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1

OHA Misc Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Misc decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

2

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercMisc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercMisc SPElectrtyUsePercMisc Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercMisc" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 8.20317536691 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 12.0483761962 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 19.7634622014 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 14.4897052022 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 7.31692552305 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 20.7341221164 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 16.7103315141 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 3.35919986719 +

3

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Kraft Rt (Kraft Electronics Inc) Place Budapest, Hungary Zip H-112 Sector Solar Product Equipment manufacturer for the clean energy industry, currently focused on thin-film solar cell production equipment. Coordinates 47.506225°, 19.06482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.506225,"lon":19.06482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

App Misc Easement ROW.pdf App Misc Easement ROW.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.54 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 4 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:36, 20 June 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:36, 20 June 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 4 pages (1.54 MB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

5

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 9.09953195331 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 8.78442379242 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 12.9530389597 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 6.03377747253 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 10.9950724049 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 14.2856105095 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 27.8718727739 +

6

Simulation of Photon energy Spectra Using MISC, SOURCES, MCNP and GADRAS  

SciTech Connect

The detector response functions included in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) are a valuable resource for simulating radioactive source emission spectra. Application of these response functions to the results of three-dimensional transport calculations is a useful modeling capability. Using a 26.2 kg shell of depleted uranium (DU) as a simple test problem, this work illustrates a method for manipulating current tally results from MCNP into the GAM file format necessary for a practical link to GADRAS detector response functions. MISC (MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor) and SOURCES 4C were used to develop photon and neutron source terms for subsequent MCNP transport, and the resultant spectrum is shown to be in good agreement with that from GADRAS. A 1 kg DU sphere was also modeled with the method described here and showed similarly encouraging results.

Tucker, Lucas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shores, Erik F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, Steven C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Felsher, Paul D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garner, Scott E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Solomon, Clell J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx Western Area Power Administration Sierra Nevada Region CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION Project Number 100101 Integral Elements Project Title: Eastshore Trail Construction Category of Action: B4.9 Grant or denial of requests for multiple-use of a transmission facility rights-of-way, such as grazing permits and crossing agreements, including electric lines, water lines and drainage culverts. Regulatory Requirements for a Categorical Exclusion Determination: The Department of Energy (DOE), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures, 10 CFR 1021.410(b) require the following determinations be made in order for a proposed action to be categorically excluded (see full text in

8

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx Western Area Power Administration Sierra Nevada Region CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION Project Number 100101 Integral Elements Project Title: Eastshore Trail Construction Category of Action: B4.9 Grant or denial of requests for multiple-use of a transmission facility rights-of-way, such as grazing permits and crossing agreements, including electric lines, water lines and drainage culverts. Regulatory Requirements for a Categorical Exclusion Determination: The Department of Energy (DOE), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures, 10 CFR 1021.410(b) require the following determinations be made in order for a proposed action to be categorically excluded (see full text in

9

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx Western Area Power Administration Sierra Nevada Region CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION Project Number 100101 Integral Elements Project Title: Eastshore Trail Construction Category of Action: B4.9 Grant or denial of requests for multiple-use of a transmission facility rights-of-way, such as grazing permits and crossing agreements, including electric lines, water lines and drainage culverts. Regulatory Requirements for a Categorical Exclusion Determination: The Department of Energy (DOE), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures, 10 CFR 1021.410(b) require the following determinations be made in order for a proposed action to be categorically excluded (see full text in

10

VOC Control in Kraft Mills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as methanol, in kraft mills has been an environmental concern. Methanol is soluble in water and can increase the biochemical oxygen demand. Furthermore, it can also be released into atmosphere at the process temperatures of kraft mill-streams. The Cluster Rule of the EPA now requires the control of the release of methanol in pulp and paper mills. This research program was conducted to develop a computer simulation tool for mills to predict VOC air emissions. To achieve the objective of the research program, much effort was made in the development of analytical techniques for the analysis of VOC and determination of vapor liquid partitioning coefficient of VOCs in kraft mill-streams using headspace gas chromatography. With the developed analytical tool, methanol formation in alkaline pulping was studied in laboratory to provide benchmark data of the amount of methanol formation in pulping in kraft mills and for the validation of VOC formation and vapor-liquid equilibrium submodels. Several millwide air and liquid samplings were conducted using the analytical tools developed to validate the simulation tool. The VOC predictive simulation model was developed based on the basic chemical engineering concepts, i.e., reaction kinetics, vapor liquid equilibrium, combined with computerized mass and energy balances. Four kraft mill case studies (a continuous digester, two brownstock washing lines, and a pre-evaporator system) are presented and compared with mill measurements. These case studies provide valuable, technical information for issues related to MACT I and MACT II compliance, such as condensate collection and Clean-Condensate-Alternatives (CCA).

Zhu, J.Y.; Chai, X.-S.; Edwards, L.L.; Gu, Y.; Teja, A.S.; Kirkman, A.G.; Pfromm, P.H.; Rezac, M.E.

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

CO2 Pyrolysis and Gasification of Kraft Black.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kraft black liquor, the bi-product of the kraft pulping process, is concentrated in evaporators and burned at high solids content in recovery boilers. The purpose (more)

Connolly, T. Sean

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NETL: Utilization Projects - Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material In pursuit of developing value added products from sulfite-rich scrubber material, e.g., low-density panels, carpet underlayment, siding, pre-cast building material, lumber panels, particle and wafer type boards, the following four experimental tasks are proposed: A comprehensive characterization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials produced by power plant generation. Specifically, the mercury, selenium, arsenic, boron, and organic content will be monitored The sulfite-rich scrubber material will be combined with cheap but renewable agricultural byproducts like micronized core fibers and/or micronized wheat straw, and the composites will be formulated by exploiting the natural polymers of the byproducts. The conditions under which structural composites can be formulated using injection molding and compressive molding will be evaluated.

13

Kraft black liquor delivery systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improvement of spray nozzles for black liquor injection into kraft recovery furnaces is expected to result from obtaining a controlled, well-defined droplet size distribution. Work this year has centered on defining the capabilities of commercial black liquor nozzles currently in use. Considerations of the observed mechanism of droplet formation suggest a major revision is needed in the theory of how droplets form from these nozzles. High resolution, high sensitivity video has been shown to be superior to flash x-ray as a technique for measuring the droplet size distribution as well as the formation history. An environmentally sound spray facility capable of spraying black liquor at temperatures up to normal firing conditions is being constructed before data acquisition continues. Preliminary correlations have been developed between liquor properties, nozzle design, and droplet size. Three aspects of nozzle design have been investigated: droplet size distribution, fluid sheet thickness, and flow and pressure drop characteristics. The standard deviation about the median droplet size for black liquor is nearly the same as the for a wide variety of other fluids and nozzle types. Preliminary correlation for fluid sheet thickness on the plate of a splashplate nozzle show the strong similarities of black liquor to other fluids. The flow and pressure drop characteristic of black liquor nozzle, follow a simple two-term relationship similar to other flow devices. This means that in routine mill operation of black liquor nozzles only the fluid acceleration in the nozzle is important, viscous losses are quiet small. 21 refs., 53 figs., 10 tabs.

Adams, T.N.; Empie, H.L.; Obuskovic, N.; Spielbauer, T.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Shattering Kraft Recovery Boiler Smelt by a Steam Jet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kraft recovery boiler smelt is shattered into small droplets by an impinging steam jet to prevent smelt-water explosions in the dissolving tank. Inadequate shattering increases (more)

Taranenko, Anton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oxygen scavengers - The chemistry of sulfite under hydrothermal conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control of oxygen corrosion is critical to the reliability of steam generator systems. Mechanical deaeration and chemical oxygen scavenging effectively reduce oxygen levels in boiler feedwater systems. This paper reviews the use of sulfites to reduce oxygen and provide corrosion control throughout the boiler feedwater circuit as well as mechanical and operational oxygen reduction methods. The mechanism of oxygen pitting, electrochemical reactions, and the basis of operation of mechanical deaeration are discussed. Estimating techniques for the amount of steam required and a deaerator troubleshooting guide are included. The chemistry of sulfites is covered in detail. Also included are a functional definition of chemical oxygen scavengers and a general discussion of their various types.

Cotton, I.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

PETSc: Misc: Funding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Science, by the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Applied Mathematics Research and SciDAC programs. Specific and...

18

MiscInfo>  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION Power Supply Report June 2013 (53kb pdf) May 2013 (53kb pdf) April 2013 (52kb pdf) March 2013 (54kb pdf) February 2013 (54kb pdf) January 2013 (54kb...

19

Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

Stuart E. Strand

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Study of the Composition of Carryover Particles in Kraft Recovery Boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carryover particles are partially/completely burned black liquor particles entrained in the flue gas in kraft recovery boilers. Understanding how carryover particles form and deposit on (more)

Khalaj-Zadeh, Asghar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors Jump to: navigation, search Name Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors Address 3404 Rhodes Ave Place New Boston, Ohio Zip 45662 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Services Product Business and legal services;Consulting;Energy audits/weatherization; Installation; Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing; Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 740-464-0144 Website http://www.vinylkraft.com Coordinates 38.7456°, -82.9459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7456,"lon":-82.9459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

SciTech Connect

According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

Vivak Malhotra

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon Fiber Production from a Kraft Hardwood Lignin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is a renewable resource material that is being evaluated for the low cost production of carbon fiber for automotive and other applications. Solvent extraction of a commercial hardwood lignin product yielded a purified lignin free of the contaminants typical of lignins derived from the Kraft chemical pulping of wood. The purified lignin was highly melt-spinnable into fibers, from which carbon fiber was subsequently produced. The lignin has been evaluated in terms of its rheological properties, fiber melt spinning ability, and potential for manufacture of low cost carbon fiber without the need for plasticizing agents or chemical modifications.

Baker, Darren A [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Use of Spray Dryer Absorber Product in Agriculture Sulfite Oxidation Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory study evaluated the rate of sulfite oxidation and the chemical quality of water extracts when spray dryer absorber (SDA) material was added to soil at rates of 0, 100, 1000, 5000, and 10,000 lb acre-1.* Water was then added to the soil on 10 occasions beginning at day 0 and ending at day 98 after the addition of ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydroxide Formation and Carbon Species Distributions During High-Temperature Kraft Black Liquor Gasification .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work focuses on high-temperature kraft black liquor gasification in the presence of H2O and CO2 in a laboratory-scale Laminar Entrained-Flow Reactor (LEFR). The effects (more)

Dance, Michael Raymond, Jr.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

Vivak M. Malhotra

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

Li, Jian (Marietta, GA); Chai, Xin Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Junyoung (Marietta, GA)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

30

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

VOC Control in Kraft Mills - Final Report: Task A and Task B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as methanol, in kraft mills has been an environmental concern. Methanol is soluble in water and can increase the biochemical oxygen demand. Furthermore, it can also be released into atmosphere at the process temperatures of kraft mill-streams. The Cluster Rule of the EPA now requires the control of the release of methanol in pulp and paper mills. This research program was conducted to develop a computer simulation tool for mills to predict VOC air emissions. To achieve the objective of the research program, much effort was made in the development of analytical techniques for the analysis of VOC and determination of vapor liquid partitioning coefficient of VOCs in kraft mill-streams using headspace gas chromatography. With the developed analytical tool, methanol formation in alkaline pulping was studied in laboratory to provide benchmark data of the amount of methanol formation in pulping in kraft mills and for the validation of VOC formation and vapor-liquid equilibrium submodels. Several millwide air and liquid samplings were conducted using the analytical tools developed to validate the simulation tool. The VOC predictive simulation model was developed based on the basic chemical engineering concepts, i.e., reaction kinetics, vapor liquid equilibrium, combined with computerized mass and energy balances. Four kraft mill case studies (a continuous digester, two brownstock washing lines, and a pre-evaporator system) are presented and compared with mill measurements. These case studies provide valuable, technical information for issues related to MACT I and MACT II compliance, such as condensate collection and Clean-Condensate-Alternatives (CCA).

Zhu, J.Y.; Chai, X.-S.; Edwards, L.L.; Gu, Y.; Teja, A.S.; Kirkman, A.G.; Pfromm, P.H.; Rezac, M.E.

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

MISC. FEDERAL College Dept. Description Amy Johnson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock Mechanics Association (ARMA), the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the International is past president of the Geo-Institute of ASCE and of ARMA. Her honors and awards include Exxon Teaching

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

35

Reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen in the presence of sulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emission from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. We studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDTA are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use. 33 figures, 9 tables.

Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

1983-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence ofSulfite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commonly, abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a geothermal powerplant requires that hydrogen sulfide dissolved in the cooling water be eliminated by chemical reaction. Oxidation by atmospheric oxygen is the preferred reaction, but requires a suitable catalyst. Nickel is the most potent and thereby cheapest catalyst for this purpose. One Mg/L nickel in the cooling water would allow 99% removal of hydrogen sulfide to be attained. A major drawback of catalytic air oxidation is that colloidal sulfur is a major reaction product; this causes rapid sludge accumulation and deposition of sulfur scale. The authors studied the kinetics and product distribution of the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen, catalyzed by nickel. Adding sodium sulfite to the solution completely suppresses formation of colloidal sulfur by converting it to thiosulfate. The oxidation reaction is an autocatalytic, free radical chain reaction. A rate expression for this reaction and a detailed reaction mechanism were developed. Nickel catalyzes the chain initiation step, and polysulfidoradical ions propagate the chains. Several complexes of iron and cobalt were also studied. Iron citrate and iron N-hydroxyEDT are the most effective iron based catalysts. Uncomplexed cobalt is as effective as nickel, but forms a precipitate of cobalt oxysulfide and is too expensive for practical use.

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor- gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher elecuical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety

38

A hybrid capacitive pressure and temperature sensor fabricated by adhesive bonding technique for harsh environment of kraft pulp digesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a compensated capacitive pressure and temperature sensor for kraft pulp digesters (pH 13.5, temperatures 25175C reaching a local maximum of 180C and pressures up to 2MPa). The gauge capacitive pressure ...

Abdolreza R. Mohammadi; Chad P. J. Bennington; Mu Chiao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

Keiser, J.R.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industrys energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

SciTech Connect

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industrys energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Use of Electrochemical Noise to Assess Corrosion in Kraft Continuous Digesters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical noise (EN) probes were deployed in two continuous kraft digesters at a variety of locations representative of corrosion throughout the vessels. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of up to 60 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were monitored continuously during each experiment. The results indicate that changes in furnish composition and process upsets were invariably associated with concurrent substantial changes in EN activity throughout the vessels. Post-test evaluation of the mild steel electrode materials in both vessels confirmed general corrosion of a magnitude consistent with historical trends in the respective vessels as well as values qualitatively (and semi-quantitatively) related to EN current sums for each electrode pair. Stainless steel electrodes representing 309LSi and 312 overlay repairs exhibited zero wastage corrosion--as did the actual overlays--but the EN data indicated periodic redox activity on the stainless steel that varied with time and position within the vessel. Little or no correlation between EN probe activity and other operational variables was observed in either vessel. Additional details for each digester experiment are summarized.

Pawel, S.J.

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy Analysis of a Kraft Pulp Mill: Potential for Energy Efficiency and Advanced Biomass Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use at a Kraft pulp mill in the United States is analyzed in detail. Annual average process steam and electricity demands in the existing mill are 19.3 MMBtu per ADST and 687 kWh per ADST, respectively. This is relatively high by industry standards. The mill meets nearly all its electricity needs with a back-pressure steam turbine. Higher electricity to heat ratios is an industry wide trend and anticipated at the mill. The potential for self-sufficiency in energy using only black liquor and bark available on-site is assessed based on the analysis of the present energy situation and potential process changes. The analysis here suggests that steam and electricity demand could be reduced by 89% by operating consistently at high production rates. Process modifications and retrofits using commercially proven technologies could reduce steam and electricity demand to as low as 9.7 MMBtu per ADST, a 50% reduction, and 556 kWh per ADST, a 19% reduction, respectively. Electricity demand could increase to about 640 kWh per ADST due to closed-cycle operation of the bleach plant and other efforts to improve environmental performance. The retrofitted energy efficient mill with low environmental impact could be self-sufficient in steam and electricity using conventional technology, such as a back pressure steam turbine or a condensing extraction steam turbine. In addition to meeting mill energy demand, about 1,000 kWh per ADST would be available for export from the mill if gasification/combined cycle technology were used instead.

Subbiah, A.; Nilsson, L. J.; Larson, E. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

SYSTEM FOR DETECTION AND CONTROL OF DEPOSITION IN KRAFT CHEMICAL RECOVERY BOILERS AND MONITORING GLASS FURNACES  

SciTech Connect

Combustion Specialists, Inc. has just completed a project designed to develop the capability to monitor and control the formation of deposits on the outside of boiler tubes inside an operating kraft recovery furnace. This project, which was carried out in the period from April 1, 2001 to January 31, 2003, was funded by the Department of Energy's Inventions and Innovations program. The primary objectives of the project included the development and demonstration of the ability to produce clear images of deposits throughout the convective sections of operating recovery boilers using newly developed infrared imaging technology, to demonstrate the automated detection and quantification of these deposits using custom designed image processing software developed as part of the project, and to demonstrate the feasibility of all technical elements required for a commercial ''smart'' sootblowing control system based on direct feedback from automated imaging of deposits in real-time. All of the individual tasks have been completed and all objectives have been substantially achieved. Imaging of deposits throughout the convective sections of several recovery boilers has been demonstrated, a design for a combined sootblower/deposit inspection probe has been developed and a detailed heat transfer analysis carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of this design, an improved infrared imager which can be sufficiently miniaturized for this application has been identified, automated deposit detection software has been developed and demonstrated, a detailed design for all the necessary communications and control interfaces has been developed, and a test has been carried out in a glass furnace to demonstrate the applicability of the infrared imaging sensor in that environment. The project was completed on time and within the initial budget. A commercial partner has been identified and further federal funding will be sought to support a project to develop a commercial prototype sootblowing control system employing automated deposit imaging.

Dr. Peter Ariessohn

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Batch slurry photocatalytic reactors for the generation of hydrogen from sulfide and sulfite waste streams under solar irradiation  

SciTech Connect

In this study, two solar slurry photocatalytic reactors i.e., batch reactor (BR) and batch recycle reactor with continuous supply of inert gas (BRRwCG) were developed for comparing their performance. The performance of the photocatalytic reactors were evaluated based on the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from water containing sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) and sodium sulfite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) ions. The photoreactor of capacity 300 mL was developed with UV-vis transparent walls. The catalytic powders ((CdS/ZnS)/Ag{sub 2}S + (RuO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2})) were kept suspended by means of magnetic stirrer in the BR and gas bubbling and recycling of the suspension in the BRRwCG. The rate constant was found to be 120.86 (einstein{sup -1}) for the BRRwCG whereas, for the BR it was found to be only 10.92 (einstein{sup -1}). The higher rate constant was due to the fast desorption of products and suppression of e{sup -}/h{sup +} recombination. (author)

Priya, R.; Kanmani, S. [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Effects of humidity and temperature on the conversion of SO/sub 2/ to particulate sulfate and sulfite. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Effects of humidity and temperature on SO/sub 2/ conversion to particulate sulfate and sulfite in relation to heterogeneous conversion in droplets and on particle surfaces; homogeneous conversion in the gas phase; and gas-to-particle conversion are discussed. Theoretical quantitative expressions for some effects are derived and order-of-magnitude calculations are given. Detailed conclusions and comparisons regarding the effects of temperature and humidity on specific oxidation paths. Major conclusions documented are: rates of SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 4//sup =/ converison in aqueous droplets are generally negatively correlated with temperature and positively correlated with relative humidity (particularly at high relative humidity); the rates of SO/sub 2/ to SO/sub 4//sup =/ conversion on reactive surfaces can be either positively correlated with relative humidity or unaffected by relative humidity, and can have a negative, a positive, or a zero correlation with temperture; the homogeneous photooxidation is considerably less sensitive to temperature than is the heterogeneous conversion. (The photooxidation of SO/sub 2/ is expected to be positively correlated with temperature, but the correlation will be weaker in clean air than in polluted air, the positive dependence of SO/sub 2/ photooxidation on humidity will be weaker in polluted air containing NMHC than in clean air); the specific conversion paths have rates with highly different sensitivities to relative humidity and temperature. Thus, a given conversion path can become more or less significant relative to other paths as relative humidity and temperature vary. This suggests that temperature and relative humidity variations can be major causes of the temporal and spatial variations in the rate and yield of conversion and in the type of sulfate produced, which in turn determine the extent of adverse environmental effects. 228 references, 1 figure, 28 tables.

Freiberg, J.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Utah's project 'Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment' (U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42261) was a response to U.S. DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS36-04GO94002, 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative' Topical Area 4-Kraft Black Liquor Gasification. The project began September 30, 2004. The objective of the project was to improve the understanding of black liquor conversion in high pressure, high temperature reactors that gasify liquor through partial oxidation with either air or oxygen. The physical and chemical characteristics of both the gas and condensed phase were to be studied over the entire range of liquor conversion, and the rates and mechanisms of processes responsible for converting the liquor to its final smelt and syngas products were to be investigated. This would be accomplished by combining fundamental, lab-scale experiments with measurements taken using a new semi-pilot scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. As a result of insufficient availability of funds and changes in priority within the Office of Biomass Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, the research program was terminated in its second year. In total, only half of the budgeted funding was made available for the program, and most of this was used during the first year for construction of the experimental systems to be used in the program. This had a severe impact on the program. As a consequence, most of the planned research was unable to be performed. Only studies that relied on computational modeling or existing experimental facilities started early enough to deliver useful results by the time to program was terminated Over the course of the program, small scale (approx. 1 ton/day) entrained-flow gasifier was designed and installed at the University of Utah's off-campus Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility. The system is designed to operate at pressures as high as 32 atmospheres, and at temperatures as high as 1500 C (2730 F). Total black liquor processing capacity under pressurized, oxygen-blown conditions should be in excess of 1 ton black liquor solids per day. Many sampling ports along the conversion section of the system will allow detailed analysis of the environment in the gasifier under industrially representative conditions. Construction was mostly completed before the program was terminated, but resources were insufficient to operate the system. A system for characterizing black liquor sprays in hot environments was designed and constructed. Silhouettes of black liquor sprays formed by injection of black liquor through a twin fluid (liquor and atomizing air) nozzle were videoed with a high-speed camera, and the resulting images were analyzed to identify overall characteristics of the spray and droplet formation mechanisms. The efficiency of liquor atomization was better when the liquor was injected through the center channel of the nozzle, with atomizing air being introduced in the annulus around the center channel, than when the liquor and air feed channels were reversed. Atomizing efficiency and spray angle increased with atomizing air pressure up to a point, beyond which additional atomizing air pressure had little effect. Analysis of the spray patterns indicates that two classifications of droplets are present, a finely dispersed 'mist' of very small droplets and much larger ligaments of liquor that form at the injector tip and form one or more relatively large droplets. This ligament and subsequent large droplet formation suggests that it will be challenging to obtain a narrow distribution of droplet sizes when using an injector of this design. A model for simulating liquor spray and droplet formation was developed by Simulent, Inc. of Toronto. The model was able to predict performance when spraying water that closely matched the vendor specifications. Simulation of liquor spray indicates that droplets on the order 200-300 microns can be expected, and that higher liquor flow will result in be

Kevin Whitty

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microsoft Word - SGIG FAQ Misc 01 29 2010.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions Grant and Award-Related Frequently Asked Questions Costs and Reimbursement Question: How long after a reimbursement request is submitted should an awardee expect payment? Answer: DOE will make payment within thirty (30) days after receipt of an acceptable invoice. Question: Can DOE confirm that Recipient will bill DOE, and DOE will reimburse Recipient for, 50% of qualified direct project expenses disbursed during the billing period as the federal share along with the proportionate share of fringe benefits? Answer: The Recipient will be reimbursed for all direct and indirect costs pursuant to the applicable OMB Cost Circular. See OMB Cost Circular A-21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (05/10/2004) HTML or PDF (109 pages, 263 kb), Relocated to 2 CFR, Part 220 (30 pages, 384 kb); OMB Circular OMB Circular OMB Circular OMB Circular

49

Building Tcl/Tk 8.2 + misc packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Building Tcl/Tk 8.2.3 + BLT, BWidget, Tix and dp packages for LINUX. This page contains ... tcl. 2. Build and Install Tcl/Tk. Note there ...

50

A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Chemical and biological 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents in fly ash from combustion of bleached kraft pulp mill sludge  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash was collected from five large-scale or pilot tests in which burning of bleached kraft pulp mill sludge was studied. The content of dioxin-like compounds in this fly ash was estimated both chemically and biologically. Fly ash was analyzed chemically for 17 PCDD and PCDF congeners by high-resolution GC-MS, and the data were transformed to Nordic TCDD equivalents. The biological analyses were based on the induction of several enzymes (aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase [AHH], 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase [EROD], aldehyde dehydrogenase-3 [ALDG3]) by the fly ash extracts in a mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa-1. The inducing potencies were expressed as biological TCDD equivalents. There was a good correlation between the Nordic and the biological TCDD equivalents. Differences in the amounts of dioxin-like compounds among the combustions were attributed mainly to the boiler types and not to fuel characteristics or combustion parameters.

Kopponen, P.; Toerroenen, R. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Physiology); Vaelttilae, O.; Talka, E. (Finnish Pulp and Paper Research Inst., Espoo (Finland)); Tarhanen, J.; Ruuskanen, J. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Kaerenlampi, S. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biotechnology)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Correlation of Process Data and Electrocheical Noise to Assess Kraft Digester Corrosion: Second Year at Spring Grove  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical noise (EN) probes were deployed in the carbon steel continuous kraft digester at Spring Grove at four locations and at one location in the bottom cone of the associated flash tank for a second consecutive year of a corrosion study. The probes contained dual electrodes of 309LSi stainless steel overlay--representing a field repair material applied to a portion of the vessel--and dual electrodes of 312 stainless steel overlay. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of 23 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were again monitored continuously for a period of almost one year. Historical vessel inspection data and post-test evaluation of the probe components were used to assess/compare EN corrosion activity with physical changes in wall thickness and corrosion patterns on the digester shell. In addition, attempts were made to correlate EN activity from each electrode type with process parameters. The results indicate the corrosion conditions aggressive to mild steel persist within the digester, as post-test inspection of the vessel revealed localized corrosion of mild steel in locations previously free of attack. Further, there was evidence that the depth of localized attack of exposed steel had increased in some locations. Nevertheless, the stainless steel overlay in the digester was essentially immune to corrosion, as evidenced by retained surface relief and heat tint associated with the original deposition process. The 309LSi electrodes also appeared visually pristine, and post-exposure metallographic examination of the 309LSi electrode materials revealed no attack. The 312 electrode materials were similar in appearance, but exhibited very minor interdendritic attack over the exposed surface. The silver electrodes in the probes were consumed (to Ag{sub 2}S) to variable degree over the course of the exposure indicating a useful life of not more than a year in digester service in this vessel. Since the stainless steel overlay electrodes were immune to corrosion during the exposure, the current and potential noise activity on these probes is likely related to redox processes on the electrode surfaces. Analysis of this activity as a function of position (and year) in the vessel suggests that redox chemistry/conditions vary by a significant amount on a consistent basis--even on opposite sides of the vessel at the same elevation--and that these differences are not identified by process parameters tracked at the mill. These variable environmental conditions (flow, temperature, liquor chemistry) appear to have little effect on stainless steel overlays under evaluation, but apparently can be quite corrosive to steel as determined in the initial study in the digester at Spring Grove. With the exception of start-up and shutdown activity, including brief upsets for ''hanging columns'' or brief maintenance periods, no regular correlation was observed between tracked process variables and EN activity on any of the probes. In combination with the variable redox activity, this result suggests that the liquor sampling and flow data compiled at the mill do not represent the corrosion conditions in the vessel particularly well.

Pawel, SJ

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of an alternative kraft black liquor recovery process based on low-temperature processing in fluidized beds. Final technical report on Annex 9, Task 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research program was to provide the fundamental knowledge and experimental data from pilot scale operation for an alternative black liquor recovery technology which would have a higher overall energy efficiency, would not suffer from the smelt-water explosion hazard and would be lower in capital cost. In addition, the alternative process would be more flexible and well suited for incremental recovery capacity or for new pulping processes, such as the new sulfide-sulfide-AQ process. The research program consists of number of specific research objectives with the aim to achieve the ultimate objective of developing an alternative recovery process which is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives are linked to individual unit operations and they represent the following research topics: (1) superheated steam drying of kraft black liquors; (2) fast pyrolysis of black liquor; (3) hydrogen sulfide absorption from flue gas; (4) reduction of sodium sulfate in solid phase with gaseous hydrogen; and (5) verification of the fundamental results in fluidized bed pilot plant. The accomplishments in each of these objectives are described.

Kubes, G.J.

1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

56

UPDATE ON NUCLEAR PLANS AND CARBON LEGISLATION 1 Misc points re climate policies --Energy Security,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with No PolicyCoal Retrofit New CCS Gas Nuclear Hydro Wind Solar Oil Demand Reduction Biomass Coal Gas Wind Portfolio Solar Biomass Hydro CCS Retrofit Biomass Hydro Apr. 30, 2010 #12;UPDATE ON NUCLEAR PLANS AND CARBON LEGISLATION NAM's Analysis of Climate Legislation (House passed version) "U.S. jobs decline by 1

57

07/06/2006 12:16 PMhttp://fti.neep.wisc.edu/MISC/EWFullPR07.htm Page 1 of 6http://fti.neep.wisc.edu/MISC/EWFullPR07.htm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&D and Integration Facility h ardware integration, mock-ups & in stallation Shielding/Remote Handling Integration. · Running fibers hot only affects the long-term absorption. · Great disparity in radiation effects in an -diagnostic Plasma 90° 60° 45° 20° Vacuum Vessel Test Cell Floor Quartz coherent fiber optic bundles Radiation

58

Combustion properties of Kraft Black Liquors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a previous study of the phenomena involved in the combustion of black liquor droplets a numerical model was developed. The model required certain black liquor specific combustion information which was then not currently available, and additional data were needed for evaluating the model. The overall objectives of the project reported here was to provide experimental data on key aspects of black liquor combustion, to interpret the data, and to put it into a form which would be useful for computational models for recovery boilers. The specific topics to be investigated were the volatiles and char carbon yields from pyrolysis of single black liquor droplets; a criterion for the onset of devolatilization and the accompanying rapid swelling; and the surface temperature of black liquor droplets during pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification. Additional information on the swelling characteristics of black liquor droplets was also obtained as part of the experiments conducted.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Hupa, M. (Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Central Air, Fuels = Oil and Gas, Other = LPG and Misc. (3)Central Air, Fuels = Oil and Gas, LPG and Misc. (3) Sources:Central Air, Fuels = Oil and Gas, Other = LPG and Misc. (3)

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Misc. Products - Fuel Use Misc. Products - Nonfuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Collecting Construction Equipment Activity Data from Caltrans Project Records  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Law n and Garden Logging Military Tactical Support Misc. Portable Equipment Transport Refrigeration

Kable, Justin M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The federal market for ESCO services: How does it measure up?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency refrigeration, industrial process improvements,Supply Refrigeration Misc. Equipment/Systems Industrial

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Birr, Dave

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

64

Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Modeling and Materials in Kraft Pulp Mills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA provided technical support to the Weyerhaeuser Company on a number of issues related to the performance and/or selection of materials at a number of locations in a pulp and paper mill. The studies related primarily to components for black liquor recovery boilers, but some effort was directed toward black liquor gasifiers and rolls for paper machines. The purpose of this CRADA was to assist Weyerhaeuser in the evaluation of materials exposed in various paper mill environments and to provide direction in the selection of alternate materials, when appropriate.

Keiser, J.R.; Gorog, J.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Automating Pro/Engineer Using Trail Files and External Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lisuop_lvl". 2. List AllFeat Utilities menu button. Buttoncommand sequence "Misc-Utilities-List Top Lvi" b. runs trailcommand sequence "Misc-Utilities-List AIIFeat" d. runs trail

Chow, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil hydronic, electric room, and electric (air source) heatFuels = Oil and Gas, LPG and Misc. (3) Sources: 1990 RECS (Fuels = Oil and Gas, Other = LPG and Misc. (3) Sources: 1990

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Short Desc Long Desc Short Desc Long Desc Short Desc Long Desc Short Desc Long Desc 401k 401k D PP PT2 Dental Pre-Paid PT 2 Misc Miscellaneous Deductions ROTH ROTH 401(k)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FICA Additional Medicare Tax ORP ING1 ORP Retirement ING 10% TCRS NF TCRS Retirement Non-Faculty AFLACSIC Aflac - Sickness Indemnity Foundat Foundation ORP ING2 ORP Retirement ING Two Split TCRS TCB Closed Teacher Class B Contrib AFLCIEET Aflac - Critical ILL-EE-Tobacco Foundat ETSU Foundation ORP ING3

Karsai, Istvan

69

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence of Sulfite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

citnlc lmsM cobdt citntq rrc rulfitq pH 7.t. Squrro: l0mM ofWackenrodcr's Scction 4.4),but rrc doubtthis wassignificant.

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen in the Presence of Sulfite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption becn is with havc correlated the LIV (ChenOH - end mtwulfidcs havc bcen -duliguc (1972), andt9? t) and ludi$ (1979) havc applicdrhis informationto

Weres, Oleh; Tsao, Leon

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Chronic disease and early exposure to air-borne mixtures. 2. Exposure assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is part of a larger study of the impact of early exposure to releases from industry on the etiology of cancer. Releases from all kraft and sulfite mills, coke ovens, oil refineries, copper, nickel, and lead/zinc smelters operating in Canada during the exposure period of 1967-1970 have been determined. All plumes have been expressed in g BaP eq/d using the RASH methodology. The releases have been divided into process, boiler fuel, dioxin, and SO{sub 2} emissions. Combustion sources have been defined with FIREv6.23. Dioxin congenors are expected in all source types when the boiler fuel is heavy fuel oil, wood or wood bark, or coal. All about 90 communities examined have an inverted sex ratio. 53 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

James Argo [IntrAmericas Centre for Environment and Health, Wolfe Island, ON (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Coalescence Enhancement in large Multicell Storms Caused by the Emissions from a Kraft Paper Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While conducting a randomized seeding experiment, a storm was selected whose microphysical characteristics were so far from what was expected, given the existing thermodynamic environment, that some explanation was needed to account for the ...

Graeme K. Mather

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Effects of Bleached Kraft Pulp-Mill Effluent on Periphyton DOE FRAP 1996-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phenolics are a family of compounds comprised of three main classes, phenols, guaiacols and catechols - Catechols 0.51 + 0.10a 1.11 + 0.03a 2.45 + 0.21b Total Mono - Chlorinated Phenolics 0.68 + 0.12a 3.22 + 0 was also apparent when mono-, di-, tri-- and tetra- chlorinated phenolics and total catechols were

74

Determination of Mechanical and Optical Properties of Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp by NIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Associaca~o Brasileira Te´cnica de Celulose e Papel: Sa~o Paulo, Brazil, 535­545. P. Fardim et al.278 #12

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

75

Hedera: Dynamic Flow Scheduling for Data Center Networks Mohammad Al-Fares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.com, cnet.com US-MISC (15): latimes.com, nfl.com, pbs.org, cisco.com, ju- niper.net, ibm.com, fastclick

Vahdat, Amin

76

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exchanger 1 . 3. The Condensers . Reboiler . . . . BoilerNet Power Waste Heat Trimmer Dist. Condenser Turbine SteamLeaks LP Turbine Condenser Misc. Heat Losses Total Waste

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

PROCEEDINGS OF THE HAWAII INVENTORS' CONFERENCE MARCH 31 - APRIL 1, 1978. HONOLULU, HAWAII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAIL INQUIRIES AND MISC. INVENTION DISCLOSURES I DISCLOSUREWhen we receive an invention disclosure, the first thing westract of the invention or the disclosure is on the first

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fermilab | Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer ...  

Quantum Diaries; Documents and Forms Work for Others. Model Work for Others ; CRADA. Model CRADA ; Misc. FAA Form ; Instruction sheet for FAA ; Record ...

79

Central Services Stock Listing as of November 1, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 11x17 60# White Ream Paper 1620 Paper, Adding Machine 2-1/4" Each Paper 1238 Paper, Legal 20# White, White Each Misc Office Supplies 0412 Correction Pen, Liquid Paper Each Misc Office Supplies 0413 Paper 0303 Certificate, white landscape with gold foil WSU outline seal Each Paper 0302 Certificate

80

Corel Office Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and sulfites of these alkaline earths are relatively soluble (CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 1971). Sulfates may be converted to sulfides and sulfites under...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of kraft black liquors. Interim report No.3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The black liquor properties program has conducted a systematic collection data of properties, liquor composition, and lignin characteristics. Complete data, except for some density data, has been collected for Slash Pine black liquors made by experimental pulping at a total of 25 different pulping conditions that cover the entire range used for commercial pulping. In addition, complete data has been collected for some mill liquors and partial properties or composition data has been collected on Slash Pine black liquors made at 16 different pulping conditions and some mill liquors. Data reduction methods have been developed or extended for correlation of viscosity, heat capacity, heat of dilution, and density. Correlation of properties to pulping conditions and of composition to pulping conditions has begun. In most cases, data reduction methods have been developed that are fundamentally based and that have been shown to be generally applicable to all black liquors. While it has not proven to be possible to include research for comprehensive correlations for properties for liquors from other species, we have shown that the behavior of liquors made from other species is similar to that which has been explored extensively for Slash Pine liquors. This report reviews the methods used, describes examples of data reduction methods that have been developed, and presents some preliminary results for correlation of liquor composition and properties to pulping conditions for Slash Pine black liquors.

Fricke, A.L.; Dong, D.J.; Schmidl, G.W.; Stoy, M.A.; Zaman, A.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 http://ec.europa.eu/energy/green-paper-energy/doc/2006bioenergy.ornl.gov/papers/misc/energy conv.html). 13 To 12leading to this paper was funded by the Energy Biosciences

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DE-FC26-06NT43010 (MISC.PROGRAM) PVT 06-08 Michael Scarpino 10106-123110 Multiple E85 sites in State of NY New York State Retail E85 Fueling Station Project (SUMMARY CX) The...

84

Microsoft PowerPoint - 060211_DOE-SRS FY 12 Budget.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Community and Regulatory Support 2,479 TOTAL SRS BUDGET AUTHORITY ARRA Appropriation (2009-2012) 1,600 M 33 OTHER MISC. PROGRAMS FY 2012 OTHER SRS Budget Request 1,030 TOTAL...

85

1114.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 4, 2005 ... NG1. alt.atheism. NG11 rec.sport.hockey. NG2. comp.graphics. NG12 sci.crypt. NG3. comp.os.ms-windows.misc. NG13 sci.electronics. NG4.

86

Light Duty Vehicle Pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in 2030 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Million BarrelsDay IMPORTS DOMESTIC OIL SUPPLY OIL DEMAND ELECTRICITY RES. & COM. INDUSTRY MISC. TRANSPORT AIR TRUCKS LIGHT DUTY VEHICLES ETHANOL...

87

Op9ons for a polarizing device for NG7?SANS and NG6 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... controller 6,000 1 6,000 Laser and optics 100 W diode bar + laser driver + optics High pressure chiller 11,000 7,000 2 1 22,000 7,000 Laser misc. ...

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Simulering av COD-fraktioner i en aktivslamanlggning vid en sulfatmassafabrik; Simulation of COD-reduction in an activated sludge process at a chemical pulp kraft mill.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis work was made for Sdra Cell Mrrums bruk in Blekinge. The purpose of the work was to develop a computer model in (more)

Moraeus, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers. Quarterly report, Phase 1a: Black liquor gasifier evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project phase addresses the following workscope: Conduct bench-scale tests of a low temperature, partial combustion gasifier; Prepare a gasifier pilot-plant preliminary design and cost estimate and prepare a budgetary cost estimate of the balance of the program; Outline a test program to evaluate gasification; Prepare an economic/market analysis of gasification and solicit pulp and paper industry support for subsequent phases; and Prepare a final report and conduct a project review prior to commencement of work leading to construction of any pilot scale components or facilities. The primary accomplishments included completion of installation of the bench-scale black liquor gasifier and supporting systems, preparing test plans and related safety procedures and detailed operating procedures, defining the functional design requirements and outlining the test plans for the pilot-scale gasifier, and preparing a preliminary economic assessment of the black liquor gasifier. This work accomplished under Phase 1a during this period is further described by task.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty: Conrad L. Dudek Mentors: Jack Kay, Walter Kraft, Wayne Shackelford, Gary K. Trietsch, Thomas, James Wright, Thomas Werner; (back row) Wayne Shackelford, Walter Kraft, Gary Trietsch #12;Preface Page

92

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 1720 of 31,917 results. 11 - 1720 of 31,917 results. Download OHA Misc Cases Archive File This is a archive file of our Misc decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/oha-misc-cases-archive-file Article Obama Administration Announces Members of Steering Team to Lead Interagency Coordination of Unconventional Oil and Gas Research and Development The Energy Department announces two members (policy and technical) to unconventional oil and gas research and development steering team. http://energy.gov/articles/obama-administration-announces-members-steering-team-lead-interagency-coordination Download EIS-0492: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

93

Overview Gaming SciTech Fun BizWorld Downloads Mobile Minigames Search text in Everything Go!Submit News | RSS Feeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!Submit News | RSS Feeds :: All Innovation Environment Health Research Space Weather Animals Misc Ads it a try! VisualThesaurus.com Introducing the new Versa Best in Class Engine & Cabin Space 6 speed to Investing Gains Plus 5 Roaring Value Stocks:New Rpt www.investmentU.com/Research_Rpt Tech News | Science

Gosselin, Frédéric

94

Colorado State University Extension. 2011.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

setting. · Regularlycheckwashingmachinehosesfor leaks. Dishwasher and Kitchen Efficiency.3 Showers 13.1 2.2 29.0 Baths 2.9 Dishwashers 7.9 0.3 2.5 Leaks 24.5 Other/Misc 5.7 Total 154.1 *(Denver

95

sup_elec.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

gas, and blast furnace gas for utilities; and hydrogen, sulfur, batteries, chemicals, fish oil, and spent sulfite liquor. 4 Includes conventional hydroelectric, geothermal,...

96

Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. (more)

Duangmanee, Thanapong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... waste solids), wood waste liquids (red liquor, sludge wood, spent sulfite liquor, and other wood-based liquids), and black liquor. ...

98

DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 23 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the NREL process. Thus, the PureVision process is economically attractive. Given its technical and economic feasibility, the project is of benefit to the public in the following ways: 1) it demonstrated a novel biomass fractionation process that can provide domestic supply of renewable transportation fuel from all three biomass components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), 2) the lignin stream from the process has many higher-value applications beyond simply burning the lignin for energy as proposed by competing technologies, 3) it can be deployed in rural areas and create jobs in these areas, and 3) it can add to the nations economy and security.

Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

DOEGO85004_1: Final Non-proprietary Technical Report, Generating Process and Economic Data for Preliminary Design of PureVision Biorefineries DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 23 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the NREL process. Thus, the PureVision process is economically attractive. Given its technical and economic feasibility, the project is of benefit to the public in the following ways: 1) it demonstrated a novel biomass fractionation process that can provide domestic supply of renewable transportation fuel from all three biomass components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), 2) the lignin stream from the process has many higher-value applications beyond simply burning the lignin for energy as proposed by competing technologies, 3) it can be deployed in rural areas and create jobs in these areas, and 3) it can add to the nations economy and security.

Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

CX-004371: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Kapstone Kraft Paper Company 3 Paper Machine Steam Efficiency Improvements CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11022010 Location(s): North...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Kraft Foods Global, Inc. Involves installing approx. 1 mile of underground bio-gas pipeline along existing ROWseasements and installing a new 28 MMBtu natural gas &...

102

Ag Communications Communications and Media Specialist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ag Lobbyist International U.S. Meat Export Federation Cargill Kraft Hershey's Nestle's Seaboard Tyson Development Chef Fats and Oil Researcher Quality Assurance Supervisor Certified Flavor Chemist Cereal

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

103

Evaluation of biological and physico-chemical quality of the compost produced from pulp mill residues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nos ltimos anos, a produo de celulose kraft branqueada vem crescendo significativamente no Brasil e, com isso, aumenta-se a preocupao dos aspectos ambientais desta tipologia, (more)

Marcos Antonio de Souza Lima Guerra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Factors Affecting the Resistivity of Recovery Boiler Precipitator Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are commonly used to control particulate emissions from recovery boilers in the kraft pulping process. The electrical resistivity of entrained particulates is (more)

Sretenovic, Ivan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Influence of Polypropylene Fibers on the Punching Resistance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Accelerated Carbonation on Kraft Pulp Fiber Reinforced ... Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on the Tensile Properties of TWIP steels Evaluation...

106

New Boston, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 2nd congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in New Boston, Ohio Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors References US Census...

107

Lignin-Based Carbon Fiber.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was undertaken in support of the Biorefinery concept applicable to hardwood Kraft mills. The near neutral hemicellulose extraction process uses sodium carbonate and (more)

Luo, Jie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This process produces a byproduct called black liquor containing the non-cellulose wood residues (lignin, hemicellulose) and Kraft process chemicals (toxic inorganics like...

109

Computational modelling in chemical engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, NPAH, PP(1-N)) PP = primary particle list 1 1 2 3 2 1 3 5 2 4 Markus Kraft mk306@cam.ac.uk Particle growth Single trajectory of a soot particle Markus Kraft mk306@cam.ac.uk Particle rotation Sub Particles: 3172 No. Carbon atoms: 4.967x106 Surface... Area: 2.345x10-10 cm2 Shape Descriptor: 0.768 Radius of Gyration: 44.384 nm Age: 0.0917 s Markus Kraft mk306@cam.ac.uk Particle composition Markus Kraft mk306@cam.ac.uk Soot in engines! HCCI, n-heptane Compression ratio 12 Equivalence ratio...

Kraft, Markus

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steam Production - SAGD Oil Sands Processing - Hydrogen Oil Sands Processing - Steam Bioethanol via fermentation - N6 Ethylene SteamUtilities Kraft Mills - N5 Steam and Heat...

111

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reducing the concentration of many undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite. 1 tab.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Intrinsic Radiation Source Generation with the ISC Package: Data Comparisons and Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of radioactive emissions from unstable isotopes (intrinsic radiation) is necessary for shielding and radiological-dose calculations from radioactive materials. While most radiation transport codes, e.g., MCNP [X-5 Monte Carlo Team, 2003], provide the capability to input user prescribed source definitions, such as radioactive emissions, they do not provide the capability to calculate the correct radioactive-source definition given the material compositions. Special modifications to MCNP have been developed in the past to allow the user to specify an intrinsic source, but these modification have not been implemented into the primary source base [Estes et al., 1988]. To facilitate the description of the intrinsic radiation source from a material with a specific composition, the Intrinsic Source Constructor library (LIBISC) and MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor (MISC) utility have been written. The combination of LIBISC and MISC will be herein referred to as the ISC package. LIBISC is a statically linkable C++ library that provides the necessary functionality to construct the intrinsic-radiation source generated by a material. Furthermore, LIBISC provides the ability use different particle-emission databases, radioactive-decay databases, and natural-abundance databases allowing the user flexibility in the specification of the source, if one database is preferred over others. LIBISC also provides functionality for aging materials and producing a thick-target bremsstrahlung photon source approximation from the electron emissions. The MISC utility links to LIBISC and facilitates the description of intrinsic-radiation sources into a format directly usable with the MCNP transport code. Through a series of input keywords and arguments the MISC user can specify the material, age the material if desired, and produce a source description of the radioactive emissions from the material in an MCNP readable format. Further details of using the MISC utility can be obtained from the user guide [Solomon, 2012]. The remainder of this report presents a discussion of the databases available to LIBISC and MISC, a discussion of the models employed by LIBISC, a comparison of the thick-target bremsstrahlung model employed, a benchmark comparison to plutonium and depleted-uranium spheres, and a comparison of the available particle-emission databases.

Solomon, Clell J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

116

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject - Other  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Misc Applications Misc Applications A B C D E F G I K L M O P Q R S T U Tool Applications Free Recently Updated ACOUSALLE acoustics, codes and standards AcousticCalc HVAC acoustics, sound level prediction, noise level Acoustics Program HVAC acoustics, sound level prediction, noise level Software has been updated. AEPS System Planning electrical system, renewable energy system, planning and design software, modeling, simulation, energy usage, system performance, financial analysis, solar, wind, hydro, behavior characteristics, usage profiles, generation load storage calculations, on-grid, off-grid, residential, commercial, system sizing, utility rate plans, rate comparison, utility costs, energy savings Software has been updated. Animate animated visualization of data, XY graphs, energy-use data

117

HAPO Plant and capital equipment budget for FY 1966 and revision of budget for FY 1965 equipment not related to construction projects  

SciTech Connect

This document is divided into: byproduct horizontal control rod system (5 reactors); high-speed scanning-effluent temperature monitoring system (KE reactor); improved reactor gas system (100-KE & KW); safety circuit system modifications (5 reactors); alternate process hot die sizing, 313 Building 300 Area; button line equipment (234-5 Building); in-tank waste solidification (3rd unit); and misc. minor equipment projects.

McDonald, J.E.

1964-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

118

AOCS Official Method Dc 4-59  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ester Sulfites AOCS Official Method Dc 4-59 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The determination of ester SO 3 is dependent upon the hydro

119

Kinetics of the Direct Causticizing Reaction between Black Liquor and Titanates During Low Temperature Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gasification of kraft black liquor increases the amount of Na2CO3, which needs to be converted into NaOH in the lune cycle because one mole of (more)

Chen, Xiaowen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ber die Bewegung gestoener Krper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Die Gr6Be des Stol3es ist definiert als das Inte- gral der Kraft fiber die Zeit (Fig. 1) . Die Dimension ist gleich der des Impulses. Der StoB fibertr~gt seinen Impuls...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... -. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR LEAD REMOVAL FROM AND STRUCTURAL RESTORATION OF CRUISER, OHIO, AND LOS ANGELES CLASS REACTOR COMPARTMENT DISPOSAL PACWGES Appendix A A-i . Table of Contents E~CUT~ S~Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A.3 1. ~TRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .." . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A.3 2. DESCR~TION OF S~ELD~G LEAD CONTmD ~ REACTOR commmm PAcmGEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A.4 2.1 PermanentSMeldingLead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A-4 2.2 MisceUaneousLead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A-5 2.3 Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................"A-5 2.4 Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................A-5 3. SHIELD~G LEAD REMOVQ

122

ESH&Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality Services Section Quality Services Section Documents Active Procedures & Forms Quality Assessments Assessment Schedule & Reports Consolidated Assessment Schedule Frequently Asked Questions DOE Related Documents 2012 QA Audit 2009 QA Audit Submitted to DOE Performance Related Orders & Other Docs Contractor Assurance CAS Website Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Form / Db Incoming LL Initial Review Overdue Lessons Learned Process Flow Contact List Assessment Questionnaire Issues Management - Coming Soon CAS QA Mgmt System Description QAR Information Center Members Quality Assurance Representative Information Sharepoint Site Meeting Minutes 2012 2011 2010 2009 & Prior Presentations Archives Submitted to DOE Misc. Suspect / Counterfeit Items S/CI Trainers & Coordinators Reference Documents

123

The Fractionation of Loblolly Pine Woodchips Into Pulp For Making Paper Products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to test the PureVision biomass fractionation technology for making pulp from loblolly pine. A specific goal was to produce a pulp product that is comparable to pulp produced from the kraft process, while reducing the environmental effects of the kraft process, known to be a highly pollutant process. The overall goal of the project was met by using the biomass fractionation concept for making pulp product. This proof-of-concept study, done with Southern pine pinchips as feedstock, evaluated NaOH concentration and residence time as variables in single-stage cocurrent pulping process. It can be concluded that 1% NaOH is adequate for effective delignification using the PureVision process; this is about ? of that used in the kraft process. Also, the PureVision process does not use sulfur-based chemicals such as N2S and hence, is environmentally more benign.

Kiran Kadam, PhD

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes. Quarterly report, December 15, 1978-March 15, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The objective for the past quarter included reversing the decline in productivity from the methane fermenters, confirming methane and yeast production from acetate, and making trial runs on kraft mill and semichemical mill effluents. Although methane production remained low (20 cc/hr) addition of 2% methanol doubled production. Progress has been made on identifying possible viruses that might be preventing higher methane production. Confirmation that acetate can be used as a substrate for methane production has been obtained. An initial test on the Decker filtrate from a kraft mill gave 20 cc/hr methane production.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1979-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

Nolan, Paul S. (North Canton, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH); Vecci, Stanley J. (Alliance, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regenerable process for the selective removal of sulfur dioxide from effluent gases  

SciTech Connect

A regenerable process is claimed for scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from effluent gases using an aqueous alkanolamine and the corresponding sulfite as the solvent, such amine having a boiling point below about 250/sup 0/ C. At one atmosphere pressure and wherein the alkanolamine solutions containing heat stable salts (Hss) is regenerated by alkali addition, crystallization and vacuum distillation of the amine.

Atwood, G.R.; Kosseim, A.J.; Sokolik, J.E.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Types and Causes of Concrete Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Chemicals that deteriorate concrete...butter (a) Coconut oil (a) Cottonseed oil (a) Fish liquor (b) Mustard oil (a) Perchloric acid, 10% Potassium dichromate Potassium hydroxide (>20%) Rapeseed oil (a) Slaughterhouse waste (c) Sodium bisulfate Sodium bisulfite Sodium hydroxide (>20%) Sulfite liquor Sulfuric acid, 80% oleum (a) Tanning...

128

Advanced Reduction Processes - A New Class of Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new class of treatment processes called Advanced Reduction Processes (ARP) has been proposed. The ARPs combine activation methods and reducing agents to form highly reactive reducing radicals that degrade oxidized contaminants. Batch screening experiments were conducted to identify effective ARP by applying several combinations of activation methods (ultraviolet light, ultrasound, electron beam, microwaves) and reducing agents (dithionite, sulfite, ferrous iron, sulfide) to degradation of five target contaminants (perchlorate, nitrate, perfluorooctanoic acid, 2,4 dichlorophenol, 1,2 dichloroethane) at 3 pH levels (2.4, 7.0, 11.2). These experiments identified the combination of sulfite activated by ultraviolet light produced by a low pressure mercury vapor lamp as an effective ARP. More detailed kinetic experiments were conducted with nitrate and perchlorate as target compounds and nitrate was found to degrade more rapidly than perchlorate. The effects of pH, sulfite concentration, and light intensity on perchlorate and nitrate degradation were investigated. The effectiveness of the sulfite/UV-L treatment process improved with increasing pH for both perchlorate and nitrate.

Vellanki, Bhanu Prakash

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM DEVELOPER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved photographic developer is presented having very high energy development fine grain characteristics and a long shelf life. These characteristics are obtained by the use of aminoacetic acid in the developer, the other constituents of which are: sodium sulfite, hydroquinone, sodiunn borate, boric acid and potassium bromide, 1-phenyl-3-pyrazolidone.

Berry, F.G.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

CX-004431: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery for the Kraft Foods Global, IncorporatedCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 11/09/2010Location(s): Allentown, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

131

Atmospheric emissions of one pulp and paper mill. contribution to the air quality of Viana do Castelo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most sensitive environmental impact of the pulp and paper mills is associated with the atmospheric pollution namely with sulphur compounds, particulate matter and nitrogen oxides. The study undertaken aimed to evaluate the influence of one ... Keywords: air pollution modelling, kraft pulp and paper mill, urban air pollution

Lgia T. Silva; Jos F. G. Mendes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mill-designed biobleaching technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biobleaching studies are ongoing, we are currently screening new organic and inorganic mediators for laccase catalyzed delignification of kraft pulps. We have established the performance of current laccase-mediator systems with respect to delignification, yield, and changes in lignin structure.

Dr. A.J. Ragauskas

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

schaftsminister Dr. Thomas Goppel, "ist ein besonderes Gtezeichen fr die Forschung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, und zwar in der ?berbauung «KraftWerk 1». Verschiedene weitere Möglichkeiten für kleinere und grössere Investitions- und Unterhaltskosten wesentlich besser ab. Zum Betrieb des In-situ-Verfahrens wird luft

Schubart, Christoph

134

Modulhandbuch Informationswirtschaft (M.Sc.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, und zwar in der ?berbauung «KraftWerk 1». Verschiedene weitere Möglichkeiten für kleinere und grössere Investitions- und Unterhaltskosten wesentlich besser ab. Zum Betrieb des In-situ-Verfahrens wird luft

135

campusDas Magazin der TU Mnchen 4| 2010 10 Jahre WZW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, und zwar in der ?berbauung «KraftWerk 1». Verschiedene weitere Möglichkeiten für kleinere und grössere Investitions- und Unterhaltskosten wesentlich besser ab. Zum Betrieb des In-situ-Verfahrens wird luft

Kemper, Gregor

136

26. Jahrgang Heft2 Oktober 2009 A5842 Auerdem in diesem Heft: Of Mice and Men +++ Romantische Neurotraumato-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kraftwerke und den Ausbau der Netzinfrastruktur aufbringen muss. Der weltweite investitions- bedarf für neue gro?e Kohle- und 300 noch grö?ere Gas- kraftwerke ersetzen, auch der von diesen Kraft- werken Solar- kraftwerke natürlich nur wenig und nachts überhaupt keine Elektrizität. Daher muss

Groppe, Sven

137

Jahresbericht 2010 Vorwort des Prsidenten 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kraftwerke und den Ausbau der Netzinfrastruktur aufbringen muss. Der weltweite investitions- bedarf für neue gro?e Kohle- und 300 noch grö?ere Gas- kraftwerke ersetzen, auch der von diesen Kraft- werken Solar- kraftwerke natürlich nur wenig und nachts überhaupt keine Elektrizität. Daher muss

138

FORUMEPFL4 -12 octobre 2011 Mot du Prsident de l'EPFL 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kraftwerke und den Ausbau der Netzinfrastruktur aufbringen muss. Der weltweite investitions- bedarf für neue gro?e Kohle- und 300 noch grö?ere Gas- kraftwerke ersetzen, auch der von diesen Kraft- werken Solar- kraftwerke natürlich nur wenig und nachts überhaupt keine Elektrizität. Daher muss

139

42 MaxPlanckForschung 4 | 11 Ein Tauziehen zwischen zwei Rubidiumatomen endete krz-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

erneuerbarer Energie, und Ingenieure arbeiten auch bereits daran, sie anzuzapfen. Doch die hohen erneuerbare Energie als bislang angenommen Schneller Wind mit wenig Kraft Wie Drachen mit Rotoren sollen sprangen dann von einem Gitterplatz zum nächsten, obwohl ihre restliche thermische Energie hierzu nicht

140

Scavenging of Aerosol Particles by Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements have been made of aerosol particle size distributions (>0.01 ?m) in aged air masses, in the plumes from several coal power plants and a large Kraft paper mill, and in the emissions from a volcano, before and after rain or ...

Lawrence F. Radke; Peter V. Hobbs; Mark W. Eltgroth

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Behavior of Paper-Polypropylene-Paper Laminate Under Thermal and Electrical Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PPP laminate has successfully replaced kraft paper insulation in high-voltage, high-pressure, fluid-filled (HPFF) cables. This has created a need for information on the laminate's gassing behavior and mechanical characteristics as a function of cable aging.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pulping lignocellulose in continuous pressurized batch digesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A batch process to produce kraft pulp is described, in which a combination of black and white liquor is used for cooking of wood chips. In the process, the steam consumption to produce 357 tons/day pulp at 50% yield was approximately 1600 lb/ton pulp, compared with 4000 lb/ton for a batch digester of conventional type.

Green, F.B.

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS AND BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COGENERATION AT PULP AND PAPER MILLS ERIC D. LARSON Milano Milan, Italy ABSTRACT Cogeneration of heat and power at kraft pulp/paper mills from on-site bioma modeling of gasifier/gas turbine pulp-mill cogeneration systemsusing gasifier designs under commercial

144

DOE-STD-1043-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Operator Aid Postings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-93 3-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATOR AID POSTINGS U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1043-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operator Aid Postings Page / Section Change Concluding Material

145

8441.full.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28 September 2012. 28 September 2012. 10.1128/AEM.02130-12. 2012, 78(23):8441. DOI: Appl. Environ. Microbiol. David A. Hogsett and Lee R. Lynd Kara K. Podkaminer, Adam M. Guss, Heather L. Trajano, through Targeted Gene Deletions Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum Discovery of a New Endoxylanase in Characterization of Xylan Utilization and http://aem.asm.org/content/78/23/8441 Updated information and services can be found at: These include: SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL Supplemental material REFERENCES http://aem.asm.org/content/78/23/8441#ref-list-1 at: This article cites 29 articles, 13 of which can be accessed free CONTENT ALERTS more» articles cite this article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new http://journals.asm.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml Information about commercial reprint orders:

146

Brown-J Bacteriol -12.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12):3290. DOI: 10.1128/JB.00473-12. 12):3290. DOI: 10.1128/JB.00473-12. J. Bacteriol. Keller and Edward A. Bayer Zamin Yang, Miriam L. Land, Sagar M. Utturkar, Martin Yuval Shoham, Dawn M. Klingeman, Courtney M. Johnson, Steven D. Brown, Raphael Lamed, Ely Morag, Ilya Borovok, Mutant Strain AD2 Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium http://jb.asm.org/content/194/12/3290 Updated information and services can be found at: These include: REFERENCES http://jb.asm.org/content/194/12/3290#ref-list-1 at: This article cites 39 articles, 21 of which can be accessed free CONTENT ALERTS more» articles cite this article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new http://journals.asm.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml Information about commercial reprint orders:

147

DOE-STD-1034-93; Guide to Good Practices for Timely Orders to Operators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-93 4-93 March 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR TIMELY ORDERS TO OPERATORS U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1034-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Timely Orders to Operators Page / Section Change p. 10 / Section 4.3

148

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dan Brueggenjohann - SWT Project Manager Dan Brueggenjohann - SWT Project Manager Byron Floyd - Resident Engineer 12 June 2013 Ozark and Webbers Falls Powerhouse Major Rehabilitation BUILDING STRONG ® * Project Scope: Rehabilitation of the Ozark Powerhouse to include replacement of five turbines, rehabilitation of all cranes, rehab of water Treatment, and misc aux systems * Project Cost including management expenses: $125.7M ($32.9M Customer Funded) * Turbine Contract Notice to Proceed : July 2005 * Awarded Turbine Contract Amount: $74.5M * Current Turbine Contract Amount: $99.0M * Current Required Completion Date : April 20, 2014 * Anticipated Completion Date: March 24, 2017 Ozark Scope, Cost and Schedule BUILDING STRONG ® Ozark Funding Status Ozark/Webbers Falls Major Rehab

149

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/misc/99601.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/approaches-electric-utility-energy-ef Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report, written for members of the Weatherization Assistance Program

150

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Supermarkets in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use Toilets/Urinals Other/Misc. Indoor (2) Cooling Total Building Size (SF) Benchmarking Values for Supermarkets (3) N Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/year 38 Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/daily transaction 38 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 52 - 64 9 - 16 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Includes water for sinks, spraying vegetables, cleaning, etc. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of

151

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

152

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

*** *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 A 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 2 1 1 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

153

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

*** *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 Company 1 RIS A 2 1 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 3 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

154

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Example 4 *** Example 4 *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 A 2 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

155

Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment Addendum for Disposition of Additional Waste at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/EA-1339A) (April 30, 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

117 117 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 83 / Wednesday, April 30, 2003 / Notices Corp., Club Affiliation, Disability, Hobbies, Military Affiliation, National Merit, Athletics, Union Affiliation, Misc., Career Objective, or Programs of Study)) * ParentVeteran? (Is either parent a Veteran) * ParentDisabledInMilitary? * ParentKilledInMilitary? * HouseholdIncome (Annual) Financial Aid Wizard For each School tracked in the user's EDpack * Tuition * RoomBoard * Fees * Books * OtherExpense Used in the EFC calculation * StOfResidence * Veteran? * SchoolsOfAttendance * ChildSupport? * OtherDependants? * Orphan? * PeopleInHousehold * CollegeStudentIn House * CompletedTaxReturn? * 1040EZ Able to file 1040A or 1040EZ) * AGI (Adjusted Gross Income) * IncomeTax * Exemptions * YouWages * SpouseWages

156

BCP Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boulder Canyon Project Information Module Boulder Canyon Project Information Module HOME MODULE OVERVIEW LEGISLATION TIMELINE TIMELINE SUMMARY CASE LAW PROJECT HISTORY MISC. DOCUMENTS RELATED LINKS Home Page Image Welcome Hoover Dam is the highest and third largest concrete dam in the United States. The dam, power plant, and high-voltage switchyards are located in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River on the Arizona-Nevada state line. Lake Mead, the reservoir behind the dam, will hold the average two-year flow of the Colorado River. Hoover Dam´s authorized purposes are: first, river regulation, improvement of navigation, and flood control; second, delivery of stored water for irrigation and other domestic uses; and third, power generation. This Page was last modified on : 05-12-2009

157

City of Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Gillette City of Place Wyoming Utility Id 7222 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial & Misc Service Commercial Demand Meter Industrial Residential Residential Residential All Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0894/kWh Commercial: $0.0692/kWh

158

DOE-STD-1033-92; Guide to Good Practices for Operations and Administration Updates Through Required Reading  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-92 3-92 December 1992 CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION UPDATES THROUGH REQUIRED READING U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No.1 DOE-STD-1033-92 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operations and Administration Updates Through

159

DOE-STD-1032-92 CN 1; Guide to Good Practices for Operations Organization and Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-92 2-92 December 1992 CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No.1 DOE-STD-1032-92 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operations Organization and Administration

160

Index of /research/alcator/documentation/2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] 2003_misc/ 27-Oct-2010 09:24 - [DIR] 20030317_In_Vessel/ 27-Oct-2010 09:21 - [DIR] 20030317_RF/ 27-Oct-2010 09:21 - [DIR] 20030325_Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:21 - [DIR] 20030327_ Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:21 - [DIR] 20030401_Alternator/ 28-Oct-2010 11:21 - [DIR] 20030403_ Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030422_Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030515_ Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030515_dterry/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030723 Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030805_Alternator_and_LH/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030805_RF/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 - [DIR] 20030806_ Alternator/ 27-Oct-2010 09:22 -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

DOE-HDBK-3012-2003; DOE Handbook Guide to Good Practices for Operational Readiness Reviews (ORR) Team Leader's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-3012-2003 SUPERSEDING DOE-HDBK-3012-96 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONAL READINESS REVIEWS (ORR) TEAM LEADER'S GUIDE U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-3012-2003 FOREWORD This Department of Energy handbook, Guide to Good Practices for Conducting Operational Readiness Reviews (ORR) Team Leader's Handbook, is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. The guidance in this document is the distillation of the experience and lessons learned during numerous operational readiness reviews contributed by team leaders with a wide range of backgrounds. There are

162

e00053-12.full.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10.1128/mBio.00053-12. 10.1128/mBio.00053-12. 3(2): . mBio . Temperature-Dependent Product Formation Engineering a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon for 2012. Mirko Basen, Junsong Sun and Michael W. W. Adams Product Formation Archaeon for Temperature-Dependent Engineering a Hyperthermophilic http://mbio.asm.org/content/3/2/e00053-12.full.html Updated information and services can be found at: REFERENCES http://mbio.asm.org/content/3/2/e00053-12.full.html#ref-list-1 This article cites 28 articles, 13 of which can be accessed free at: CONTENT ALERTS more>> article), Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new articles cite this http://journals.asm.org/subscriptions/ To subscribe to another ASM Journal go to: http://mbio.asm.org/misc/contentdelivery.xhtml Information about Print on Demand and other content delivery options:

163

DOE-STD-1036-93; Guide to Good Practices for Independent Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-93 6-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1036-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Independent Verification Page / Section Change p. 11 / Section 4.1.2

164

DOE-STD-1039-93; Guide to Good Practices for Control of Equipment and System Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-93 9-93 March 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEM STATUS U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1039-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Control of Equipment and System Status Page / Section

165

DOE-STD-1041-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Shift Routines and Operating Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-93 1-93 June 1998 Change Notice No. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR SHIFT ROUTINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A:Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1041-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Shift Routines and Operating Practices Page / Section Change

166

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webbers Falls Major Rehab Webbers Falls Major Rehab Webbers Falls Major Rehab BUILDING STRONG ® 6/8/2010 2 Plant Cross Section Plant Cross Section BUILDING STRONG ® Project Cost and Scope Project Cost and Scope *Current Cost: $72.7M *Current Completion Date: Jun 2012 *Rehab 2 Bridge Cranes *Rehab 2 Gantry Cranes *Rewind 3 Generators *Install New 13.8KV Breakers and Buss *Repair Misc Mechanical & Electrical Items BUILDING STRONG ® Project Funding Project Funding *Project was 100% funded through customer funding until FY09 ARRA funds were received. ARRA funds now being used for, gantry cranes, breakers, cables and distribution panels. *To date customer funds in the amount of $67.9M have been provided for this project. BUILDING STRONG ® Total Cost Breakdown Total Cost Breakdown

167

The Standards Actions, November 1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for Coordination The appropriate Technical Standards Managers (TSM) will provide selected reviewers with copies for comment. If you wish to comment on a particular document, please notify your TSM. DOE documents sent for coordination during the past month are given below. * Supplementary Guidance and Design Experience for DOE Fusion Safety Standards, SAFT-0059, (Steve Herring, INEL, 208-525-9497, sth@inel.gov. * Risk-Based Prioritization of DOE Activities, MISC-0022, (Kenneth P . Ferlic, DP-45, 301-903-6703, Kenneth.Ferlic@dp.doe.gov); comments due November 4, 1996. Documents Recently Published The following DOE documents have recently been published: * DOE-STD-1095-95, Department of Energy Laboratory Accredi- tation Program for Personnel Dosimetry Systems, December

168

DOE-STD-3006-95; DOE Standard Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews (ORR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3006-95 3006-95 November 1995 SUPERSEDING DOE-STD-3006-93 November 1993 DOE STANDARD PLANNING AND CONDUCT OF OPERATIONAL READINESS REVIEWS (ORR) U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-3006-95 i PLANNING AND CONDUCT OF OPERATIONAL READINESS REVIEWS (ORR) FOREWORD 1. DOE 0 425.1 establishes the requirement to conduct Operational Readiness Reviews

169

DOE-STD-1038-93; Guide to Good Practices for Operations Turnover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-93 8-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONS TURNOVER U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No.1 DOE-STD-1038-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operations Turnover Page/Section Change Concluding Material The Preparing Activity was changed from NE-

170

DOE-STD-1042-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Control Area Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-93 2-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL AREA ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No.1 DOE-STD-1042-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operations Turnover Page/Section Change Concluding Material Preparing Activity was changed from

171

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057 Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057 file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/blackard/Desktop/MiscCases/lef0057.htm[11/29/2012 2:35:38 PM] Case Nos. LEF-0057 and LEF-0073 September 6, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Implementation of Special Refund Procedures Names of Firms:Intercoastal Oil Corporation Gulf States Oil & Refining Dates of Filing: July 20, 1993 July 20, 1993 Case Numbers:LEF-0057 LEF-0073 The Office of General Counsel (OGC) of the Department of Energy (DOE) filed a Petition requesting that the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) formulate and implement Subpart V special refund proceedings. Under the procedural regulations of the DOE, special refund proceedings may be implemented to refund monies to persons injured by violations of the DOE petroleum price regulations,

172

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2*** 2*** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 2 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

173

Lincoln Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana Montana Utility Id 11022 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting - 100 Watt HPS Lighting Area Lighting - 1000 Watt MV Lighting Area Lighting - 150 Watt HPS Lighting Area Lighting - 250 Watt HPS Lighting Area Lighting - 400 Watt HPS Lighting Area Lighting - Misc. (sirens) Lighting Green Power Premium Residential Industrial Service Industrial Irrigation Service Industrial Large Commercial Service Commercial Residential and General Service Residential Small Commercial Service Commercial

174

Data:Fae609c8-361f-45f9-9a78-bf0242b7f353 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c8-361f-45f9-9a78-bf0242b7f353 c8-361f-45f9-9a78-bf0242b7f353 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lincoln Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2010/08/20 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting - Misc. (sirens) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.lincolnelectric.coop/PDF/schedule-hsecuritylightservice.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

175

DOE-STD-1045-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Notifications and Investigation of Abnormal Events  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-93 5-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR NOTIFICATIONS AND INVESTIGATION OF ABNORMAL EVENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1045-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Notifications and Investigation of Abnormal Events

176

DOE-HDBK-3012-96; Team Leader's Preparation Guide for Operational Readiness Reviews (ORR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INCH-POUND INCH-POUND DOE-HDBK-3012-96 June 1996 SUPERSEDING DOE-HDBK-3012-94 September 1994 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONAL READINESS REVIEWS (ORR) TEAM LEADER'S GUIDE U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE96009471 DOE-HDBK-3012-96 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy handbook, Guide to Good Practices for Conducting Operational

177

DOE-STD-1035-93; Guide to Good Practices for Logkeeping  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-93 5-93 March 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR LOGKEEPING U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1035-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Logkeeping Page / Section Change p. 13 / Section 4.7 The references to DOE O 1324.5 and DOE O 1324.2A

178

Usenetfs: A Stackable File System for Large Article Directories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Internet has grown much in popularity in the past few years. Numerous users read USENET newsgroups daily for entertainment, work, study, and more. USENET News servers have seen a gradual increase in the traffic exchanged between them, to a point where the hardware and software supporting the servers is no longer capable of meeting demand, at which point the servers begin "dropping " articles they could not process. The rate of this increase has been faster than software or hardware improvements were able to keep up, resulting in much time and effort spent by administrators upgrading their news systems. One of the primary reasons for the slowness of news servers has been the need to process many articles in very large flat directories representing newsgroups such as control. cancel and misc.jobs.offered. A large portion of the resources is spent on processing articles in these few newsgroups. Most Unix directories are organized as a linear unsorted sequence of entries. Large newsgr...

Erez Zadok; Ion Badulescu

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

DOE-HDBK-5504-95; Guidance for Evaluation of Operational Emergency Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5504-95 5504-95 March 1995 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDANCE FOR EVALUATION OF OPERATIONAL EMERGENCY PLANS U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE95012002 DOE-HDBK-5504-95 iii FOREWORD This handbook incorporates emergency planning information from the following EPA and OSHA regulations:

180

Franklin Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Completion Analysis Job Completion Analysis Yun (Helen) He, Hwa-Chun Wendy Lin, and Woo-Sun Yang National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center CUG 2010, May 24-27, Edinburgh 2 Our Goal * Identify and track system issues that cause user jobs to fail. Work with Cray to get them fixed. * Job completion report, i.e. how many jobs ran successfully and how many jobs failed for what reasons. 3 Our Data Job Completion rate = Success + User related failures 4 User Related Job Failures * Application Errors: APEXIT, APNOENT, APRESOURCE, APWRAP * Runtime Errors: CCERUNTIME, PATHRUNTIME * MPI Errors: MPIABORT, MPIENV, MPIFATAL, MPIIO * IO Errors: PGFIO * PTL Errors: PTLUSER * Signal: SIGSEGV, SIGTERM, * Misc: XBIGOUT, DISKQUOTA, OOM, NIDTERM 5 System Related Job Failures

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE-STD-1037-93; Guide to Good Practices for Operations Aspects of Unique Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-93 7-93 June 1993 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 1998 DOE STANDARD GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF UNIQUE PROCESSES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MISC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1037-93 December 1998 Guide to Good Practices for Operations Aspects of Unique Processes Page / Section

182

The Standards Actions, November 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Criteria, Assessment Criteria, September 1995. * DOS-STD-1032-92, Guide to Good Practices for Operations Organization and Administration, December 1992. * DOE-STD-1045-93, Guide to Good Practices for Notifications and Identification of Abnormal Events, June 1993. * DOE-STD-1061-93, Guide to Technical Standards Program Document Status as of 10/31/95 Projects Initiated The following DOE technical standards projects were recently initiated. If you are interested in participating in the development of these standards, please contact the persons listed below. * DOE-STD-3006-93, Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews, Project No. MISC-0030; Jeffery L. Roberson, DP-31; 301-903- 8026. (Note: This project will revise the standard to conform with the new DOE Orders System. Since this

183

Alaska Meeting #1 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska Meeting #1 Alaska Meeting #1 Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kwitherbee's picture Submitted by Kwitherbee(15) Member 12 August, 2012 - 21:38 The kickofff meeting for Alaska was sparsely attended with representatives from Division of Oil and Gas, Alaska Energy Authority, and Economic Development Commission. Discussions included current and planned geothermal development in AK. Progress was made in review of flowcharts for geothermal leasing and the use of the Misc Land Use Pwermit for geothermal/geophysical exploration, including seismic. Follow up with state agency personnel is planned prior to the planned second meeting. Groups: Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Login to post comments Kwitherbee's blog Latest blog posts Kyoung Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC

184

Help:Preferences | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preferences Preferences Jump to: navigation, search Clicking on the my preferences link in the upper right while logged in allows you to change your preferences. You will be presented with the User profile section, as well as a bar of tabs across the top for changing other types of settings. Contents 1 User profile 1.1 User profile 1.2 Change password 1.3 E-mail 1.4 Languages 2 Skin 3 Math 4 Files 5 Date and time 6 Editing 7 Recent changes 8 Watchlist 9 Search 10 Misc 11 See also User profile User profile Username: Your user name. Only bureaucrats can change your username, and the wiki must also have the Renameuser extension installed. User ID: A number assigned to your account when you created it (for example, if your number is 42 you are the 42nd user to sign up at this particular wiki). This number is used for internal purposes.

185

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Detector Maintenance and Operations Subproject  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HCAL Announcements, Documentation, and Resources HCAL Announcements, Documentation, and Resources Forward Pixels SiTracker ECAL HCAL Endcap Muon System TriDAS (This page last updated August 2000, although the 1997 version of the TDR was added in July 2010.) [See also HCAL web pages at Maryland and Boston.] HCAL Review Documents HCAL Project Organization Chart (13 Kb gif file) [ps: 46 Kb] HCAL Meeting Announcements, Agendas, and Minutes HCAL Technical Design Report HCAL Drawings: 3-D and perspective barrel HCAL views. HCAL Trigger: Calorimeter trigger algorithm specifications. HCAL Display Resources: transparencies, misc. figures, ... HCAL Documents: Technical Proposal, DRDC Notes, and Papers. CMS Technical Notes: HCAL, HCAL-HV. HCAL Page on CMSDOC WWW Server at CERN HCAL HF Document Server from the University of Iowa

186

Dancing in the Dark: Berkeley Lab Scientists Computing at NERSC Shed New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dancing in the Dark Dancing in the Dark Dancing in the Dark Berkeley Lab scientists computing at NERSC shed new light on protein-salt interactions August 11, 2010 Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov , +1 510 486 6008 To study nanostructures in real environments, Berkeley Lab scientists have combined theoretical and experimental approaches to glimpse into a protein's interaction with simple salts in water. Enabled by x-ray absorption simulation software developed at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, these findings shed new light on how salts impact protein structure at the atomic level. Simulation of the interaction between triglycine and dissolved sodium sulfite in water shows the long chain-like triglycine molecule (center) interacting directly with sulfite anions (tripods of yellow and red atoms)

187

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from simulated geothermal brines by reaction with oxygen. Final report, October 6, 1975-February 4, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling hydrogen sulfide emissions and corrosivity in geothermal systems has been evaluated on a small laboratory pilot plant scale and shown to be technically feasible. The hydrogen sulfide was oxidized by oxygen injected directly into a 11.4-liter-(3-gallon)-per-minute flowing stream of simulated geothermal brine. The oxidation of the sulfide was complete at oxygen:sulfide mole ratios of 1.25:1 to 1.5:1, depending on temperature and total dissolved solids in the brine. The reaction products were free sulfur, sulfite and sulfate. The ratio of these was dependent upon the oxygen:sulfide mole ratios; but, generally, more than 80% of the sulfide was converted to sulfate, approximately 10% to free sulfur and less than 10% to sulfite.

Wilson, J.S.; King, J.E.; Bullard, G.R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Berkeley Lab News Center » Dancing in the Dark: Berkeley Lab Scientists Shed New Light on Protein-Salt Interactions » Print  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/10 3:30 PM /10 3:30 PM Berkeley Lab News Center » Dancing in the Dark: Berkeley Lab Scientists Shed New Light on Protein-Salt Interactions » Print Page 1 of 3 http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/08/11/protein-salt-interactions/print/ Simulation of the interaction between triglycine and dissolved sodium sulfite in water shows the long chain-like triglycine molecule (center) interacting directly with sulfite anions (tripods of yellow and red atoms) while also interacting via multiple hydrogen bonds (thin red or blue lines) with the surrounding water molecules (red and white sticks). - Berkeley Lab News Center - http://newscenter.lbl.gov - Dancing in the Dark: Berkeley Lab Scientists Shed New Light on Protein-Salt Interactions Posted By lcyarris On August 11, 2010 @ 12:08 pm In Feature Stories | Comments Disabled

189

CX-002120: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002120: Categorical Exclusion Determination Illinois State Energy Program Large Customer Energy Efficiency Retrofit Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Illinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity (DCED) has submitted the following three projects totaling $1,297,908 that fall within the National Environmental Policy State Energy Program template. Kraft Foods, Naperville; Kraft Foods, Chicago Bakery; and Rentech Energy Midwest. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002120.pdf More Documents & Publications Audit Report: OAS-RA-11-02 CX-009569: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002816

190

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method for scavenging mercury  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Method for scavenging mercury  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

Shale, Correll C. (Morgantown, WV); Cross, William G. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

194

PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New sulfur dioxide removal technologies produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products that contain sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. The scarcity of landfill disposal sites for such flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has led to a long-term study on possible large-volume beneficial applications. To date, FGD by-products have been successfully used in agriculture, construction, and strip mine reclamation.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Applying New Markers for Improving Accuracy in Transformer Remaining Life Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of work on the report New Tracer Compounds to Estimate Transformer Life On-line. Work in previous phases has demonstrated that on-line detection of nonfuranic marker compounds from the degradation of mixed paper systems (Kraft and thermally upgraded paper [TUP]) was a viable approach to assess the condition of transformer insulation. To research the dynamic behavior of marker compounds in oil and headspace, a new on-line monitoring method was developed. This ...

2013-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Pinch Technology/Process Optimization: Volume 3: Case Study--Port Townsend Paper Corp.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sitewide study of a Kraft pulp and paper mill operated by Port Townsend Paper Corp. identified projects to reduce energy costs by $1.0 million annually while accommodating a 30% increase in plant capacity. The study, using advanced process analysis techniques known as `pinch technology,` found cost-effective applications for improved evaporator integration and enhanced process heat recovery. Payback would be less than two years.

1998-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

198

Minimizing Process Energy Use for a Large TMP Mill With Pinch Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

American Process Inc. conducted an energy targeting scoping study for a large thermomechanical pulping (TMP) mill, using Pinch analysis. The mill produces bleached, unbleached, and semibleached kraft market pulp and standard and offset newsprint. Operations are supported by steam raised in the recovery boiler and in the power boilers. Oil and hog fuels are used in the power boilers. Some power is generated on site and also purchased. The study concentrated on identifying the steps necessary for the mill ...

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fundamental Investigations of C1O2 Delignification - Final Report - 07/10/1996 - 07/09/1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of chlorine dioxide delignification of low kappa kraft pulps and identify new methods of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of this bleaching agent. The approach adopted was to investigate the fundamental structural components of lignin that contribute to delignification reactions with chlorine dioxide. These results were then used to examine new bleaching technologies that will permit enhanced delignification while simultaneously reducing the generation of chlorinated organic compounds.

Ragauskas, Arthur J.; McDonough, T. J.

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Novel Techniques to Estimate and Extend Transformer Life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is a continuation of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1017736, Use of Paper Degradation Products for Diagnostics and Condition Assessment: Phase 2Identification of Marker Compounds of Insulating Paper. In this phase, laboratory experiments were performed to identify non-furanic marker compounds as diagnostic indicators and for monitoring the degradation of mixed paper systems (kraft and thermally upgraded paper [TUP]). Such knowledge is necessary to estimate the condition of the ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)  

SciTech Connect

Pre-extractionkraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called near neutral pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the near-neutral green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Historical collection of preprints, reprints, working papers, correspondence, and other documents related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann.  

SciTech Connect

This historical collection consists of various letters, correspondence, working papers, reprints, preprints, workshop reports, and news clippings related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann. Binders and contents. 1. Laboratory Reprints/Preprints (Laboratory Documents from 9 national Labs. Some original documents); 2. Summary Report by Dr. Duane L. Barney (Articles, Letters, and Reports through 1994 on Cold Fusion. Original Documents); 3. Conference Workshops (Official Documents, schedules, and notes from 4 conferences); 4. HSS&T Hearings, SRI Incident Jan. 1992 (Summary of Cold Fusion Research and reports following SRI Incident. Original Documents); 5. Media 1989 to Present (circa 1995) (Journals, Magazines, Newspapers, and Press Releases from 1989-1995. Some reprints, some original articles/magazines); 6. Science in Service of National Economy aka Manfred's Book (A comprehensive overview of various research being done at Laboratories across the country that could impact the economy); 7. ERAB Information (Comprehensive Report on Cold Fusion Research w/ recommendations on funding and continued research. Original documents); 8. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1989 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion in order of print from 1989. Original documents); 9. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1990-1992 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1990-1992. Original documents); 10. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1993-1995 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1993-1995. Original documents); 11. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution A-H (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 12. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution I-R (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 13. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution S-Z (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 14. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries A-F (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 15. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries G-L (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 16. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries M-R (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 17. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries S-Z (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 18. Miscellaneous papers (Investigation of Cold Fusion Phenomena in Deuterated Metals-NCFI Final Report Volumes I. II, and III; June 1991; 4th Annual Conference on Cold Fusion Proceedings: Volumes 1-4; Development of Advanced Concepts for Nuclear Processes in Deuterated Metals; A Comprehensive Report on the research methods, background information, and principles related to Cold Fusion; Cold Fusion Research: November 1989; ERAB report on Cold Fusion Research; Proceedings: Workshop on Anomalous Effects in Deuterided Metals; Workshop designed to generate audio between skeptics and advocates to examine Cold Fusion research results and remaining questions in research methods; Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Overview of Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Grant Application for Cold Fusion Research; Original application to DOE from Prof. Pons that was withdrawn in favor of a new grant proposal).

None

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 cP in viscosity in comparison to high AA pulp for the oxygen delignification. This difference is also seen for high-kappa SW kraft pulps with an average improvement of {approx}3% in yield and 3 cP in viscosity for low AA high kappa number 50 pulp. Low AA hardwood kappa number 20 pulp had an average improvement of {approx}4% in yield and 6-12 cP in viscosity as compared to high AA pulp. Lower kraft cooking temperature (160 vs. 170 C) in combination with the medium AA provides a practical approach for integrating high kappa pulping of hardwoods (i.e., low rejects) with an advanced extended oxygen delignification stage. ECF pulp bleaching of low and high kappa kraft SW and HW pulps exhibit comparable optical and physical strength properties when bleached D(EPO)D.

Arthur J. Ragauskas

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

C:\My Documents\FORMS\DOE F 4200.40.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCUREMENT PROCUREMENT ACTIONS DOE F 4200.40 (10-03) (All Other Editions Are Obsolete) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY INDIVIDUAL PROCUREMENT ACTION REPORT (IPAR) See Handbook for the Preparation of the Individual Procurement Action Report Original - Contract File Goldenrod - ADP Entry Printed with soy ink on recycled paper 80. DATE 81. DOLLARS 82. MISC. 83. INT. OFF. USE 84. PR NUMBER 85. TEXT 86. TRANSFERRED TO OFFICE 18. EMG SM BUS 19. HUBZone BUS 20. VERY SM BUS 23. R & D 5. CONTRACTOR NAME 6. DIVISION 7. MASTER BIN 16. SDB 17. B(A) PGM ADD/CHANGE/DELETE 1. AWARD BIN 2. MOD NUMBER 3. KIND OF AWARD Change Delete Add 24. SUPP SERV 26. HISPANIC INST. 25. SAFETY & HEALTH 4. DUNS NO. 14. CO SIZE 15. TOB CODE 21. TYPE OF AWARD 22. E-GOVT 8. STATE 9. COUNTRY 10. CITY 11. COUNTY 12. ZIP CODE 13. CONG. DIST. 30. SR INVESTIGATOR 27. ADMIN DELEG OFF 28. ADMIN DELEG DATE OTHER No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No

207

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Hotels in Western United States (Gallons per Room per Year) (1) Fixture/End Use Bathtub (2) Faucets Showers Toilets Leaks Laundry Ice making (3) Other/misc. indoor Total Indoor Use Number of Rooms Logged average daily use, kgal: Peak instantaneous demand, gpm: Benchmarking Values for Hotels N Indoor Use, gal./day/occupied room 98 Cooling Use, gal./year/occupied room 97 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 60 - 115 7,400 - 41,600 Based on four budget hotels and one luxury hotel. Three budget hotels in Southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. Luxury hotel in Los Angeles, CA. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Based on one hotel. 3) Based on three hotels. 5) The

208

Data:A1964da0-1cf8-488d-885a-2acfbed9b357 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

da0-1cf8-488d-885a-2acfbed9b357 da0-1cf8-488d-885a-2acfbed9b357 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Indiana Inc Effective date: 2009/09/14 End date if known: Rate name: AL - 150 watt HPS - Misc. Sector: Lighting Description: Availability This rate schedule is no longer available after September 1, 2004. Potential lighting customers wanting a lighting system installed and maintained by Company can do so via the Outdoor Lighting Equipment agreement (OLE). Potential customers should contact a Company account representative for further information concerning OLE options. This rate schedule terminates May 1, 2014. Customers currently being provided service under this rate schedule can continue being provided service under this rate schedule until their contract expires or this rate schedule terminates, whichever occurs first.

209

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

210

NETL: News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12.29.2008 News Three Property Sales for "Misc. Scrap Metal" have been posted. 12.23.2008 News Fossil Energy Research Grants Awarded to Four Minority Universities Continuing its long-standing minority university research program, DOE has selected four institutions where students and faculty will investigate projects dealing with sensors and controls, computational energy sciences, and advanced materials for use in fossil fuel power systems. 12.22.2008 News Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-PS26-09NT01236 entitled "Clean Cities FY 09 Petroleum Reduction Technologies Projects for Transportation Sector" has been posted in our Business Solicitation area. 12.19.2008 News NETL's Multiphase Flow Research Group Wins INCITE Award The Multiphase Flow Research Group at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has won a 2009 Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) award from the U.S. Department of Energy for their proposal "Clean and Efficient Coal Gasifier Designs using Large-Scale Simulations."

211

Data:A4403d2b-559d-493d-8a68-567e3d396128 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

559d-493d-8a68-567e3d396128 559d-493d-8a68-567e3d396128 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Indiana Inc Effective date: 2009/09/14 End date if known: Rate name: AL - 400 watt HPS - Misc. Sector: Lighting Description: Availability This rate schedule is no longer available after September 1, 2004. Potential lighting customers wanting a lighting system installed and maintained by Company can do so via the Outdoor Lighting Equipment agreement (OLE). Potential customers should contact a Company account representative for further information concerning OLE options. This rate schedule terminates May 1, 2014. Customers currently being provided service under this rate schedule can continue being provided service under this rate schedule until their contract expires or this rate schedule terminates, whichever occurs first.

212

Forms of Al in Hanford Tank Waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actual Waste Testing Actual Waste Testing Lanée Snow Sandra Fiskum Rick Shimskey Reid Peterson 4/9/09 2 Tested > 75% of sludge waste types Sludge Sources Bi-Phosphate waste Redox Purex Cladding TBP FeCN sludge Redox Cladding Zirc Cladding Purex waste Misc NA 4/9/09 3 Tested > 75% of saltcake waste types Saltcake fractions Bi-phosphate saltcake S A B R NA Tested 8 groups of tank waste types Group ID Type Al Cr PO 4 3- Oxalate Sulfate Fluoride 1 Bi Phosphate sludge 3% 3% 21% 2% 6% 12% 2 Bi Phosphate saltcake (BY, T) 18% 25% 36% 36% 43% 36% 3 PUREX Cladding Waste sludge 12% 1% 3% 1% 1% 3% 4 REDOX Cladding Waste sludge 8% 1% 0% 0% 0% 2% 5 REDOX sludge 26% 8% 1% 3% 1% 2% 6 S - Saltcake (S) 11% 38% 12% 24% 14% 3% 7 TBP Waste sludge 1% 1% 8% 0% 2% 1% 8 FeCN sludge 2% 1% 4% 1% 1% 1% *Percentages reflect % of total inventory of species in the tank farm. *Discussion will focus on those that make up the largest fraction of the Al

213

The art and science of magnet design: Selected notes of Klaus Halbach. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains a compilation of 57 notes written by Dr. Klaus Halbach selected from his collection of over 1650 such documents. It provides an historic snapshot of the evolution of magnet technology and related fields as the notes range from as early as 1965 to the present, and is intended to show the breadth of Dr. Halbach`s interest and ability that have long been an inspiration to his many friends and colleagues. As Halbach is an experimental physicist whose scientific interests span many areas, and who does his most innovative work with pencil and paper rather than at the workbench or with a computer, the vast majority of the notes in this volume were handwritten and their content varies greatly--some reflect original work or work for a specific project, while others are mere clarifications of mathematical calculations or design specifications. As the authors converted the notes to electronic form, some were superficially edited and corrected, while others were extensively re-written to reflect current knowledge and notation. The notes are organized under five categories which reflect their primary content: Beam Position Monitors, (bpm), Current Sheet Electron Magnets (csem), Magnet Theory, (thry), Undulators and Wigglers (u-w), and Miscellaneous (misc). Within the category, they are presented chronologically starting from the most recent note and working backwards in time.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985-1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Energy Intensity in the Manufacturing Sector 1985 - 1994 Full Report Introduction Summary of Data Data Tables Data Summaries All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone (32) Metals (33) Fab. Metals (34) Machinery (35) El. Equip.(36) Instruments (38) Misc. (39) Appendices Survey Design Quality of Data Sector Description Nonobservation Errors Glossary Intensity Sites Commercial Residential Transportation International Manufacturing Energy Intensity Changes in Energy Intensity Click for Full Graph Manufacturing Energy Consumption Consumption of Energy Click for Full Graph Manufacturing Shipments History of Shipments Click for Full Graph The focus of this data report is on intensity of energy use, measured by energy consumption relative to constant dollar shipments of manufactured products -- commonly called energy intensities (EI) by energy analysts. This report explicitly relates changes in two energy measures of energy intensity to efficiency, while being cognizant that there are structural and behavioral effects enmeshed in those measures of energy efficiency. Reporting EI serves to continue the Intensity Change report series.

215

Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers  

SciTech Connect

Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Novel Pulping Technology: Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general objectives of this new project are the same as those described in the original proposal. Conventional kraft pulping technologies will be modified for significant improvements in pulp production, such as strength, bleachability, and yield by using green liquor, a naturally high, kraft mill-derived sulfidity source. Although split white liquor sulfidity and other high sulfidity procedures have the promise of addressing several of the latter important economic needs of pulp mills, they require considerable engineering/capital retrofits, redesigned production methods, and thus add to overall mill expenditures. Green liquor use, however, possesses the required high sulfidity to obtain in general the benefits attributable to higher sulfidity cooking, without the required capital constraints for implementation. Before introduction of green liquor in our industrial operations, a stronger understanding of its fundamental chemical interaction with the lignin and carbohydrates in US hardwood and softwoods must be obtained. In addition, its effect on bleachability, enhancement of pulp properties, and influence on the overall energy and recovery of the mill requires further exploration before the process witnesses widespread mill use in North America. Thus, proof of principle will be accomplished in this work and the consequent effect of green liquor and other high sulfide sources on the pulping and bleaching operations will be explored for US kraft mills. The first year of this project will generate the pertinent information to validate its ability for implementation in US pulping operations, whereas year two will continue this work while proceeding to analyze pulp bleachability and final pulp/paper properties and develop a general economic and feasibility analysis for its eventual implementation in North America.

Lucian A. Lucia

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Exhaust gas clean up process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

Walker, R.J.

1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Improved efficiency in the sulfur dioxide-iodine hydrogen cycle through the use of magnesium oxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of iodine with dry magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfite hexahydrate was studied experimentally as a possible means of improving the efficiency of the sulfur dioxide-iodine cycle. When no extra water was introduced, the maximum product yield was 67% obtained at 423 K. With excess water vapor, a nonporous plug was formed which prevented complete reaction. In the second case, maximum yield was 62% measured at 433 K showing that added water does not increase reaction products. This reaction gives an alternate route for producing hydrogen from water via the sulfur dioxide-iodine process.

Mason, C.F.V.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING THORIUM AND URANIUM WITH RESPECT TO RUTHENIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The control of ruthenium extraction in solvent-extraction processing of neutron-irradiated thorium is presented. Ruthenium is rendered organic-insoluble by the provision of sulfite or bisulfite ions in the aqueous feed solution. As a result the ruthenium remains in the aqueous phase along with other fission product and protactinium values, thorium and uranium values being extracted into the organic phase. This process is particularly applicable to the use of a nitrate-ion-deficient aqueous feed solution and to the use of tributyl phosphate as the organic extractant.

Meservey, A.A.; Rainey, R.H.

1959-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

On the characterization and spinning of solvent extracted lignin towards the manufacture of low-cost carbon fiber  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT: A Kraft hardwood lignin (HWL) and an organic-purified hardwood lignin (HWL-OP) were evaluated as potential precursors for the production of lowcost carbon fibers. It was found that the unpurified HWL exhibited poor spinnability while the HWL-OP exhibited excellent spinnability characteristics. Fibers of various diameters were obtained from the HWL-OP. Thermostabilization studies showed that oxidative stabilization can only be used to convert HWL-OP-based fibers into carbon fibers if extremely low heating rates are applied. Carbonized lignin-based fibers had tensile strength of 0.51 GPa and tensile modulus of 28.6 GPa. VC

Baker, Darren A [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Apparatus for control of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing mercury in industrial gases such as the flue gas produced by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal adds hydrogen sulfide to the flue gas in or just before a scrubber of the industrial process which contains the wet scrubber. The method and apparatus of the present invention is applicable to installations employing either wet or dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization systems. The present invention uses kraft green liquor as a source for hydrogen sulfide and/or the injection of mineral acids into the green liquor to release vaporous hydrogen sulfide in order to form mercury sulfide solids.

Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which bums the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Process for the desulfurization of flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from gases is described that is comprised of the steps of contacting the gas with a cerium oxide sorbent at conditions whereby the sulfur oxides present in the gas are sorbed by the cerium oxide sorbent and regenerate the cerium oxide sorbent by contacting it with a reducing atmosphere at conditions whereby the sorbent is substantially converted to a sulfur-free state. The gas may be an exhaust gas, e.g., from an automobile or a flue gas. This invention is especially preferred for treating flue gas. In this preferred embodiment, the flue gas may be contacted with the cerium oxide sorbent at a temperature of from 300/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C, to form cerium sulfate and/or sulfite and the sorbent is regenerated by contacting with a reducing gas, for example, hydrogen in admixture with steam or other inert gases at a temperature of from 500/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C to convert the cerium sulfate or sulfite to cerium oxide. During the regeneration step, the desorbed species is initially sulfur dioxide. However, when about 50% of the sulfur is removed from the sorbent, the desorbed species becomes H/sub 2/S. Thus, the instant invention provides SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in admixture with the excess reducing gas, which can be fed conveniently to the Claus plant for conversion into elemental sulfur.

Longo, J.M.

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers: Gasifiers for Special Applications Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers: Gasifiers for Special Applications Black Liquor Gasification What is Black Liquor? Industrial paper manufacture involves a procedure known as the Kraft process, where wood is converted into wood pulp and then into paper. The process, however, produces a toxic byproduct referred to as black liquor. This primarily liquid mixture of pulping residues (like lignin and hemicellulose) and inorganic chemicals from the Kraft process (sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, for example) is toxic and until the invention of recovery boilers in the early 20th century was often simply released into waterways. Recovery boilers allowed paper manufacturers to recover and reuse the inorganic chemicals and extract energy from the pulping residues. Many of these boilers were built in the 1960s and 70s and will need to be replaced sometime in the next few decades. The replacement of these boilers brings new interest in producing not only steam and electricity, but perhaps also fuels and chemicals via gasification of black liquor.

227

Das Standard Modell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Model Was ist fundamental? Das Standard Modell Physiker haben eine Theorie - Das Standard Modell - entwickelt, welche erklärt, woraus die Welt besteht und was sie zusammenhält. Es ist eine einfache und überzeugende Theorie, welche hunderte von Teilchen und ihre gegenseitigen Wechselwirkungen erklärt. Dazu braucht sie nur wenige elementare Teilchen : 6 Quarks. 6 Leptonen. Das bekannteste Lepton ist das Elektron. Wir reden gleich von Leptonen. Kraft-Träger Teilchen, wie z.B. das Photon. Wir werden später über diese Teilchen reden. Alle bekannten materiellenTeilchen sind aus Quarks und Leptonen zusammengesetzt und sie wechselwirken untereinander durch den Austausch von Kraft-Träger Teilchen. Das Standard Modell ist eine gute Theorie. Eine grosse Zahl von Experimenten haben ihre Voraussagen mit unglaublicher Präzision bestätigt und alle Teilchen, welche die Theorie bis heute vorausgesagt hat, wurden auch gefunden. Aber die Theorie kann nicht alles erklären. Die Schwerkraft zum Beispiel ist nicht im Standard Modell eingeschlossen.

228

Design of plywood and paper flywheel rotors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Technical and economic design factors of cellulosic rotors are compared with conventional materials for stationary flywheel energy storage systems. Wood species, operation in a vacuum, assembly and costs of rotors are evaluated. Wound kraft paper, twine and plywood rotors are examined. Two hub attachments are designed. Support stiffness is shown to be constrained by the material strength, rotor configuration and speed ratio. Preliminary duration of load tests was performed on vacuum dried hexagonal birch plywood. Dynamic and static rotor-hub fatigue equipment is designed. Moisture loss rates while vacuum drying plywood cylinders were measured, and the radial and axial diffusion coefficients were evaluated. Diffusion coefficients of epoxy coated plywood cylinders were also obtained. Economics of cellulosic and conventional rotors were examined. Plywood rotor manufacturing costs were evaluated. The optimum economic shape for laminated rotors is shown to be cylindrical. Vacuum container costs are parametrically derived and based on material properties and costs. Containment costs are significant and are included in comparisons. The optimum design stress and wound rotor configuration are calculated for seventeen examples. Plywood rotors appear to be marginally competitive with the steel hose wire or E-glass rotors. High performance oriented kraft paper rotors potentially provide the lowest energy storage costs in stationary systems.

Erdman, A.G.; Hagen, D.L.; Gaff, S.A.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO[sub 2]; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO[sub 2] with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0 and 100 C at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environmentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed. 16 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO.sub.2, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO.sub.2 and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process.

Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Lin, Yuehe (Moscow, ID); Kwang, Yak Hwa (Moscow, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO{sub 2} and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process. 1 fig.

Smart, N.G.; Wai, C.M.; Lin, Y.; Kwang, Y.H.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Characterization of a transient +2 sulfur oxidation state intermediate from the oxidation of aqueous sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation H{sub 2}S to sulfate involves a net transfer of eight electrons and occurs through the formation of several partially oxidized intermediates with oxidation states ranging from {minus}1 to +5. Known intermediates include elemental sulfur (oxidation state 0), polysulfides (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: 0), sulfite (+4) and thiosulfate (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: +5). A noticeable gap in this series of intermediates is that of a +2 sulfur oxidation state oxoacid/oxoanion species, which was never detected experimentally. Here, we present evidence of the transient existence of +2 oxidation state intermediate in the Ni(II)-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous sulfide. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize this species; they suggest that it has a sulfoxylate ion (SO{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) structure.

Vairavmurthy, M.A.; Zhou, Weiqing

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Paper pulp from sugar mill bagasse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a continuation-in-part of US Serial No. 884,513, abandoned. Neutral sulfite semichemical (NSSC) cooking of depithed bagasse gave pulp with improved physicomechanical properties for use in the production of newsprint paper. Thus, the NSSC cooking at 170-175/sup 0/ gave pulp in 70-75% yield. The NSSC pulp as above was bleached with alkali H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at 50-70/sup 0/ to give a product with breaking load 8.7 kg, tensile 3.9%, breaking length 7.13 km, absolute tearing strength 135 cmg/cm, absolute bursting strength 3.8 kg/sq. cm and Elrepho brightness 61.

Krueger, H.; Berndt, W.; Schwartzkopff, U.; Reitter, F.J.; Hoepner, T.; Muehlig, H.J.

1981-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Water treatment program raises boiler operating efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the boiler water treatment program which played a vital role in changing an aging steam plant into a profitable plant in just three years. Boiler efficiency increased from approximately 70 percent initially to 86 percent today. The first step in this water treatment program involves use of a sodium zeolite water softener that works to remove scale-forming ions from municipal water used in the system. A resin cleaner is also added to prolong the life of resins in the softener. The water is then passed through a new blow-down heat exchanger, which allows preheating from the continuous blow-down from the boiler system. The water gets pumped into a deaerator tank where sulfite treatment is added. The water then passes from feedpumps into the boiler system.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY (B&W)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY (B&W) BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY (B&W) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO.. DE-FC36-94GO 10002; W(A)-94-030; CH-0847 This waiver request is for domestic and foreign rights for all subject inventions made by the Babcock & Wilcox Company's (B&W's) employees under the subject cooperative agreement. The object of the work to be performed under this cooperative agreement is to develop technologies to improve high solids firing of black liquor in pulp mill recovery boilers or to recover kraft pulping or mill process chemicals by alternate means involving black liquor gasification. Principally, the work involves evaluating and selecting either the high solids advanced combustion or black liquor gasification technology, designing, constructing and using a pilot scale unit to develop

237

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2010 0, 2010 CX-004423: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolina Blue Skies Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 11/10/2010 Location(s): Sumter, South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 9, 2010 CX-004432: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery - Albright College Co-Generation Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 11/09/2010 Location(s): Reading, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 9, 2010 CX-004431: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery for the Kraft Foods Global, Incorporated

238

Microsoft Word - DOE Final Report-July 13.doc  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Dewatering Aids Dewatering Aids for Minerals and Coal Fines by Roe-Hoan Yoon, Ramazan Asmatulu, Ismail Yildirim, William Jansen, Jinming Zhang, Brad Atkinson, and Jeff Havens The Final Report to United States Department of Energy for Project Period During January 2001 to January 2004 DOE Award Number, DE-FC26-01NT41053 Mineral and Coal Technologies (MCT) Inc. 1800 Kraft Drive, Suite 106 Blacksburg, VA 24060 Report Issued July 2004 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

239

Deep oxidation of glucose in enzymatic fuel cells through a synthetic enzymatic pathway containing a cascade of two thermostable dehydrogenases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Deep oxidation of glucose in enzymatic fuel cells through a synthetic enzymatic pathway containing a cascade of two thermostable dehydrogenases Zhiguang Zhu a , Fangfang Sun a , Xiaozhou Zhang a,d , Y.-H. Percival Zhang a,b,c,d,n a Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA b Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA c DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA d Gate Fuels Inc., 2200 Kraft Drive, Suite 1200B, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 12 January 2012 Received in revised form 26 March 2012 Accepted 4 April 2012 Keywords: Deep oxidation Enzymatic fuel cell Glucose biobattery Thermoenzyme

240

Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 162°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=387552"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Simpson Tacoma Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tacoma Biomass Facility Tacoma Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Simpson Tacoma Biomass Facility Facility Simpson Tacoma Sector Biomass Owner Simpson Tacoma Kraft Location Tacoma, Washington Coordinates 47.2528768°, -122.4442906° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.2528768,"lon":-122.4442906,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Pennsylvania | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2010 November 9, 2010 CX-004431: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery for the Kraft Foods Global, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/09/2010 Location(s): Allentown, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 8, 2010 CX-004433: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery for the Fox Chase Cancer Center CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/08/2010 Location(s): Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 8, 2010 CX-004402: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation

243

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 3050 of 31,917 results. 41 - 3050 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kapstone Kraft Paper Company #3 Paper Machine Steam Efficiency Improvements CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/02/2010 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004371-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Energy Management and Financing This Tuesday Webcast for Industry covers how to become a Certified Energy Manager and Certified Practitioner in Energy Management Systems http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/energy-management-and-financing Download Small Business Innovation Research Project Phase I Release 2 Solicitations Awards List of awards announced on February 5, 2013 for the SBIR Program's Phase

244

CX-004717: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

717: Categorical Exclusion Determination 717: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004717: Categorical Exclusion Determination Earl Fisher Biofuels CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/14/2010 Location(s): Chester, Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Montana Department of Environmental Quality is proposing to provide $25,000 of State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to Earl Fisher Biofuels, LLC (EFB) for the purchase and installation of two Kern Kraft KK40 oil seed crushers at their existing biodiesel production facility located in Chester's industrial park west of Chester, Montana. The purpose of the proposed project is to increase oil seed crushing capacity and biodiesel production by 40% and support a self sustaining industry by creating a market for oilseed crops that can be

245

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 6600 of 29,416 results. 91 - 6600 of 29,416 results. Download CX-004431: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery for the Kraft Foods Global, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/09/2010 Location(s): Allentown, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004431-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004432: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery - Albright College Co-Generation Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 11/09/2010 Location(s): Reading, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

246

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Bibliography Gasification Plant Databases - National Energy Technology Laboratory 2009 Corporate Responsibility Report - Air Products 5th International Symposium on Gas Cleaning at High Temperatures A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry (Princeton University Energy Group - Dec 2006) A Pathway Study Focused on Non-Carbon Capture Advanced Power Systems R&D Using Bituminous Coal, Volume 1 (Oct 2008) A Review of Air Separation Technologies and their Integration with Energy Conversion Processes - A. Smith, Fuel Processing Technology (2000) About Gasification - Clean-energy.us Acid Gas Removal - The Linde Group (Nov 2011) Advanced Gasification Systems Development - S.P. Fusselman, K.M. Sprouse, A.K. Darby, J. Tennant and G.J. Stiegel, International Pittsburgh Coal Conference (Sept 2005)

247

Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 192°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=388168

248

Thailand's gas line underway: coating a major achievement  

SciTech Connect

Using primarily local personnel and materials, Bredero Price International's Thai pipe-coating plant has prepared some 374 miles of 34 and 28-in. pipe for service in the Gulf of Thailand gas-pipeline project. The enamel-coating shop cleaned, primed and coated all the pipe with coal-tar enamel, glass-fiber mat, felt, and a kraft-paper outer wrap; the cement-coating facility then added a concrete-weight coating to the portion of the pipe earmarked for offshore duty. Scheduled for a 1981 completion, the pipeline will initially carry 250 million CF/day to power-generating plants in Bangpakong and South Bangkok; the volume transported will eventually reach 500 million CF/day when addition offshore production is tied in to the line and an offshore compressor station added.

Hale, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, Jr., James S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Westmoreland, Clyde G. (Rockwood, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Cooling energy measurements of houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.; Knight, D.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 8410 of 26,764 results. 01 - 8410 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005319: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alternative Fuel/Advanced Vehicle Technology - City of Raleigh CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Raleigh, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005319-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004431: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Economic Development Association Sustainable Business Recovery for the Kraft Foods Global, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/09/2010 Location(s): Allentown, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004431-categorical-exclusion-determination

254

Ohio's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio. Ohio. Registered Energy Companies in Ohio's 2nd congressional district AHL-TECH Ameridian Speciality Services CECO Environmental Corp CIMx Software Cinergy Ventures II LLC DELTEC INC Eagle Energy LLC Global Energy Inc Green Builder Media /Green Builder College Icon Solar Power, LLC Innovative Solutions Unlimited, LLC (InSolves) KATZEN International Inc Macy's Manuta Chemical Consulting Inc. Melink Industries Melink Solar OnPower Inc Pilus Energy SEMCO THOR Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC The Utilities Group Inc Ultimate Best Buy LLC Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors Vision Energy Energy Generation Facilities in Ohio's 2nd congressional district Melink Solar Canopy at the Cincinnati Zoo Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ohio%27s_2nd_congressional_district&oldid=196998

255

Cracking and Corrosion of Composite Tubes in Black Liquor Recovery Boiler Primary Air Ports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Black liquor recovery boilers are an essential part of kraft mills. Their design and operating procedures have changed over time with the goal of providing improved boiler performance. These performance improvements are frequently associated with an increase in heat flux and/or operating temperature with a subsequent increase in the demand on structural materials associated with operation at higher temperatures and/or in more corrosive environments. Improvements in structural materials have therefore been required. In most cases the alternate materials have provided acceptable solutions. However, in some cases the alternate materials have solved the original problem but introduced new issues. This report addresses the performance of materials in the tubes forming primary air port openings and, particularly, the problems associated with use of stainless steel clad carbon steel tubes and the solutions that have been identified.

Keiser, James R.; Singbeil, Douglas L.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Kish, Joseph R.; Yuan, Jerry; Frederick, Laurie A.; Choudhury, Kimberly A.; Gorog, J. Peter; Jett, Francois R.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Singh, Prett M.; Maziasz, Phillip J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes. Annual report, June 15, 1976--June 15, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of ozone treatment on spent sulfite liquor yeast plant effluent was studied. A 500 ml capacity packed column was constructed to efficiently react ozone with spent sulfite liquor (SSL) on a continuous flow basis. The SSL was reacted at pH 3.0 for 3 hours averaging an ozone consumption of 12.8 gm/1. It was found that pH tended to decrease during ozonation indicative of the formation of oxalic and other organic acids. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased 13 percent from 101,000 to 88,000 mg/1. The SSL was rendered more biologically metabolizable as indicated by the biological oxygen demand (BOD) increase of 10.5 percent from 10,500 to 11,600 mg/1. The ozonated SSL was then fed to an anaerobic fermenter for conversion to fuel gas. The average gas production was 423 ml/day from 700 ml size fermenter at a retention time of 2.8 days. The fermenter effluent gas contained approximately 65 percent CH/sub 4/ and 35 percent CO/sub 2/. Total bacterial populations were found in excess of 147 x 10/sup 7/ counts/ml and approximately 70 percent of the bacteria present was methane bacteria while 30 percent proved to be Desulfovibrio. The fermenter liquid effluent exhibited a drop in BOD of 3200 mg/l corresponding to the amount of COD in the CH/sub 4/ produced. Torula yeast were observed to grow on ozonated SSL in contrast to no growth on raw SSL thus indicating a potential for protein production.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes. Final report, 15 Jun 1976-14 Jun 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to convert the organics and sulfur in sulfite spent liquor (SSL) now classified as pollutants from sulfite pulp mills, into synthetic methane and protein by means of a combination chemical-biological process. Ozonization was used to break the high molecular weight lignosulfonate molecules present in SSL into lower weight fractions which could be metabolized by methane-producing bacteria and protein-producing yeast. Ozonization experiments showed that this treatment is effective in partially oxidizing and fragmenting lignosulfonates into fermentable substrates. This process is initiated at low ozone concentrations and proceeds rapidly until nearly 30% of the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) has been consumed. The conditions under which ozonization is conducted greatly affect the degree of oxidation and the molecular weight of the cleaved fragments. In spite of the appreciable oxidative cleavage of the lignosulfonate molecules, continuous-flow fermentation studies showed rather low yields of methane and yeast from ozonated SSL. Under optimum conditions, methane production averaged only 1.7 1/1 of SSL or approximately 3% of the total organics present. Protein production was somewhat more favorable with 6% of the organics being converted to yeast biomass. (6g/1). Neither fermentation fully used all of the oxygenated fragments produced by ozonization, and thus, a two-stage process might yield better results. Although it appears that ozonization is not a viable treatment of SSL under present economic conditions, with increased demand for energy and protein, it could become more competitive in the future. However, of possibly greater importance is the potential use of partial oxidation treatments to improve the biodegradability of organic wastes.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1979-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft paper faced nominal R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicated that the most effective way of installing the foil was to lay it on top of the fiberglass batt insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to house by approximately 30-35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current generation of laccase has a broad spectrum of operating parameters. Nonetheless, the development of future genetically engineered laccases with enhanced temperature, pH and redox potentials will dramatically improve the overall process. A second challenge for LMS bleaching technologies is the need to develop effective, catalytic mediators. From the literature we already know this is feasible since ABTS and some inorganic mediators are catalytic. Unfortunately, the mediators that exhibit catalytic properties do not exhibit significant delignification properties and this is a challenge for future research studies. Potential short-term mill application of laccase has been recently reported by Felby132 and Chandra133 as they have demonstrated that the physical properties of linerboard can be improved when exposed to laccase without a chemical mediator. In addition, xxx has shown that the addition of laccase to the whitewater of the paper machine has several benefits for the removal of colloidal materials. Finally, this research program has presented important features on the delignification chemistry of LMS{sub NHA} and LMS{sub VA} that, in the opinion of the author, are momentous contributions to the overall LMS chemistry/biochemistry knowledge base which will continue to have future benefits.

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the experimental combustion evaluations to several specific technologies that can be used with HAT technology. After 5 years of extensive research and development, P&W is pleased to report that the HAT Technology Development Program goals have been achieved. With 0 to 10 percent steam addition, emissions achieved during this program featured less than 8 ppm NO{sub x}, less than 16 ppm CO, and unburned hydrocarbons corrected to 15 percent O{sub 2} for an FT8 engine operating between 0 and 120 F with 65 to 100 percent power at any day.

Richard Tuthill

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

SciTech Connect

The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

SUGAMA,T.

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method for the recovery of silver from waste photographic fixer solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention is directed to the recovery of silver from spent photographic fixer solutions and for providing an effluent essentially silver-free that is suitable for discharge into commercial sewage systems. The present method involves the steps of introducing the spent photographic fixer solution into an alkaline hypochlorite solution. The oxidizing conditions of the alkaline hypochlorite solution are maintained during the addition of the fixer solution so that the silver ion complexing agents of thiosulfate and sulfite ions are effectively destroyed. Hydrazine monohydrate is then added to the oxidizing solution to form a reducing solution to effect the formation of a precipitate of silver which can be readily removed by filtration or decanting. Experimental tests indicate that greater than 99.99% of the original silver in the spent photographic fixer can be efficiently removed by practicing the present method. Also, the chemical and biological oxygen demand of the remaining effluent is significantly reduced so as to permit the discharge thereof into sewage systems at levels in compliance with federal and state environmental standards.

Posey, Franz A. (Concord, TN); Palko, Aloysius A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Scalable economic extracellular synthesis of CdS nanostructured particles by a non-pathogenic thermophile  

SciTech Connect

We report microbially facilitated synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanostructured particles (NP) using anaerobic, metal-reducing Thermoanaerobacter sp. The extracellular CdS crystallites were <10 nm in size with yields of ~3 g/L of growth medium/month with demonstrated reproducibility and scalability up to 24 L. During synthesis, Thermoanaerobacter cultures reduced thiosulfate and sulfite salts to H2S, which reacted with Cd2+ cations to produce thermodynamically favored NP in a single step at 65oC with catalytic nucleation on the cell surfaces. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of dry CdS NP revealed an exciton-dominated PL peak at 440 nm, having a narrow full width at half maximum of 10 nm. A PL spectrum of CdS NP produced by dissimilatory sulfur reducing bacteria was dominated by features associated with radiative exciton relaxation at the surface. High reproducibility of CdS NP PL features important for scale-up conditions was confirmed from test tubes to 24L batches at a small fraction of the manufacturing cost associated with conventional inorganic NP production processes.

Moon, Ji Won [ORNL] [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL] [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL] [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Dr. Yi-Liang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Madden, Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL] [ORNL; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL] [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL] [ORNL; Jung, Hyunsung [ORNL] [ORNL; Lauf, Robert J [ORNL] [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes. Progress report, September 15, 1976--December 15, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made during the past quarter in establishing the operability and reliability of major pieces of equipment needed for the production of protein and methane from spent sulfite liquor (SSL). Batch ozonations of SSL were conducted at times varying from 1 to 6 hours at pH's in the range of 10 to 2. These screening experiments consistently indicate that low ph's favor the breakdown of SSL into organic fragments which are more easily assimulated by micro-organisms. Approximately 23% of the organics are oxidized at all pH levels indicated that pH has no effect on the total oxidation of SSL. As was expected total sulfur content of SSL is not measurably altered by ozonation. The intense brown color of SSL is appreciably removed during ozonation. The contents of the reactor assume a light brownish-yellow hue during the course of a 4 hour ozonation treatment. Attempts to quantify the reduction have not been successful to date.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1976-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coolside waste management demonstration OCDO grant agreement No. CDO/D-902-9. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to evaluate the potential utilization in road construction of wastes produced from the Coolside, LIMB (limestone injection multi-stage burner) and FBC (fluidized-bed combustion) processes, and to specify criteria for landfill disposal of waste from the Coolside process. These three processes are considered to be clean coal technologies. The Coolside process involves injecting an aqueous slurry of hydrated lime into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater in a coal-fired boiler. The hydrated lime captures sulfur dioxide from the flue gas producing anhydrous calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate, which are collected along with the unused hydrated lime and fly ash. The LIMB process involves injection of lime or hydrated lime directly into the furnace to capture sulfur dioxide. The waste consists principally of anhydrous calcium sulfate, lime, and fly ash. Both processes were demonstrated successfully at the Edgewater Station of Ohio Edison in Lorrain, OH, from 1989 to 1992. Circulating fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a commercial technology which combines steam generation with SO{sub 2} control by burning coal in a circulating bed of limestone. The waste, chemically similar to LIMB waste, is produced by bleed-off of the bed material and by collection of the flue dust. All three processes produce a dry solid waste, which must either be used or disposed of and managed to ensure environmental compliance and economic feasibility. The project was completed in June 1996.

Wu, M.; Winschel, R.A. [CONSOL Inc., Library, PA (United States). Research & Development

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research efforts during the past quarter have centered on increasing yeast protein production using ozonated spent sulfite liquor (SSL) and improving the biodegradability of SSL by ultrasonic treatments. Continuous-flow fermentation experiments demonstrated the suitability of ozonated SSL as a substrate for Torula yeast growth. Yeast yields averaging between 2.0--2.2 g/l of SSL were obtained at the optimum retention time of 1.8 days. This contrasts to yeast production rates of 4.8--5.0 g/l of SSL in two day batch cultures. Lower yields were expected under continuous-flow conditions as compared to batch conditions, but production rates were sufficient to warrant further investigation. In contrast, effluent from anaerobic digestors used for methane production supported very little yeast growth even though it contains appreciable amounts of acetate. A toxic product or products apparently are synthesized during fermentation which are inhibitory to the Torula yeast. Experiments were also run to determine if sonic treatments would increase the content of fermentable substrates in SSL. Results indicated striking increases in BOD levels of SSL after sonication, especially when used in conjunction with ozonation. Such gains in available carbon would likely result in increased methane and yeast production.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1978-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impact of Cell Wall Acetylation on Corn Stover Hydrolysis by Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of variously pretreated corn stover samples showed neutral to mildly acidic pretreatments were more effective at removing xylan from corn stover and more likely to maintain the acetyl to xylopyranosyl ratios present in untreated material than were alkaline treatments. Retention of acetyl groups in the residual solids resulted in greater resistance to hydrolysis by endoxylanase alone, although the synergistic combination of endoxylanase and acetyl xylan esterase enzymes permitted higher xylan conversions to be observed. Acetyl xylan esterase alone did little to improve hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes, although a direct relationship was observed between the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups and improvements in the enzymatic conversion of xylan present in substrates. In all cases, effective xylan conversions were found to significantly improve glucan conversions achievable by cellulolytic enzymes. Additionally, acetyl and xylan removal not only enhanced the respective initial rates of xylan and glucan conversion, but also the overall extents of conversion. This work emphasizes the necessity for xylanolytic enzymes during saccharification processes and specifically for the optimization of acetyl esterase and xylanase synergies when biomass processes include milder pretreatments, such as hot water or sulfite steam explosion.

Selig, M. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radiative cooling and solar heating potential by using various roofing materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of testing over twenty typical and potential roofing materials such as: corrugated galvanized steel, corrugated clear fiberglass, 90number black roll roofing, 90number green roll roofing, 90number red roll roofing, 90number brown roll roofing, 90number white roll roofing, 240number brown asphalt shingles, anodized aluminum, etc. under exposure to solar and nocturnal sky radiation are presented. Some cadmium sulfite solar cells and silicon solar cells are being tested as potential future roofing panels. Graphs showing the temperature variation of each material versus testing time are given for a heating and a cooling cycle. The environmental conditions of testing such as: solar insolation, apparent sky temperature, ambient air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed are also given. On the basis of preliminary results obtained during the testing of roofing materials, several mini-modules of an integrated collector/radiator/ roof element with the dimensions 0.6 m x 0.6 m (2 ft x 2 ft) were constructed and tested. The thermal response of the mini-modules under solar and nocturnal sky radiation is shown and the testing results are discussed. The spectral transmittance curves for nine transparent cover materials are also presented. The preliminary results indicate that solar radiation and nocturnal sky radiation could be used effectively by employing an integrated collector/radiator structure.

Pytlinski, J.T.; Connell, H.L.; Conrad, G.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Elektromagnetische Restwechselwirkung  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E-M Force E-M Force Was hält sie zusammen? Elektromagnetische Restwechselwirkung Atome haben normalerweise dieselbe Anzahl Elektronen wie Protonen. Sie sind elektrisch neutral, weil sich die Ladungen der Protonen und der Elektronen gerade aufheben. Wenn sie aber neutral sind, warum können sie dennoch stabile Moleküle bilden? Die Antwort tönt etwas seltsam: wir haben entdeckt, dass geladene Teile des Atoms mit geladenen Teilen anderer Atome wechselwirken können, ein Effekt, der elektromagnetische Restwechselwirkung genannt wird. Er bewirkt, dass verschiedene Atome zusammenhalten können. Es ist wiederum die e-m Kraft, die es den Atomen ermöglicht, sich zu Molekülen zu verbinden. Auf diese Weise hält die Welt zusammen und so wird auch die Materie gebildet mit der wir ständig in Wechselwirkung stehen. Interessant, nicht wahr? Alle Strukturen der Welt existieren nur deshalb, weil Protonen und Elektronen entgegengesetzt elektrisch geladen sind!

274

Reconnecting broken blood vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reconnecting broken blood vessels Reconnecting broken blood vessels Name: Catherine A Kraft Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: While watching the television program "Chicago Hope" the other day, I watched a doctor sew someone's ear back on using an elaborate microscope. I was wondering if a surgeon is required to reconnect all the broken blood vessels, and how you would accomplish this? Thanks for your time! Replies: I'm not a surgeon, but I think the answer to your question is "no." The blood will flow across the wound (out the end of one blood vessel and into the end of another), although not efficiently. I believe they sometimes use leeches sucking on the end of the reconnected part to help induce flow of blood in the right direction through the area. You probably do need to put the ends of the major vessels near each other, so the distribution of blood flow is reasonably like it was before the injury, and so the vessels can eventually reconnect. But probably the microscope is used mostly to be sure the various layers of muscle, connective tissue, and fat are connected together correctly.

275

Effect of ionic liquid treatment on the structures of lignins in solutions  

SciTech Connect

The solution structures of three types of isolated lignin - organosolv (OS), Kraft (K), and low sulfonate (LS) - before and after treatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) over a concentration range of 0.3-2.4 wt %. The results indicate that each of these lignins is comprised of aggregates of well-defined basal subunits, the shapes and sizes of which, in D{sub 2}O and DMSO-d{sub 6}, are revealed using these techniques. LS lignin contains a substantial amount of nanometer-scale individual subunits. In aqueous solution these subunits have a well-defined elongated shape described well by ellipsoidal and cylindrical models. At low concentration the subunits are highly expanded in alkaline solution, and the effect is screened with increasing concentration. OS lignin dissolved in DMSO was found to consist of a narrow distribution of aggregates with average radius 200 {+-} 30 nm. K lignin in DMSO consists of aggregates with a very broad size distribution. After ionic liquid (IL) treatment, LS lignin subunits in alkaline solution maintained the elongated shape but were reduced in size. IL treatment of OS and K lignins led to the release of nanometer-scale subunits with well-defined size and shape.

Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Kent, Michael S [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Varanasi, Patanjali [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Dibble, Dean [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Singh, Seema [Joint Bioenergy Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Analysis of the topochemical effects of dielectric-barrier discharge on cellulosic fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigates the fundamental topochemical effects of dielectric-barrier discharge treatment on bleached chemical pulp and unbleached mechanical pulp fiber surfaces. Fibers were treated with various levels of dielectric-barrier discharge treatment ranging from 0 to 9.27 kw/m2/min. Changes to the fiber surface topochemistry were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM studies were complemented by inverse gas chromatography (IGC), contact angle evaluation, poly-electrolyte titration, viscosity testing and determination of water retention value (WRV). The static coefficient of friction and zero-span tensile index of sheets were also evaluated. Low dielectric-barrier discharge treatment levels resulted in increased surface energy and roughness. Fibers treated at high applied power levels showed surface energies and roughness levels near that of reference samples as well as evidence of degradation and decreased fiber swelling. Abbreviations: AFM- atomic force microscopy; BKP- bleached kraft pulp; IGC- inverse gas chromatography; TMP- thermomechanical pulp; WRV- water retention value.

Lorraine C. V; Thomas Lder; Arthur J. A~auskas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Procedure for Applying an Open-Cycle Heat Pump to An Existing Evaporator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An open-cycle heat pump, or mechanical vapor compression (MVC) system, is often an attractive technique for increasing the energy efficiency of an evaporator. With proper design, an MVC system is capable of dramatic cost savings when retrofitted to an existing evaporator. This is especially true if the evaporator is a single or double effect design. Many such evaporators were built when energy was cheap, or because a particular process is not amenable to modern designs incorporating many effects. Advances in compressor design have made MVC applicable to a broader range of processes than ever before. This paper discusses the basic steps required to apply MVC as a retrofit to an existing evaporator. Because of their importance to identification of candidate applications, this paper emphasizes the preliminary analysis and premonitoring steps. For illustration purposes the authors refer to an MVC retrofit in progress at a plant operated by Kraft, Inc. The project is cofunded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Albany, NY), and will serve as a demonstration site to facilitate increased adoption of MVC by other industrial firms.

Wagner, J. R.; Brush, F. C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 5 contains model validation simulations and comparison with data.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Wood Residues as Fuel Source for Lime Kilns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main obstacles to total energy self sufficiency of kraft mills appears to be the fossil fuel requirements of the lime kilns. If an economical technology can be developed which allows fossil fuel to be replaced in whole or in part by wood-based fuel, the savings in fossil fuel by the pulp and paper industry would be very substantial. Our study focuses around the direct in-situ combustion of hog fuel fed from the cold feed end in order to substantially reduce the fossil fuel fired from the hot product discharge end of the lime kiln. Thus far we have carried out two series of tests using two different pilot-scale kilns and dry limestone in the first test series and mill produced lime mud in the second test series. Mill scale trials have just been completed and the preliminary results indicate that our approach is potentially a very cost-effective and simple option to substantially reduce or possibly eliminate fossil-fuel usage in lime kilns.

Azarniouch, M. K.; Philp, R. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Deconstruction of Lignin Model Compounds and Biomass-Derived Lignin using Layered Double Hydroxide Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is an underutilized value stream in current biomass conversion technologies because there exist no economic and technically feasible routes for lignin depolymerization and upgrading. Base-catalyzed deconstruction (BCD) has been applied for lignin depolymerization (e.g., the Kraft process) in the pulp and paper industry for more than a century using aqueous-phase media. However, these efforts require treatment to neutralize the resulting streams, which adds significantly to the cost of lignin deconstruction. To circumvent the need for downstream treatment, here we report recent advances in the synthesis of layered double hydroxide and metal oxide catalysts to be applied to the BCD of lignin. These catalysts may prove more cost-effective than liquid-phase, non-recyclable base, and their use obviates downstream processing steps such as neutralization. Synthetic procedures for various transition-metal containing catalysts, detailed kinetics measurements using lignin model compounds, and results of the application of these catalysts to biomass-derived lignin will be presented.

Chmely, S. C.; McKinney, K. A.; Lawrence, K. R.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Beckham, G. T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

New industrial heat pump applications to an integrated thermomechanical pulp and paper mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of pinch technology US industries in an early screening study done by TENSA Services (DOE/ID/12583-1) identified potential for heat pumps in several industrial sectors. Among these, processes with large evaporation units were found to be some of the most promising sectors for advanced heat pump placement. This report summarizes the results of a study for Bowater Incorporated, Carolina Division. The units selected for this study are the thermo-mechanical pulper (TMP), kraft digester, evaporators, boiler feed water (BFW) train and pulp dryer. Based on the present level of operation, the following recommendations are made: 1. Install a mechanical vapor compression (MVR) heat pump between the TMP mill and {number sign}3 evaporator. This heat pump will compress the 22 psig steam from the TMP heat recovery system and use it to replace about 70% of the 60 psig steam required in {number sign} evaporator. The boiler feed water heat losses (in the low pressure deaerator) will be supplied by heat available in the TMR's zero psig vent steam. 2. Study the digester to verify the practicality of installing an MVR heat pump which will compress the dirty weapons from the cyclone separator. The compressed vapors can be directly injected into the digester and thus reduce the 135 psig steam consumption. 31 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Design, fabrication and operation of a biomass fermentation facility. Technical progress report No. 3, April 1-July 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Further studies on process economics and optimization for hexose production from wood by dilute acid hydrolysis were conducted. In the previous report, detailed studies on process economics and optimization of hexose production were undertaken for a continuously stirred reactor (CSTR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR). These studies were based on Saeman's kinetics for a Douglas fir substrate. The studies in this report are based on Fagan's kinetics for a Kraft paper substrate. Application to a plug flow reactor and to a fixed bed reactor (FBR) have been undertaken. The initial results, as predicted in an earlier report, indicate that the FBR is at least comparable to a PFR in terms of process economics. Results of these studies are presented in Section 2.0. Section 4.0 describes the progress which has been achieved under Task 2 of this contract, Detailed Engineering Design, which had been interrupted by the unanticipated revisions, and concomitant delay, experienced in obtaining final approval of the conceptual design for the process development unit. The conceptual design of the process development unit is included.

O'Neil, D.J.; Colcord, A.R.; Bery, M.K.; Roberts, R.S.; Sondhi, D.K.; Robb, B.C.; Williams, R.R.; Cook, A.A.; Nachowiak, J.J.; Crider, J.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Determining the effect of thermal loading on the remaining useful life of a power transformer from its impedance versus frequency characteristic  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that cellulose materials used to insulate transformer windings gradually degrade during service due to a combination of thermal, mechanical, and electrical stresses. As a result the mechanical characteristics of the paper change during use and may affect the useful life of the transformer. It has generally been assumed that the electrical characteristics remain relatively constant throughout the aging process. If, however, thermal aging changes the electrical characteristics, it may be possible to gauge the thermal age of a transformer by externally monitoring these electrical characteristics over time. In this work, samples of oil impregnated thermally upgraded Kraft insulating paper are subjected to accelerated thermal aging. The relative dielectric constant and loss tangent are investigated by monitoring changes in capacitance and conductance as a function of frequency and thermal aging. This paper presents data showing that the thermal aging process produces changes in the electrical characteristics of the insulating system paper. An example is presented comparing the admittance versus frequency for a model of a 765 kV 500 MVA auto transformer. This demonstrates that the effect of aging can theoretically be observed from the terminals of the transformer.

Batruni, R.; Degeneff, R.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Electric Power Engineering Dept.; Lebow, M.A. [Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An Evaluation of the Placement of the Placement of Radiant Barriers on their Effectiveness in Reducing Heat Transfer in Attics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental tests were conducted to measure the influence of radiant barriers and the effect of the radiant barrier location on attic heat transfer. All the tests were conducted in an attic simulator at a steady state. The heat flux through the attic floor was measured at two different roof deck temperatures (120F and 140F). The temperature distribution within the base fibrous insulation was also measured. Three different solid kraft laminates with aluminum foil backing were tested. There was a 34 percent reduction (sample A) in heat flux through the ceiling for the case where the radiant barrier was placed 6 inches below the roof deck in addition to the base fibrous insulation (R-11), with the roof deck at 140 F. The reduction for the same sample with the radiant barrier placed on the studs of the attic floor was 46 percent. For all the three samples, the heat flux through the attic floor was reduced when the radiant barrier was placed on the attic floor studs.

Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Closeout of the Melton Valley Completion Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy DOE Order 413.3A (Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets) identifies major milestones in a project life cycle that require approval upon achievement, including Critical Decision-4 (CD-4), the project completion milestone. A CD-4 document is required for all DOE projects in accordance with DOE Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for Acquisition of Capital Assets. A conditional CD-4 report was prepared for the Melton Valley Completion Project (MVCP) in order to document the completion of the remedial action in the Melton Valley watershed. Approval of the MVCP CD-4 was 'conditional' pending final resolution of a small quantity of unexpected pyrophoric material, with no current disposition pathway, remaining in one of the waste trenches that were to be remediated as part of the completion project. This paper will provide an overview of the MVCP remediation work and the process successfully used to demonstrate closeout of a major CERCLA project in accordance with DOE requirements. In summary: The MV ROD was planned to be completed in 12 years; however, under the ACP the remedial activities were completed 6 years ahead of schedule (September 2006). Highlights of the remedial actions include: - Completion of remedial action activities at 219 release sites identified in the MV ROD. - Construction of 58 hectares of multilayer caps for SWSA 4, SWSA 5, SWSA 6, Pits 2, 3 and 4 and Trenches 5, 6, and 7; - Complete excavation, retrieval and over-pack of 204 casks, 8 boxes, and 530 m{sup 3} of loose waste from the TRU waste retrieval project; - Complete demolition and disposition of approx. 557 m{sup 2} of various buildings such as HRE ancillary facilities, NHF, Liquid LLW pumping stations, 7841 Scrap Yard, misc. storage buildings, and well P and A; - Removal of LLW sludges and stabilization of T-1, T-2, and HFIR tanks; - In situ grouting/stabilization of approx. 12 km of inactive waste pipelines; - Excavation and disposition of approx. 38,000 m{sup 3} of soil from HFIR impoundments, HRE cryogenic pond, IHP and contaminated soil from miscellaneous leak sites; - Completion of in-situ grouting of LLLW matrix at Trenches 5 and 7. The CD-4 document to demonstrate attainment of the project completion milestone was prepared to document close-out activities. Approval of the MVCP CD-4 was obtained but deemed 'conditional' pending final resolution of a small quantity of unexpected pyrophoric material, with no current disposition pathway, remaining in Trench 13 of the 22 Trench Area in SWSA 5N. DOE is currently evaluating options for the final disposition of this material and has committed to resolution of the issue by the end of Fiscal Year 2008. At that time, all aspects of the Melton Valley Completion Project will be complete. (authors)

Bonilla, R.; Johnson, Ch. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, R. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, V. [U.S. DOE, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. syngas) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950C), but was limited to pressures below about 5 bar. It is desirable however to operate BLG at 20-30 bar for efficiency reasons related to either firing the syngas in a turbine, or catalytically forming liquid fuels. This work focused on achieving high direct causticizing yields at 20 bars pressure. The titanate direct causticizing reactions are inhibited by CO2. Previous work has shown that the partial pressure of CO2 should be kept below about 0.5 bar in order for the process to work. This translates to a total reactor pressure limit of about 5 bar for airblown BLG, and only 2 bar for O2-blown BLG. In this work a process was developed in which the CO2 partial pressure could be manipulated to a level under 0.5 bar with the total system pressure at 10 bar during O2-blown BLG. This fell short of our 20 bar goal but still represents a substantial increase in the pressure limit. A material and energy balance was performed, as well as first-pass economics based on capital and utilities costs. Compared to a reference case of using BLG with a conventional lime cycle [Larson, 2003], the IRR and NVP were estimated for further replacing the lime kiln with direct causticizing. The economics are strongly dependent on the price of lime kiln fuel. At $6/mmBTU the lime cycle is the clear choice. At $8/mmBTU the NPV is $10M with IRR of 17%. At $12/mmBTU the NPV is $45M with IRR of 36%. To further increase the total allowable pressure, the CO2 could be further decreased by further decreasing the temperature. Testing should be done at 750C. Also a small pilot should be built.

Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

Stephenson, M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

FUSED REACTOR FUELS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a nuciear reactor fuel composition comprising (1) from about 0.01 to about 50 wt.% based on the total weight of said composition of at least one element selected from the class consisting of uranium, thorium, and plutonium, wherein said eiement is present in the form of at least one component selected from the class consisting of oxides, halides, and salts of oxygenated anions, with components comprising (2) at least one member selected from the class consisting of (a) sulfur, wherein the sulfur is in the form of at least one entity selected irom the class consisting of oxides of sulfur, metal sulfates, metal sulfites, metal halosulfonates, and acids of sulfur, (b) halogen, wherein said halogen is in the form of at least one compound selected from the class of metal halides, metal halosulfonates, and metal halophosphates, (c) phosphorus, wherein said phosphorus is in the form of at least one constituent selected from the class consisting of oxides of phosphorus, metal phosphates, metal phosphites, and metal halophosphates, (d) at least one oxide of a member selected from the class consisting of a metal and a metalloid wherein said oxide is free from an oxide of said element in (1); wherein the amount of at least one member selected from the class consisting of halogen and sulfur is at least about one at.% based on the amount of the sum of said sulfur, halogen, and phosphorus atom in said composition; and wherein the amount of said 2(a), 2(b) and 2(c) components in said composition which are free from said elements of uranium, thorium, arid plutonium, is at least about 60 wt.% based on the combined weight of the components of said composition which are free from said elements of uranium, thorium, and plutonium. (AEC)

Mayer, S.W.

1962-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy and protein production from pulp mill wastes. Annual report, June 15, 1977--June 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on desugared spent sulfite liquor, DSSL, subjected to ozonation indicate that this complex organic substrate in water solution reacts readily with ozone to produce lower molecular weight organic fragments which can be metabolized by a variety of microorganisms. Ozone uptake is complete up to approximately 15 g/l and results in an increase of 35% BOD and a reduction of 16% COD. The production of BOD is pH dependent with a maximum occurring at aroung pH 3. The production of methane via fermentation of DSSL is greatly enhanced by the ozonation reaction. Methane production on raw DSSL is only 45.3 standard cc/1 of DSSL. After ozonation of the DSSL during which 15 g/l of ozone are reacted, the resulting product yields 1239 standard cc/1. The hypothesis that methane is produced from acetic acid, held by several prior workers, could not be corroborated in this study. Liquor remaining in the fermenter after gas production has essentially ceased in much richer in acetic acid than ozonated DSSL. Continuous fermentation studies operated to optimize gas production produced a fermentate containing 3.96 g/l of acetic acid. The production of protein accomplished through the growth of Torula yeast on DSSL is also enhanced by the ozonation reaction. Two variants show minimal growth on unozonated DSSL but cell densities of 5 g/l were obtained with the rough variant when this substrate has been ozonated. In contrast to the methane fermentation which showed high ozone consumption to be beneficial, the yeast prefer very minimal ozone reaction. Yeast growth was not vigorous on methane fermentate shown to be rich in acetic acid.

Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1978-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome c3 in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Metabolism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role of tetraheme cytochrome c3 (CycA) in the metabolism of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) was investigated by deletion of the cycA gene using a marker-exchange deletion strategy. A highly abundant periplasmic cytochrome, CycA has the important function of transferring electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd, Hyn, Hys) to transmembrane complexes which transport the electrons to the cytoplasm where sulfate is reduced. Previous studies have indicated that during its interaction with periplasmic hydrogenases, CycA is also involved in the reduction of toxic metals. Growth of the cycA mutant strain on lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor showed that, despite its abundance, CycA is not essential for DvH growth. However, the rate of growth of the mutant strain was significantly lower, and the extent of growth less, than rates and extents of growth of the wild type and complement strains on lactate/sulfate medium. This indicates that a portion of the electrons generated from cytoplasmic lactate oxidation are transported by CycA for energy production, possibly in a hydrogen cycling mechanism employed to generate ATP. Failure of the mutant strain to grow on either formate or H2, with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors, further indicated that CycA may be the only redox partner of periplasmic hydrogenases. The cycA mutant strain also did not grow as well as either the wild type or complement strains on medium supplemented with pyruvate/sulfate. Final growth on pyruvate/sulfate was comparable, but the mutant grew more slowly than the wild type and complement strains. Interestingly, the mutant grew better than the wild type or complement strains on pyruvate alone, possibly due to the release of H2 and/or CO2 in concentrations which may be somewhat inhibitory to wild type growth.

Semkiw, Elizabeth; Zane, Grant; Wall, Judy

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.s and three (3) MScs, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

Malcolm J. Andrews

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Design of plywood and paper flywheel rotors  

SciTech Connect

Technical and economic design factors of cellulosic rotors are compared with conventional materials for stationaly flywheel energy storage systems. Wood species, operation in a vacuum, assembly and costs of plywood rotors are evaluated. Wound kraft paper, twine and veneer rotors are examined. Plywood moisture equilibration during manufacture and assembly is critical. Disk shaping and rotor assembly are described. Potential self-centering dynamic balancing methods and equipment are described. High resolution tensile tests were performed while monitoring the acoustic emissions. Reasonable correlations exist between the instantaneous sample stiffness during the test and the accumulated acoustic energy released in fracture of the sample. They indicate promise for short term monitoring of damage during tensile tests. Preliminary duration of load tests were performed on vacuum dried hexagonal Birch plywood. Dynamic and static rotor-hub fatigue equipment were designed. Moisture loss rates while vacuum drying plywood cylinders were measured, and the radial and axial diffusion coefficients were evaluated. Diffusion coefficients of epoxy coated plywood cylinders were also obtained. Economics of cellulosic and conventional rotors were examined. Plywood rotor manufacturing costs were evaluated. The optimum economic shape for laminated rotors is shown to be cylindrical. Vacuum container costs are parametrically derived and based on material properties and costs. Containment costs are significant and are included in comparisons. The optimum design stress and wound rotor configuration are calculated for 17 examples. Plywood rotors appear to be marginally competitive with steel hose wire or E-glass rotors. High performance oriented draft paper rotors potentially provide the lowest energy storage costs in stationary systems.

Hagen, D.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in solutions and at mineral/solution interfaces were investigated by monitoring micropolarity of the aggregates using fluorescence technique. Compositional changes of the aggregates in solution were observed with the increase in surfactant concentration. The importance of this lies in that the resulting polarity/hydrophobicity change of the mixed micelles will affect the adsorption of surfactant mixtures on reservoir minerals, surfactant/oil emulsion formation and wettability, as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes in EOR.

P. Somasundaran

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Structure of {alpha}-Glycerophosphate Oxidase from Streptococcus sp.: A Template for the Mitochondrial {alpha}-Glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FAD-dependent a-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO) from Enterococcus casseliflavus and Streptococcus sp. was originally studied as a soluble flavoprotein oxidase; surprisingly, the GlpO sequence is 30-43% identical to those of the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenases (GlpDs) from mitochondrial and bacterial sources. The structure of a deletion mutant of Streptococcus sp. GlpO (GlpO?, lacking a 50-residue insert that includes a flexible surface region) has been determined using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. Using the GlpO? structure as a search model, we have also determined the intact GlpO structure, as refined at 2.4 Angstroms resolution. The first two domains of the GlpO fold are most closely related to those of the flavoprotein glycine oxidase, where they function in FAD binding and substrate binding, respectively; the GlpO C-terminal domain consists of two helix bundles and is not closely related to any known structure. The flexible surface region in intact GlpO corresponds to a segment of missing electron density that links the substrate-binding domain to a {beta}a element of the FAD-binding domain. In accordance with earlier biochemical studies (stabilizations of the covalent FAD-N5-sulfite adduct and p-quinonoid form of 8-mercapto-FAD), Ile430-N, Thr431-N, and Thr431-OG are hydrogen bonded to FAD-O2a in GlpO?, stabilizing the negative charge in these two modified flavins and facilitating transfer of a hydride to FAD-N5 (from Glp) as well. Active-site overlays with the glycine oxidase-N-acetylglycine and d-amino acid oxidase-d-alanine complexes demonstrate that Arg346 of GlpO? is structurally equivalent to Arg302 and Arg285, respectively; in both cases, these residues interact directly with the amino acid substrate or inhibitor carboxylate. The structural and functional divergence between GlpO and the bacterial and mitochondrial GlpDs is also discussed.

Colussi,T.; Parsonage, D.; Boles, W.; Matsuoka, T.; Mallett, T.; Karplus, P.; Clairborne, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Structure of alpha-glycerophosphate Oxidase from Streptococcus sp.: a Template for the Mitochondrial alpha-glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FAD-dependent {alpha}-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO) from Enterococcus casseliflavus and Streptococcus sp. was originally studied as a soluble flavoprotein oxidase; surprisingly, the GlpO sequence is 30-43% identical to those of the {alpha}-glycerophosphate dehydrogenases (GlpDs) from mitochondrial and bacterial sources. The structure of a deletion mutant of Streptococcus sp. GlpO (GlpO{Delta}, lacking a 50-residue insert that includes a flexible surface region) has been determined using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Using the GlpO{Delta} structure as a search model, we have also determined the intact GlpO structure, as refined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. The first two domains of the GlpO fold are most closely related to those of the flavoprotein glycine oxidase, where they function in FAD binding and substrate binding, respectively; the GlpO C-terminal domain consists of two helix bundles and is not closely related to any known structure. The flexible surface region in intact GlpO corresponds to a segment of missing electron density that links the substrate-binding domain to a {beta}{beta}{alpha} element of the FAD-binding domain. In accordance with earlier biochemical studies (stabilizations of the covalent FAD-N5-sulfite adduct and p-quinonoid form of 8-mercapto-FAD), Ile430-N, Thr431-N, and Thr431-OG are hydrogen bonded to FAD-O2{alpha} in GlpO{Delta}, stabilizing the negative charge in these two modified flavins and facilitating transfer of a hydride to FAD-N5 (from Glp) as well. Active-site overlays with the glycine oxidase-N-acetylglycine and d-amino acid oxidase-d-alanine complexes demonstrate that Arg346 of GlpO{Delta} is structurally equivalent to Arg302 and Arg285, respectively; in both cases, these residues interact directly with the amino acid substrate or inhibitor carboxylate. The structural and functional divergence between GlpO and the bacterial and mitochondrial GlpDs is also discussed.

T Colussi; D Parsonage; W Boles; T Matsuoka; T Mallett; P Karplus; A Claiborne

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Compressed Air Audits: A Holistic Approach -Addressing the Air System as a Whole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First, consider the Independent Auditor. Plant management should consider using an independent auditor without ties to equipment sales who has experience with a variety of manufacturing facilities and can provide strong references documenting proven energy savings. The quality and comprehensiveness of manufacturing facilities, and therefore audits, vary widely and it is important to consider experience. Compressed Air Technologies has audited nearly 200 manufacturing facilities since our inception in 1996. Compressed Air Technologies is the preferred air energy services provider for Georgia Pacific Corporation, INVISTA Chemicals and a primary energy partner with KRAFT Foods, among others. Compressed Air Technologies has no OEM affiliation of any kind and will provide recommendations that are system-neutral and commercially impartial. Compressed Air Technologies (CAT) is an international energy reduction and system optimization services corporation. CAT is a totally independent business structure with no ties or affiliations with any air compressor manufacturers -we are free of OEM restrictions. Our strict adherence to an independent approach related to compressed air and gas system assessments allows for unbiased commentary and recommendations, regardless of the brand or equipment type currently utilized in your plant. The majority of our competitors have either 1) equipment to sell and/or,2) existing equipment on the site to protect. In both situations, the interests of the client is not the paramount issue. Independent auditors should have no obvious or hidden agenda. CAT compressed air audit services are in essence, holistic. The analysis of your facility compressed air and gases systems is all-inclusive and consists of an engineered assessment beginning at the air compressor equipment area inside your facility and finishing at point-of-use consumption points. CAT engineers utilize a variety of instruments to collect data from all critical, relevant areas of the compressed air and gas systems. From air compressor blow off loss to the cost of the always present distribution/ piping system leaks, each individual loss or inefficiency is measured, analyzed, quantified and catalogued. CAT engineers then compile all of the collected data to create a total current profile report of your facility operations including an assigned cost to each discovered inefficiency. A typical audit results in identification of 25 to 60 percent or more in total system operational waste, which includes energy costs, maintenance costs, and all matters related to operating your compressed gas systems. It is not unusual to discover half of what you pay for compressed air operations is wasted due to inefficient utilization and operation of this important utility.

Shaver, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones as compounds neuroprotective against oxidative stress in a manner associated with specific transcriptional activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrophilic compounds protect neurons through the activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway and the induction of phase-2 enzymes [T. Satoh, S.A. Lipton, Redox regulation of neuronal survival by electrophilic compounds, Trends Neurosci. 30 (2007) 38-45; T. Satoh, S. Okamoto, J. Cui, Y. Watanabe, K. Furuta, M. Suzuki, K. Tohyama, S.A. Lipton, Activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway for neuroprotection by electrophilic phase II inducers. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103 (2006) 768-773]. Hydroquinone-type electrophilic compounds such as tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) and carnosic acid (CA) have attracted special attention, because the oxidative conversion of 'hydroquinone' to 'quinone' is essential for the transcriptional activation of the above-mentioned enzymes [T. Satoh, K. Kosaka, K. Itoh, A. Kobayashi, M. Yamamoto, Y. Shimojo, C. Kitajima, J. Cui, J. Kamins, S. Okamoto, T. Shirasawa, S.A. Lipton, Carnosic acid, a catechol-type electrophilic compound, protect neurons both in vitro and in vivo through activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway via S-alkylation of specific cysteine, J. Neurochem. 104 (2008) 1161-1131; A.D. Kraft, D.A. Johnson, J.A. Johnson, Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2-dependent antioxidant response element activation by tert-butylhydroquinone and sulforaphane occurring preferentially in astrocytes conditions neurons against oxidative insult, J. Neurosci. 24 (2004) 1101-1112]. In the present study, we examined the relationship between electrophilicity and the protective effects afforded by electrophilic compounds. Electrophilicity was assessed in terms of the ability of a compound to bind to a cysteine on bovine serum albumin, by which we found that neuroprotective hydroquinones [TBHQ (para-) and CA (ortho-)] had distinctive patterns of cysteine binding compared with other electrophilic compounds. Further, we found that isomers of simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones such as 2-methylhydroquinone (para-) and 4-methyl-catechol (ortho-) [not in abstract] had similar properties of cysteine binding as TBHQ and CA, which compounds were associated with the transcriptional activation and an increase in the level of reduced glutathione. These results suggest that para- and ortho-dihydroquinones may be neuroprotective compounds active against oxidative stress.

Satoh, Takumi [Department of Welfare Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, Ueda 4-3-5, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan)], E-mail: tsatoh@iwate-u.ac.jp; Saitoh, Sachie; Hosaka, Manami [Department of Welfare Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, Ueda 4-3-5, Morioka, Iwate 020-8551 (Japan); Kosaka, Kunio [Research and Development Center, Nagase Co., Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo 651-2241 (Japan)

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

David Liscinsky

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline (octane or decane) at low temperature and ambient pressure via treatment with a TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase system consisting of the fuel as the first phase and a water/tertiary butanol second phase. The DBTs are oxidized to sulphones (or sulfoxides), which then completely extract into the water/t-butanol phase. Treatment of commercial diesel spiked with DBT under the same conditions results in compete DBT oxidation. In contrast with the octane and decane experiments, removal to the water/t-butanol phase is not yet complete and is being further optimized. Analysis by the sulfur specific GC-FPD technique suggests that >70% sulfur compounds are removed from unspiked diesel after one treatment. Further treatments are being investigated. The GC-FPD results will be checked by total sulfur analysis methodology.

Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Efficacy of Consumer-Available Antimicrobials for the Disinfection of Pathogen Contaminated Green Bell Pepper and Efficacy of Consumer Cleaning Methods for the Decontamination of Knives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited information exists regarding the efficacy of consumer-available antimicrobials for the use on produce surfaces. There is a strong focus on eliminating pathogens from produce at a commercial level, but consumers can achieve pathogen reduction in a domestic setting. The objectives were to determine the ability of consumer-available antimicrobials to disinfect waxed green bell peppers, determine the efficacy of knife cleaning methods, and assess the transfer of contamination. Peppers were inoculated via immersion in a cocktail of rifampicin-resistant Salmonella serovars and Escherichia coli O157:H7 to a final concentration of 5.6 0.5 log CFU/cm2. In study 1, samples of 3 10-cm2 pieces of inoculated pepper were excised from smooth tissue and immersed in 3% (v/v) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 2.5% (v/v) acetic acid, 70% (v/v) ethyl alcohol (EtOH), or sterile distilled water (SDW) for various lengths of time. Following treatment, samples were immersed for 30 s in a neutralizer solution. For study 2, inoculated peppers were chopped into 1-cm2 pieces. Knives were treated with one cleaning method: no treatment (control), towel wipe (TW), running hot water for 5 s (5SW), running hot water for 10 s (10SW) or 1% (v/v) detergent solution followed by hot running water for 10 s (ST). After treatments, knives were used to chop cucumbers. Surviving Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 for both studies were selectively enumerated on lactose-sulfite-phenol red-rifampicin agar following aerobic incubation of plates for 24 h at 35 C. Hydrogen peroxide exposure for 5 min resulted in reductions of 1.3 0.3 log CFU/cm2 for both pathogens. Following 1 min exposure to EtOH, pathogens were reduced by 1.3 0.1 3 log CFU/cm2; exposure for >1 min did not result in additional reduction. Acetic acid exposure after 5 min resulted in a Salmonella reduction of 1.0 0.7 log CFU/cm2, but for E. coli O157:H7, exposure resulted in no significant reduction (p<0.05) of pathogens compared to SDW at the various points. For study 2, 5SW, 10SW, and ST were equally effective for knife decontamination. No significant difference (p<0.05) was found between log CFU/cm2 on knife blade and log CFU/cm2 transferred to surface of cucumber; therefore, viable organisms remaining on the knife blade were transferred onto the surface of the cucumber. Findings suggest EtOH and H2O2 may be effective consumer-deployable antimicrobials for surface decontamination of smooth produce, and contaminated produce can contaminate other produce. Further research of antimicrobial exposure on produce sensorial characteristics is also advised in order to determine how various antimicrobial exposure times will affect the quality and sensorial characteristics of the produce commodity.

Perez, Keila Lizth

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of antibodies and enzymes containing disulfide bonds and requiring folding/post-translational modification. With only limited time remaining in the Phase I schedule, a single construct was made to produce MnP with this system. The enzyme was produced in the soluble fraction of the cell lysate, but no activity was measured. MnP from the existing recombinant source was used to act on lignin. The lignin was from a Kraft process and had a molecular weight of about 10,000 Da. Using 1000 Da dialysis membranes and UV-visible spectroscopy, no modification of either lignin was evident in the dialysate or the retentate. Assays using 2,6 dimethoxy phenol (DMP) as a substrate showed consistent activity throughout the project. In summary, these results fell far short of our expectations. A Phase II proposal was not submitted. Possible reasons for the failure of peroxisomal targeting include destruction by native hydrogen peroxide, native proteases, or unforeseen causes. The AbSci system was only lighted tested and further work may yield a strain with active enzyme. The lack of evidence for lignin modification may be due to the techniques employed. NMR or GC-MS studies may reveal evidence of modification.

Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z