundaries enter the relaxation rate and makes it longer. This is the slow phase. Finally, the effect of a random particle creation in the bulk is also investigated.

  3. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  4. Non-modal analysis of the diocotron instability for cylindrical geometry with conducting boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Seok Kim, Jin; Jo, Younghyun; June Lee, Hae; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Kharkiv National Automobile and Highway University, 61002 Kharkiv

    2014-05-15

    The temporal evolution of the linear diocotron instability of a cylindrical annular plasma column surrounded by a conducting boundary has been investigated by using the methodology of the cylindrical shearing modes. The linear solution of the initial and boundary-value problems is obtained which is valid for any time at which linear effects dominate. The solution reveals that the initial perturbations of the electron density pass through the stage of the non-modal evolution when the perturbation experiences spatio-temporal distortion pertinent to the considered geometry of the electron column. The result is confirmed by a two-dimensional cylindrical particle-in-cell simulation.

  5. Modeling to Support Groundwater Contaminant Boundaries for the Shoal Underground Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Pohlmann; G. Pohll; J. Chapman; A. Hassan; R. Carroll; C. Shirley

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test through numerical modeling using site-specific hydrologic data. The ultimate objective is the development of a contaminant boundary, a model-predicted perimeter defining the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from the underground test throughout 1,000 years at a prescribed level of confidence. This boundary will be developed using the numerical models described here, after they are approved for that purpose by DOE and NDEP.

  6. Modeling to Support Groundwater Contaminant Boundaries for the Shoal Underground Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Pohlmann; G. Pohll; J. Chapman; A. Hassan; R. Carroll; C. Shirley

    2004-03-01

    Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test are characterized using three-dimensional numerical models, based on site-specific hydrologic data. The objective of this modeling is to provide the flow and transport models needed to develop a contaminant boundary defining the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater at the site throughout 1,000 years at a prescribed level of confidence. This boundary will then be used to manage the Project Shoal Area for the protection of the public and the environment.

  7. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the tracking result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 0.08 mm and 96.7% 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking tumor boundary in EPID images by using a LSM-based algorithm. Experimental results conducted on phantom and clinical EPID images demonstrated the effectiveness of the tracking algorithm for visible tumor target. Compared with previous tracking methods, the authors algorithm has the potential to improve the tracking accuracy in radiation therapy. In addition, real-time tumor boundary information within the irradiation field will be potentially useful for further applications, such as adaptive beam delivery, dose evaluation.

  8. Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb1 xDyxFe2 Alloys (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Tb1 xDyxFe2 Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Morphotropic Phase Boundaries in Ferromagnets: Tb1 xDyxFe2 Alloys The structure and properties of the ferromagnet Tb1 xDyxFe2 are explored through the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) separating ferroic phases of differing symmetry. Our synchrotron data support a first order structural transition, with a broadening MPB width at higher temperatures. The optimal point for magnetomechanical applications

  9. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  10. Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slevinsky, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

  11. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  12. Measurements of stress fields near a grain boundary: Exploring blocked arrays of dislocations in 3D

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Y.; Collins, D. M.; Tarleton, E.; Hofmann, F.; Tischler, J.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.

    2015-06-24

    The interaction between dislocation pile-ups and grain boundaries gives rise to heterogeneous stress distributions when a structural metal is subjected to mechanical loading. Such stress heterogeneity leads to preferential sites for damage nucleation and therefore is intrinsically linked to the strength and ductility of polycrystalline metals. To date the majority of conclusions have been drawn from 2D experimental investigations at the sample surface, allowing only incomplete observations. Our purpose here is to significantly advance the understanding of such problems by providing quantitative measurements of the effects of dislocation pile up and grain boundary interactions in 3D. This is accomplished throughmore »the application of differential aperture X-ray Laue micro-diffraction (DAXM) and high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) techniques. Our analysis demonstrates a similar strain characterization capability between DAXM and HR-EBSD and the variation of stress intensity in 3D reveals that different parts of the same grain boundary may have different strengths in resisting slip transfer, likely due to the local grain boundary curvature.« less

  13. A REDUCED-BOUNDARY-FUNCTION METHOD FOR LONGITUDINAL SOLUTION DISPERSION IN SYMMETRIC CONFINED FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhijie

    2013-07-01

    We present a reduced-boundary-function method for longitudinal solute transport in symmetric laminar flows. Flow is confined by two flat plates separated by a distance of 2a or by a tube with a radius of a (Figure 1). The standard advection-diffusion equation is mapped onto the boundary (r = a and r = 0, where r is the distance from the centerline shown in Figure 1). The original problem of solving c(x,r,t) is reduced to solve the solutions of c at the boundary, and the problem dimensionality is reduced from 3 to 2. Final results show that the boundary concentration ca(x,t) = c(x, r = a,t) is advected at the mean velocity with a dispersion equal to the molecular diffusion. The centerline concentration c0(x,t) = c(x,r = 0,t) is also advected at the mean velocity, but with a dispersion much larger than the Taylor dispersion. The cross-sectional average concentration is in agreement with the classical Taylor dispersion by neglecting higher order contributions. This study is relevant to the upscaling of solute transport.

  14. Solid State Theory of Photovoltaic Materials: Nanoscale Grain Boundaries and Doping CIGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zunger, A

    2005-01-01

    We use modern first-principles electronic structure theory to investigate (1) why are grain boundaries in chalcopyrites passive; (2) can chalcopyrites be doped by transition metals, and; (3) can hot electrons and carrier multiplication be efficient in quantum-dot solar cells.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  16. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Observations of Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Returns at SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chandra, A. S., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chandra AS, P Kollias, SE Giangrande, and SA Klein. 2010. "Long-term observations of the convective boundary layer using insect radar returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility." Journal of Climate, 23, 5699-5714. Example of time-height mapping

  17. Setting up boundary conditions for soil-structure interaction problems with DYNALK (a link from TENSOR to DYNA3D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thigpen, L.; Peterson, J.C.

    1983-08-01

    This report provides instructions on the use of the DYNALK computer program to generate boundary conditions for a soil island used in soil-structure interaction problems. DYNALK converts temporal motions from 2-D TENSOR calculations into appropriate three-dimensional boundary conditions for a DYNA3D soil-structure interaction problem. The program is operational on the CRAY-1 computer.

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  19. A coupling strategy for nonlocal and local diffusion models with mixed volume constraints and boundary conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    D'Elia, Marta; Perego, Mauro; Bochev, Pavel B.; Littlewood, David John

    2015-12-21

    We develop and analyze an optimization-based method for the coupling of nonlocal and local diffusion problems with mixed volume constraints and boundary conditions. The approach formulates the coupling as a control problem where the states are the solutions of the nonlocal and local equations, the objective is to minimize their mismatch on the overlap of the nonlocal and local domains, and the controls are virtual volume constraints and boundary conditions. When some assumptions on the kernel functions hold, we prove that the resulting optimization problem is well-posed and discuss its implementation using Sandia’s agile software components toolkit. As a result,more » the latter provides the groundwork for the development of engineering analysis tools, while numerical results for nonlocal diffusion in three-dimensions illustrate key properties of the optimization-based coupling method.« less

  20. A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.

    1998-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition.

  1. THE MONOCLINIC PHASE IN PZT: NEW LIGHT ON MORPHOTROPIC PHASE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NOHEDA,B.; GONZALO,J.A.; GUO,R.; PARK,S.E.; CROSS,L.E.; COX,D.E.; SHIRANE,G.

    2000-03-09

    A summary of the work recently carried out on the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) of PZT is presented. By means of x-ray powder diffraction on ceramic samples of excellent quality, the MPB has been successfully characterized by changing temperature in a series of closely spaced compositions. As a result, an unexpected monoclinic phase has been found to exist in between the well-known tetragonal and rhombohedral PZT phases. A detailed structural analysis, together with the investigation of the field effect in this region of compositions, have led to an important advance in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the physical properties of PZT as well as other piezoelectric materials with similar morphotropic phase boundaries.

  2. Amphoteric doping of praseodymium Pr3+ in SrTiO3 grain boundaries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, H.; Lee, H. S.; Kotula, P. G.; Sato, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.; Browning, N. D.

    2015-03-26

    Charge Compensation in rare-earth Praseodymium (Pr3+) doped SrTiO3 plays an important role in determining the overall photoluminescence properties of the system. Here, the Pr3+ doping behavior in SrTiO3 grain boundaries (GBs) is analyzed using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The presence of Pr3+ induces structure variations and changes the statistical prevalence of GB structures. In contrast to the assumption that Pr3+ substitutes for A site as expected in the bulk, Pr3+ is found to substitute both Sr and Ti sites inside GBs with the highest concentration in the Ti sites. As a result, this amphoteric doping behavior inmore »the boundary plane is further confirmed by first principles theoretical calculations.« less

  3. On the no-boundary proposal for ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battarra, Lorenzo; Lehners, Jean-Luc, E-mail: lorenzo.battarra@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: jlehners@aei.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    The no-boundary proposal provides a compelling theory for the initial conditions of our universe. We study the implications of such initial conditions for ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies. These cosmologies allow for the existence of a new type of ''ekpyrotic instanton'', which describes the creation of a universe in the ekpyrotic contraction phase. Remarkably, we find that the ekpyrotic attractor can explain how the universe became classical. In a cyclic context, in addition to the ekpyrotic instantons there exist de Sitter-like instantons describing the emergence of the universe in the dark energy phase. Our results show that typically the ekpyrotic instantons yield a higher probability. In fact, in a potential energy landscape allowing both inflationary and cyclic cosmologies, the no-boundary proposal implies that the probability for ekpyrotic and cyclic initial conditions is vastly higher than that for inflationary ones.

  4. Substitutional Boron in Nanodiamond, Bucky-Diamond, and Nanocrystalline Diamond Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2006-10-05

    Although boron has been known for many years to be a successful dopant in bulk diamond, efficient doping of nanocrystalline diamond with boron is still being developed. In general, the location, configuration, and bonding structure of boron in nanodiamond is still unknown, including the fundamental question of whether it is located within grains or grain boundaries of thin films and whether it is within the core or at the surface of nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional boron in various types of nanocrystalline diamond. The results predict that boron is likely to be positioned at the surface of isolated particles and at the grain boundary of thin-film samples.

  5. "Non-Reflective" Boundary Design via Remote Sensing and PID Control Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qin Fen; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Pejovic, Dr. Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of a nonreflective (or semireflective) boundary condition using the combination of a remote sensor and a control system to modulate a relief valve. The essential idea is to sense the pressure change at a remote location and then to use the measured data to adjust the opening of an active control valve at the end of the line to eliminate or attenuate the wave reflections at the valve, thus controlling system transient pressures. This novel idea is shown here through numerical simulation to have considerable potential for transient protection. Using this model, wave reflections and resonance can be effectively eliminated for frictionless pipelines or initial no-flow conditions and can be better controlled in more realistic pipelines for a range of transient disturbances. In addition, the features of even-order harmonics and nonreflective boundary conditions during steady oscillation, obtained through time domain transient analysis, are verified by hydraulic impedance analysis in the frequency domain.

  6. Amphoteric doping of praseodymium Pr3+ in SrTiO3 grain boundaries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, H.; Lee, H. S.; Kotula, P. G.; Sato, Y.; Ikuhara, Y.; Browning, N. D.

    2015-03-26

    Charge Compensation in rare-earth Praseodymium (Pr3+) doped SrTiO3 plays an important role in determining the overall photoluminescence properties of the system. Here, the Pr3+ doping behavior in SrTiO3 grain boundaries (GBs) is analyzed using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The presence of Pr3+ induces structure variations and changes the statistical prevalence of GB structures. In contrast to the assumption that Pr3+ substitutes for A site as expected in the bulk, Pr3+ is found to substitute both Sr and Ti sites inside GBs with the highest concentration in the Ti sites. As a result, this amphoteric doping behavior inmore » the boundary plane is further confirmed by first principles theoretical calculations.« less

  7. Mixing in thermally stratified nonlinear spin-up with uniform boundary fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baghdasarian, Meline; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo; Pacheco, J. Rafael; Verzicco, Roberto

    2014-09-15

    Studies of stratified spin-up experiments in enclosed cylinders have reported the presence of small pockets of well-mixed fluids but quantitative measurements of the mixedness of the fluid has been lacking. Previous numerical simulations have not addressed these measurements. Here we present numerical simulations that explain how the combined effect of spin-up and thermal boundary conditions enhances or hinders mixing of a fluid in a cylinder. The energy of the system is characterized by splitting the potential energy into diabatic and adiabatic components, and measurements of efficiency of mixing are based on both, the ratio of dissipation of available potential energy to forcing and variance of temperature. The numerical simulations of the NavierStokes equations for the problem with different sets of thermal boundary conditions at the horizontal walls helped shed some light on the physical mechanisms of mixing, for which a clear explanation was absent.

  8. Explicit expressions for three-dimensional boundary integrals in linear elasticity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    On employing isoparametric, piecewise linear shape functions over a flat triangle, exact formulae are derived for all surface potentials involved in the numerical treatment of three-dimensional singular and hyper-singular boundary integral equations in linear elasticity. These formulae are valid for an arbitrary source point in space and are represented as analytical expressions along the edges of the integration triangle. They can be employed to solve integral equations defined on triangulated surfaces via a collocation method or may be utilized as analytical expressions for the inner integrals in a Galerkin technique. A numerical example involving a unit triangle and a source point located at various distances above it, as well as sample problems solved by a collocation boundary element method for the Lame equation are included to validate the proposed formulae.

  9. Experimental investigation of sound generation by a protuberance in a laminar boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, M.; Asai, M.; Inasawa, A. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Sound radiation from a two-dimensional protuberance glued on the wall in a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally at low Mach numbers. When the protuberance was as high as the boundary-layer thickness, a feedback-loop mechanism set in between protuberance-generated sound and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves generated by the leading-edge receptivity to the upstream-propagating sound. Although occurrence of a separation bubble immediately upstream of the protuberance played important roles in the evolution of instability waves into vortices interacting with the protuberance, the frequency of tonal vortex sound was determined by the selective amplification of T-S waves in the linear instability stage upstream of the separation bubble and was not affected by the instability of the separation bubble.

  10. DOE/SC-ARM-14-034 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report P Klein WG Blumberg TA Bonin S Mishra JF Newman M Carney DD Turner EP Jacobsen PB Chilson S Wharton CE Wainwright RK Newsom November 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

  11. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-132 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Height Value

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Height Value Added Product (VAP): Radiosonde Retrievals C Sivaraman S McFarlane 1 E Chapman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory M Jensen T Toto Brookhaven National Laboratory S Liu University of Maryland M Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory August 2013 Version 1.0 1 Now at the U.S. Department of Energy, Climate & Environmental Science Division DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the

  12. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary layer experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, P.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Mishra, S.; Carney, M.; Jacobsen, E. P.; Wharton, Sonia; Newsom, Rob K.

    2015-10-23

    This paper presents an overview of the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE), which included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was conducted as a collaborative effort between the University of Oklahoma (OU), the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the ARM program. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. The main objective of LABLE was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrain using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques. Several instruments from OU and LLNL were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper provides an overview of the experiment including i) instruments deployed, ii) sampling strategies, iii) parameters observed, and iv) student involvement. To illustrate these components, the presented results focus on one particular aspect of LABLE, namely the study of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation and structure of nocturnal low-level jets. During LABLE, low-level jets were frequently observed and they often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages.

  13. Iridium profile for 10 million years across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary at Gubbio (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, W.; Montanari, A. ); Asaro, F. )

    1990-12-21

    The iridium anomaly at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) boundary was discovered in the pelagic limestone sequence at Gubbio on the basis of 12 samples analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA) and was interpreted as indicating impact of a large extraterrestrial object at exactly the time of the KT mass extinction. Continuing controversy over the shape of the Ir profile at the Gubbio KT boundary and its interpretation called for a more detailed follow-up study. Analysis of a 57-meter-thick, 10-million-year-old part of the Gubbio sequence using improved NAA techniques revealed that there is only one Ir anomaly at the KT boundary, but this anomaly shows an intricate fine structure, the origin of which cannot yet be entirely explained. The KT Ir anomaly peaks in a 1-centimeter-thick clay layer, where the average Ir concentration is 3,000 parts per trillion (ppt); this peak is flanked by tails with Ir concentrations of 20 to 80 ppt that rise above a background of 12 to 13 ppt. The fine structure of the tails is probably due in part to lateral reworking, diffusion, burrowing, and perhaps Milankovitch cyclicity.

  14. Spherules from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay at Gubbio, Italy: the problem of outcrop contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, A.

    1986-12-01

    Surficial outcrop contamination has occurred in some well-known stratigraphic sections of carbonate rocks in the northern Apennines. A critical case involves several contaminated clay partings, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay in the classic Bottaccione section near Gubbio, Italy. These clay layers contain shiny spherules which, in several recent studies, have been said to consist of volcanic glass and have been used to support the hypothesis that the terminal Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by widespread volcanism. Laboratory tests, however, indicate that these shiny spherules are made of HF-insoluble and combustible material and are therefore of recent biological origin. These objects were introduced into the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and other clay layers from the surrounding soil along with abundant detrital contaminants derived from erosion of the middle Miocene flysch exposed at the head of the Bottaccione Gorge. They are completely different from the altered and flattened microtektitelike spheroids that are found only in the iridium-rich Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and that provide strong evidence for a large impact.

  15. The impedance problem of wave diffraction by a strip with higher order boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, L. P.; Simões, A. M.

    2013-10-17

    This work is devoted to analyse an impedance boundary-transmission problem for the Helmholtz equation originated by a problem of wave diffraction by an infinite strip with higher order imperfect boundary conditions. A constructive approach of operator relations is built, which allows a transparent interpretation of the problem in an operator theory framework. In particular, different types of operator relations are exhibited for different types of operators acting between Lebesgue and Sobolev spaces on a finite interval and the positive half-line. All this has consequences in the understanding of the structure of this type of problems. In particular, a Fredholm characterization of the problem is obtained in terms of the initial space order parameters. At the request of the author and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained an error in the title of the article. The original title appeared as: 'The Impedance Problem of Wave Diffraction by a trip with Higher Order Boundary Conditions.' This article has been replaced and the title now appears correctly online. The corrected article was published on 8 November 2013.

  16. Traction–separation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rémi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a traction–separation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the traction–separationmore » relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni Σ3(112)[11¯0] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted traction–separation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.« less

  17. Tractionseparation relationships for hydrogen induced grain boundary embrittlement in nickel via molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, Wesley; Dingreville, Rmi; Spearot, Douglas

    2015-10-19

    A statistical approach combined with molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the influence of hydrogen on intergranular decohesion. This methodology is applied to a Ni ?3(112)[110] symmetric tilt grain boundary. Hydrogenated grain boundaries with different H concentrations are constructed using an energy minimization technique with initial H atom positions guided by Monte Carlo simulation results. Decohesion behavior is assessed through extraction of a tractionseparation relationship during steady-state crack propagation in a statistically meaningful approach, building upon prior work employing atomistic cohesive zone volume elements (CZVEs). A sensitivity analysis is performed on the numerical approach used to extract the tractionseparation relationships, clarifying the role of CZVE size, threshold parameters necessary to differentiate elastic and decohesion responses, and the numerical averaging technique. Results show that increasing H coverage at the Ni ?3(112)[110] grain boundary asymmetrically influences the crack tip velocity during propagation, leads to a general decrease in the work of separation required for crack propagation, and provides a reduction in the peak stress in the extracted tractionseparation relationship. Furthermore the present framework offers a meaningful vehicle to pass atomistically derived interfacial behavior to higher length scale formulations for intergranular fracture.

  18. Boundary element method using B-splines with applications to groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, J.J.S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is now established as a suitable and efficient technique for the analysis of engineering problems. However, as in other discretization procedures, inaccuracies can be introduced as a result of the lack of derivative continuity between adjacent elements. A new element formulation has been developed for BEM analysis using uniform cubic B-splines. These functions can be employed to provide higher degrees of continuity along the geometric boundary of the region, and also as interpolation functions for the problem variables. The formulation was then extended to include multiple knots and non-uniform blending functions. In this way, it is possible to lower the degree of continuity of the main variable at points of geometric discontinuity. Initially, applications are presented related to potential problems governed by Laplace's equation but there are no restrictions in the formulation regarding its extension to other physical problems. Continuity of the derivatives of the main variable is important to obtain a good representation of moving boundaries with iterative or time-marching schemes. This formulation is applied to stead-state and transient unconfined flow in homogeneous and inhomogeneous porous media. Finally, the formulation is applied to saltwater intrusion problems in confined, leaky and unconfined aquifers.

  19. Method of making quasi-grain boundary-free polycrystalline solar cell structure and solar cell structure obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Franklin N. (Gainesville, FL); Neugroschel, Arnost (Gainesville, FL)

    1984-02-14

    A new solar cell structure is provided which will increase the efficiency of polycrystalline solar cells by suppressing or completely eliminating the recombination losses due to the presence of grain boundaries. This is achieved by avoiding the formation of the p-n junction (or other types of junctions) in the grain boundaries and by eliminating the grain boundaries from the active area of the cell. This basic concept can be applied to any polycrystalline material; however, it will be most beneficial for cost-effective materials having small grains, including thin film materials.

  20. Rigid-body translation and bonding across l brace 110 r brace antiphase boundaries in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, D.R.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B. )

    1991-05-20

    A transmission-electron-microscope strong-beam technique is used to investigate the rigid-body translation across {l brace}110{r brace} antiphase boundaries in GaAs. The results show a translation in the {l angle}001{r angle} direction parallel to the plane of the boundary. The magnitude of the translation is determined, and the antisite bond lengths are discussed in terms of the tetrahedral radii of Ga and As. Given this knowledge of the rigid-body translation, the absolute polarity of a GaAs grain can be determined immediately from a bright-field image of the {l brace}110{r brace} antiphase boundary.

  1. Simulation of xenon, uranium vacancy and interstitial diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, Anders D.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Nerikar, Pankaj; Vyas, Shyam; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2014-10-31

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations 1, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 ( ?5 tilt, ?5 twist and a high angle random boundary),as derived from atomistic calculations. All models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  2. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  3. Direct measurement of the work of fracture for grain boundaries of twist misorientation about (100) in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The authors report results on the direct measurement of the work of fracture in twist boundaries in electron beam zone refined bicrystals of tungsten. The work of fracture is referred to as the energy required for crack extension. This approach may be used to advantage when the effects of impurities are present, for example, in problems related to grain boundary embrittlement in steels, copper and nickel.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using ARM SGP Data to Evaluate the Summertime Boundary Layer in the ECMWF Model Cheinet, S.(a), Jakob, C.(b), and Morcrette, J.-J.(a), ECMWF (a), BMRC (b) In summertime, sub-tropical continental boundary layers are crucially affected by dry, shallow cumulus and deep precipitating convections. Site measurements allow continuous and high resolution measurements of many aspects of the boundary layer properties. They are thus particularly adapted to evaluate the representation of these various

  5. Theoretical investigation of the impact of grain boundaries and fission gases on UO2 thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Shiyu; Andersson, Anders D.; Germann, Timothy C.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-05-02

    Thermal conductivity is one of the most important metrics of nuclear fuel performance. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of microstructure features on thermal conductivity, especially since the microstructure evolves with burn-up or time in the reactor. For example, UO{sub 2} fuels are polycrystalline and for high-burnup fuels the outer parts of the pellet experience grain sub-division leading to a very fine grain structure. This is known to impact important physical properties such as thermal conductivity as fission gas release. In a previous study, we calculated the effect of different types of {Sigma}5 grain boundaries on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity and predicted the corresponding Kapitza resistances, i.e. the resistance of the grain boundary in relation to the bulk thermal resistance. There have been reports of pseudoanisotropic effects for the thermal conductivity in cubic polycrystalline materials, as obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, which means that the conductivity appears to be a function of the crystallographic direction of the temperature gradient. However, materials with cubic symmetry should have isotropic thermal conductivity. For this reason it is necessary to determine the cause of this apparent anisotropy and in this report we investigate this effect in context of our earlier simulations of UO{sub 2} Kapitza resistances. Another source of thermal resistance comes from fission products and fission gases. Xe is the main fission gas and when generated in sufficient quantity it dissolves from the lattice and forms gas bubbles inside the crystalline structure. We have performed studies of how Xe atoms dissolved in the UO{sub 2} matrix or precipitated as bubbles impact thermal conductivity, both in bulk UO{sub 2} and in the presence of grain boundaries.

  6. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore » and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  7. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  8. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  9. Numerical simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by inelastic bodies using hypersingular boundary integral equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daeva, S.G.; Setukha, A.V.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical method for solving a problem of diffraction of acoustic waves by system of solid and thin objects based on the reduction the problem to a boundary integral equation in which the integral is understood in the sense of finite Hadamard value is proposed. To solve this equation we applied piecewise constant approximations and collocation methods numerical scheme. The difference between the constructed scheme and earlier known is in obtaining approximate analytical expressions to appearing system of linear equations coefficients by separating the main part of the kernel integral operator. The proposed numerical scheme is tested on the solution of the model problem of diffraction of an acoustic wave by inelastic sphere.

  10. Region and edge-adaptive sampling and boundary completion for segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillard, Scott E; Prasad, Lakshman; Grazzini, Jacopo A

    2010-01-01

    Edge detection produces a set of points that are likely to lie on discontinuities between objects within an image. We consider faces of the Gabriel graph of these points, a sub-graph of the Delaunay triangulation. Features are extracted by merging these faces using size, shape and color cues. We measure regional properties of faces using a novel shape-dependant sampling method that overcomes undesirable sampling bias of the Delaunay triangles. Instead, sampling is biased so as to smooth regional statistics within the detected object boundaries, and this smoothing adapts to local geometric features of the shape such as curvature, thickness and straightness.

  11. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site During the November Flux-Profiler Test s. P. Oncley and J. Van Baelen National Center for Atmospheric Research(8) Boulder, CO 80307-3000 Introduction Resu Its Figure 1 shows the raw data from two of the ten profile patterns flown during this experiment. Each aircraft profile consisted of a descent to the profiler site followed by 3-5 legs at increasing heights. Note that because of this flightpattern, the

  12. COLLOQUIUM: Excitement at the Plasma Boundary" | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab January 16, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Excitement at the Plasma Boundary" Professor Robert Goldston Princeton University Presentation: PDF icon WC16JAN2013_RGoldston.pdf We now know how to heat plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, and even how to confine the resulting hot plasmas to produce immense amounts of fusion power. The next major R&D challenge is to cope with these successes: How can we handle the heat flux that emerges from a fusion

  13. Inverse scattering transform for the focusing nonlinear Schrdinger equation with nonzero boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biondini, Gino; Kova?i?, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    The inverse scattering transform for the focusing nonlinear Schrdinger equation with non-zero boundary conditions at infinity is presented, including the determination of the analyticity of the scattering eigenfunctions, the introduction of the appropriate Riemann surface and uniformization variable, the symmetries, discrete spectrum, asymptotics, trace formulae and the so-called theta condition, and the formulation of the inverse problem in terms of a Riemann-Hilbert problem. In addition, the general behavior of the soliton solutions is discussed, as well as the reductions to all special cases previously discussed in the literature.

  14. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-10-30

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  15. Twist-averaged boundary conditions for nuclear pasta Hartree-Fock calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-10-21

    Nuclear pasta phases, present in the inner crust of neutron stars, are associated with nucleonic matter at subsaturation densities arranged in regular shapes. Those complex phases, residing in a layer which is approximately 100-m thick, impact many features of neutron stars. Theoretical quantum-mechanical simulations of nuclear pasta are usually carried out in finite three-dimensional boxes assuming periodic boundary conditions. The resulting solutions are affected by spurious finite-size effects. To remove spurious finite-size effects, it is convenient to employ twist-averaged boundary conditions (TABC) used in condensed matter, nuclear matter, and lattice quantum chromodynamics applications. In this work, we study the effectiveness of TABC in the context of pasta phase simulations within nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrated that by applying TABC reliable results can be obtained from calculations performed in relatively small volumes. By studying various contributions to the total energy, we gain insights into pasta phases in mid-density range. Future applications will include the TABC extension of the adaptive multiresolution 3D Hartree-Fock solver and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov TABC applications to superfluid pasta phases and complex nucleonic topologies as in fission.

  16. Applications of large-eddy simulation: Synthesis of neutral boundary layer models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohmstede, W.D.

    1987-12-01

    The object of this report is to describe progress made towards the application of large-eddy simulation (LES), in particular, to the study of the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The broad purpose of the study is to provide support to the LES project currently underway at LLNL. The specific purpose of this study is to lay the groundwork for the simulation of the SBL through the establishment and implementation of model criteria for the simulation of the NBL. The idealistic NBL is never observed in the atmosphere and therefore has little practical significance. However, it is of considerable theoretical interest for several reasons. The report discusses the concept of Rossby-number similarity theory as it applies to the NBL. A particular implementation of the concept is described. Then, the results from prior simulations of the NBL are summarized. Model design criteria for two versions of the Brost LES (BLES) model are discussed. The general guidelines for the development of Version 1 of the Brost model (BV1) were to implement the model with a minimum of modifications which would alter the design criteria as established by Brost. Two major modifications of BLES incorporated into BV1 pertain to the initialization/parameterization of the model and the generalization of the boundary conditions at the air/earth interface. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  17. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  18. Defining window-boundaries for genomic analyses using smoothing spline techniques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beissinger, Timothy M.; Rosa, Guilherme J.M.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Gianola, Daniel; de Leon, Natalia

    2015-04-17

    High-density genomic data is often analyzed by combining information over windows of adjacent markers. Interpretation of data grouped in windows versus at individual locations may increase statistical power, simplify computation, reduce sampling noise, and reduce the total number of tests performed. However, use of adjacent marker information can result in over- or under-smoothing, undesirable window boundary specifications, or highly correlated test statistics. We introduce a method for defining windows based on statistically guided breakpoints in the data, as a foundation for the analysis of multiple adjacent data points. This method involves first fitting a cubic smoothing spline to the datamore » and then identifying the inflection points of the fitted spline, which serve as the boundaries of adjacent windows. This technique does not require prior knowledge of linkage disequilibrium, and therefore can be applied to data collected from individual or pooled sequencing experiments. Moreover, in contrast to existing methods, an arbitrary choice of window size is not necessary, since these are determined empirically and allowed to vary along the genome.« less

  19. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The waves grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.

  20. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  1. A fast multigrid-based electromagnetic eigensolver for curved metal boundaries on the Yee mesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Carl A., E-mail: carl.bauer@colorado.edu [Department of Physics and the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Werner, Gregory R. [Department of Physics and the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cary, John R. [Department of Physics and the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States) [Department of Physics and the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    For embedded boundary electromagnetics using the DeyMittra (Dey and Mittra, 1997) [1] algorithm, a special graddiv matrix constructed in this work allows use of multigrid methods for efficient inversion of Maxwells curlcurl matrix. Efficient curlcurl inversions are demonstrated within a shift-and-invert Krylov-subspace eigensolver (open-sourced at ([ofortt]https://github.com/bauerca/maxwell[cfortt])) on the spherical cavity and the 9-cell TESLA superconducting accelerator cavity. The accuracy of the DeyMittra algorithm is also examined: frequencies converge with second-order error, and surface fields are found to converge with nearly second-order error. In agreement with previous work (Nieter et al., 2009) [2], neglecting some boundary-cut cell faces (as is required in the time domain for numerical stability) reduces frequency convergence to first-order and surface-field convergence to zeroth-order (i.e. surface fields do not converge). Additionally and importantly, neglecting faces can reduce accuracy by an order of magnitude at low resolutions.

  2. Twist-averaged boundary conditions for nuclear pasta Hartree-Fock calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-10-21

    Nuclear pasta phases, present in the inner crust of neutron stars, are associated with nucleonic matter at subsaturation densities arranged in regular shapes. Those complex phases, residing in a layer which is approximately 100-m thick, impact many features of neutron stars. Theoretical quantum-mechanical simulations of nuclear pasta are usually carried out in finite three-dimensional boxes assuming periodic boundary conditions. The resulting solutions are affected by spurious finite-size effects. To remove spurious finite-size effects, it is convenient to employ twist-averaged boundary conditions (TABC) used in condensed matter, nuclear matter, and lattice quantum chromodynamics applications. In this work, we study the effectivenessmore » of TABC in the context of pasta phase simulations within nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrated that by applying TABC reliable results can be obtained from calculations performed in relatively small volumes. By studying various contributions to the total energy, we gain insights into pasta phases in mid-density range. Future applications will include the TABC extension of the adaptive multiresolution 3D Hartree-Fock solver and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov TABC applications to superfluid pasta phases and complex nucleonic topologies as in fission.« less

  3. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The wavesmore » grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.« less

  4. Method and system for detecting polygon boundaries of structures in images as particle tracks through fields of corners and pixel gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W. (Pleasanton, CA); Manay, Siddharth (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-20

    A stochastic method and system for detecting polygon structures in images, by detecting a set of best matching corners of predetermined acuteness .alpha. of a polygon model from a set of similarity scores based on GDM features of corners, and tracking polygon boundaries as particle tracks using a sequential Monte Carlo approach. The tracking involves initializing polygon boundary tracking by selecting pairs of corners from the set of best matching corners to define a first side of a corresponding polygon boundary; tracking all intermediate sides of the polygon boundaries using a particle filter, and terminating polygon boundary tracking by determining the last side of the tracked polygon boundaries to close the polygon boundaries. The particle tracks are then blended to determine polygon matches, which may be made available, such as to a user, for ranking and inspection.

  5. Effective Radius of Cloud Droplets Derived from Ground-based Remote Sensing at the ARM SGP site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficacy of Aerosol - Cloud Interactions under Varying Meteorological Conditions Byung-Gon Kim, @ Mark Miller, # Stephen Schwartz, $ Yangang Liu, $ Qilong Min % Kangnung National University, @ Rutgers University # Brookhaven National Laboratory, $ State Univ. of NY at Albany % (Courtesy Magritte) Cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulators of cloud optical properties in certain situations. Entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by

  6. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  7. A Reduced-Boundary-Function Method for Convective Heat Transfer With Axial Heat Conduction and Viscous Dissipation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhijie Xu

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a new method of solution for the convective heat transfer under forced laminar flow that is confined by two parallel plates with a distance of 2a or by a circular tube with a radius of a. The advection-conduction equation is first mapped onto the boundary. The original problem of solving the unknown field T(x,r,t) is reduced to seek the solutions of T at the boundary (r = a or r = 0, r is the distance from the centerline shown in Fig. 1), i.e., the boundary functions T{sub a}(x,t) {triple_bond} T(x,r=a,t) and/or T{sub 0}(x,t) {triple_bond} T(x,r=0,t). In this manner, the original problem is significantly simplified by reducing the problem dimensionality from 3 to 2. The unknown field T(x,r,t) can be eventually solved in terms of these boundary functions. The method is applied to the convective heat transfer with uniform wall temperature boundary condition and with heat exchange between flowing fluids and its surroundings that is relevant to the geothermal applications. Analytical solutions are presented and validated for the steady-state problem using the proposed method.

  8. A Reduced-Boundary-Function Method for Convective Heat Transfer with Axial Heat Conduction and Viscous Dissipation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a method of solution for the convective heat transfer under forced laminar flow that is confined by two parallel plates with a distance of 2a or by a circular tube with a radius of a. The advection-conduction equation is first mapped onto the boundary. The original problem of solving the unknown field is reduced to seek the solutions of T at the boundary (r=a or r=0, r is the distance from the centerline shown in Fig. 1), i.e. the boundary functions and/or . In this manner, the original problem is significantly simplified by reducing the problem dimensionality from 3 to 2. The unknown field can be eventually solved in terms of these boundary functions. The method is applied to the convective heat transfer with uniform wall temperature boundary condition and with heat exchange between flowing fluids and its surroundings that is relevant to the geothermal applications. Analytical solutions are presented and validated for the steady state problem using the proposed method.

  9. Three-body scattering theory without knowledge of exact asymptotic boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakeshaft, Robin

    2009-07-15

    We formulate the theory of three-body scattering without explicit reference to exact asymptotic boundary conditions on the wave function. The transition rate and amplitude are expressed as volume integrals of the resolvent, which are insensitive to the region of asymptotically large distances. The physical branch of the resolvent is selected through the arrow of time, which is required to point forward in each subchannel. This is accomplished by first expressing the resolvent as an integral over time and then making a conformal transformation of each half of the time plane onto a unit disk. The physical branch corresponds to a path of integration in the upper half of the disk. We have tested the method, using a real discrete basis, by calculating the total cross section for singlet S-wave electron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen; our results are in reasonable agreement overall with the landmark results of Bartlet and Stelbovics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 233201 (2004)].

  10. Electromagnetic field of a charge intersecting a cold plasma boundary in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhina, Tatiana Yu.; Tyukhtin, Andrey V.

    2011-06-15

    We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charge crossing a boundary between a vacuum and cold plasma in a waveguide. We obtain exact expressions for the field components and the spectral density of the transition radiation. With the steepest descent technique, we investigate the field components. We show that the electromagnetic field has a different structure in a vacuum than in cold plasma. We also develop an algorithm for the computation of the field based on a certain transformation of the integration path. The behavior of the field depending on distance and time and the spectral density depending on frequency are explored for different charge velocities. Some important physical effects are noted. A considerable increase and concentration of the field near the wave front in the plasma is observed for the case of ultrarelativistic particles. In the plasma, the mode envelopes and spectral density show zero points when the charge velocity is within certain limits.

  11. Modeling the influence of bubble pressure on grain boundary separation and fission gas release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritam Chakraborty; Michael R. Tonks; Giovanni Pastore

    2014-09-01

    Grain boundary (GB) separation as a mechanism for fission gas release (FGR), complementary to gas bubble interlinkage, has been experimentally observed in irradiated light water reactor fuel. However there has been limited effort to develop physics-based models incorporating this mechanism for the analysis of FGR. In this work, a computational study is carried out to investigate GB separation in UO2 fuel under the effect of gas bubble pressure and hydrostatic stress. A non-dimensional stress intensity factor formula is obtained through 2D axisymmetric analyses considering lenticular bubbles and Mode-I crack growth. The obtained functional form can be used in higher length-scale models to estimate the contribution of GB separation to FGR.

  12. Model of the boundary layer of a vacuum-arc magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Grondona, D.; Della Torre, H.; Kelly, H.

    2013-03-21

    A model is developed to describe the electrostatic boundary layer in a positively biased magnetic filter in filtered arcs with low collisionality. The set of equations used includes the electron momentum equation, with an anomalous collision term due to micro-instabilities leading to Bohm diffusion, electron mass conservation, and Poisson equation. Analytical solutions are obtained, valid for the regimes of interest, leading to an explicit expression to determine the electron density current to the filter wall as a function of the potential of the filter and the ratio of electron density at the plasma to that at the filter wall. Using a set of planar and cylindrical probes it is verified experimentally that the mentioned ratio of electron densities remains reasonably constant for different magnetic field values and probe bias, which allows to obtain a closed expression for the current. Comparisons are made with the experimentally determined current collected at different sections of a positively biased straight filter.

  13. Boundary layer modeling of reactive flow over a porous surface with angled injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shiling; Fotache, Catalin G.; Hautman, Donald J.; Ochs, Stuart S. [United Technologies Research Center, MS 129-29, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Chao, Beei-Huan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    An analytical model was developed to investigate the dynamics of nonpremixed flames in a shear layer established between a mainstream flow of fuel-rich combustion products and a porous surface with an angled injection of air. In the model, a one-step overall chemical reaction was employed, together with boundary layer conservation equations solved using similarity solutions. Parametric studies were performed to understand the effects of equivalence ratio, temperature, and mass flow rate of the fuel and air streams on the flame standoff distance, surface temperature, and heat flux at the surface. The analytical model predictions were compared with computational fluid dynamics results obtained using the FLUENT commercial code for both the laminar and the turbulent flow models. Qualitative agreement in surface temperature was observed. Finally, the flame stability limits predicted by the model were compared with available experimental data and found to agree qualitatively, as well. (author)

  14. Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2014-05-13

    Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or “boundary electrode” bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

  15. Nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundary materials and plans for collecting and presenting their properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, C.B.

    1995-04-01

    A program is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)) in their assessment of the effects of degradation (primarily corrosion) on the structural capacity and leaktight integrity of metal containments and steel liners of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to characterize and quantify manifestations of corrosion on the properties of steels used to construct containment pressure boundary components. This report describes a plan for use in collecting and presenting data and information on ferrous alloys permitted for use in construction of pressure retaining components in concrete and metal containments. Discussions about various degradation mechanisms that could potentially affect the mechanical properties of these materials are also included. Conclusions and recommendations presented in this report will be used to guide the collection of data and information that will be used to prepare a material properties data base for containment steels.

  16. Small-angle neutron scattering measurement of deuterium trapping at dislocations and grain boundaries in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuser, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been performed on deformed single and polycrystalline palladium with and without deuterium dissolved in the solution phase at room temperature. The purpose of these experiments was to directly measure the spatial distribution of trapped deuterium at dislocations in the deformed metal. The net scattering cross section for the same smaple with and without deuterium shows a behavior expected from deuterium correlation with dislocations froming rod-like scattering structures. The measured cross sections indicate the trapped deuterium is within 2 to 3 Burgers vectors of the dislocation core. On average 1 to 3 deuterons per {angstrom} are trapped at the dislocations in the deformed samples. The measurements also indicate the straight, rod-like correlation geometry extends on average 50 to 100 {angstrom} along the dislocations. Dislocation densities on the order of 5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm/cm{sup 3} were found for all samples investigated. Net scattering from a well annealed polycrystalline palladium sample exhibiting a behavior expected from spherical shells has been observed. This net scattering is attributed to deuterium trapping at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline sample. net scattering in excess of that expected from deuterium correlated at dislocations was also observed in a deformed polycrystalline measurement. This too is attributed to deuterium trapping at grain boundaries. The dislocation substructure of the deformed palladium samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This analysis illustrated the cellular arrangement that evolved in palladium during cold working. The presence of MnO particles also was confirmed by TEM analysis.

  17. Examinations of Oxidation and Sulfidation of Grain Boundaries in Alloy 600 Exposed to Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Saxey, David W.; Kruska, Karen; Moore, K. L.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution characterizations of intergranular attack in alloy 600 (Ni-17Cr-9Fe) exposed to 325 C simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water have been conducted using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, NanoSIMS, analytical transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The intergranular attack exhibited a two-stage microstructure that consisted of continuous corrosion/oxidation to a depth of ~200 nm from the surface followed by discrete Cr-rich sulfides to a further depth of ~500 nm. The continuous oxidation region contained primarily nanocrystalline MO-structure oxide particles and ended at Ni-rich, Cr-depleted grain boundaries with spaced CrS precipitates. Three-dimensional characterization of the sulfidized region using site-specific atom probe tomography revealed extraordinary grain boundary composition changes, including total depletion of Cr across a several nm wide dealloyed zone as a result of grain boundary migration.

  18. Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

    2007-12-01

    Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

  19. A comparison of conjugate gradient, SIP, and other iterative methods for the solution of Poisson's equation with irregular boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, D.J.

    1990-06-01

    Several well known iterative methods for solving Poisson's equation, including Strongly Implicit Procedure and several preconditioned conjugate gradient methods are first applied to a problem with simple boundary conditions and a known solution. Then a problem with more complicated boundary conditions, similar to those encountered when modeling AVLIS plasmas, is solved. Differences in the solutions of the various methods are examined through the use of Fourier analysis. It was found that combinations of different iterative schemes will in some cases be the most efficient method of solution. 22 refs., 29 figs.

  20. Concepts Associated with Transferring Temporal and Spatial Boundary Conditions between Modules in the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2006-10-03

    This document describes concepts associated with transferring temporal and spatial boundary conditions between modules in FRAMES and how FRAMES might consider dynamic feedback.

  1. Memorandum Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1 -H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

  2. Multi-Timescale Investigation of Radiation Damage near TiO2 Rutile Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xian-Ming Bai; Blas P. Uberuaga

    2012-04-01

    Although grain boundaries (GBs) have been experimentally demonstrated to serve as sinks for absorbing radiation induced defects and improving the radiation tolerance of materials, the detailed atomistic interactions between defects and GBs leading to this enhanced tolerance are not well understood. In oxide ceramics the interactions are further complicated as defects can be charged and grain boundaries may exhibit space charge and charge dipole effects. Here, we use two atomistic modeling methods to examine the role of GBs in a model oxide system, rutile TiO2, in modifying defect production during irradiation events. The GB studied is a symmetric tilt GB with a rotation axis of [100] and a rotation angle of 15.25{sup o}. We use molecular dynamics to investigate defect production near the GB at both 300K and 1000 K and find that the damage production is sensitive to the initial distance of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) from the GB. We find three distinct regimes in which GBs have different effects on modifying defect production. Similar to GBs in metals, the GB absorbs more interstitials than vacancies at certain distances while this behavior of biased loading of interstitials diminishes at other distances. Further, we obtain the statistics of both interstitial and vacancy clusters 2 produced in collision cascades in terms of their compositions at two temperatures. We find that perfectly stoichiometric defect clusters (Schottky and anti-Schottky clusters) represent a small fraction of the total defect clusters produced. Moreover, a significant reduction in the number of interstitial clusters at 1000 K compared to 300 K is thought to be a consequence of enhanced migration of interstitials towards the GB. Finally the kinetic properties of certain defect clusters are investigated with temperature accelerated dynamics, without any priori assumptions of migration mechanisms. We find that small interstitial clusters become mobile at high temperatures while small vacancy clusters do not. Multiple migration pathways exist and are typically complex and non-intuitive. We use this kinetic information to explain experimental observations and predict their long-time migration behavior near GBs.

  3. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

  4. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, Noel C. (Kansas City, MO); Emery, James D. (Kansas City, MO); Smith, Maurice L. (Kansas City, MO)

    1988-04-05

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object.

  5. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, N.C.; Emery, J.D.; Smith, M.L.

    1985-04-29

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object. 19 figs.

  6. Three-dimensional local ALE-FEM method for fluid flow in domains containing moving boundaries/objects interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrington, David Bradley; Monayem, A. K. M.; Mazumder, H.; Heinrich, Juan C.

    2015-03-05

    A three-dimensional finite element method for the numerical simulations of fluid flow in domains containing moving rigid objects or boundaries is developed. The method falls into the general category of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian methods; it is based on a fixed mesh that is locally adapted in the immediate vicinity of the moving interfaces and reverts to its original shape once the moving interfaces go past the elements. The moving interfaces are defined by separate sets of marker points so that the global mesh is independent of interface movement and the possibility of mesh entanglement is eliminated. The results is a fully robust formulation capable of calculating on domains of complex geometry with moving boundaries or devises that can also have a complex geometry without danger of the mesh becoming unsuitable due to its continuous deformation thus eliminating the need for repeated re-meshing and interpolation. Moreover, the boundary conditions on the interfaces are imposed exactly. This work is intended to support the internal combustion engines simulator KIVA developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories. The model's capabilities are illustrated through application to incompressible flows in different geometrical settings that show the robustness and flexibility of the technique to perform simulations involving moving boundaries in a three-dimensional domain.

  7. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  8. Development of an Immersed Boundary Method to Resolve Complex Terrain in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2007-09-04

    Flow and dispersion processes in urban areas are profoundly influenced by the presence of buildings which divert mean flow, affect surface heating and cooling, and alter the structure of turbulence in the lower atmosphere. Accurate prediction of velocity, temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy fields are necessary for determining the transport and dispersion of scalars. Correct predictions of scalar concentrations are vital in densely populated urban areas where they are used to aid in emergency response planning for accidental or intentional releases of hazardous substances. Traditionally, urban flow simulations have been performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes which can accommodate the geometric complexity inherent to urban landscapes. In these types of models the grid is aligned with the solid boundaries, and the boundary conditions are applied to the computational nodes coincident with the surface. If the CFD code uses a structured curvilinear mesh, then time-consuming manual manipulation is needed to ensure that the mesh conforms to the solid boundaries while minimizing skewness. If the CFD code uses an unstructured grid, then the solver cannot be optimized for the underlying data structure which takes an irregular form. Unstructured solvers are therefore often slower and more memory intensive than their structured counterparts. Additionally, urban-scale CFD models are often forced at lateral boundaries with idealized flow, neglecting dynamic forcing due to synoptic scale weather patterns. These CFD codes solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and include limited options for representing atmospheric processes such as surface fluxes and moisture. Traditional CFD codes therefore posses several drawbacks, due to the expense of either creating the grid or solving the resulting algebraic system of equations, and due to the idealized boundary conditions and the lack of full atmospheric physics. Meso-scale atmospheric boundary layer simulations, on the other hand, are performed by numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes, which cannot handle the geometry of the urban landscape, but do provide a more complete representation of atmospheric physics. NWP codes typically use structured grids with terrain-following vertical coordinates, include a full suite of atmospheric physics parameterizations, and allow for dynamic synoptic scale lateral forcing through grid nesting. Terrain following grids are unsuitable for urban terrain, as steep terrain gradients cause extreme distortion of the computational cells. In this work, we introduce and develop an immersed boundary method (IBM) to allow the favorable properties of a numerical weather prediction code to be combined with the ability to handle complex terrain. IBM uses a non-conforming structured grid, and allows solid boundaries to pass through the computational cells. As the terrain passes through the mesh in an arbitrary manner, the main goal of the IBM is to apply the boundary condition on the interior of the domain as accurately as possible. With the implementation of the IBM, numerical weather prediction codes can be used to explicitly resolve urban terrain. Heterogeneous urban domains using the IBM can be nested into larger mesoscale domains using a terrain-following coordinate. The larger mesoscale domain provides lateral boundary conditions to the urban domain with the correct forcing, allowing seamless integration between mesoscale and urban scale models. Further discussion of the scope of this project is given by Lundquist et al. [2007]. The current paper describes the implementation of an IBM into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open source numerical weather prediction code. The WRF model solves the non-hydrostatic compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and employs an isobaric terrain-following vertical coordinate. Many types of IB methods have been developed by researchers; a comprehensive review can be found in Mittal and Iaccarino [2005]. To the authors knowledge, this is the first IBM approach that is able to

  9. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marxen, Olaf, E-mail: olaf.marxen@vki.ac.be [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States) [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chausse de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Gense (Belgium); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chausse de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Gense (Belgium)] [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chausse de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Gense (Belgium); Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)] [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible NavierStokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This NavierStokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  10. The behavior of the electron plasma boundary in ultraintense laser–highly overdense plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Sanz, J.; Debayle, A.; Lehmann, G.

    2014-12-15

    The structural stability of the laser/plasma interaction is discussed, for the case of a linearly polarized laser beam interacting with a solid at normal incidence. Using a semi-analytical cold fluid model, the dynamics of the electron plasma boundary (EPB), usually related to the high-order harmonic generation and laser absorption, are presented. While the well-known J × B plasma oscillations at two times the laser frequency are recovered by the model, several other periodic in time stable solutions exist for exactly the same value of the physical parameters. This novel behavior highlights the importance of the laser pulse history among other factors. Some important features, such as the synchronization between the incident laser and the EPB oscillation, depend on the solution under consideration. A description of the possible types of stable oscillations in a parametric plane involving plasma density and laser amplitude is presented. The semi-analytical model is compared with particle-in-cell and semi-Lagrangian Vlasov simulations. They show that, among all the stable solutions, the plasma preferentially evolves to a state with the EPB oscillating twice faster than the laser. The effect of the plasma temperature and the existence of a ramp in the ion density profile are also discussed.

  11. DROPOUTS IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES: ASSOCIATED WITH LOCAL TRAPPING BOUNDARIES OR CURRENT SHEETS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seripienlert, A.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P. E-mail: scdjr@mahidol.ac.t E-mail: piyanate@gmail.co

    2010-03-10

    In recent observations by the Advanced Composition Explorer, the intensity of solar energetic particles exhibits sudden, large changes known as dropouts. These have been explained in terms of turbulence or a flux tube structure in the solar wind. Dropouts are believed to indicate filamentary magnetic connection to a localized particle source near the solar surface, and computer simulations of a random-phase model of magnetic turbulence have indicated a spatial association between dropout features and local trapping boundaries (LTBs) defined for a two-dimensional (2D) + slab model of turbulence. Previous observations have shown that dropout features are not well associated with sharp magnetic field changes, as might be expected in the flux tube model. Random-phase turbulence models do not properly treat sharp changes in the magnetic field, such as current sheets, and thus cannot be tested in this way. Here, we explore the properties of a more realistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence model (2D MHD), in which current sheets develop and the current and magnetic field have characteristic non-Gaussian statistical properties. For this model, computer simulations that trace field lines to determine magnetic connection from a localized particle source indicate that sharp particle gradients should frequently be associated with LTBs, sometimes with strong 2D magnetic fluctuations, and infrequently with current sheets. Thus, the 2D MHD + slab model of turbulent fluctuations includes some realistic features of the flux tube view and is consistent with the lack of an observed association between dropouts and intense magnetic fields or currents.

  12. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sok?, J. M.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ?0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ?0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. These results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  13. Investigation of Rossby-number similarity in the neutral boundary layer using large-eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohmstede, W.D.; Cederwall, R.T.; Meyers, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    One special case of particular interest, especially to theoreticians, is the steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, autobarotropic (PLB), hereafter referred to as the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The NBL is in fact a 'rare' atmospheric phenomenon, generally associated with high-wind situations. Nevertheless, there is a disproportionate interest in this problem because Rossby-number similarity theory provides a sound approach for addressing this issue. Rossby-number similarity theory has rather wide acceptance, but because of the rarity of the 'true' NBL state, there remains an inadequate experimental database for quantifying constants associated with the Rossby-number similarity concept. Although it remains a controversial issue, it has been proposed that large-eddy simulation (LES) is an alternative to physical experimentation for obtaining basic atmospherc 'data'. The objective of the study reported here is to investigate Rossby-number similarity in the NBL using LES. Previous studies have not addressed Rossby-number similarity explicitly, although they made use of it in the interpretation of their results. The intent is to calculate several sets of NBL solutions that are ambiguous relative to the their respective Rossby numbers and compare the results for similarity, or the lack of it. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasing Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.

  15. Estimations of atmospheric boundary layer fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzvi Galchen; Mei Xu ); Eberhard, W.L. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. Here the authors present results on doppler LIDAR measurements used to measure a range of turbulence parameters in the region of the unstable planetary boundary layer (PBL). The parameters include, averaged velocities, cartesian velocities, variances in velocities, parts of the covariance associated with vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum, and third moments of the vertical velocity. They explain their analysis technique, especially as it relates to error reduction of the averaged turbulence parameters from individual measurements with relatively large errors. The scales studied range from 150m to 12km. With this new diagnostic they address questions about the behavior of the convectively unstable PBL, as well as the stable layer which overlies it.

  16. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (? ? z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79??10{sup 6} cm{sup ?2}s{sup ?1} and 2.20 10{sup 5} cm{sup ?3}s{sup ?1}, respectively.

  17. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by space-based Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, D.

    2015-12-03

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere and to the marine low cloud processes. This paper explores MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region with a new 4 year satellite-based dataset. The MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) was used to identify the MBL top (BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH). Results showed that MBL is generally decoupled with MLH / BLH ratio ranging from ? 0.5 to ? 0.8 and the MBL decoupling magnitude ismoremainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS) that affects the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops, which may relate to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in MBL, also show dependence on EIS. Further analysis indicated that the MBL shows similar decoupled structure for clear sky and cumulus cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.less

  18. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers withclosed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2007-02-07

    In large-scale geologic storage projects, the injected volumes of CO{sub 2} will displace huge volumes of native brine. If the designated storage formation is a closed system, e.g., a geologic unit that is compartmentalized by (almost) impermeable sealing units and/or sealing faults, the native brine cannot (easily) escape from the target reservoir. Thus the amount of supercritical CO{sub 2} that can be stored in such a system depends ultimately on how much pore space can be made available for the added fluid owing to the compressibility of the pore structure and the fluids. To evaluate storage capacity in such closed systems, we have conducted a modeling study simulating CO{sub 2} injection into idealized deep saline aquifers that have no (or limited) interaction with overlying, underlying, and/or adjacent units. Our focus is to evaluate the storage capacity of closed systems as a function of various reservoir parameters, hydraulic properties, compressibilities, depth, boundaries, etc. Accounting for multi-phase flow effects including dissolution of CO{sub 2} in numerical simulations, the goal is to develop simple analytical expressions that provide estimates for storage capacity and pressure buildup in such closed systems.

  19. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasingmore » Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.« less

  20. The interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Update at the end of phase B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Pope, S.; Scherrer, J.; Bartolone, L.; Knappenberger, P.; Bochsler, P.; Wurz, P.; Bzowski, M.; Collier, M.; Moore, T.; Fahr, H.; Fichtner, H.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H.; Fuselier, Steve; Gloeckler, G.; Gruntman, M.; Izmodenov, V.; Lee, M.

    2006-09-26

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission will make the first global observations of the heliosphere's interaction with the interstellar medium. IBEX achieves these breakthrough observations by traveling outside of the Earth's magnetosphere in a highly elliptical orbit and taking global Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) images over energies from {approx}10 eV to 6 keV. IBEX's high-apogee ({approx}50 RE) orbit enables heliospheric ENA measurements by providing viewing from far above the Earth's relatively bright magnetospheric ENA emissions. This high energy orbit is achieved from a Pegasus XL launch vehicle by adding the propulsion from an IBEX-supplied solid rocket motor and the spacecraft's hydrazine propulsion system. IBEX carries two very large-aperture, single-pixel ENA cameras that view perpendicular to the spacecraft's Sun-pointed spin axis. Each six months, the continuous spinning of the spacecraft and periodic re-pointing to maintain the sun-pointing spin axis naturally lead to global, all-sky images. Over the course of our NASA Phase B program, the IBEX team optimized the designs of all subsystems. In this paper we summarize several significant advances in both IBEX sensors, our expected signal to noise (and background), and our groundbreaking approach to achieve a very high-altitude orbit from a Pegasus launch vehicle for the first time. IBEX is in full scale development and on track for launch in June of 2008.

  1. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty, which thwarts accurate prediction of future climate change. Low clouds are poorly simulated in climate models, partly due to inadequate long-term simultaneous observations of their macrophysical and microphysical structure, radiative effects, and associated aerosol distribution in regions where their impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling, boundary layer turbulence, and precipitation (much of which evaporates before reaching the ocean surface and is closely connected to the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei). These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding sufficient for developing parameterizations, which adequately predict aerosol indirect effects and low cloud response to climate perturbations. This is especially true of the interactions between clouds, aerosol, and precipitation. These processes take place in an ever-changing synoptic environment that can confound interpretation of short time period observations.

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28, 2005 [Facility News] Readiness of New Lidar Evaluated at Southern Great Plains Site Bookmark and Share Aircraft for the Boundary Layer CO2 Intensive Operational Period will fly over the SGP Central Facility using both spirals and racetrack patterns. Data will be collected under a variety of cloud and meteorological conditions. As the focus of the Boundary Layer Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP) starting in March, science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using ARM Measurements to Evaluate and Improve the Turbulent Boundary-Layer Parameterization in the CCM Zhang, M.H. (a) and Yu, R.C. (a), State University of New York(a) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Three-Dimensional advective tendencies at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, together with diurnal variation of the clear-sky boundary layer atmosphere temperature and moisture, are used to study the

  4. gottschalck(1)-99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Macroscopic Cloud and Boundary Layer Properties for Continental Stratus at the SGP CART Site During 1997 J. C. Gottschalck and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Stratus and stratocumulus clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and thus play an important role in climate over both the land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Consequently, there is a great need for accurate boundary layer cloud parameterizations in climate models (Slingo

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

    2011-05-06

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  6. Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, the MARC  Board of Directors adopted a vision of sustainability, helping to guide the agency’s mission of fostering regional cooperation to solve problems that cannot be solved by a single...

  7. The effect of guide-field and boundary conditions on collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-01-15

    Works of Tsiklauri and Haruki [Phys. Plasmas 15, 102902 (2008); 14, 112905 (2007)] are extended by inclusion of the out-of-plane magnetic (guide) field. In particular, magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse for varying out-of-plane guide-fields is studied using a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code. For zero guide-field, cases for both open and closed boundary conditions are investigated, where magnetic flux and particles are lost and conserved, respectively. It is found that reconnection rates, out-of-plane currents and density in the X-point increase more rapidly and peak sooner in the closed boundary case, but higher values are reached in the open boundary case. The normalized reconnection rate is fast: 0.10-0.25. In the open boundary case it is shown that an increase of guide-field yields later onsets in the reconnection peak rates, while in the closed boundary case initial peak rates occur sooner but are suppressed. The reconnection current changes similarly with increasing guide-field; however for low guide-fields the reconnection current increases, giving an optimal value for the guide-field between 0.1 and 0.2 times the in-plane field in both cases. Also, in the open boundary case, it is found that for guide-fields of the order of the in-plane magnetic field, the generation of electron vortices occurs. Possible causes of the vortex generation, based on the flow of decoupled particles in the diffusion region and localized plasma heating, are discussed. Before peak reconnection onset, oscillations in the out-of-plane electric field at the X-point are found, ranging in frequency from approximately 1 to 2 ?{sub pe} and coinciding with oscillatory reconnection. These oscillations are found to be part of a larger wave pattern in the simulation domain. Mapping the out-of-plane electric field along the central lines of the domain over time and applying a 2D Fourier transform reveal that the waves predominantly correspond to the ordinary and the extraordinary mode and hence may correspond to observable radio waves such as solar radio burst fine structure spikes.

  8. Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundary of Refractory Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, Debasis; Kwak, Shaun; Vasenkov, Alex; Shin, Yun Kyung; Duin, Adri van

    2014-09-30

    New high performance refractory alloys are critically required for improving efficiency and decreasing CO2 emissions of fossil energy systems. The development of these materials remains slow because it is driven by a trial-and-error experimental approach and lacks a rational design approach. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic (MD) design has the potential to accelerate this development through the prediction of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of new materials. The success of MD simulations depends critically on the fidelity of interatomic potentials. This project, in collaboration with Penn State, has focused on developing and validating high quality quantum mechanics based reactive potentials, ReaxFF, for Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S system. A larger number of accurate density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to generate data for parameterizing the ReaxFF potentials. These potentials were then used in molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo (MD-MC) for much larger system to study for which DFT calculation would be prohibitively expensive, and to understand a number of chemical phenomena Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S based alloy systems . These include catalytic oxidation of butane on clean Cr2O3 and pyrite/Cr2O3, interfacial reaction between Cr2O3 (refractory material) and Al2O3 (slag), cohesive strength of at the grain boundary of S-enriched Cr compared to bulk Cr and Ssegregation study in Al, Al2O3, Cr and Cr2O3 with a grain structure. The developed quantum based ReaxFF potential are available from the authors upon request. During this project, a number of papers were published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition, several conference presentations were made.

  9. AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF INTERSTELLAR GAS IN THE HELIOSPHERE TAILORED TO INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Martin A.; Kucharek, Harald; Moebius, Eberhard; Wu Xian [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Bzowski, Maciej [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); McComas, David, E-mail: marty.lee@unh.edu [Engineering and Space Science Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The stationary distribution of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere subject to solar gravity, solar radiation pressure, photoionization, and charge exchange is investigated analytically assuming ionization rates and radiation pressure that are proportional to R{sup -2}, where R is the heliocentric radius. The collisionless hyperbolic trajectories of the individual atoms including ionization losses are combined with Liouville's Theorem to construct the heliospheric phase-space distribution function of an interstellar gas species in the solar reference frame under the assumption that the distribution is a drifting Maxwellian at large distances from the Sun. The distribution is transformed to the Earth (essentially Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX)) frame as a function of solar longitude. The expression is then tailored to the latitudinal scan of IBEX as a function of longitude using the fact that IBEX detects each atom close to perihelion in its hyperbolic orbit. The distribution is further adapted to IBEX by integrating the differential intensity over the entrance aperture solid angle of the IBEX-Lo collimator, and over energy to predict the IBEX count rate of helium. The major features of the predicted count rate are described, including a peak in longitude, a peak in latitude at each longitude, and the widths of the major peak in both latitude and longitude. Analytical formulae for these features are derived for comparison with IBEX observations in order to determine the temperature and bulk velocity of the gas in interstellar space. Based in part on these formulae, the results for helium are presented in the companion paper by Moebius et al.

  10. Delineating Bukit Bunuh impact crater boundary by geophysical and geotechnical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azwin, I. N. Rosli, S.; Nordiana, M. M.; Ragu, R. R.; Mark, J.; Mokhtar, S.

    2015-03-30

    Evidences of crater morphology and shock metamorphism in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Malaysia were found during the archaeological research conducted by the Centre for Global Archaeological Research Malaysia, Universiti Sains Malaysia. In order to register Bukit Bunuh as one of the world meteorite impact site, detailed studies are needed to verify the boundary of the crater accordingly. Geophysical study was conducted utilising the seismic refraction and 2-D electrical resistivity method. Seismic refraction survey was done using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph with 14Hz geophones and 40kg weight drop while 2-D electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode selector with pole-dipole array. Bedrock depths were digitized from the sections obtained. The produced bedrock topography map shows that there is low bedrock level circulated by high elevated bedrock and interpreted as crater and rim respectively with diameter approximately 8km. There are also few spots of high elevated bedrock appear at the centre of the crater which interpreted as rebounds zone. Generally, the research area is divided into two layers where the first layer with velocity 400-1100?m/s and resistivity value of 10-800 Om predominantly consists of alluvium mix with gravel and boulders. Second layer represents granitic bedrock with depth of 5-50m having velocity >2100?m/s and resistivity value of >1500 Om. This research is strengthen by good correlation between geophysical data and geotechnical borehole records executed inside and outside of the crater, on the rim, as well as at the rebound area.

  11. Determination of Grain Boundary Charging in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin Films: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Contreras, M. A.; Repins, I.; Moutinho, H. R.; Noufi, R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-06-01

    Surface potential mapping of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) aims to understand the minority-carrier recombination at the grain boundaries (GBs) of this polycrystalline material by examining GB charging, which has resulted in a number of publications. However, the reported results are highly inconsistent. In this paper, we report on the potential mapping by measuring wide-bandgap or high-Ga-content films and by using a complementary atomic force microscopy-based electrical technique of scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). The results demonstrate consistent, positively charged GBs on our high-quality films with minimal surface defects/charges. The potential image taken on a low-quality film with a 1.2-eV bandgap shows significantly degraded potential contrast on the GBs and degraded potential uniformity on grain surfaces, resulting from the surface defects/charges of the low-quality film. In contrast, the potential image on an improved high-quality film with the same wide bandgap shows significantly improved GB potential contrast and surface potential uniformity, indicating that the effect of surface defects is critical when examining GB charging using surface potential data. In addition, we discuss the effect of the SKPFM setup on the validity of potential measurement, to exclude possible artifacts due to improper SKPFM setups. The SKPFM results were corroborated by using SCM measurements on the films with a CdS buffer layer. The SCM image shows clear GB contrast, indicating different electrical impedance on the GB from the grain surface. Further, we found that the GB contrast disappeared when the CdS window layer was deposited after the CIGS film was exposed extensively to ambient, which was caused by the creation of CIGS surface defects by the ambient exposure.

  12. Retrieval of Urban Boundary Layer Structures from Doppler Lidar Data. Part I: Accuracy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Quanxin; Lin, Ching Long; Calhoun, Ron; Newsom, Rob K.

    2008-01-01

    Two coherent Doppler lidars from the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Arizona State University (ASU) were deployed in the Joint Urban 2003 atmospheric dispersion field experiment (JU2003) held in Oklahoma City. The dual lidar data are used to evaluate the accuracy of the four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) method and identify the coherent flow structures in the urban boundary layer. The objectives of the study are three-fold. The first objective is to examine the effect of eddy viscosity models on the quality of retrieved velocity data. The second objective is to determine the fidelity of single-lidar 4DVAR and evaluate the difference between single- and dual-lidar retrievals. The third objective is to correlate the retrieved flow structures with the ground building data. It is found that the approach of treating eddy viscosity as part of control variables yields better results than the approach of prescribing viscosity. The ARL single-lidar 4DVAR is able to retrieve radial velocity fields with an accuracy of 98% in the along-beam direction and 80-90% in the cross-beam direction. For the dual-lidar 4DVAR, the accuracy of retrieved radial velocity in the ARL cross-beam direction improves to 90-94%. By using the dual-lidar retrieved data as a reference, the single-lidar 4DVAR is able to recover fluctuating velocity fields with 70-80% accuracy in the along-beam direction and 60-70% accuracy in the cross-beam direction. Large-scale convective roll structures are found in the vicinity of downtown airpark and parks. Vortical structures are identified near the business district. Strong updrafts and downdrafts are also found above a cluster of restaurants.

  13. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  14. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporated before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)

  15. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporatedmore » before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)« less

  16. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Suffian N. [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-11-27

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity. We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22210 m Jm?2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundariesmaking a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower assessed ordered moments from longer spatial and/or time averaging and should be considered directly.

  17. Low-energy planar magnetic defects in BaFe2As2: Nanotwins, twins, antiphase, and domain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, S. N. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Alam, A. [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2013-01-01

    In BaFe2As2, structural and magnetic planar defects begin to proliferate below the structural phase transition, affecting descriptions of magnetism and superconductivity.We study, using density-functional theory, the stability and magnetic properties of competing antiphase and domain boundaries, twins and isolated nanotwins (twin nuclei), and spin excitations proposed and/or observed. These nanoscale defects have a very low surface energy (22 210 m Jm 2), with twins favorable to the mesoscale. Defects exhibit smaller moments confined near their boundaries making a uniform-moment picture inappropriate for long-range magnetic order in real samples. Nanotwins explain features in measured pair distribution functions so should be considered when analyzing scattering data. All these defects can be weakly mobile and/or can have fluctuations that lower

  18. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  19. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore » for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  20. Direct imaging of enhanced current collection on grain boundaries of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, JunHo; Kim, SeongYeon; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Ramanathan, Kannan; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2014-02-10

    We report on direct imaging of current collection by performing conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) measurement on a complete Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell. The localized current was imaged by milling away the top conductive layer of the device by repeated C-AFM scans. The result exhibits enhanced photocurrent collection on grain boundaries (GBs) of CIGS films, consistent with the argument for electric-field-assisted carrier collection on the GBs.

  1. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; Li, Zhijin; Xie, Shaocheng; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Zhang, Minghua; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.

  2. Plasmon excitation in metal slab by fast point charge: The role of additional boundary conditions in quantum hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; An, Sheng-Bai; Song, Yuan-Hong Wang, You-Nian; Kang, Naijing; Mikovi?, Z. L.

    2014-10-15

    We study the wake effect in the induced potential and the stopping power due to plasmon excitation in a metal slab by a point charge moving inside the slab. Nonlocal effects in the response of the electron gas in the metal are described by a quantum hydrodynamic model, where the equation of electronic motion contains both a quantum pressure term and a gradient correction from the Bohm quantum potential, resulting in a fourth-order differential equation for the perturbed electron density. Thus, besides using the condition that the normal component of the electron velocity should vanish at the impenetrable boundary of the metal, a consistent inclusion of the gradient correction is shown to introduce two possibilities for an additional boundary condition for the perturbed electron density. We show that using two different sets of boundary conditions only gives rise to differences in the wake potential at large distances behind the charged particle. On the other hand, the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model is seen to cause a reduction in the depth of the potential well closest to the particle, and a reduction of its stopping power. Even for a particle moving in the center of the slab, we observe nonlocal effects in the induced potential and the stopping power due to reduction of the slab thickness, which arise from the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model.

  3. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  4. THE KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY AT CORONAL MASS EJECTION BOUNDARIES IN THE SOLAR CORONA: OBSERVATIONS AND 2.5D MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moestl, U. V.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2013-03-20

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory observed a coronal mass ejection with an embedded filament on 2011 February 24, revealing quasi-periodic vortex-like structures at the northern side of the filament boundary with a wavelength of approximately 14.4 Mm and a propagation speed of about 310 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}. These structures could result from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability occurring on the boundary. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and compare the simulated characteristic properties of the instability with the observations, where we obtain qualitative as well as quantitative accordance. We study the absence of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex-like structures on the southern side of the filament boundary and find that a magnetic field component parallel to the boundary with a strength of about 20% of the total magnetic field has stabilizing effects resulting in an asymmetric development of the instability.

  5. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the OctoberNovember 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20 S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosolcloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosolcloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  6. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore » observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  7. Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A. D.

    2010-07-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT), the marine boundary layer (MBL), and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV). These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV ({kappa} {approx} 0.2-0.25). FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in {kappa} with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6-0.8) found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions ({kappa}{sub org} {approx} 0.1-0.2). A comparison of CCN-derived {kappa} (for particles at the critical diameter) to H-TDMA-derived {kappa} (for particles at 100 nm diameter) showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived {kappa} values were significantly higher.

  8. P-SV conversions at a shallow boundary beneath Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) - evidence for the magma chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrucci, F.; Hirn, A.; De Natale, G.; Virieux, J.; Mirabile, L. Inst. de Physique du Globe, Paris Osservatorio Vesuviano, Naples CNRS, Inst. de Geodynamique, Valbonne Ist. Universitario Navale, Naples )

    1992-10-01

    Seismograms from an active seismic experiment carried out at Campi Flegrei caldera (near Naples, Italy), show a large-amplitude SV-polarized shear wave, following by less than 1.5-s P waves reflected at wide angle from a deep crustal interface. Early arriving SV-polarized waves, with the same delay to direct P waves, are also observed in seismograms from a regional 280 km-deep, magnitude 5.1 earthquake. Such short delays of S to P waves are consistent with a P-SV conversion on transmission occurring at a shallow boundary beneath the receivers. The large amplitude of the converted-SV phase, along with that the P waves are near vertical, requires a boundary separating a very low rigidity layer from the upper caldera fill. The converted phases are interpreted as a seismic marker of a magma chamber. The top of this magma chamber is located slightly deeper than the deepest earthquakes observed during the 1982-1984 unrest of Campi Flegrei. 8 refs.

  9. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and R- BCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain themore » flow rate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon valida- tion of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the \\all-or-nothing" phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis model.« less

  10. The Orientation Distributions of Lines, Surfaces, and Interfaces Around Three-Phase Boundaries in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Shen; Helmick, Lam; Miller, Herbert M.; Johnson, Christopher; Wilson, Lane; Gemmen, Randall; Petrova, Rumyana; Barmak, Katayun; Gerdes, Kirk; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Salvador, Paul A.

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction was used to measure the crystallographic distribution of the electrochemically relevant triple phase boundary lines and surfaces near them in SOFC cathodes made up of a porous mixture of yttria-stabilized zirconia and lanthanum strontium manganese oxide, both before and after mild electrochemical loading. All distributions were observed to be nearly isotropic, but non-random textures above the detection threshold were observed. The distributions differ between the two cells, as do the phase fractions and the electrochemical history. The different distributions are interpreted as evidence that steady-state distributions vary locally with phase fractions or that they evolve during the initial operation of the fuel cell. The rates at which triple lines, pore surfaces, and interface boundaries in the porous mixture approach a steady-state value appear to decrease with the average amount of mass transport required to reorient that specific feature. This work provides initial insights into the crystallography of interfaces in a multiphase ceramic material.

  11. Kaluza-Klein masses of bulk fields with general boundary conditions in AdS{sub 5} space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Sanghyeon; Park, Seong Chan; Song, Jeonghyeon

    2005-05-15

    Recently bulk Randall-Sundrum theories with the gauge group SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub B-L} have drawn a lot of interest as an alternative to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. These models are in better agreement with electroweak precision data since custodial isospin symmetry on the IR-brane is protected by the extended bulk gauge symmetry. We comprehensively study, in the S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2}xZ{sub 2}{sup '} orbifold, the bulk gauge and fermion fields with the general boundary conditions as well as the bulk and localized mass terms. Master equations to determine the Kaluza-Klein (KK) mass spectra are derived without any approximation, which is an important basic step for various phenomenologies at high energy colliders. The correspondence between orbifold boundary conditions and localized mass terms is demonstrated not only in the gauge sector but also in the fermion sector. As the localized mass increases, the first KK fermion mass is shown to decrease while the first KK gauge boson mass is shown to increase. The degree of gauge coupling universality violation is computed to be small in most parameter space, and its correlation with the mass difference between the top quark and light quark KK mode is also studied.

  12. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and RBCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain the flowmorerate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon validation of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the all-or-nothing phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of the new methodology in simulations of blood flow in vessels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis modeless

  13. Microstructural and chemical evolution near anode triple phase boundary in Ni/YSZ solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yun; Chen, Song; Hackett, Gregory; Finklea, Harry; Song, Xueyan; Gerdes, Kirk

    2011-12-12

    In this study, we report the micro-structural and chemical evolution of anode grain boundaries and triple phase boundary (TPB) junctions of Ni/YSZ anode supported solid oxide fuel cells. A NiO phase was found to develop along the Ni/YSZ interfaces extending to TPBs in the operated cells. The thickness of the NiO ribbon phase remains constant at ~ 5 nm in hydrogen for operating durations up to 540 h. When operating on synthesis gas, an increase in interphase thickness was observed from ~ 11 nm for 24 h of operation to ~ 51 nm for 550 h of operation. YSZ phases are observed to be stable in H{sub 2} over 540 h of operation. However, for the cell operated in syngas for 550 h, a 510 nm tetragonal YSZ (t-YSZ) interfacial layer was identified that originated from the Ni/YSZ interfaces. Yttrium species seem to segregate to the interfaces during operation, leading to the formation of t-YSZ in the Y-depleted regions.

  14. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore » under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m−2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m−2.« less

  15. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore » using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  16. Shape of the terrestrial plasma sheet in the near-Earth magnetospheric tail as imaged by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Ogasawara, K.; Petrinec, S. M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Valek, P.

    2015-04-11

    We present remote, continuous observations from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer of the terrestrial plasma sheet location back to -16 Earth radii (RE) in the magnetospheric tail using energetic neutral atom emissions. The time period studied includes two orbits near the winter and summer solstices, thus associated with large negative and positive dipole tilt, respectively. Continuous side-view images reveal a complex shape that is dominated mainly by large-scale warping due to the diurnal motion of the dipole axis. Superposed on the global warped geometry are short-time fluctuations in plasma sheet location that appear to be consistent with plasma sheet flapping and possibly twisting due to changes in the interplanetary conditions. We conclude that the plasma sheet warping due to the diurnal motion dominates the average shape of the plasma sheet. Over short times, the position of the plasma sheet can be dominated by twisting and flapping.

  17. Atomic-scale evolution of modulated phases at the ferroelectric-antiferroelectric morphotropic phase boundary controlled by flexoelectric interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Eliseev, Eugene; Morozovska, A. N.; Cheng, Ching-Jung; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Chu, Ying-Hao; Kan, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Valanoor, Nagarajan V; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    Physical and structural origins of morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs) in ferroics remain elusive despite decades of studies. The leading competing theories employ either low symmetry bridging phases or adaptive phases with nanoscale textures to describe different subsets of the macroscopic data, while the decisive atomic-scale information has so far been missing. We report direct atomically-resolved mapping of polarization and structure order parameter fields in Sm-doped BiFeO3 system and their evolution as the system approaches MPB. We further show that both the experimental phase diagram and the phase evolution observed by STEM can be explained by taking into account flexoelectric interaction, which renders the effective domain wall energy negative, thus stabilizing modulated phases in the vicinity of the MPB. Our study highlights the importance of local order parameter mapping at the atomic scale and establishes a hitherto unobserved physical origin of spatially modulated phases existing in the vicinity of the MPB.

  18. Shape of the terrestrial plasma sheet in the near-Earth magnetospheric tail as imaged by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Ogasawara, K.; Petrinec, S. M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Valek, P.

    2015-04-11

    We present remote, continuous observations from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer of the terrestrial plasma sheet location back to -16 Earth radii (RE) in the magnetospheric tail using energetic neutral atom emissions. The time period studied includes two orbits near the winter and summer solstices, thus associated with large negative and positive dipole tilt, respectively. Continuous side-view images reveal a complex shape that is dominated mainly by large-scale warping due to the diurnal motion of the dipole axis. Superposed on the global warped geometry are short-time fluctuations in plasma sheet location that appear to be consistent with plasma sheet flapping andmore » possibly twisting due to changes in the interplanetary conditions. We conclude that the plasma sheet warping due to the diurnal motion dominates the average shape of the plasma sheet. Over short times, the position of the plasma sheet can be dominated by twisting and flapping.« less

  19. Plasticity and ultra-low stress induced twin boundary migration in nanotwinned Cu by in situ nanoindentation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Chen, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Jian, J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Zhang, X., E-mail: zhangx@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Nanotwinned metals have rare combinations of mechanical strength and ductility. Previous studies have shown that detwinning occurs in plastically deformed nanotwinned metals. Although molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that fine nanotwins can migrate at low stress, there is little in situ evidence to validate such predictions. Also it is unclear if detwinning occurs prior to or succeeding plastic yielding. Here, by using in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope, we show that a non-elastic detwinning process in nanotwinned Cu occurred at ultra-low indentation stress (0.1?GPa), well before the stress necessary for plastic yielding. Furthermore, the in situ nanoindentation technique allows us to differentiate dislocation-nucleation dominated microscopic yielding preceding macroscopic yielding manifested by dislocation-transmission through twin boundaries. This study thus provides further insights for understanding plasticity in nanotwinned metals at microscopic levels.

  20. ON THE LOW-FREQUENCY BOUNDARY OF SUN-GENERATED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN THE SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shergelashvili, Bidzina M.; Fichtner, Horst

    2012-06-20

    New aspects of the slow solar wind turbulent heating and acceleration are investigated. A physical meaning of the lower boundary of the Alfven wave turbulent spectra in the solar atmosphere and the solar wind is studied and the significance of this natural parameter is demonstrated. Via an analytical and quantitative treatment of the problem we show that a truncation of the wave spectra from the lower frequency side, which is a consequence of the solar magnetic field structure and its cyclic changes, results in a significant reduction of the heat production and acceleration rates. An appropriate analysis is presented regarding the link of the considered problem with existing observational data and slow solar wind initiation scenarios.

  1. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C.

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  2. Gravity and magnetic anomalies associated with Tertiary volcanism and a Proterozoic crustal boundary, Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation (Arizona)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan-Ealy, P.F. . Geology Dept.); Hendricks, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Hopi Buttes volcanic field is located in the Navajo Nation of northeastern Arizona, near the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. Explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions from late Miocene to mid-Pliocene time produced more than 300 maar-diatremes and deposited limburgite tuffs and tuff breccia and monchiquite dikes, necks and flows within a roughly circular 2,500 km[sup 2] area. The volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks make up the middle member of the Bidahochi Formation, whose lower and upper members are lacustrine and fluvial, respectively. The Bidahochi Formation overlies gently dipping Mesozoic sedimentary rocks exposed in the southwestern portion of the volcanic field. Two significant gravity and magnetic anomalies appear within the Hopi Buttes volcanic field that are unlike the signatures of other Tertiary volcanic fields on the Colorado Plateau. A circular 20 mGal negative gravity anomaly is centered over exposed sedimentary rocks in the southwestern portion of the field. The anomaly may be due to the large volume of low density pyroclastic rocks in the volcanic field and/or extensive brecciation of the underlying strata from the violent maar eruptions. The second significant anomaly is the northeast-trending Holbrook lineament, a 5 km-wide gravity and magnetic lineament that crosses the southeastern part of the volcanic field. The lineament reflects substantial gravity and magnetic decreases of 1.67 mGals/km and 100 gammas/km respectively, to the southeast. Preliminary two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling suggests the lineament represents a major Proterozoic crustal boundary and may correlate with one of several Proterozoic faults exposed in the transition zone of central Arizona. Gravity modeling shows a 3--5 km step'' in the Moho near the crustal boundary. The decrease in depth of the Moho to the northwest indicates either movement along the fault or magmatic upwelling beneath the volcanic field.

  3. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  4. Calculation of contact angles at triple phase boundary in solid oxide fuel cell anode using the level set method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaojun; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Kohno, Haruhiko; Jiao, Zhenjun; Hayakawa, Koji; Okita, Kohei; Shikazono, Naoki

    2014-10-15

    A level set method is applied to characterize the three dimensional structures of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases in solid oxide fuel cell anode reconstructed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the triple phase boundary based on interfacial normal vectors which can be calculated from the signed distance functions defined for each of the three phases. Furthermore, surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles by assuming the interfacial force balance at the triple phase boundary. The average contact angle values of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore are found to be 143156, 83138 and 82123, respectively. The mean contact angles remained nearly unchanged after 100 hour operation. However, the contact angles just after reduction are different for the cells with different sintering temperatures. In addition, standard deviations of the contact angles are very large especially for yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases. The calculated surface tension forces from mean contact angles were close to the experimental values found in the literature. Slight increase of surface tensions of nickel/pore and nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia were observed after operation. Present data are expected to be used not only for the understanding of the degradation mechanism, but also for the quantitative prediction of the microstructural temporal evolution of solid oxide fuel cell anode. - Highlights: A level set method is applied to characterize the 3D structures of SOFC anode. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the TPB. Surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles. The average contact angle values are found to be 143o-156o, 83o-138o and 82o-123o. Present data are expected to understand degradation and predict evolution of SOFC.

  5. Oxygen Diffusion Enables Anti-Wear Boundary Film Formation on Titanium Surfaces in Zinc-Dialkyl-Dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-Containing Lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a wear reduction by up to six orders of magnitude for Ti-6Al-4V alloy when treated by an oxygen diffusion (OD) process and subsequently tested in a zinc-dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-containing lubricant. In addition to case hardening, it is discovered that OD enables the formation of an anti-wear boundary film on the titanium surface. Transmission electron microscopy and surface chemical analyses revealed that this boundary film has a two-layer structure comprising an amorphous oxide interlayer and a ZDDP-based top film with complex compounds.

  6. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  7. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  8. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    2014-05-05

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  9. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dong, Xiquan

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  10. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert

    2013-05-31

    The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP?MBL) at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

  11. Quantifying stoichiometry-induced variations in structure and energy of a SrTiO3 symmetric ?13 {510}/<100?>?grain boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Hao; Lee, H. S.; Sarahan, M. C.; Sato, Yoichi; Chi, Miaofang; Moeck, Peter; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-04-01

    shown to readily accommodate nonstoichiometry changing the electrostatic potential at the boundary plane and effectively controlling material properties such as capacitance, magnetoresistance and superconductivity. Understanding and quantifying exactly how variations in atomic scale nonstoichiometry at the boundary plane extend to the practical mesoscale operating length of the system is therefore critical for improving the overall properties. Bicrystals of SrTiO3 were fabricated to provide the model GB model structures that are analysed in this paper. We show that statistical analysis of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope images acquired from a large area of GB is an effective routine to understanding the variation in boundary structure that occurs to accommodate nonstoichiometry. In the case of the SrTiO3 22.6 ?13 (510)/[100] GB analysed here, the symmetric atomic structures observed from a micron-long GB can be categorized as two different competing structural arrangements, with and without a rigid-body translation along the boundary plane. How this quantified experimental approach can provide direct insights into the GB energetics is further confirmed from the first principles density functional theory, and the effect of nonstoichiometry in determining the GB energies is quantified.

  12. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore » relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  13. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  14. LandUse/Land Cover Map of the CF of ARM in the SGP Site Using DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) Satellite Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use/Land Cover Map of the Central Facility of ARM in the Southern Great Plains Site Using DOE's Multi-Spectral Thermal Imager Satellite Images S. E. Báez Cazull Pre-Service Teacher Program University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico A. Cialla Brookhaven National Laboratory Department of Environmental Sciences Upton, New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a multi-laboratory, interagency program that was created with funding from the U.S.

  15. Ellipsometry characterization of polycrystalline ZnO layers with the modeling of carrier concentration gradient: Effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sago, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Hideto; Iigusa, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Kentaro

    2014-04-07

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been applied to study the effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture on the carrier transport properties of Al-doped ZnO layers fabricated by dc and rf magnetron sputtering. In the SE analysis, the variation in the free carrier absorption toward the growth direction, induced by the ZnO grain growth on foreign substrates, has been modeled explicitly by adopting a multilayer model in which the optical carrier concentration (N{sub opt}) varies continuously with a constant optical mobility (?{sub opt}). The effect of the grain boundary has been studied by comparing ?{sub opt} with Hall mobility (?{sub Hall}). The change in ?{sub Hall}/?{sub opt} indicates a sharp structural transition of the ZnO polycrystalline layer at a thickness of d???500?nm, which correlates very well with the structure confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In particular, below the transition thickness, the formation of the high density grain boundary leads to the reduction in the ?{sub Hall}/?{sub opt} ratio as well as N{sub opt}. As a result, we find that the thickness dependence of the carrier transport properties is almost completely governed by the grain boundary formation. On the other hand, when the ZnO layer is exposed to wet air at 85?C, ?{sub Hall} reduces drastically with a minor variation of ?{sub opt} due to the enhanced grain boundary scattering. We have also characterized textured ZnO:Al layers prepared by HCl wet etching by SE. The analysis revealed that the near-surface carrier concentration increases slightly after the etching. We demonstrate that the SE technique can be applied to distinguish various rough textured structures (size???1??m) of the ZnO layers prepared by the HCl etching.

  16. TH-E-17A-11: Tracking Tumors Boundary in MV Image Sequences for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X; Homma, N; Ichiji, K; Abe, M; Sugita, N; Yoshizawa, M; Narita, Y; Takai, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a level set method (LSM)-based algorithm to track the tumors boundary in MV image sequences for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Method: Four MV image sequences, each of which consists of 100 frames at frame rate of 7.5 Hz, are acquired by using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) (Varian Medical Systems, Pal Alto, USA) during the treatment of lung cancer. In the first frame of each sequence, we roughly delineate an initial contour of the target tumor by hand. Using a LSM-based algorithm, the initial contour can automatically shape itself to fit the tumor, and eventually detect the tumors boundary. We then employ the tumors boundary obtained from the previous frame as the initial contour in the subsequent frame, so that the LSM-based method can drive this initial contour to the tumors boundary quickly and fulfill a tracking task. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on four MV image sequences. The mean tracking errors were 0.23, 0.29, 0.37, and 1.18 mm, and their corresponding standard deviations were 0.97, 0.75, 1.2 and 1.48 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Compared with conventional tumor tracking techniques, the proposed system is capable not only of tracking the tumors position, but also of detecting the tumors boundary varying with the respiration during the treatment. Considering current radiation therapy technique, for example, dynamical multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) has been widely applied in clinical treatment, this study indicates the potential for significant accuracy improvement in radiation therapy. This work was partially supported by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems (Palo Alto, California)

  17. Influence of steel type on the propensity for tribochemical wear in boundary lubrication with a wind turbine gear oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Ryan D.; Doll, Gary L.; Hager, C H; Howe, Jane Y

    2010-01-01

    Tribochemical wear may occur at the interface between a surface and a lubricant as a result of chemical and mechanical interactions in a tribological contact. Understanding the onset of tribochemical wear damage on component surfaces requires the use of high resolution techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this study, two steel types, case carburized AISI 3310 and through-hardened AISI 52100, were wear tested using a ball-on-disk rolling/sliding contact tribometer in fully formulated commercial wind turbine gearbox oil under boundary lubrication conditions with 10% slip. With the exception of steel type, all other test conditions were held constant. Conventional tribofilm analysis in the wear tracks was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and no significant composition differences were detected in the tribofilms for the different steel disk types. However, TEM analysis revealed significant tribochemical wear differences between the two steel types at multiple length scales, from the near-surface material microstructure (depth < 500 nm) to the tribofilm nanostructure. Nanometer-scale interfacial cracking and surface particle detachment was observed for the AISI 52100 case, whereas the tribofilm/substrate interface was abrupt and undamaged for the AISI 3310 case. Differences in tribofilm structure, including the location and orientation of MoS{sub 2} single sheet inclusions, were observed as a function of steel type as well. It is suggested that the tribochemical wear modes observed in these experiments may be origins of macroscopic surface-initiated damage such as micropitting in bearings and gears.

  18. Phonon coupling to dynamic short-range polar order in a relaxor ferroelectric near the morphotropic phase boundary

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    John A. Schneeloch; Xu, Zhijun; Winn, B.; Stock, C.; Gehring, P. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Xu, Guangyong

    2015-12-28

    We report neutron inelastic scattering experiments on single-crystal PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3 doped with 32% PbTiO3, a relaxor ferroelectric that lies close to the morphotropic phase boundary. When cooled under an electric field E∥ [001] into tetragonal and monoclinic phases, the scattering cross section from transverse acoustic (TA) phonons polarized parallel to E weakens and shifts to higher energy relative to that under zero-field-cooled conditions. Likewise, the scattering cross section from transverse optic (TO) phonons polarized parallel to E weakens for energy transfers 4 ≤ ℏω ≤ 9 meV. However, TA and TO phonons polarized perpendicular to E show no change. This anisotropicmore » field response is similar to that of the diffuse scattering cross section, which, as previously reported, is suppressed when polarized parallel to E but not when polarized perpendicular to E. Lastly, our findings suggest that the lattice dynamics and dynamic short-range polar correlations that give rise to the diffuse scattering are coupled.« less

  19. A BROKEN SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST INDUCED BY A CORONAL SHOCK PROPAGATING ACROSS THE STREAMER BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, X. L.; Chen, Y.; Li, G.; Feng, S. W.; Song, H. Q.; Jiao, F. R.; Guo, F.

    2012-05-10

    We discuss an intriguing type II radio burst that occurred on 2011 March 27. The dynamic spectrum was featured by a sudden break at about 43 MHz on the well-observed harmonic branch. Before the break, the spectrum drifted gradually with a mean rate of about -0.05 MHz s{sup -1}. Following the break, the spectrum jumped to lower frequencies. The post-break emission lasted for about 3 minutes. It consisted of an overall slow drift which appeared to have a few fast-drift sub-bands. Simultaneous observations from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and the Solar Dynamics Observatory were also available and are examined for this event. We suggest that the slow-drift period before the break was generated inside a streamer by a coronal eruption driven shock, and the spectral break as well as the relatively wide spectrum after the break is a consequence of the shock crossing the streamer boundary where density drops abruptly. It is suggested that this type of radio bursts can be taken as a unique diagnostic tool for inferring the coronal density structure, as well as the radio-emitting source region.

  20. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAAs High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  1. Kinetics of spin relaxation in quantum wires and channels: Boundary spin echo and formation of a persistent spin helix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2011-10-15

    In this paper we use a spin kinetic equation to study spin-polarization dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) wires and 2D channels. The spin kinetic equation is valid in both diffusive and ballistic spin transport regimes and therefore is more general than the usual spin drift-diffusion equations. In particular, we demonstrate that in infinite 1D wires with Rashba spin-orbit interaction the exponential spin-relaxation decay can be modulated by an oscillating function. In the case of spin relaxation in finite length 1D wires, it is shown that an initially homogeneous spin polarization spontaneously transforms into a persistent spin helix. We find that a propagating spin-polarization profile reflects from a system boundary and returns back to its initial position similarly to the reflectance of sound waves from an obstacle. The Green's function of the spin kinetic equation is derived for both finite and infinite 1D systems. Moreover, we demonstrate explicitly that the spin relaxation in specifically oriented 2D channels with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of equal strength occurs similarly to that in 1D wires of finite length. Finally, a simple transformation mapping 1D spin kinetic equation into the Klein-Gordon equation with an imaginary mass is found thus establishing an interesting connection between semiconductor spintronics and relativistic quantum mechanics.

  2. Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L.

    2007-07-01

    Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  3. Purcell Boundary Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purcell

  4. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  5. Morris Boundary Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bf

  6. A TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE CURRENT WATER POLICY BOUNDARY AT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-13

    In 1988, groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99) was identified in samples collected from residential water wells withdrawing groundwater from the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) north of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) facility. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided temporary drinking water supplies to approximately 100 potentially affected residents by initially supplying bottled water, water tanks, and water-treatment systems, and then by extending municipal water lines, all at no cost, to those persons whose wells could be affected by contaminated groundwater. The Water Policy boundary was established in 1993. In the Policy, DOE agreed to pay the reasonable monthly cost of water for homes and businesses and, in exchange, many of the land owners signed license agreements committing to cease using the groundwater via rural water wells. In 2012, DOE requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), managing contractor of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), provide an independent assessment of the quality and quantity of the existing groundwater monitoring data and determine if there is sufficient information to support a modification to the boundary of the current Water Policy. As a result of the assessment, ORAU concludes that sufficient groundwater monitoring data exists to determine that a shrinkage and/or shift of the plume(s) responsible for the initial development of this policy has occurred. Specifically, there is compelling evidence that the TCE plume is undergoing shrinkage due to natural attenuation and associated degradation. The plume shrinkage (and migration) has also been augmented in local areas where large volumes of groundwater were recovered by pump-and treat remedial systems along the eastern and western boundaries of the Northwest Plume, and in other areas where pump-and-treat systems have been deployed by DOE to remove source contaminants. The available evidence supports adjusting the western and northwestern Water Policy boundary. Based on the historical and modeled hydrogeological data reflecting past flow and plume attenuation, along with associated plume migration toward the northeast, the establishment of a new boundary along the westernmost margin of the earliest indication of the TCE plume is proposed and justified on hydrogeological grounds. Approximately 30% of the original area would remain within the adjusted Water Policy area west and northwest of the PGDP facility. This modification would release about 70% of the area, although individual properties would overlap the new boundary.

  7. A 2.5D boundary element formulation for modeling damped waves in arbitrary cross-section waveguides and cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzotti, M.; Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 ; Bartoli, I.; Marzani, A.; Viola, E.

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: Dispersive properties of viscoelastic waveguides and cavities are computed using a regularized 2.5D BEM. Linear viscoelasticity is introduced at the constitutive level by means of frequency dependent complex moduli. A contour integral algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is used to select the permissible Riemann sheets. Attenuation of surface waves in cavities approaches the attenuation of Rayleigh waves. -- Abstract: A regularized 2.5D boundary element method (BEM) is proposed to predict the dispersion properties of damped stress guided waves in waveguides and cavities of arbitrary cross-section. The wave attenuation, induced by material damping, is introduced using linear viscoelastic constitutive relations and described in a spatial manner by the imaginary component of the axial wavenumber. The discretized dispersive wave equation results in a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is solved obtaining complex axial wavenumbers for a fixed frequency using a contour integral algorithm. Due to the singular characteristics and the multivalued feature of the wave equation, the requirement of holomorphicity inside the contour region over the complex wavenumber plane is fulfilled by the introduction of the Sommerfeld branch cuts and by the choice of the permissible Riemann sheets. A post processing analysis is developed for the extraction of the energy velocity of propagative guided waves. The reliability of the method is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained for a rail and a bar with square cross-section with those obtained from a 2.5D Finite Element formulation also known in literature as Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method. Next, to show the potential of the proposed numerical framework, dispersion properties are predicted for surface waves propagating along cylindrical cavities of arbitrary cross-section. It is demonstrated that the attenuation of surface waves approaches asymptotically the attenuation of Rayleigh waves.

  8. USING A RISK-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR THE TRANSFER OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL WITHIN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.; Loibl, M.

    2010-06-03

    Shipment of radioactive materials (RAM) is discussed in the Code of Federal Regulations in parts of both 49 CFR and 10 CFR. The regulations provide the requirements and rules necessary for the safe shipment of RAM across public highways, railways, waterways, and through the air. These shipments are sometimes referred to as in-commerce shipments. Shipments of RAM entirely within the boundaries of Department of Energy sites, such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), can be made using methodology allowing provisions to maintain equivalent safety while deviating from the regulations for in-commerce shipments. These onsite shipments are known as transfers at the SRS. These transfers must follow the requirements approved in a site-specific Transportation Safety Document (TSD). The TSD defines how the site will transfer materials so that they have equivalence to the regulations. These equivalences are documented in an Onsite Safety Assessment (OSA). The OSA can show how a particular packaging used onsite is equivalent to that which would be used for an in-commerce shipment. This is known as a deterministic approach. However, when a deterministic approach is not viable, the TSD allows for a risk-based OSA to be written. These risk-based assessments show that if a packaging does not provide the necessary safety to ensure that materials are not released (during normal or accident conditions) then the worst-case release of materials does not result in a dose consequence worse than that defined for the SRS. This paper will discuss recent challenges and successes using this methodology at the SRS.

  9. ARM - Education Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2006 Education Students Tour the SGP Facility Bookmark and Share Seventh graders tour the ARM SGP site in November. On November 1, 2006, the SGP site hosted a group of 30...

  10. ARM - Other Aircraft Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Radar Campaign 12 days Stephen Sekelsky SGP 1998-08-03 Past BDRF Campaign 25 days Don Cahoon SGP 2002-05-13 Past IHOP Campaign 1 months Dave Parsons SGP 2005-05-21 Past...

  11. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact of NO emissions. Our project shows that the urban canopy should be included in future air quality models to better represent nocturnal chemistry. This project has considerably advanced our understanding of the chemistry of the urban nocturnal boundary layer. The results of this project have implications for air quality studies in the urban nocturnal boundary layer. The study has also identified new questions on nocturnal processes, which we will continue to address through other projects.

  12. EV Community Readiness projects: Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (PA); Metropolitan Energy Information Center, Inc. (KS, MO)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Effect of radiation and magnetohydrodynamic free convection boundary layer flow on a solid sphere with Newtonian heating in a micropolar fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkasasbeh, Hamzeh Taha Sarif, Norhafizah Md Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Tahar, Razman Mat; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, the effect of radiation on magnetohydrodynamic free convection boundary layer flow on a solid sphere with Newtonian heating in a micropolar fluid, in which the heat transfer from the surface is proportional to the local surface temperature, is considered. The transformed boundary layer equations in the form of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme known as the Keller-box method. Numerical solutions are obtained for the local wall temperature and the local skin friction coefficient, as well as the velocity, angular velocity and temperature profiles. The features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics for various values of the Prandtl number Pr, micropolar parameter K, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter N{sub R}, the conjugate parameter γ and the coordinate running along the surface of the sphere, x are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation

  15. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  16. Full Coverage Shaped Hole Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer with High Free-Stream Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest E.; Kingery, Joseph E.

    2015-06-17

    Full coverage shaped-hole film cooling and downstream heat transfer measurements have been acquired in the accelerating flows over a large cylindrical leading edge test surface. The shaped holes had an 8° lateral expansion angled at 30° to the surface with spanwise and streamwise spacings of 3 diameters. Measurements were conducted at four blowing ratios, two Reynolds numbers and six well documented turbulence conditions. Film cooling measurements were acquired over a four to one range in blowing ratio at the lower Reynolds number and at the two lower blowing ratios for the higher Reynolds number. The film cooling measurements were acquired at a coolant to free-stream density ratio of approximately 1.04. The flows were subjected to a low turbulence condition (Tu = 0.7%), two levels of turbulence for a smaller sized grid (Tu = 3.5%, and 7.9%), one turbulence level for a larger grid (8.1%), and two levels of turbulence generated using a mock aero-combustor (Tu = 9.3% and 13.7%). Turbulence level is shown to have a significant influence in mixing away film cooling coverage progressively as the flow develops in the streamwise direction. Effectiveness levels for the aero-combustor turbulence condition are reduced to as low as 20% of low turbulence values by the furthest downstream region. The film cooling discharge is located close to the leading edge with very thin and accelerating upstream boundary layers. Film cooling data at the lower Reynolds number, show that transitional flows have significantly improved effectiveness levels compared with turbulent flows. Downstream effectiveness levels are very similar to slot film cooling data taken at the same coolant flow rates over the same cylindrical test surface. However, slots perform significantly better in the near discharge region. These data are expected to be very useful in grounding computational predictions of full coverage shaped hole film cooling with elevated turbulence levels and acceleration. IR measurements were performed for the two lowest turbulence levels to document the spanwise variation in film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer.

  17. Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

  18. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE DWARF NOVA RU Peg IN QUIESCENCE: PROBE OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balman, Soelen; Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M.; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Schlegel, Eric; Barrett, Paul E.; Szkody, Paula E-mail: patrick.godon@villanova.edu E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int E-mail: barrett.paul@usno.navy.mil

    2011-11-10

    We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long-period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf (WD), possibly the hottest WD in a dwarf nova (DN), it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer (BL), and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code (i.e., CEVMKL). We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the European Photon Imaging Camera MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most DNe, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the WD in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a BL luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming M{sub wd} = 1.3 M{sub sun}), in agreement with the expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19 A as observed by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer implies a projected stellar rotational velocity v{sub rot}sin i = 695 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the line is emitted from material rotating at {approx}936-1245 km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 34 Degree-Sign -48 Degree-Sign) or about 1/6 of the Keplerian speed; this velocity is much larger than the rotation speed of the WD inferred from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum. Cross-correletion analysis yielded an undelayed (time lag {approx} 0) component and a delayed component of 116 {+-} 17 s where the X-ray variations/fluctuations lagged the UV variations. This indicates that the UV fluctuations in the inner disk are propagated into the X-ray emitting region in about 116 s. The undelayed component may be related to irradiation effects.

  19. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility News SGP Hosts Two Groups for "Lunch and Launch" Visit Bookmark and Share John Schatz, SGP Deputy Site Manager (in striped shirt), answers questions from Billings...

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2005 Facility News Aging, Overworked Computer Network at SGP Gets Overhauled Bookmark and Share This aerial map of instruments deployed at the SGP Central Facility provides...

  1. Proximal impact deposits at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the Gulf of Mexico: A restudy of DSDP Leg 77 Sites 536 and 540

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F. ); Smit, J. ); Lowrie, W. ); Asaro, F. ); Margolis, S.V.; Claeys, P. ); Kastner, M. ); Hildebrand, A.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Restudy of Deep Sea Drilling Project Sites 536 and 540 in the southeast Gulf of Mexico gives evidence for a giant wave at Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary time. Five units are recognized: (1) Cenomanian limestone underlies a hiatus in which the five highest Cretaceous stages are missing, possibly because of catastrophic K-T erosion. (2) Pebbly mudstone, 45 m thick, represents a submarine landslide possibly of K-T age. (3) Current-bedded sandstone, more than 2.5 m thick, contains anomalous iridium, tektite glass, and shocked quartz; it is interpreted as ejecta from a nearby impact crater, reworked on the deep-sea floor by the resulting tsunami. (4) A 50-cm interval of calcareous mudstone containing small Cretaceous planktic foraminifera and the Ir peak is interpreted as the silt-size fraction of the Cretaceous material suspended by the impact-generated wave. (5) Calcareous mudstone with basal Tertiary forams and the uppermost tail of the Ir anomaly overlies the disturbed interval, dating the impact and wave event as K-T boundary age. Like Beloc in Haiti and Mimbral in Mexico, Sites 536 and 540 are consistent with a large K-T age impact at the nearby Chicxulub crater.

  2. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more » The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  3. Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostylev, M.

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

  4. On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

  5. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations. The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR STRONTIUM TITANATE IN SWSA 7 AND ADJACENT PARCELS IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST SITE BOUNDARY DEFINITION PROGRAM OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King

    2011-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office requested support from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract to delineate the extent of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) contamination in and around Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7 as part of the Oak Ridge National Priorities List Site boundary definition program. The study area is presented in Fig. 1.1 relative to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The investigation was executed according to Sampling and Analysis Plan/Quality Assurance Project Plan (SAP/QAPP) (DOE 2011) to supplement previous investigations noted below and to determine what areas, if any, have been adversely impacted by site operations.

  7. On the effective implementation of a boundary element code on graphics processing units unsing an out-of-core LU algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    A collocation boundary element code for solving the three-dimensional Laplace equation, publicly available from \\url{http://www.intetec.org}, has been adapted to run on an Nvidia Tesla general purpose graphics processing unit (GPU). Global matrix assembly and LU factorization of the resulting dense matrix were performed on the GPU. Out-of-core techniques were used to solve problems larger than available GPU memory. The code achieved over eight times speedup in matrix assembly and about 56~Gflops/sec in the LU factorization using only 512~Mbytes of GPU memory. Details of the GPU implementation and comparisons with the standard sequential algorithm are included to illustrate the performance of the GPU code.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  9. The atomic structure and chemistry of Fe-rich steps on antiphase boundaries in Ti-doped Bi{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLaren, Ian Craven, Alan J.; Schaffer, Bernhard; Wang, LiQiu; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Kalantari, Kambiz; Reaney, Ian M.

    2014-06-01

    Stepped antiphase boundaries are frequently observed in Ti-doped Bi{sub 0.85}Nd{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3}, related to the novel planar antiphase boundaries reported recently. The atomic structure and chemistry of these steps are determined by a combination of high angle annular dark field and bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging, together with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The core of these steps is found to consist of 4 edge-sharing FeO{sub 6} octahedra. The structure is confirmed by image simulations using a frozen phonon multislice approach. The steps are also found to be negatively charged and, like the planar boundaries studied previously, result in polarisation of the surrounding perovskite matrix.

  10. State","County","NOAA Climate Division (Number)","NOAA Climate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CENTRAL",3 "KS","SHERIDAN",1,"NORTHWEST",2 "KS","SHERMAN",1,"NORTHWEST",2 "KS","SMITH",2,"NORTH CENTRAL",2 "KS","STAFFORD",8,"SOUTH CENTRAL",3 "KS","STANTON",7,"SOUTHWEST",...

  11. ARM - XDC Data Viewers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Viewers XDC Data Viewers Aerosol Properties Plots Composite Images SGP GOES Composite TWP GOES Composite TWP MTSAT Composite HFE MTSAT Composite NSA AVHRR Satellite quick looks SGP Reflectivity Loops for Summer 1997 IOP Hovuller Diagrams SGP GOES Satellite TWP GMS Satellite Landsat Data NSA Landsat TM SGP Landsat TM TWP Landsat TM XDC Data Viewers The XDC provides and maintains the following data viewers. AOS Aerosol Properties Plots: In-situ Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS) plots for SGP, AMF

  12. ARM - PI Product - Merged and corrected 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler moments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsMerged and corrected 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler moments ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Merged and corrected 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler moments [ ARM research ] The radar wind profiler (RWP) present at the SGP central facility operates at 915 MHz and was reconfigured in early 2011, to collect key sets of measurements for precipitation and boundary layer studies. The RWP is

  13. Twofold enhancement of the hidden-order/large-moment antiferromagnetic phase boundary in the URu2-xFexSi₂ system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanchanavatee, N.; Janoschek, M.; Baumbach, R. E.; Hamlin, J. J.; Zocco, D. A.; Huang, K.; Maple, M. B.

    2011-12-16

    Electrical resistivity, specific heat, and magnetization measurements on URu2-xFexSi₂ reveal a twofold enhancement of the “hidden-order” (HO)/large-moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase boundary T₀(x). The T₀(Pch) curve, obtained by converting x to “chemical pressure” Pch, is strikingly similar to the T₀(P) curve, where P is applied pressure, for URu₂Si₂ both exhibit a “kink” at 1.5 GPa and a maximum at ~7 GPa. This similarity suggests that the HO-LMAFM transition at 1.5 GPa in URu₂Si₂ occurs at x ≈ 0.2 (Pch≈1.5 GPa) in URu2-xFexSi₂. URu2-xFexSi₂ provides an opportunity for studying the HO and LMAFM phases with methods that probe the electronic structure [e.g.,more » scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS)] but cannot be used under pressure.« less

  14. Erosional remnants and adjacent unconformities along an eolian-marine boundary of the Page Sandstone and Carmel Formation, Middle Jurassic, south-central Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, L.S.; Blakey, R.C. (Univ. of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone ridges along the marine-eolian boundary of the Middle Jurassic Page Sandstone (eolian) with the lower Carmel Formation (restricted marine) in south-central Utah have been identified as erosional remnants consisting of strata of siliciclastic sabkha and eolian origin. The ridges lie within two distinct units of the Thousand Pockets Tongue of the Page. Two equally plausible models explain the genesis of these ridges. One model involves (1) early cementation of eolian and sabkha strata, (2) wind erosion leading to development of yardangs and unconformities, (3) yardang tilting due to evaporite dissolution, and (4) renewed deposition and burial. The alternative model explains ridge development through (1) subsidence, with tilting, of eolian and sabkha strata into evaporites due to loading from linear dunes, (2) evaporite dissolution and unconformity development, and (3) renewed deposition and burial. These models provide important clues about the nature of a missing part of the rock record. Reconstruction of units that were deposited but later eroded improves paleogeographic interpretation and here indicates that the Carmel paleo-shoreline was considerably farther to the northwest than previously believed.

  15. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Elijah H; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C Christopher; Hillairet, J.; Isler, Ralph C; Caughman, J. B. O.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Colledani, G.; Lotte, Ph.; Litaudon, X; Hillis, Donald Lee; Harris, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be important, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies ($E_{LH}$) was announced (Phys. Rev. Lett., 110:215005, 2013). The measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the processing of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique is investigated. It was found through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra pulses that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled $E_{LH}$ when the launched power exceeds 0.5MW. For low power the measurement becomes formidable utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.

  16. Study of the recombination process at crystallite boundaries in CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) films by microwave photoconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocharov, K. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Hsieh, T. Y.; Gapanovich, M. V.; Jeng, M. J.

    2013-03-15

    The loss kinetics of photogenerated charge carriers in thin polycrystalline chalcopyrite CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) films has been studied by microwave photoconductivity (at 36 GHz). The films were synthesized using the ampoule method and three variants of physical vapor deposition with subsequent selenization: magnetron sputtering, thermal deposition, and modified thermal deposition with intermetallic precursors. The photoconductivity was excited by 8-ns nitrogen laser pulses with maximum intensity of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} photons/cm per pulse. Measurements were performed in the temperature range 148-293 K. The photoresponse amplitude is found to depend linearly on the sizes of coherent-scattering regions in the film grains, which were calculated from X-ray diffraction data. The photoresponse decay obeys hyperbolic law. The photoresponse half-decay time increases with a decrease in both temperature and light intensity. It is shown that the recombination of free holes with trapped electrons is very efficient near the crystallite boundaries.

  17. Central Safety Factor and #12;N Control on NSTX-U via Beam Power and Plasma Boundary Shape Modification, using TRANSP for Closed Loop Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Gates, David A.; Gerhardt, S.; Goumiri, I. R.; Menard, Jon

    2014-08-01

    The high-performance operational goals of NSTX-U will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms, including control of N and the safety factor profile. In this work, a novel approach to simultaneously controlling #12;N and the value of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q0, through manipulation of the plasma boundary shape and total beam power, is proposed. Simulations of the proposed scheme show promising results and motivate future experimental implementation and eventual integration into a more complex current profile control scheme planned to include actuation of individual beam powers, density, and loop voltage. As part of this work, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the high-fidelity code TRANSP was developed. The framework, used here to identify control-design-oriented models and to tune and test the proposed controller, exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc.). The flexible framework should enable high-fidelity testing of a variety of control algorithms, thereby reducing the amount of expensive experimental time needed to implement new control algorithms on NSTX-U and other devices.

  18. Tuning electronic and magnetic properties of armchair|zigzag hybrid graphene nanoribbons by the choice of supercell model of grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, Ke-Yan; Li, Xiao-Fei; Duan, Sai; Jin, Ming-Xing; Ding, Da-Jun; Luo, Yi

    2014-03-14

    Grain boundaries (GBs) attract much interest for its ability to tune the property of hybrid materials. Theoretically predicting the properties of hybrid graphene with GBs, even a linear GB remains challenging due to its inhomogeneous structure, which makes supercell model tough to choose in theoretic studies. For the first time, the applicability of supercells with different GBs and lattice-mismatches for describing armchair-zigzag hybrid graphene nanoribbons was validated by ab initio molecular dynamic simulations and first principles electronic structure calculations. And to what extent the electronic properties can be tuned by the strain effects resulting from the lattice-mismatch and the GBs distortion in supercells was demonstrated. This work showed that the intrinsic strain in such system plays a decisive role in determining the band structure and spin polarization properties. Hybrid graphene nanoribbon was found to be ferromagnetic in the ground state, especially for the case of using the supercell with nearly-perfect lattice match. Its high Curie temperature suggests the potential applications of this material in spintronics.

  19. Direct observation of ferromagnetism in grain boundary phase of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnet using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, T.; Yasui, A.; Kotani, Y.; Iwai, H.; Akiya, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Hirosawa, S.; Gohda, Y.

    2014-11-17

    We have investigated the magnetism of the grain boundary (GB) phase in a Nd{sub 14.0}Fe{sub 79.7}Cu{sub 0.1}B{sub 6.2} sintered magnet using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at the Fe L{sub 2,3}-edges. Soft XMCD spectra were measured from the fractured surface that was confirmed to be covered with a thin GB phase by Auger electron spectroscopy. The magnetic moment of Fe in the GB phase was estimated to be m{sub GB}=1.4??{sub B} at 30?C using the sum rule analysis for XMCD spectra, which is 60% of that of Fe in the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound. The temperature dependence of m{sub GB} evaluated with reference to Fe in the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase indicated that the Curie temperature of the GB phase is more than 50?C lower compared to that of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B.

  20. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section

  1. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD 1 3 2 Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

  2. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Denver Basin Outline 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± CO 2001 Reserve Summary for All Denver Basin Fields KS NE CO NE WY KS SD Index Map For 3 Denver Basin Panels The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of

  3. Electrochemistry: Catalysis at the boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-04-09

    Renewable energy provides an opportunity to power society without the potential impacts from the use of fossil fuels, but a major limitation of sources such as solar and wind is their intermittent availability. Efficient storage of energy from these renewable sources is critical in developing their widespread utilization. One approach to the storage of renewable energy is the production of fuels, such as ethanol, from water and carbon dioxide. Unlike traditional centralized fuel production, electrochemical systems can operate under mild pressures and temperatures in dispersed, small-scale reactors. Renewable sources of energy are inherently dispersed, and therefore are well matched with the production of fuels electrochemically. However, the development of efficient catalysts is essential for the intended chemical transformations.

  4. pac 2003 boundary3.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but H-mode densities might be too high for AT GoalsProgram Develop improved surface temperature monitoring Extend divertor heat-handling capability (x2). Extend power...

  5. Plasma Boundary Colloquium.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    There are Some Scientific Disagreements Gene Hackman vs. Ernest Borgnine What Sets the SOL Width? Standard Analysis or 14 .. -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13...

  6. Stratigraphic Boundaries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tectonics Mississippian-Pennsylvanian; Pleistocene, 1.6 to 1.25 Ma Limestone-Madera Formation "MIPu"; Rhyolitic tuff-Intracaldera Bandelier Tuff (upper Tshirege "Qbt" and...

  7. Potential variation around grain boundaries in BaSi{sub 2} films grown on multicrystalline silicon evaluated using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baba, Masakazu; Tsukahara, Daichi; Toko, Kaoru; Hara, Kosuke O.; Usami, Noritaka; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Suemasu, Takashi

    2014-12-21

    Potential variations across the grain boundaries (GBs) in a 100?nm thick undoped n-BaSi{sub 2} film on a cast-grown multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) substrate are evaluated using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM). The ?-2? X-ray diffraction pattern reveals diffraction peaks, such as (201), (301), (410), and (411) of BaSi{sub 2}. Local-area electron backscatter diffraction reveals that the a-axis of BaSi{sub 2} is tilted slightly from the surface normal, depending on the local crystal plane of the mc-Si. KFM measurements show that the potentials are not significantly disordered in the grown BaSi{sub 2}, even around the GBs of mc-Si. The potentials are higher at GBs of BaSi{sub 2} around Si GBs that are formed by grains with a Si(111) face and those with faces that deviate slightly from Si(111). Thus, downward band bending occurs at these BaSi{sub 2} GBs. Minority carriers (holes) undergo a repelling force near the GBs, which may suppress recombination as in the case of undoped n-BaSi{sub 2} epitaxial films on a single crystal Si(111) substrate. The barrier height for hole transport across the GBs varies in the range from 10 to 55?meV. The potentials are also higher at the BaSi{sub 2} GBs grown around Si GBs composed of grains with Si(001) and Si(111) faces. The barrier height for hole transport ranges from 5 to 55?meV. These results indicate that BaSi{sub 2} GBs formed on (111)-dominant Si surfaces do not have a negative influence on the minority-carrier properties, and thus BaSi{sub 2} formed on underlayers, such as (111)-oriented Si or Ge and on (111)-oriented mc-Si, can be utilized as a solar cell active layer.

  8. High Schottky barrier at grain boundaries observed in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somphan, Weeraya; Thongbai, Prasit; Yamwong, Teerapon; Maensiri, Santi

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: NSCTO exhibits a high ?? of 7.08.4 10{sup 3} and low tan ? of 0.0300.041. NSCTO exhibits a high E{sub b} of ?2208 V cm{sup ?1} and large ? of 15.6. Giant ?? response is attributed to the electrically heterogeneous microstructure. High ?{sub b} values at grain boundaries are found to be 0.9250.964 eV. Formation of a potential barrier at grain boundaries is caused by Schottky effect. - Abstract: The dielectric properties and nonlinear currentvoltage characteristics of Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics prepared by a conventional solid state reaction method were investigated. Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics exhibited a high dielectric permittivity of 7.08.4 10{sup 3} and low loss tangent (tan ??0.0300.041). Non-Ohmic properties with a high breakdown voltage of ?2208 V cm{sup ?1} and large nonlinear coefficient of 15.6 were observed in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics. Using complex impedance analysis, Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics were shown to be electrically heterogeneous consisting of semiconducting grains and insulating grain boundaries. Giant dielectric properties were described based on the electrically heterogeneous microstructure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggested that the semiconductive nature of grains may be related to the presence of Cu{sup +} and Ti{sup 3+}. The formation of an electrostatic potential barrier at the grain boundaries of Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics was suggested to be caused by the Schottky effect. Interestingly, high electrostatic potential barriers at grain boundaries in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics were calculated and found to be 0.9250.964 eV.

  9. Study of CP violation in Dalitz-plot analyses of B0 to K K-KS, B to K K-K , and B to KSKSK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-03-20

    We perform amplitude analyses of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields}, and measure CP-violating parameters and partial branching fractions. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 470 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. For B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, we find a direct CP asymmetry in B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup +} of A{sub CP} = (12.8 {+-} 4.4 {+-} 1.3)%, which differs from zero by 2.8{sigma}. For B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0}, we measure the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub eff} ({phi}(1020)K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (21 {+-} 6 {+-} 2){sup o}. For B{sup +} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sup +}, we measure an overall direct CP asymmetry of A{sub CP} = (4{sub -5}{sup +4} {+-} 2)%. We also perform an angular-moment analysis of the three channels, and determine that the f{sub X}(1500) state can be described well by the sum of the resonances f{sub 0}(1500), f{prime}{sub 2}(1525), and f{sub 0}(1710).

  10. GOMA - A full-Newton finite element program for free and moving boundary problems with coupled fluid/solid momentum, energy, mass, and chemical species transport: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, P.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Rao, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    GOMA is a two- and three-dimensional finite element program which excels in analyses of manufacturing processes, particularly those involving free or moving interfaces. Specifically, the full-Newton-coupled heat, mass, momentum, and pseudo-solid mesh motion algorithm makes GOMA ideally suited for simulating processes in which the bulk fluid transport is closely coupled to the interfacial physics. Examples include, but are not limited to, coating and polymer processing flows, soldering, crystal growth, and solid-network or solution film drying. The code is based on the premise that any boundary can be (1) moving or free, with an apriori unknown position dictated by the distinguishing physics, (2) fixed, according to a global analytical representation, or (3) moving in time and space under user-prescribed kinematics. The goal is to enable the user to predict boundary position or motion simultaneously with the physics of the problem being analyzed and to pursue geometrical design studies and fluid-structure interaction problems. The moving mesh algorithm treats the entire domain as a computational Lagrangian solid that deforms subject to the physical principles which dictate boundary position. As an added benefit, the same Lagrangian solid mechanics can be exploited to solve multi-field problems for which the solid motion and stresses interact with other transport phenomena, either within the same material phase (e.g. shrinking coating) or in neighboring material phases (e.g. flexible blade coating). Thus, analyses of many fluid-structure interaction problems and deformable porous media problems are accessible. This document serves as a user`s guide and reference for GOMA and provides a brief overview of GOMA`s capabilities, theoretical background, and classes of problems for which it is targeted.

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News New Shortwave Spectroradiometer Deployed at SGP Bookmark and Share A ceiling port in the SGP Optical Trailer houses the optic element of the SWS, which connects to the...

  12. A Method for the Automatic Detection of Insect Clutter in Doppler-Radar Returns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke,E.; Kollias, P.; Johnson, K.

    2006-06-12

    The accurate detection and removal of insect clutter from millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) returns is of high importance to boundary layer cloud research (e.g., Geerts et al., 2005). When only radar Doppler moments are available, it is difficult to produce a reliable screening of insect clutter from cloud returns because their distributions overlap. Hence, screening of MMCR insect clutter has historically involved a laborious manual process of cross-referencing radar moments against measurements from other collocated instruments, such as lidar. Our study looks beyond traditional radar moments to ask whether analysis of recorded Doppler spectra can serve as the basis for reliable, automatic insect clutter screening. We focus on the MMCR operated by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Oklahoma. Here, archiving of full Doppler spectra began in September 2003, and during the warmer months, a pronounced insect presence regularly introduces clutter into boundary layer returns.

  13. ALL GRADE 5 AND GRADE 8 FASTENERS ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WITH THE FOLLOWING HEADMARKS: MARK A325 KS A325 KS A325 KS A325 KS KEY: CA-Canada, JP-Japan, TW-Taiwan, YU-Yugoslavia Type 1 Type 2 Type 3 Headmarkings are usually raised -...

  14. Microsoft Word - Teske-JJ.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of the Corrective Maintenance Records of the ARM SGP CART J. J. Teske Aeromet Corporation Tulsa, Oklahoma J. C. Liljegren and D. L. Sisterson Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction The primary responsibility of Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site Operations is to operate and maintain the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) instruments at the SGP Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. Since 1992, SGP Site Operations has

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Kassianov_etal_ARM2007_presentation_v01.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Between Relationship Between Cumulus Cloud Fraction Cumulus Cloud Fraction Cumulus Cloud Fraction Cumulus Cloud Fraction and and Aerosol Optical Depth Aerosol Optical Depth: : p p p p a Five a Five- -Year Climatology at Year Climatology at th ARM SGP Sit th ARM SGP Sit the ARM SGP Site the ARM SGP Site E. Kassianov, L. Berg, C.Flynn, and S. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratoty Outline Outline Outline Outline * * Motivation & Objectives Motivation & Objectives * * Approach

  16. Final Technical Report ARM DOE Grant #DE-FG02-03ER63520 Parameterizations of Shortwave Radiactive Properties of Broken Clouds from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce, A.

    2006-06-19

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: 1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, 2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the pocesses responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and 3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: 1)develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, 2) evaluate the capability and limitation of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low-signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak non-precipitating clouds, 3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and 4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  17. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  18. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  19. ENERGETIC PARTICLE ANISOTROPIES AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florinski, V.; Le Roux, J. A. [Department of Space Sciences, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)] [Department of Space Sciences, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jokipii, J. R. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Alouani-Bibi, F. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)] [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    In 2012 August the Voyager 1 space probe entered a distinctly new region of space characterized by a virtual absence of heliospheric energetic ions and magnetic fluctuations, now interpreted as a part of the local interstellar cloud. Prior to their disappearance, the ion distributions strongly peaked at a 90 pitch angle, implying rapid escape of streaming particles along the magnetic field lines. Here we investigate the process of particle crossing from the heliosheath into the interstellar space, using a kinetic approach that resolves scales of the particle's cyclotron radius and smaller. It is demonstrated that a 'pancake' pitch-angle distribution naturally arises at a tangential discontinuity separating a weakly turbulent plasma from a laminar region with a very low pitch-angle scattering rate. The relatively long persistence of gyrating ions is interpreted in terms of field line meandering facilitating their cross-field diffusion within the depletion region.

  20. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    out of BL & Aerosol processing by clouds * Variety of conditions - Useful to evaluate LES models and GCM parameterizations Slingo et al. 2004; Kollias et al. (2007) Need of...