Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Index of /~wilker/misc/Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Index of /~wilker/misc/Electronics. [ICO], Name · Last modified · Size · Description. [DIR], Parent Directory, -. [ ], dram.pdf, 11-Sep-1998 23:10, 124K. [ ] ...

2

Nitrogen Dioxide Absorption and Sulfite Oxidation in Aqueous Sulfite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen Dioxide Absorption and Sulfite Oxidation in Aqueous Sulfite C H E N H . S H E N A N D G by absorption in sulfite solution in existing scrubbers for desulfurization. Rates of NO2 absorption and sulfite absorption initiates sulfite oxidation in the presence of oxygen, and this study quantified the effect

Rochelle, Gary T.

3

Minimizing the sulphur content in Kraft lignin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this project is to investigate the possibilities of minimizing the sulphur content in Kraft lignin. Kraft lignin contains about 1.5 to… (more)

Svensson, Sara

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Methanol-reinforced kraft pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of methanol to a high-sulfidity kraft cook on Scandinavian softwood chips was studied under different process conditions. Delignification and the degradation of carbohydrates were accelerated, but the effect on delignification was greater. Thus, methanol addition improved selectivity. The positive effect of methanol could also be observed for modified kraft cooks having a leveled out alkali concentration and lower concentration of sodium ions and dissolved lignin at the end of the cook. Methanol addition had no discernible effect on pulp strength or on pulp bleachability.

Norman, E.; Olm, L.; Teder, A. (STFI, Stockholm (Sweden))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Kraft Liquor Corrosion Margaret Gorog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Kraft Liquor Corrosion Margaret Gorog Federal Way, WA Pulp and Paper Corrosion Symposium Georgia Tech Renewable Bioproducts Institute November 2014 · Brown Stock Corrosion · Alkaline Liquor Corrosion · Black Liquor Corrosion ­ Evaporators ­ Research · High Solids Black Liquor Corrosion of Stainless Steel

Das, Suman

6

Information KraftMcMillan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC310 -- Information Theory Sam Roweis Lecture 3: Proving the Kraft­McMillan Inequalities) Modeling. We have to represent the stochastic behaviour of the source and the channel using probabilistic. Review: Mathematical Setup 3 . A stochastic source emits a sequence of symbols (from alphabet A) X = X1

Roweis, Sam

7

System vendor Contents Type Location Removal of Misc Cable, Conduit and Junction Boxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System vendor Contents Type Location Removal of Misc Cable, Conduit and Junction Boxes in the NCSX;System vendor Contents Type Location Installation for NCSX Power Cables Procedure Procedure Files IP Procedure Procedure Files IP-NCSX-2972 #12;System vendor Contents Type Location Coils NCSX Coil System DC

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid sulfites Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences ; Biology and Medicine 3 Nitrogen Dioxide Absorption and Sulfite Oxidation in Aqueous Sulfite Summary: disulfonic...

9

Separation of kraft lignin from kraft black liquor: Final report, July 1984-April 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of this work is related to the fact that with over 16 million tons of kraft lignin available annually, practically all of it is burned just for its heat value. In essence, kraft lignin has no real value except its heat value. The major accomplishments of this research has shown that it is possible to produce high purity kraft lignin from kraft black liquor. This patented technology represents a way of producing a material that can be utilized in a wide variety of markets. Kraft lignin that was produced using this technology was sent to major corporations who used this kraft lignin as a starting material in their chemical processes. 3 figs.

Kurple, K.R.

1988-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Separation of kraft lignin from kraft black liquor: Final report, July 1984-April 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All the objectives were accomplished: a high-quality kraft lignin containing less than 50 ppM sodium was separated into a solvent phase (freon) from as much as 1000 lb kraft black liquor. Supporting data (infrared spectra, chemical analyses, etc.) are included. (DLC)

Kurple, K.R.

1988-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Oxidation kinetics of by-product calcium sulfite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constant and order of reaction for calcium sulfite oxidation using succinic acid as an additive 6. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in contact with sulfuric and acetic acid . 7. Maximum operating temperature for lining material . . . 8. Costs... of sodium thiosulfate required to inhibit the oxidation was very sma11 The second mechanism suggests that the thiosulfate reacts with the metal ions which were considered to catalyze the sulfite oxidation. The third possible mechanism involves...

Othman, Hasliza

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Misc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This is

13

File:App Misc Easement ROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf Jump to:TXATransmissionSiting.pdfCappFS.pdfsource HistoryMisc Easement

14

Kraft black liquor delivery systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvement of spray nozzles for black liquor injection into kraft recovery furnaces is expected to result from obtaining a controlled, well-defined droplet size distribution. Work this year has centered on defining the capabilities of commercial black liquor nozzles currently in use. Considerations of the observed mechanism of droplet formation suggest a major revision is needed in the theory of how droplets form from these nozzles. High resolution, high sensitivity video has been shown to be superior to flash x-ray as a technique for measuring the droplet size distribution as well as the formation history. An environmentally sound spray facility capable of spraying black liquor at temperatures up to normal firing conditions is being constructed before data acquisition continues. Preliminary correlations have been developed between liquor properties, nozzle design, and droplet size. Three aspects of nozzle design have been investigated: droplet size distribution, fluid sheet thickness, and flow and pressure drop characteristics. The standard deviation about the median droplet size for black liquor is nearly the same as the for a wide variety of other fluids and nozzle types. Preliminary correlation for fluid sheet thickness on the plate of a splashplate nozzle show the strong similarities of black liquor to other fluids. The flow and pressure drop characteristic of black liquor nozzle, follow a simple two-term relationship similar to other flow devices. This means that in routine mill operation of black liquor nozzles only the fluid acceleration in the nozzle is important, viscous losses are quiet small. 21 refs., 53 figs., 10 tabs.

Adams, T.N.; Empie, H.L.; Obuskovic, N.; Spielbauer, T.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Kraft lignin recovery by ultrafiltration: economic feasibility and impact on the kraft recovery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The widespread use of the kraft pulping process could provide a ready supply of lignin materials for many uses. Simulation studies demonstrate that recovery of the high-molecular-weight kraft lignin by ultrafiltration of a fraction of the black liquor flow is attractive from both an economic and an operational standpoint. Benefits are derived from relief of a furnace-limited recovery system and from the marketing of the lignin or modified lignin products. 10 references.

Kirkman, A.G.; Gratzl, J.S.; Edwards, L.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

Stuart E. Strand

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

17

Kraft recovery boiler physical and chemical processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this book is on the recent research into the physical and chemical processes occurring in and around a black liquor recovery boiler. Almost all of the detailed technical information in this book has previously appeared in the open literature. The purpose here is not to present research for the first time, but to present it in a context of the other processes occurring in recovery boilers. Topics covered include: general characteristics of recovery boilers; black liquor thermal and transport properties; black liquor droplet formation and combustion; recovery boiler char bed processes; flow and mixing in Kraft recovery boilers; entrainment and carryover in recovery furnaces; fume formation and dust chemistry; deposits and boiler plugging; and recovery boiler thermal performance. 257 refs., 102 figs., 38 tabs.

Adams, T.N.; Frederick, W.J. (Adams (Terry N.), Tacoma, WA (USA); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of kraft lignins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft lignins are the lignin degradation products from kraft pulping. They are complex, heterogeneous polymers with some polar character. The molecular weight of kraft lignins greatly affect the physical properties of black liquors, and are of primary importance in separation from black liquor and in evaluating potential uses. Several purified kraft lignins from slash pine were analyzed for number average molecular weight by vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), for weight average molecular weight by low angle laser light scattering (LALLS), and for the molecular weight distribution by high temperature size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The lignins were run in tetrahydrofuran (THF), N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF), DMF with 0.1M LiBr, and pyridine at conditions above the Theta temperature. Experimental methods are discussed. The results show that VPO may be used to determine M[sub n] for kraft lignins if the purity of the lignins and the identity of the impurities are known. LALLS can be used to determine M[sub w] for kraft lignins if measurements are made at or above the Theta temperature of the lignin-solvent pair. SEC should be used at temperatures at, or above, the Theta temperature of the lignin-solvent pair. Size separation is highly dependent on the solvent used, and DMF is a much better solvent than THF for high temperature SEC. Future work using moment resolution procedures to derive an accurate calibration curve are also discussed.

Schmidl, W.; Dong, D.; Fricke, A.L. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Lowering kraft black liquor viscosity of ultrafiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High viscosity is a major factor limiting the percentage total dissolved solids (%TDS) to which kraft black liquor (KBL), a spent pulping liquor, can be concentrated before it is burned to recover its fuel value and its inorganic chemicals. The effect on black liquor viscosity of removing high molecular weight lignin by ultrafiltration of 16% and 24% TDS liquors was studied. Viscosities of ultrafiltration permeates were reduced relative to feed black liquors. When a permeate was concentrated to higher %TDS levels, its viscosity decreased yet further relative to feed samples evaporated to similar solids levels. Retentate viscosity was very high relative to both feed and permeate. Ultrafiltration was carried out at 75/degrees/C using polysulfone membranes in a plate-and-frame or hollow fiber system. Flux rates varied greatly depending upon the specific liquor used. Flux was enhanced by increased temperature and increased linear velocity. The membrane molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) typically used was 50,000; increasing 100,000 or 200,000 did not enhance flux.

Hill, M.K.; Violette, D.A.; Woerner, D.L.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Kraft black liquor combustion: Advancement in fundamental understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-generated fuel streams plus purchased fossil fuel and power supply the pulp and paper industry with its energy requirements. The total industry energy use for 1986 was approximately 2.3 Quad (2300 trillion Btus). Self-generated and residue fuels accounted for 57% of the energy requirements. Spent pulping liquors provide the single largest self-generated energy source, approximately one Quad (900 trillion Btus). The pulp and paper industry also leads the nation in cogeneration performance. In 1986 eighty-nine percent (89%) of the 46 billion KWHs generated were produced by cogeneration. Spent pulping liquors supply the single largest fuel source (35%) to these cogeneration facilities. Spent pulping liquors consist of solubilized wood organics, spent inorganic chemicals, and water. Since kraft pulp dominates the North American market, 74%, kraft black liquor is the dominant spent pulping liquor. Effective recovery of high level energy and chemicals from black liquor contributes heavily toward dominance of kraft pulping. The kraft chemical recovery cycle centers around the recovery boiler. Kraft recovery boilers have been commercially available for over 50 years. The potential still exists, however, for significant improvements in energy recovery and black liquor throughput. Potential energy benefits from black liquor combustion research amount to 30 trillion Btus. Energy recovery increases often are an additional benefit from modifications made to increase black liquor throughput. Capacity increases of at least 5% are often achievable. Increased energy productivity of the kraft chemical recovery boiler will come by incorporation of improved fundamental knowledge into the technology used for boiler upgrades and new boiler construction. 5 refs., 9 figs.

Clay, D.T.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gas Dynamics of NGC 4472 R. P. Kraft(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Dynamics of NGC 4472 R. P. Kraft(1) , W. R. Forman(1) , C. Jones(1) , P. E. J. Nulsen(1) M. J present preliminary results from a 100 ks XMM-Newton observation of the hot gas in the nearby massive to be falling into the Virgo cluster. We find several structures in the gas indicative of a previous epoch

Sarazin, Craig

22

Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

Vivak Malhotra

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

Simo Sarkanen

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ultrafiltration of kraft black liquor: Final report, Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1981, a research program has been in progress to determine the physical properties of kraft black liquors and to develop methods for reduction of data and correlation of properties with pumping conditions. The basic premise that has been used to direct the research program is that kraft black liquor behaves as a polymer solution, particularly at high solids, and that the behavior is dominated by the characteristics of the lignin present. This premise is proving to be correct, and the principles that follow from this premise are proving to be successful for data reduction and correlation. The research has been a complex program involving experimental pulping, chemical analysis, lignin separation and characterization, thermal analysis, rheological measurements, and considerable equipment and methods development. Due to the complexity of the program, the unforeseen need to expend a great deal of effort in development of experimental techniques for analysis, and the fact that our liquors proved to be unstable at high temperatures and solids, all of the original objectives could not be accomplished. However, our program has added substantially to the body of knowledge of physical properties of black liquor. Our results indicate that the goal of developing correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor is practical and can be realized through extension of the present work. 21 refs., 32 figs.

Hill, M.K.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Diese nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 1. Okober 2009 in Kraft. Sie wird im  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 1. Okober 2009 in Kraft: ,,Bachelorarbeit". Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 1. Oktober 2009 in Kraft

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

26

Review: Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interests in the American Political System, by Michael E. Kraft and Sheldon Kamieniecki (eds.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Martijn Meij Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA Kraft, Michael E. andCandidate in Sociology, Oklahoma State University, Classroom

Meij, Jan-Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32?) to sulfate (SO42?). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH?, H2O, SO32?, or SO42? group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold; Enemark, John H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

Vivak M. Malhotra

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Non-linear Dynamical Systems' Proof of Kraft-McMillan Inequality and its Converse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this short paper, we shall provide a dynamical systems' proof of the famous Kraft-McMillan inequality and its converse. Kraft-McMillan inequality is a basic result in information theory which gives a necessary and sufficient condition for the lengths of the codewords of a code to be uniquely decodable.

Nithin Nagaraj

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft Black Liquor (KBL) is ultrafiltered to favorably affect the properties of the KBL permeate. The major property to be changed is viscosity. If the high molecular weight lignin is removed by ultrafiltration, the KBL permeate should show a significant drop in viscosity. An objective of the work reported was to examine how much KBL viscosity is lowered relative to membrane and membrane pore size used in the ultrafiltration. Another objective was an initial evaluation of ultrafiltration equipment and membranes. Operating characteristics were determined for selected equipment and membranes. Decreases in KBL permeate viscosity were indeed seen. (LEW)

Hill, M.K.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Synergistic air port corrosion in kraft recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized hot corrosion can occur on the cold-side of air-ports in Kraft recovery boilers. Depending on the basicity of the molten salt, either acidic or basic fluxing takes place, with a solubility minima at the transition between the two reactions. For stainless steel, if the basicity of the fused salt is between the iron and chromium oxide solubility minima, then a synergistic effect can occur that leads to rapid corrosion. The products of one reaction are the reactants of the other, which eliminates the need for rate-controlling diffusion. This effect can explain why stainless steel is attacked more readily than carbon steel.

Holcomb, Gordon R.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Physical properties of Kraft Black Liquor. Interim report, Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are to determine the rheological, thermal, and surface properties of Kraft Black Liquors, and to relate these properties to the chemical composition and to pulping conditions. A four-variable, multi-level pulping experiment is being conducted. Pulping results are reported. Complete analyses of the liquors have been done. Thermal analyses have been done. DSC was employed to determine heat capacities of black liquors and lignins. Rheological (viscosity) studies are being conducted. Density and thermal expansion have been studied for seven liquors. Energy savings through more efficient recovery systems are appreciable.

Fricke, A.L.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Carbon Fiber Production from a Kraft Hardwood Lignin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a renewable resource material that is being evaluated for the low cost production of carbon fiber for automotive and other applications. Solvent extraction of a commercial hardwood lignin product yielded a purified lignin free of the contaminants typical of lignins derived from the Kraft chemical pulping of wood. The purified lignin was highly melt-spinnable into fibers, from which carbon fiber was subsequently produced. The lignin has been evaluated in terms of its rheological properties, fiber melt spinning ability, and potential for manufacture of low cost carbon fiber without the need for plasticizing agents or chemical modifications.

Baker, Darren A [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ethanol production from spent sulfite liquor fortified by hydrolysis of pulp mill primary clarifier sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some low-yield sulfite pulping operations ferment spent sulfite liquor (SSL) to remove biochemical oxygen demand associated with dissolved sugars while at the same time generating ethanol as a salable product. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of primary clarifier sludge in a medium of SSL was proposed as a means of reducing the amount of sludge to be disposed of while at the same time increasing ethanol productivity. In this article, the option of fortifying existing SSL fermenting processes with the sugars produced via in situ enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfite primary clarifier sludge (PCS) has been explored. In 100% SSL PCS hydrolysis rates as high as 3.4 g/(L{center_dot}h) were observed at an initial enzyme loading of 10 filter paper units (FPU)/g PCS. To reduce the deleterious effects of glucose inhibition, single-stage SSF was carried out using cellulose enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The production rate of ethanol in SSL was increased by as much as 25% through the SSF process. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Moritz, J.W.; Duff, S.J.B. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Siemens und Axsionics sichern Online-Banking mit Internetpass ab ... http://www.computerwoche.de/_misc/article/articleprintpopup/index... 1 of 2 01/25/08 12:16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Siemens und Axsionics sichern Online-Banking mit Internetpass ab ... http://www.computerwoche.de/_misc/article/articleprintpopup/index... 1 of 2 01/25/08 12:16 Datum: URL: Siemens und Axsionics sichern Online-Banking mit Internetpass ab-Erkennung will Siemens IT Solutions and Services einen neuen Online-Banking-Standard in Deutschland einführen. Mit dem

Borchert, Bernd

37

Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-10 0.00 0.00 0.00 15.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 15.50 0.00 15.50 100.0%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Diversion Diversion Rate (Recycled / Total) SS Secure Shredding Scrap Scrap Metals (All) CG&MP Cans, GlassMonth HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-09 0.00 0.00 0.00 0

Waterloo, University of

38

Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered Landfilled Total Diversion Jan-09 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Diversion Diversion Rate (Recycled / Total) SS Secure Shredding Scrap Scrap Metals (All) CG&MP Cans, GlassMonth HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc: Month HT OCC O. Paper OPF SS CG&MP SW/MP Reused Organics Hazardous E-waste Scrap Skids Misc Recovered

Waterloo, University of

39

Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

Venceslau, Sofia S. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dahl, Christiane [Institut für Mikrobiologie and Biotechnologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 168, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)] [Institut für Mikrobiologie and Biotechnologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 168, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Saraiva, Lígia M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Pereira, Inęs A.C., E-mail: ipereira@itqb.unl.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Recaustization of kraft black liquor via bipolar electrodialysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy in conjunction with HPD Inc. supported a research program to perform a laboratory feasibility study with various black liquor samples for the recaustization of these samples via bipolar electrodialysis. The research was conducted at the HPD pilot plant facility in Plainfield, Illinois, beginning in April 1989. This report is a summary of the work completed thru November 1989. The program was designed to operate the electrodialyzer in order to obtain performance and engineering data such as current efficiency, power consumption per gram of NaOH produced, and assess fouling and/or membrane durability. Prior to the electrodialysis laboratory runs, the black liquor samples were pretreated in order to remove as much lignin as possible. The black liquor samples were air oxidized, acidified to pH = 9.0 and pH = 2.0 and later filtered via a Buchner funnel under vacuum. The filtrate was then utilized to become the feed to the electrodialysis stack. Initial test runs were performed with synthetic solutions of either sodium sulfate or sodium bicarbonate in order to determine acceptable operating current, power, current efficiencies, and fouling behavior. A second set of test were conducted with a series of four Southern Kraft black liquor samples. Based on the results of this study, it was determined that the use of bipolar electrodialysis for producing a caustic stream and an acidified black liquor stream is feasible and was demonstrated. 9 refs., 27 figs., 32 tabs.

Koumoundouros, J.A.; Oshen, S.; Lynch, J.D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hot Corrosion at Air-Ports in Kraft Recovery Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot corrosion can occur on the cold-side of airports in Kraft recovery boilers. The primary corrosion mechanism involves the migration of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide vapors through leaks in the furnace wall at the airports and their subsequent condensation. It has been reported that stainless steel is attacked much faster than carbon steel in composite tubes, and that carbon steel tubing, when used with a low-chromium refractory, does not exhibit this type of corrosion. For hot corrosion fluxing of metal oxides, either acidic or basic fluxing takes place, with a solubility minimum at the basicity of transition between the two reactions. For stainless steel, if the basicity of the fused salt is between the iron and chromium oxide solubility minima, then a synergistic effect can occur that leads to rapid corrosion. The products of one reaction are the reactants of the other, which eliminates the need for rate-controlling diffusion. This effect can explain why stainless steel is attacked more readily than carbon steel.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

Li, Jian (Marietta, GA); Chai, Xin Sheng (Atlanta, GA); Zhu, Junyoung (Marietta, GA)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Field Comparison of the Sampling Efficacy of Two Smear Media: Cotton Fiber and Kraft Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two materials were compared in field tests at the Defense Waste Processing Facility: kraft paper (a strong, brown paper made from wood pulp prepared with a sodium sulfate solution) and cotton fiber. Based on a sampling of forty-six pairs of smears, the cotton fiber smears provide a greater sensitivity. The cotton fiber smears collected an average of forty-four percent more beta activity than the kraft paper smears and twenty-nine percent more alpha activity. Results show a greater sensitivity with cotton fiber over kraft paper at the 95 percent confidence level. Regulatory requirements for smear materials are vague. The data demonstrate that the difference in sensitivity of smear materials could lead to a large difference in reported results that are subsequently used for meeting shipping regulations or evaluating workplace contamination levels.

Hogue, M.G.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor: Phase II, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major justification for examining ultrafiltration was to lower the viscosity of the Kraft Black Liquor by recovering it as an ultrafiltration permeate from which the highest MW lignin had been removed. The liquor could then be concentrated to a higher percentage solids before firing into the recovery boiler. Consequent energy savings for the 1000 ton/day pulp mill would be 2.05 x 10 Btu/y for each percentage increase in TDS (total dissolved solids) to the recovery boiler. This Phase II report gives data on viscosity with percentage solids of KBL permeates. Another favorable effect of ultrafiltration on the permeate properties is disproportionate removal of multivalent ions including the major scaling ion CaS . If this high-viscosity high-Ca retentate could be treated to lower its viscosity and to release the Ca in a non-scaling form, this would enhance the possibility that ultrafiltration might be useful in a mill situation. Included in this report are data on the results of treating the retentate fraction. Other justifications for this program included further information in KBL properties: lignin MW in the KBL at high pH; elemental and sugar analyses; and differential properties of lignins in the retentate and the permeate fractions. A preliminary economic analysis of ultrafiltration is contained in this report. These analyses indicate that with flux rates now attainable, ultrafiltration would not be economically justified at this time if the only justification is to lower KBL viscosity. For certain situations where high Ca liquors present a scaling problem, especially in an evaporator-limited mill, the economics are more favorable. There are also unsolved problems relating to the use of the high viscosity retentate.

Hill, M.K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC having two conserved cysteine residues. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts, a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor its redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. We show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we successfully produced DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond (oxidized state) by treatment with arginine.

Venceslau, Sofia S.; Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W.; Dahl, Christiane; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Pereira, Ines Ac

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

CSC310 Information Theory Sam Roweis Proving the Kraft-McMillan Inequalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC310 ­ Information Theory Sam Roweis Lecture 3: Proving the Kraft-McMillan Inequalities September) Modeling. We have to represent the stochastic behaviour of the source and the channel using probabilistic. Review: Mathematical Setup 3 · A stochastic source emits a sequence of symbols (from alphabet A) X = X1

Roweis, Sam

48

Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Die nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rek-tors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artikel 2 Die Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rek- tors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rek- tors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft. Bremen, den 10

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

50

Physical properties of kraft black liquor: Summary report, Phases 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1981, a research program has been in progress to determine the physical properties of kraft black liquors and to develop methods for reduction of data and correlation of properties with pumping conditions. The basic premise that has been used to direct the research program is that kraft black liquor behaves as a polymer solution, particularly at high solids, and that the behavior is dominated by the characteristics of the lignin present. This premise is proving to be correct, and the principles that follow from this premise are proving to be successful for data reduction and correlation. The research has been a complex program involving experimental pulping, chemical analysis, lignin separation and characterization, thermal analysis, rheological measurements, and considerable equipment and methods development. Due to the complexity of the program, the unforeseen need to expend a great deal of effort in development of experimental techniques for analysis, and the fact that our liquors proved to be unstable at high temperatures and solids, all of the original objectives could not be accomplished. However, our program has added substantially to the body of knowledge of physical properties of black liquor. Our results indicate that the goal of developing correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor is practical and can be realized through extension of the present work.

Fricke, A.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Eucalyptus kraft black liquor enhances growth and productivity of Spirulina in outdoor cultures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass cultivation of microalgae for commercial applications suffers from poor productivities when measured against laboratory results or theoretical projections. In an effort to reduce this gap it was discovered that addition of eucalyptus kraft black liquor (BL) enhanced biomass productivity in outdoor cultures of Spirulina by increasing growth rate by 38% and biomass yield by 43%. BL treatment resulted in elevation of nitrogen assimilating enzyme activities and efficiency of phosphate utilization. Analyses of forenoon and afternoon oxygen production rates (OPRs) indicated higher photosynthetic and respiratory activity in BL-treated cultures compared to untreated cultures. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Chauhan, V.S.; Singh, G.; Ramamurthy, V. [Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala (India)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the program was to develop correlations to predict physical properties within requirements of engineering precision from a knowledge of pulping conditions and of kraft black liquor composition, if possible. These correlations were to include those relating thermodynamic properties to pulping conditions and liquor composition. The basic premise upon which the research was based is the premise that black liquor behaves as a polymer solution. This premise has proven to be true, and has been used successfully in developing data reduction methods and in interpreting results. A three phase effort involving pulping, analysis of liquor composition, and measurement of liquor properties was conducted.

Fricke, A.L.; Zaman, A.A.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Combustion of concentrates resulting from ultrafiltration of bleached-kraft effluents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that closed cycle concentrates were simulated by laboratory-scale ultrafiltration of (C + D) and first E-stage effluents from two bleached-kraft mills. The concentrates were found to be similar to typical kraft black liquor in carbon content, heating value, and density, Viscosities of concentrates were similar to or slightly above the values over which black liquor viscosities commonly range. Burning rates for the dried solids from the concentrates were found to be similar to burning rates reported for black liquor. Volatiles yields (percentage of initial dried solids evolving as pyrolysis gases under pyrolytic conditions) were 46-50% and were not strongly dependent on final heating temperature. Char yields (percentage of initial dried solids gasified by heterogeneous char oxidation reactions) were strongly dependent on final heating temperature, increasing from nearly zero at 600{degrees} C to 42% at 1000{degrees} C. A simplistic combustion rate model was developed to predict the overall burning rates. It should prove useful for approximating the rates of combustion of ultrafiltration concentrates. The model includes a first-order rate expression for volatiles evolution and a pseudo-first order rate expression for char burning.

Nichols, K.M. (Div. of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (US))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Recycling of water in bleached kraft pulp mills by using electrodialysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conservation of water in bleached kraft pulp mills by recycling the bleach plant effluent directly without treatment will cause accumulation of inorganic ''non-process elements'' (NPEs) and serious operational problems. In this work, an electrodialysis process is being developed for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached kraft pulp mills. In this process, electrodialysis functions as a selective kidney to remove inorganic NPEs from bleach plant effluents, before they reach the recovery cycle. Acidic bleach plant effluents from several mills using bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The total dissolved solids were mostly inorganic NPEs. Sodium was the predominant cation and chloride was present at significant levels in all these effluents. In laboratory electrodialysis experiments, selective removal of chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently. Rejection of organic compounds was up to 98%. Electrodialysis was shown to be resistant to membrane fouling and scaling, in a 100-hour laboratory experiment. Based on a model mill with 1,000 ton/day pulp production, the economic analysis suggests that the energy cost of electrodialysis is less than $200/day, and the capital cost of the stack is about $500,000.

Fracaro, A. T.; Henry, M. P.; Pfromm, P.; Tsai, S.-P.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industry’s energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

Diese nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2008 in Kraft.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober Name des zweiten Gruppenmit- glieds zu nennen." Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 1. Oktober 2009 in Kraft. Sie wird im Amtsblatt der

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

57

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP high-temperature gasifiers for gas turbine applications. ABB and MTCr/Stonechem are developing low-load performance of gasifier/gas turbine systemsincorporating the four above-noted gasifier designs are reported

58

Diese nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den am 1. April 2010 in Kraft. Sie wird im Amtsblatt der Freien Hansestadt Bremen verffentlicht.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den am 1. April 2010 in Kraft. Sie wird Kolloquium" gestrichen. Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 1. April 2010

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

59

Development of viscometers for kraft black liquor. Summary report, Phase 2 and 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the evaluation of the on-line prototype viscometers for kraft black liquors carried out at the Pilot Plant facilities of the University of Florida. The original plan called for the evaluation of five prototype on-line viscometers along with laboratory bench versions. At a later stage in the project an additional experimental prototype under development at Southwest Research Institute was added. The viscometers are evaluated for accuracy and repeatability under varying process conditions, such as black liquor species, solids content, temperature, flow rate, and contaminants, as well as for maintenance and reliability. This document reports extensive results of the evaluations and recommendations for design modifications and for the installation of the instruments in industrial pulping mills for further field evaluations in Phase 3 of the project. The report also documents relevant details of the final design of the pilot flow loop used to support the experiments.

Fricke, A.L.; Crisalle, O.D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Research on droplet formation for application to kraft black liquors---Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to generate technical data to guide the design of new nozzles for kraft black liquor recovery boilers. The goal of new nozzle designs would be to narrow the droplet size distribution compared to current nozzles and to adjust for changing black liquor properties and production requirements. Uniform droplets in a recovery boiler should reduce fouling of superheater tubes and caused a more efficient burning of the black liquor, both of which result in improved energy efficiency. The research was organized into five tasks which are described in the next chapter. This fifth and final project report contains the details of Task 4 and 5 and further analysis of Task 1 results. The details of the other tasks are reported in previous technical reports. The major results from the entire project are highlighted in this section in order of significance.

Bousfield, D.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

Keiser, J.R.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

Keiser, J.R.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Swelling of kraft black liquor: an understanding of the associated phenomena during pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this thesis were to quantify the swelling of black liquor during pyrolysis in a nitrogen atmosphere and to determine what factors were responsible for swelling. The first part of the investigation studied the process variables: pyrolysis temperature, solid content, heating rate and particle size. A temperature of 500/sup 0/C resulted in maximum swelling for the investigated temperature range of 300-900/sup 0/C. The swelling of black liquor occurred during the evolution of pyrolysis gases; however, there was no correlation found between the amount of pyrolysis gases evolved and the change in char volume. The initial solid content of black liquor had a small influence on the swelling of black liquor. The heating rate was found to effect the rate of swelling but not the final volume. Particle size had no effect on the swollen volume per unit particle weight. The effect of black liquor composition was studied. An interaction between sugar acids and kraft lignin was responsible for swelling. The extractives interfered with the swelling mechanism of black liquor, while inorganic salts acted as a diluent. The swelling behavior of black liquor appeared to be dictated by the surface active and viscous forces present in black liquor during pyrolysis. Surface active forces were evidenced by the formation of small bubbles (50-150 microns in diameter) which appeared necessary for highly swollen chars. Low swelling chars did not exhibit this phenomenon. Bubble formation began at 250/sup 0/C, which closely corresponded to the thermal decomposition temperature of sugar acids. The sugar acids formed bubbles when pyrolyzed but did not swell significantly during pyrolysis. Kraft lignin appeared to enhance the swelling of the sugar acids by increasing the viscosity and stabilizing the bubbles during pyrolysis.

Miller, P.T.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Gasification of kraft black liquor and use of the products in combined cycle cogeneration. Final report, Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in combined cycle cogeneration based on combustion gas turbines was motivated by the very promising results of the Phase I feasibility study. The Phase I study indicated that the alternative technology to the Tomlinson recovery furnace had the potential of improving the energy efficiency and safety of combusting black liquor, reducing the capital and operating costs, increasing the electric power output, and providing an economical system for incremental kraft capacity additions. During Phase II, additional bench-scale experiments were run, pilot-scale experiments were conducted, equipment systems were investigated, and performance and economics were reanalyzed. All of the objectives of the Phase II project were met. Recommendations are summarized.

Kelleher, E.G.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Methanol Fractionation of Softwood Kraft Lignin: Impact on the Lignin Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of technologies to tune lignin properties for high-performance lignin-based materials is crucial for the utilization of lignin in various applications. Here, the effect of methanol (MeOH) fractionation on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition, and chemical structure of lignin were investigated. Repeated MeOH fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin successfully removed the low-molecular-weight fraction. The separated high-molecular-weight lignin showed a Tg of 211 C and a char yield of 47%, much higher than those of asreceived lignin (Tg 153 C, char yield 41%). The MeOH-soluble fraction of lignin showed an increased low-molecular-weight fraction and a lower Tg (117 C) and char yield (32%). The amount of low-molecular-weight fraction showed a quantitative correlation with both 1/Tg and char yield in a linear regression. This study demonstrated the efficient purification or fractionation technology for lignin; it also established a theoretical and empirical correlation between the physical characteristics of fractionated lignins.

Saito, Tomonori [ORNL] [ORNL; Perkins, Joshua H [ORNL] [ORNL; Vautard, Frederic [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolnai, Balazs [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Research on droplet formation for application to kraft black liquors: Final report: Tasks I and III, report No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to generate technical data with which to design nozzles for kraft black liquor recovery boilers which can reduce under and over size droplets and adjust for changing black liquor properties and production requirements. The research is organized into five tasks: Droplet formation from a single jet, theoretical and experimental--ambient gas medium; Surface tensions of black liquor; Aerodynamic/hydrodynamic stability/instability of droplets once formed; Black liquor droplet formation from a single jet--furnace gas medium; Prototype of a new nozzle design. 88 figs.

Stockel, I.H.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Utah's project 'Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment' (U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42261) was a response to U.S. DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS36-04GO94002, 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative' Topical Area 4-Kraft Black Liquor Gasification. The project began September 30, 2004. The objective of the project was to improve the understanding of black liquor conversion in high pressure, high temperature reactors that gasify liquor through partial oxidation with either air or oxygen. The physical and chemical characteristics of both the gas and condensed phase were to be studied over the entire range of liquor conversion, and the rates and mechanisms of processes responsible for converting the liquor to its final smelt and syngas products were to be investigated. This would be accomplished by combining fundamental, lab-scale experiments with measurements taken using a new semi-pilot scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. As a result of insufficient availability of funds and changes in priority within the Office of Biomass Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, the research program was terminated in its second year. In total, only half of the budgeted funding was made available for the program, and most of this was used during the first year for construction of the experimental systems to be used in the program. This had a severe impact on the program. As a consequence, most of the planned research was unable to be performed. Only studies that relied on computational modeling or existing experimental facilities started early enough to deliver useful results by the time to program was terminated Over the course of the program, small scale (approx. 1 ton/day) entrained-flow gasifier was designed and installed at the University of Utah's off-campus Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility. The system is designed to operate at pressures as high as 32 atmospheres, and at temperatures as high as 1500 C (2730 F). Total black liquor processing capacity under pressurized, oxygen-blown conditions should be in excess of 1 ton black liquor solids per day. Many sampling ports along the conversion section of the system will allow detailed analysis of the environment in the gasifier under industrially representative conditions. Construction was mostly completed before the program was terminated, but resources were insufficient to operate the system. A system for characterizing black liquor sprays in hot environments was designed and constructed. Silhouettes of black liquor sprays formed by injection of black liquor through a twin fluid (liquor and atomizing air) nozzle were videoed with a high-speed camera, and the resulting images were analyzed to identify overall characteristics of the spray and droplet formation mechanisms. The efficiency of liquor atomization was better when the liquor was injected through the center channel of the nozzle, with atomizing air being introduced in the annulus around the center channel, than when the liquor and air feed channels were reversed. Atomizing efficiency and spray angle increased with atomizing air pressure up to a point, beyond which additional atomizing air pressure had little effect. Analysis of the spray patterns indicates that two classifications of droplets are present, a finely dispersed 'mist' of very small droplets and much larger ligaments of liquor that form at the injector tip and form one or more relatively large droplets. This ligament and subsequent large droplet formation suggests that it will be challenging to obtain a narrow distribution of droplet sizes when using an injector of this design. A model for simulating liquor spray and droplet formation was developed by Simulent, Inc. of Toronto. The model was able to predict performance when spraying water that closely matched the vendor specifications. Simulation of liquor spray indicates that droplets on the order 200-300 microns can be expected, and that higher liquor flow will result in be

Kevin Whitty

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

<RatesMiscInfo>  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe β- DecayBe GeneralHeatingMontana -

69

Index of /~wilker/misc/chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methanol.pdb, 01-Dec-1998 15:47, 500. [ ], nh3-2.pdb, 01-Dec-1998 15:47, 314. [ ], propane.pdb, 01-Dec-1998 15:47, 840. [ ], vit-c.pdb, 01-Dec-1998 15:47, 1.4 ...

70

A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effect of sulfite ions in N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} purged 0.5 m NaCl solution on stainless steels examined by different electrochemical techniques and by reflectance measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three steels, 13% Cr-steel, SS 304 steel and duplex steel are examined for corrosion for 48-hours periods in N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} purged 0.5 M sodium chloride electrolytes with different sulfite concentrations. The results show that 13%Cr-steel is most susceptible to pitting in the presence of sulfite both under N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} atmospheres. SS 304 steel was more resistant to corrosion than 13%Cr-steel. Duplex steel showed rather good corrosion resistance under these conditions. The corrosion rate, inclusive pitting corrosion, after 24 hours in presence of 0--10 mM sulfite based on LPR-measurements is for duplex steel 0.5--0.9 mm/year under N{sub 2} and 0.1--1.8 mm/year under CO{sub 2}, for SS 304 steel 1.0--1.8 mm/year under N{sub 2} and 0.6--1.4 mm/year under CO{sub 2}, and for 13%Cr-steel 1.3--2.2 mm/year under N{sub 2} and 0.7--1.8 mm/year under CO{sub 2}. The use of AC-impedance measurements is discussed. The method should be used with care when other mechanisms than general corrosion are involved.

Hemmingsen, T.; Aagotnes, N.O.; Kroeger-Silseth, T.; Kolak, N.; Kaik, M. [Stavanger Coll. (Norway)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of Kraft black liquor. Interim report No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The black liquor properties program has been conducted over this last period so as to systematically collect data on properties, liquor composition, and lignin characteristics very carefully by methods that have developed during this program. Complete data has been collected for Slash Pine black liquors made by experimental pulping at different pulping conditions. In addition, data has been collected for mill liquors and partial properties or composition data has been collected on Slash Pine black liquors. Data reduction methods have been developed or extended for correlation of viscosity, heat capacity, heat of dilution, and density. Correlation of properties to pulping conditions and of composition to. pulping conditions has begun. In most cases, data reduction methods have been developed that are fundamentally based and that have been shown to be generally applicable to all black liquors. In the near future, we fully expect to accomplish our goal of developing generalized correlations relating physical properties of Slash Pine kraft black liquors to liquor composition. This interim report reviews the methods used, describes examples of data reduction methods that have been developed, and presents some preliminary results for correlation of liquor composition and properties to pulping conditions for Slash Pine black liquors.

Fricke, A.L.; Dong, D.J.; Schmidl, G.W.; Stoy, M.A.; Zaman, A.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of Kraft black liquor. Interim report No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental effort for the program to evaluate physical properties of kraft black liquors is now proceeding well. Experimental work includes pulping, liquor analysis, lignin purification and characterization, vapor-liquid equilibria, heat capacity, heats of solution and combustion, and viscosity measurements. Measurement of thermal conductivity has not yet begun. Collection of the data necessary for development of generalized correlations is proceeding, but will require about two more years. The digester is operating very well. It is now possible to operate the digester as a closed, rotating reactor or as a batch reactor with liquor circulation. When operated with liquor circulation, temperatures within the chip bed can be monitored during cooking. Cooking is reproducible, and cooks are being performed to produce liquors for experimental studies. The digester could be further modified to permit us to conduct rapid exchange batch pulping or to permit us to simulate continuous pulping. Liquors to be used in experimental studies are concentrated in our large scale evaporator or in our small scale evaporator. The large scale evaporator is used to concentrate liquors to about 50% solids for storage and for use in studies requiring high solids liquors. The small scale evaporator is used for preparing final samples to as high as 85% solids and for measuring vapor-liquid equilibria. Liquors are now routinely analyzed to determine all components, except higher molecular weight organic acids and extractives. Lignin determination by uv-visible means has been improved. Lignin purification from black liquor has been improved and lignin molecular weights are determined routinely. Work on lignin molecular weight distribution is still not satisfactory, but recent developments holds promise.

Fricke, A.L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Der Oktapod Kraft-und Momentensensor (Otto Bock HealthCare GmbH) ist ein Dehnungsmesstreifen basiertes System fr den direkten Einbau in Beinprothesen. Damit knnen die Belastungen der Prothese in allen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Der Oktapod Kraft- und Momentensensor (Otto Bock HealthCare GmbH) ist ein Dehnungsmesstreifen automatischen Kalibrator (Otto Bock HealthCare, Duderstadt) Auswertung der Messdaten o Optimierung der Berlin erfolgt durch Dipl.-Ing. Julius Thiele, von Seiten der Otto Bock HealthCare GmbH erfolgt sie durch

Berlin,Technische Universität

76

Correlation of Process Data and Electrocheical Noise to Assess Kraft Digester Corrosion: Second Year at Spring Grove  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical noise (EN) probes were deployed in the carbon steel continuous kraft digester at Spring Grove at four locations and at one location in the bottom cone of the associated flash tank for a second consecutive year of a corrosion study. The probes contained dual electrodes of 309LSi stainless steel overlay--representing a field repair material applied to a portion of the vessel--and dual electrodes of 312 stainless steel overlay. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of 23 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were again monitored continuously for a period of almost one year. Historical vessel inspection data and post-test evaluation of the probe components were used to assess/compare EN corrosion activity with physical changes in wall thickness and corrosion patterns on the digester shell. In addition, attempts were made to correlate EN activity from each electrode type with process parameters. The results indicate the corrosion conditions aggressive to mild steel persist within the digester, as post-test inspection of the vessel revealed localized corrosion of mild steel in locations previously free of attack. Further, there was evidence that the depth of localized attack of exposed steel had increased in some locations. Nevertheless, the stainless steel overlay in the digester was essentially immune to corrosion, as evidenced by retained surface relief and heat tint associated with the original deposition process. The 309LSi electrodes also appeared visually pristine, and post-exposure metallographic examination of the 309LSi electrode materials revealed no attack. The 312 electrode materials were similar in appearance, but exhibited very minor interdendritic attack over the exposed surface. The silver electrodes in the probes were consumed (to Ag{sub 2}S) to variable degree over the course of the exposure indicating a useful life of not more than a year in digester service in this vessel. Since the stainless steel overlay electrodes were immune to corrosion during the exposure, the current and potential noise activity on these probes is likely related to redox processes on the electrode surfaces. Analysis of this activity as a function of position (and year) in the vessel suggests that redox chemistry/conditions vary by a significant amount on a consistent basis--even on opposite sides of the vessel at the same elevation--and that these differences are not identified by process parameters tracked at the mill. These variable environmental conditions (flow, temperature, liquor chemistry) appear to have little effect on stainless steel overlays under evaluation, but apparently can be quite corrosive to steel as determined in the initial study in the digester at Spring Grove. With the exception of start-up and shutdown activity, including brief upsets for ''hanging columns'' or brief maintenance periods, no regular correlation was observed between tracked process variables and EN activity on any of the probes. In combination with the variable redox activity, this result suggests that the liquor sampling and flow data compiled at the mill do not represent the corrosion conditions in the vessel particularly well.

Pawel, SJ

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Development of an alternative kraft black liquor recovery process based on low-temperature processing in fluidized beds. Final technical report on Annex 9, Task 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research program was to provide the fundamental knowledge and experimental data from pilot scale operation for an alternative black liquor recovery technology which would have a higher overall energy efficiency, would not suffer from the smelt-water explosion hazard and would be lower in capital cost. In addition, the alternative process would be more flexible and well suited for incremental recovery capacity or for new pulping processes, such as the new sulfide-sulfide-AQ process. The research program consists of number of specific research objectives with the aim to achieve the ultimate objective of developing an alternative recovery process which is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives are linked to individual unit operations and they represent the following research topics: (1) superheated steam drying of kraft black liquors; (2) fast pyrolysis of black liquor; (3) hydrogen sulfide absorption from flue gas; (4) reduction of sodium sulfate in solid phase with gaseous hydrogen; and (5) verification of the fundamental results in fluidized bed pilot plant. The accomplishments in each of these objectives are described.

Kubes, G.J.

1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

FOIASI - Special Inquiry Review of Allegations InvolvingPotentialMisc...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office of Environmental Management. The allegations involved potential violations of political activity restrictions, lack of impartiality in performing official duties, misuse of...

80

OHA Misc Cases Archive File | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National RenewableNovember09 ANNUAL REPORTFOIA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase Ia - Low-temperature gasifier evaluation. Final report, November 1, 1995--October 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, conducted under The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-94GO10002/A002, was part of a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies that improve the energy efficiency and economics of chemical process recovery in the pulp and paper industry. The approach taken was to consider two major alternatives in two phases. Phase I, conducted previously, considered means to improve pulp mill recovery boilers using high-solids advanced combustion of black liquor; while this project, Phase la, considered means to recover kraft pulping mill process chemicals by low-temperature black liquor gasification. The principal steps previously proposed in this program were: (1) Evaluate these two technologies, high-solids advanced combustion and gasification, and then select a path forward using the more promising of these two options for future work. (2) Design and construct a pilot-scale unit based on the selected technology, and using that unit, develop the precompetitive data necessary to make commercialization attractive. (3) Develop and deploy a first-of-a-kind (FOAK) commercial unit in a kraft pulp mill. Phase I, which evaluated the high-solids advanced combustion option, was concluded in 1995. Results of that project phase were reported previously. This report describes the work conducted in Phase Ia. The work is described in Sections 1 through 4 and six appendices provide additional detail.

Southards, W.T.; Blude, J.D.; Dickinson, J.A. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood,GeorgeKlimaschutzKosmo Solar

83

LEIOCEPHALIDAE 1989 Leiocephalinae Frost and Etheridge, Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hispaniola, Navassa, and Martinique. Recently extinct species were found on Barbuda and Antigua, Anguilla, Guadeloupe, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. Leiocephalus Gray 1827 Leiocephalus Gray, Philos. Mag, 84: 1. Range: Cuba and nearby islands, the Cayman Islands, the Bahama Islands, Hispaniola

84

R:\\Groups\\ENVIRO\\Work Requests\\2010\\Misc\\100101_Eastshore Trail...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

unless surveys detect that no nests are present in the location of brush removal. Sediment control devises such as straw, seeding, erosion control mats and waddles will be used...

85

UPDATE ON NUCLEAR PLANS AND CARBON LEGISLATION 1 Misc points re climate policies --Energy Security,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Trading Workshop Purdue Climate Change Research Center April 30, 2010 #12;UPDATE ON NUCLEAR PLANS side must compromise ·Emissions trading aligns the incentives for both in same direction ·Nuclear

86

https://mi3.ncdc.noaa.gov/mi3report/MISC/asos-stations.txt  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepareA ReviewManualREMSCareers

87

Materials selection for kraft batch digesters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several candidate materials were evaluated by corrosion testing in autoclaves containing white and black liquors for batch digesters. The relationship between corrosion rate and corrosion potential was determined for ASTM SA516-Grade 70 carbon steel, UNS S30403 (Type 304L) austenitic stainless steel, UNS S31803 (2205) and UNS S32550 (2605) duplex stainless steels, and two stainless steel weld overlays, applied by the GMAW (gas metal arc welding) and SAW (submerged arc welding) processes. The tests revealed that SA516-Grade 70 carbon steel and type 304L stainless steel can experience high rates of corrosion. For the duplex stainless steels and weld overlays, corrosion resistance improved with chromium content. A chromium content of at least 25% was found to be necessary for good corrosion resistance.

Wensley, A. [Bacon Donaldson Consulting Engineers, Richmond, British Columbia (Canada); Moskal, M. [Stone Container Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Wilton, W. [Stone-Consolidated Corp., Fort Frances, Ontario (Canada)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Char reactions during kraft black liquor pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pyrolysis characteristics of dried black liquor particles were investigated at high heating rates in a laminar entrained-flow reactor at temperatures of 600-1100{degrees}C. Primary pyrolysis of the organic fraction occurred very rapidly, in less 0.5 seconds. Char yields at the end or volatiles evolution were 58-72%. The decreased with increasing reactor temperature to 900{degrees}C but remained constant at higher temperatures. 35-65% of the fuel nitrogen was volatilized, nearly all in less than 0.5 s. Relatively little fuel nitrogen was evolved from the char. Significant alkali metal chloride volatization from the char occurred at all temperatures, while additional sodium volatilization became important above 900{degrees}C. Reduction of sulfur species in the char increased rapidly with increasing temperature. A temperature-dependent delay time in the onset of Na{sub 2}S formation was observed.

Frederick, W.J.; Sricharoenchaikul, V.; Reis, V.V. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Low Odor, High Yield Kraft Pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laboratory cooks pure oxygen was profiled into the circulation line of a batch digester during two periods of the cooking cycle: The first injection occurred during the heating steps for the purpose of in-situ generation of polysulfide. This chip treatment was studied to explore stabilization against alkaline induced carbohydrate peeling and to increase pulp yield. Under optimum conditions small amounts of polysulfide were produced with yield increase of about 0.5% These increases fell below earlier reports suggesting that unknown differences in liquor composition may influence the relative amounts of polysulfide and thiosulfate generated during the oxidation. Consequently, further studies are required to understand the factors that influence the ratios of those two sulfur species.

W.T. McKean

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Combustion properties of Kraft Black Liquors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a previous study of the phenomena involved in the combustion of black liquor droplets a numerical model was developed. The model required certain black liquor specific combustion information which was then not currently available, and additional data were needed for evaluating the model. The overall objectives of the project reported here was to provide experimental data on key aspects of black liquor combustion, to interpret the data, and to put it into a form which would be useful for computational models for recovery boilers. The specific topics to be investigated were the volatiles and char carbon yields from pyrolysis of single black liquor droplets; a criterion for the onset of devolatilization and the accompanying rapid swelling; and the surface temperature of black liquor droplets during pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification. Additional information on the swelling characteristics of black liquor droplets was also obtained as part of the experiments conducted.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Hupa, M. (Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

arabidopsis thaliana sulfite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occurring variation is an important alternative resource for functional genetics and genomics research.; In a well-characterized collection of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we...

92

The preparation and analysis of ammonia base sulfite pulping liquor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NH3 Concentrations . . . . . , ~ . ~ . . ~ ~ . ~ q IV The Distribution of S02 in a 2. 82$ RR3 Solution for Various Total SO2 Concentrations . . . . . . , . . . ~ . . . 31 FIGURES l. Variation of pH with Percent NH3 in Solution. . . . . ~. . . 25... 2. Variation of pH with S02 Concentration in Solutions of Various NH Concentrations . . . . ~ . . . ~ . ~ o ~ . o . ~ 27 3 ~ Composition of Solutions to give a Constant pH of T and 2. 5 , ~ 2Q 4. The Variation of the Ratio of Free S02 to Total SO2...

Honstead, John Frederick

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy ofevolved gasComputers

94

07/06/2006 12:16 PMhttp://fti.neep.wisc.edu/MISC/EWFullPR07.htm Page 1 of 6http://fti.neep.wisc.edu/MISC/EWFullPR07.htm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including solar, biomass and nuclear energy, roughly a $380 million increase for energy supply to support energy conservation demonstration projects and to implement solid state lighting like high and Conservation to support the "Advanced Energy Initiative" to find alternatives to foreign oil

95

R:\Groups\ENVIRO\Work Requests\2010\Misc\100101_Eastshore Trail\100101_Eastshore Trail Construction CX.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office of Science7a.

96

Effektiv brug af grnne afgifter i kraft-og varmesektoren  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gennem tilskyndelse til et lavere energiforbrug og en mere miljøvenlig energiproduktion fx ved en øget energiproduktion. Det drejer sig primært om tre styringsmidler: 1. Grønne og ikke så grønne afgifter 2

97

Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced Modeling and Materials in Kraft Pulp Mills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CRADA provided technical support to the Weyerhaeuser Company on a number of issues related to the performance and/or selection of materials at a number of locations in a pulp and paper mill. The studies related primarily to components for black liquor recovery boilers, but some effort was directed toward black liquor gasifiers and rolls for paper machines. The purpose of this CRADA was to assist Weyerhaeuser in the evaluation of materials exposed in various paper mill environments and to provide direction in the selection of alternate materials, when appropriate.

Keiser, J.R.; Gorog, J.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Why Do Kraft Recovery Boiler Composite Floor Tubes Crack?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracks were first reported in 1992 in co-extruded 304L stainless steel/SA210 Gd Al carbon steel floor tubes of North American black liquor recovery boilers. Since then, a considerable amount of information has been collected on the tube environment, crack characteristics, the stress state of the tubes, and the crack initiation and propagation mechanisms. These studies have identified both operating procedures that apparently can greatly lessen the likelihood of crack formation in the stainless steel layer and alternate materials that appear to be much more resistant to cracking than is 304L stainless.

Keiser, J.R.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

100

Freeze crystallization technology for Kraft black liquor concentration. Third report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 25% of the purchased energy in the pulp and paper industry is used to concentrate black liquor. The technical feasibility of using freeze concentration to supplement evaporation has been successfully demonstrated, and results indicate that energy consumption can be reduced 45%. After compiling a considerable data base on the characteristics of black liquor at low temperature and after developing a computer program to aid analysis, the process chosen was vacuum freezing-vapor absorption (VFVA). A pilot plant was built and operated; however, due to problems with crystallization of the absorbent and contamination, it was found that maintaining the conditions necessary for a continuous process was not practical at the present state of development. Therefore, indirect freezing was used for all subsequent work. This required the design and fabrication of a simple shuttle crystallizer to replace scraped surface units conventionally used. CSI also developed an integrated ice separation column that combined crystal growth, a concentration gradient, and washing all in one unit. Finally, extensive heat transfer coefficient data were collected so that a preliminary design could be completed for a 350 TPD industrial freeze concentration unit. An economic analysis was calculated in order to compare using evaporation and freeze concentration to process the increased liquor flow from a pulp mill expansion. A 200,000 lb/hr freezing unit used to preconcentrate the mill's entire stream up to 18.7% solids would save $10 to $16 per ton of pulp.

Johnson, W.E.; Rhodes, C.R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report. Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods were selected, equipment installed, and procedures developed for determining rheological properties; for determining thermal properties (stability, density, thermal expansion, and heat capacity); for purification and characterization of lignin (glass transition, stability, weight average molecular weight, and number average molecular weight); and for performing chemical analyses (negative inorganic ions, positive inorganic ions, acid organic salts, lignin, and total solids). A strategy for pulping to supply test liquors was developed, and a statistically designed pulping experiment was specified for a Southern softwood species. Arrangements were made for performing initial pulping work in an industrial pilot plant, and a preliminary set of pulping experiments were conducted. Liquors from the preliminary pulping experiments were used to test procedures and to determine reproducibility of the experiment. Literature was also surveyed and preliminary selection of designs for a pilot digester, and for equipment to determine surface tension were made.

Fricke, A.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpenVerona,HamptonVinland, Wisconsin: Energy

103

Admin. Duties 0708 -by person This version : 15/11/2007 12:28 Surname 0708 Duty Type Duty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anderson Misc BCS/IEE Accreditation Armstrong Course/Year Organiser MSc Armstrong Director Edinburgh Centre for Bioinformatics (Deputy) Armstrong Misc Bioinformatics MSc Liaison Armstrong Misc PhD Selector - ANC Armstrong MSc

Edinburgh, University of

104

EHRS Impact on Engine Warm-up and Fuel Economy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20% Traction Power Gasoline 6% Transmission and misc 37% Cooling 37% Exhaust Diesel 25% Traction Power 6% Transmission and misc 37% Cooling 32% Exhaust Diesel...

105

Alternatives for balanced production of fibers, chemicals, and energy from wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased oil prices and shortage of fossil materials have recently focused interest on the possibilities of conversion of wood to various forms of fuels and chemicals. It is to be expected that new approaches are emerging from the totality of the research effort now in progress. However, irrespective of this, the function of wood as a construction material and a source for fibers presumably remains unchanged or even becomes more important in the future. In regard to the principal pulping methods for production of fibers, no abrupt changes in current practices are probable, apart from important progress in energy saving. In a very favorable situation of the kraft process, when surplus energy generated from the burning of black liquor is availiable, a partial recovery of dissolved organic solids, such as lignin and carbohydrates and their degradation products, becomes more attractive. Quite different is the case of the conventional sulfite process when evaporation and burning of the spent liquor result in severe air pollution. Successful recovery, conversion, and marketing of the dissolved solids can then be the only way to compensate for the expense of using external fuel. Alternatives for production of organic chemicals from kraft and sulfite spent liquors are discussed by taking into consideration the fiber production, composition of dissolved solids, energy requirements, pollution problems, and recovery of inorganic pulping chemicals. 11 references, 10 figures, 5 tables

Sjoestroem, E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Use of Evolutionary Factor Analysis in the Spectroelectrochemistry of Escherichia coli Sulfite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and their concentrations and spectra were determined by the use of the mass balance equation. The spectra of the one and a mass balance equation. Identification of the fifth species, which was probably the initial reduction that it was present in the same time region as the starting material. Factor analysis has been shown to be a powerful

Reid, Scott A.

107

Oxidation of byproduct calcium sulfite hemihydrate from coal-fired power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flue gas desulfurization by-product from the TU Electric Martin Lake power plant near Tatum, Texas was characterized using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, microprobe and infrared spectroscopy. The byproduct, called gypsite, consisted of a...

Bhatt, Sandeep

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oxidation and characterization of FGD byproduct calcium sulfite and oxidized product  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed using a Netzsch STA-409 Thermal Analyzer to determine the composition of the sample. The analyzer recorded the change in weight (TG) and the heat effects associated with the exothermic and endothermic reactions (DTA...

Gupta, Anurag

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The economical use of standby equipment for a typical Kraft process pulp and paper mill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the pine system is about 350 tons of pulp per day. The ~Pa er Mill The Beater Room - In the beater room the paper making chemicals such as rosin, size, alum, and clay are added to the pulp in a mixing chest. Size is any substance which is added to a... it in on the supposition that it may do some good, Alum, used to denote aluminum sulphate, is used to precipitate the dissolved rosin in the size on the fibers of the paper. This is sometimes referred to as "setting" the size. Alum tends to make the paper hard...

Cox, Elmer Adrain

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Alkali salt ash formation during black liquor combustion at kraft recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery boiler is an essential part of paper pulping process, where waste sludge called black liquor is burned for chemical recovery and energy production. This study was carried out at an operating industrial recovery boiler in Finland. Measurement of aerosol particles was carried out at bullnose level of furnace, at boiler exit, and at outlet of electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Aerosol mass size distributions in size range 0.02--50 {micro}m were measured with Berner type low pressure impactor (BLPI) operated with precyclone. BLPI samples were further analyzed with ion chromatography for water soluble Na, K, SO{sub 4}, and Cl. Particle morphology was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase composition of crystalline salts was measured with X-ray diffraction (XRD). Particles larger than 1 {micro}m were analyzed with computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) to derive particle composition classes. At ESP inlet mass size distribution was bimodal with a major mode at about 1.2 {micro}m and a minor mode at about 5 {micro}m (aerodynamic diameter). At ESP outlet the mass size distribution showed only one peak at about 1.2 {micro}m. Both submicron and supermicron particles were agglomerates formed from 0.3 to 0.5 {micro}m spherical primary particles. XRD analyses indicated that particles were crystalline with two phases of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (thenardite and sodium sulphate) and K{sub 3}Na(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. CCSEM results of individual particles larger than 1 {micro}m showed that 79 to 88 volume percent of particles contained mainly Na and S, 7 to 10 volume percent Na, K, and S with minor amount of particles containing Na, S, and Ca.

Mikkanen, P. Kauppinen, E.I.; Pyykoenen, J.; Jokiniemi, J.K. [VTT (Finland); Maekinen, M. [Finnish Meterological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of kraft black liquors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental work includes pulping, liquor analysis, lignin purification and characterization, vapor-liquid equilibria, heat capacity, heats of solution and combustion, and viscosity measurements. It is now possible to operate the digester as a closed, rotating reactor or as a batch reactor with liquor circulation. When operated with liquor circulation, temperatures within the chip bed can be monitored during cooking. Cooking is reproducible, and cooks are being performed to produce liquors for experimental studies. The digester could be further modified to permit them to conduct rapid exchange batch pulping or to permit them to simulate continuous pulping. Liquors are now routinely analyzed to determine all components, except higher molecular weight organic acids and extractives. Lignin determination by UV-visible means has been improved. Lignin purification from black liquor has been improved and lignin molecular weights are determined routinely. The paper describes the digestor, the large scale evaporation, liquor analysis, thermal studies, and viscosity results. 31 figs., 5 tabs.

Fricke, A.L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Effects of Bleached Kraft Pulp-Mill Effluent on Periphyton DOE FRAP 1996-08  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 3.3.4 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 3.3.5 Dioxins

113

Production of Lignin-Based Phenolic Resins Using De-Polymerized Kraft Lignin and Process Optimization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Commercialization of Lignin-based phenol formaldehyde resins (LPF) has been limited due to the increase in curing temperatures and decrease in adhesive strength of LPF compared… (more)

Siddiqui, Homaira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of raw material and Kraft Pulping Conditions on Characteristics of Dissolved Lignin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Lignin is one of the main components in wood and during the chemical pulping processes it is degraded and dissolved into the cooking liquor.… (more)

Svärd, Antonia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Determination of absolute molecular mass distribution and other structural properties of kraft lignin samples.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Lignin is an aromatic macromolecule present in wood and also a by-product in the process of making paper. For a long time, this by-product… (more)

Chedid, Fadia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Analysis of a Kraft Pulp Mill: Potential for Energy Efficiency and Advanced Biomass Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be energy self-sufficent (with excess energy as a potentially important by-product for export) requires , Permanent address: Departmenl of Environmental and Energy Systems Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. " To whom all correspondence should... identified significant savings potentials. For example, one mill in Sweden uses 13-14 MMBtu per ADST of steam and has a process (;onfiguration similar to the mill studied here (23). Despite the already low steam consumption at the Swedish mill, a pin...

Subbiah, A.; Nilsson, L. J.; Larson, E. D.

117

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for physical properties of kraft black liquor. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of experimental techniques have been used in this work, and many of these have been developed completely or improved significantly in the course of the research done during this program. Therefore, it is appropriate to describe these techniques in detail as a reference for future workers so that the techniques can be used in future work with little additional effort or so that the results reported from this program can be compared better with future results from other work. In many cases, the techniques described are for specific analytical instruments. It is recognized that these may be superseded by future developments and improvements in instrumentation if a complete description of techniques used successfully in the past on other instrumentation is available. The total pulping and liquor preparation research work performed included chip and white liquor preparation, digestion, pulp washing, liquor and wash recovery, liquor sampling, weak liquor concentration in two steps to about 45--50% solids with an intermediate soap skimming at about 140F and 27--30% solids, determination of pulp yield and Kappa number, determination of total liquor solids, and a check on the total material balance for pulping. All other research was performed either on a sample of the weak black liquor (the combined black liquor and washes from the digester) or on the skimmed liquor that had been concentrated.

Fricke, A.L.; Zaman, A.A.; Stoy, M.O.; Schmidl, G.W.; Dong, D.J.; Speck, B.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

KRAFT: Supporting Virtual Organisations through Knowledge Fusion Alun Preece, Kit Hui & Peter Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organisations enable partner companies to develop and manufacture customised products with low costs and rapid. Introduction One of the most promising areas of electronic commerce (e-commerce) is improved management as a knowledge exchange medium, and show how constraint fusion supports the design of customised products

Preece, Alun

119

Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes. Abstract:...

120

A comprehensive program to develop correlations for the physical properties of kraft black liquors. Interim report No.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The black liquor properties program has conducted a systematic collection data of properties, liquor composition, and lignin characteristics. Complete data, except for some density data, has been collected for Slash Pine black liquors made by experimental pulping at a total of 25 different pulping conditions that cover the entire range used for commercial pulping. In addition, complete data has been collected for some mill liquors and partial properties or composition data has been collected on Slash Pine black liquors made at 16 different pulping conditions and some mill liquors. Data reduction methods have been developed or extended for correlation of viscosity, heat capacity, heat of dilution, and density. Correlation of properties to pulping conditions and of composition to pulping conditions has begun. In most cases, data reduction methods have been developed that are fundamentally based and that have been shown to be generally applicable to all black liquors. While it has not proven to be possible to include research for comprehensive correlations for properties for liquors from other species, we have shown that the behavior of liquors made from other species is similar to that which has been explored extensively for Slash Pine liquors. This report reviews the methods used, describes examples of data reduction methods that have been developed, and presents some preliminary results for correlation of liquor composition and properties to pulping conditions for Slash Pine black liquors.

Fricke, A.L.; Dong, D.J.; Schmidl, G.W.; Stoy, M.A.; Zaman, A.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effect of pulping conditions and black liquor composition on Newtonian viscosity of high solids kraft black liquors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of black liquor composition and solids concentrations on the Newtonian viscosity of slash pine black liquors over wide ranges of temperature (up to 140 C) and solids concentrations (between 50% and 83% solids) has been studied. It was found that the zero shear rate viscosity of high solids black liquors depends strongly on the cooking conditions and/or black liquor composition. Not only is high solids viscosity affected by lignin molecular weight and lignin concentration in the liquor but other organic and inorganic constituents of black liquor also make a significant contribution to viscosity. The dependency of zero shear rate viscosity on solids concentrations, and temperature is defined. The Newtonian viscosities vary over a wide range depending on temperature, solids concentrations and solids composition. The results indicate that, at fixed levels of effective alkali and sulfidity, the zero shear rate viscosities can be described as a function of both lignin concentration and lignin molecular weight. The viscosity of black liquor is an increasing function of the organics-to-inorganics ratio and is a decreasing function of the concentration of sodium and chloride ions and pH of the liquor.

Zaman, A.A.; Fricke, A.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Review: Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interests in the American Political System, by Michael E. Kraft and Sheldon Kamieniecki (eds.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interests ineds). Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interestsalso holds in the environmental policy-making realm and many

Meij, Jan-Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Nr. 60 / 13 vom 12. August 2013 Satzung zur nderung der  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ă?nderungssatzung tritt zum 01. Oktober 2013 in Kraft. Artikel I Nr. 1 tritt bereits zum 01. Juni 2013 in Kraft. Sie

Noé, Reinhold

124

ber die Erhebung von Gebhren fr den Masterstudiengang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Kraft-Treten 1 Diese Satzung tritt mit Wirkung vom 1. Juli 2008 in Kraft. 2 Gleichzeitig tritt die Satzung ĂĽber

Hofmann, Martin

125

Additional file 4a. References of the African populations compiled in the databases. Country Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] 99 Egypt Arab MT 83 [25] 100 Egypt Arab MT 101 [26] 101 Egypt Arab Y 20 [7] 102 Egypt Berber Siwa MT 78 [27] 103 Egypt Copte MT 9 [25] 104 Egypt Copte MT 101 [27] 105 Egypt Misc. MT 32 [28] 106 Egypt Misc. Y 19 [17] 107 Egypt Misc.Upper Egypt MT 24 [28] 108 Egypt Nubia MT 11 [25] 109 Equatorial Guinea

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Gebhrenordnung der Universitt Heidelberg fr den nicht-konsekutiven Masterstudiengang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satzung tritt am Tag nach ihrer Bekanntmachung im Mitteilungsblatt des Rektors in Kraft. Zugleich tritt

Heermann, Dieter W.

127

"Jean-Pierre-Miville-Preis" der Vetsuisse-Fakultt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ausgeschlossen. Dieses Reglement tritt mit dem Datum der Unterzeichnung durch den Stiftungsrat in Kraft

Richner, Heinz

128

PROPERTIES OF HDPE/CLAY/WOOD NANOCOMPOSITES , C. M. Clemons 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from wood, kenaf, flax, hemp, cotton, Kraft pulp, coconut husk, areca fruit, pineapple leaf, oil palm

129

Energistyrelsens workshop om  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in February 2002 Windpower/consumption,% #12;Betydningen af at forudsige vindkraftproduktionen Vind- kraft MW

130

Detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes of Kraft chemical recovery boilers. Quarterly report for the period July-September 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities during this period continued to focus on obtaining a clear image of deposits inside an operating recovery boiler.

Kychakoff, George

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers. Quarterly report, Phase 1a: Black liquor gasifier evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project phase addresses the following workscope: Conduct bench-scale tests of a low temperature, partial combustion gasifier; Prepare a gasifier pilot-plant preliminary design and cost estimate and prepare a budgetary cost estimate of the balance of the program; Outline a test program to evaluate gasification; Prepare an economic/market analysis of gasification and solicit pulp and paper industry support for subsequent phases; and Prepare a final report and conduct a project review prior to commencement of work leading to construction of any pilot scale components or facilities. The primary accomplishments included completion of installation of the bench-scale black liquor gasifier and supporting systems, preparing test plans and related safety procedures and detailed operating procedures, defining the functional design requirements and outlining the test plans for the pilot-scale gasifier, and preparing a preliminary economic assessment of the black liquor gasifier. This work accomplished under Phase 1a during this period is further described by task.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry Kraft recovery boilers. Final report, Phase 1, Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The objectives are to develop a preliminary design of a recovery furnace simulator; evaluate the economics of high-solids; and delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies to improve chemical recovery.

Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

zur nderung von Studiengangsstrukturen im Fach Informatik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studierenden mehr im Diplomstudiengang Informatik immatrikuliert. § 3 Inkrafttreten 1 § 1 tritt am Tag nach der Bekanntmachung dieser Satzung in Kraft. 2 § 2 tritt mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2010 in Kraft. #12;- 3

Hofmann, Martin

135

Hochschulrechenzentrum FreieUniversittBerlin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dieses in IT- Angelegenheiten. § 3 Inkrafttreten Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach Veröffentlichung in den Mitteilungen der FU Berlin in Kraft. Gleichzeitig tritt die Ordnung der ZEDAT vom 08. Juli 1992 au�er Kraft

Ziegler, GĂĽnter M.

136

Gebhrenordnung der Universitt Heidelberg fr den nicht-konsekutiven Masterstudiengang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. § 6 Inkrafttreten Diese Satzung tritt am Tag nach ihrer Bekanntmachung im Mitteilungsblatt des Rektors in Kraft. Zugleich tritt die vom Senat am 18.11.2008 beschlossene Satzung au�er Kraft. Heidelberg, den 11

Heermann, Dieter W.

137

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 23.Dezember 2009 1 Satzung der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main fr die Festset-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach ihrer Bekanntmachung im UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main in Kraft; sie tritt am 30. September 2010 au�er Kraft

Mester, Rudolf

138

Verfahrensordnung fr die Verleihung der Bezeichnung ,,auerplanmige Professorin / auerplanmiger Professor"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstimmung erfolgt geheim. § 7 In-Kraft-Treten, �bergangsregelung Die Verfahrensordnung tritt mit Verkündung in den ,,Amtlichen Bekanntmachungen der Uni- versität Rostock" in Kraft. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt tritt die

Rostock, Universität

139

Zweite Satzung zur nderung der Prfungs-und Studienordnung fr den Bachelor-und den Masterstudiengang Psychologie der Friedrich-Alexander-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tritt am 1. Oktober 2009 in Kraft. 2 Sie gilt für alle Studierenden, die ab dem Wintersemester 2009 bleiben davon unberührt." § 2 Diese Satzung tritt am Tag nach ihrer Bekanntmachung in Kraft. Ausgefertigt

Fiebig, Peter

140

6 M A X P L A N C K F O R S C H U N G 1 / 2 0 0 8 1 / 2 0 0 8 M A X P L A N C K F O R S C H U N G 7 FORSCHUNG AKTUELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Kraft verdankt ihren Na- men der kritischen Temperatur, nahe der sie auf- tritt. Solch eine kritische Temperatur

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

1456 Amtsblatt der Freien Hansestadt Bremen vom 17 . November 2011 Nr . 135 Diese nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor mit Wirkung vom 1 . Oktober 2009 in Kraft . Sie gilt

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

142

This article was originally published in a journal published by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) [15,16] have been compounded with natural fibers (such as wood, kenaf, flax, hemp, cotton, Kraft pulp

143

Goulden Equipment and Facilities Lab: 1400 ft2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Sorval RC 5C, etc). Instruments for in-situ remote sensing: (2) FLIR thermal cameras, (2) JAI VIS fluorescence, (1) Ocular Robotics scanning LIDAR, misc pan-tilt mounts (FLIR D100 and D48), computers, software

Kimball, Sarah

144

Plant Operations Executive Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus North Campus Recycling Operations Materials Human Resources Payroll Misc Svs Special Projects Planning Spray Shop Glass Shop Upholstery Shop Plant IT Painting Services G. Weincouff Human Resources Business Services Estimating Shutdown Coordination Scheduling L. Rastique Human Resources 67398 M

Awtar, Shorya

145

Please bring this to a Financial Aid Counselor to review and determine aid eligibility Program Name Computer Science in Croatia Program Dates March 4, 2013 -May 17, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name Computer Science in Croatia Program Dates March 4, 2013 - May 17, 2013 Student Name Student UID,300.00$ Temporary Stay Visa in Croatia $96 $206 Personal 1,000.00$ Misc. Expenses (books) 100.00$ Total estimated

Zanibbi, Richard

146

Fachspezifischer Teil der studiengangsspezifischen Prfungsordnung fr den Bachelorstudiengang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masterzeugnisses nachgewiesen werden. § 5 In-Kraft-Treten (1) 1 Die Prüfungsordnung tritt zum 01.10.2014 in Kraft. 2 Gleichzeitig tritt die bisher geltende Prüfungsordnung au�er Kraft, Absatz 2 bleibt hiervon

Steinhoff, Heinz-JĂĽrgen

147

Metagenomic and Cultivation-Based Analysis of Novel Microorganisms and Functions in Metal-Contaminated Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operon encoding production of hydrogen sulfide from sulfite.hydrogen lyase that catalyzes non-syntrophic growth on formate and production

Yelton, Alexis Pepper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOEGO85004_1: Final Non-proprietary Technical Report, Generating Process and Economic Data for Preliminary Design of PureVision Biorefineries DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 2–3 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the NREL process. Thus, the PureVision process is economically attractive. Given its technical and economic feasibility, the project is of benefit to the public in the following ways: 1) it demonstrated a novel biomass fractionation process that can provide domestic supply of renewable transportation fuel from all three biomass components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), 2) the lignin stream from the process has many higher-value applications beyond simply burning the lignin for energy as proposed by competing technologies, 3) it can be deployed in rural areas and create jobs in these areas, and 3) it can add to the nation’s economy and security.

Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

For more information on any of the articles in this report, contact Joshua Buck, Rachel Kraft, or Trent Perrotto in NASA's Public Affairs Office at 202-358-1100. To review NASA's other commercial space accomplishments, visit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to carry excessive weight all the way to orbit and back to Earth. Thus, every launch requires a brand new will surpass our original requirements." Dream Chaser hybrid motor test firing. Image courtesy of Sierra Nevada SuperDraco hot fire test. Image courtesy of SpaceX Test flight of Apollo's tower abort system. Image

150

Ordnung zur nderung der fachspezifischen Pr-fungsordnung fr den Bachelorstudiengang ,,Musik-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prüfungsordnung tritt nach der Genehmi- gung durch den Rektor mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft. Sie wird vom 19. Dezember 2005 tritt mit dem Inkrafttreten dieser Ordnung vom 2. März 2008 au�er Kraft. (3 �nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rek- tors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft. Sie wird im

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

151

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fachspezifischer Teil der studiengangsspezifischen Prfungsordnung fr den Bachelorstudiengang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 1 Die PrĂĽfungsordnung tritt zum 01.10.2014 in Kraft. 2 Gleichzeitig tritt die bisher geltende PrĂĽ

Steinhoff, Heinz-JĂĽrgen

154

Zweite Satzung zur nderung der Studien-und Prfungsordnung der Universitt Stuttgart fr den Bachelorstudiengang Technisch orientierte Betriebswirtschaftslehre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tritt am 01. Oktober 2011 in Kraft. Abweichend hierfĂĽr tritt die Regelung unter Nr. 2 rĂĽckwirkend zum 01

Reyle, Uwe

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - action disruptive selection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) LESSON(S): strategic guidance of innovation projects in action; operational principles Creativity step 3 Source: Kraft, Markus - Department of Chemical Engineering, University...

156

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 3.5.1. Black Liquor2006. "Ultrafiltration of black liquor using rotating diskultrafiltration of Kraft black liquor using rotating disk

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Sun City and the Sounds of Liberation: Cultural Resistance for Social Justice in Apartheid South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FNI Multimedia, "Sun City." Http://africanactivist.msu.edu/1985. Kraft, Scott. "Shunning Sun City: Cultural Boycott ofWhites." The Vancouver Sun, March 31, 1990. Lacey, Liam. "

Freeman, Jonathan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical imaging findings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 94 Categorization Theory and Research in Consumer Psychology Summary: brand image (e.g., Kraft) affect its categori zation? How will the image affect its...

159

Types of Insulation | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

-- into insulation systems that can include a variety of backings, such as kraft paper, plastic film, polyethylene bubbles, or cardboard, as well as thermal insulation materials....

160

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola… (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Confidential and Privileged: The President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board - Learning Lessons from Its Past to Shape Its Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2007, at: http://cio.energy.gov/pfiab-doe.pdf. 8 Warren Rudman, Perspectives on National Security in the Twenty-First Century, Seminar on Intelligence, Command, and Control at Harvard University (Boston), April 22, 2002. 49 Anne L. Armstrong to Leo... Cherne, Washington, D.C., September 20, 1984; PFIAB-Misc. 1/01/84-11/31/85; Leo Cherne Papers; Department of Special Collections; HGARC; Seymour Weiss to Anne Armstrong, Bethesda, MD, September 27, 1984; PFIAB- Misc. 01/01/84-11/31/85; Leo Cherne Papers...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 26. September 2014 1 Satzung der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main fr die Festset-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Fachsemester, gestrichen und die Zulassungszahl 107 neu festgesetzt. Artikel 2 Diese �nderung tritt am Tage-Universität Frankfurt am Main in Kraft; sie tritt am 31. März 2015 au�er Kraft. Frankfurt, den 24.09.2014 Prof. Dr

163

Gemeinsame Anordnung der Ministerien ber die Weitergeltung der Gemeinsamen Anordnung der Ministerien ber die Dienstordnung fr die Landesverwaltung Ba-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-WĂĽrttemberg vom 28. Dezember 2009, Az.: 1-0200.0/12, tritt mit Ab- lauf des 31.12.2012 auĂ?er Kraft. Sie wird hiermit in der bisherigen Fassung neu erlas- sen. 2. Diese Anordnung tritt am 1. Januar 2013 in Kraft und

Schindelhauer, Christian

164

Zweite Satzung zur nderung der Studienordnung fr den Studiengang Medizin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ersten Abschnitt der �rztlichen Prüfung teilnehmen können." § 2 (1) Diese Satzung tritt mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2003 in Kraft. (2) Abweichend von Abs. 1 tritt § 1 Nr. 1 am 1. Oktober 2005 in Kraft und findet

Hofmann, Martin

165

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 22.08.2014 1 Satzung der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main ber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inkrafttreten Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach ihrer VerkĂĽndung im UniReport in Kraft. Die Satzung der Johann HImmaVO tritt gleichzeitig auĂ?er Kraft. Frankfurt am Main, den 21. August 2014 Prof. Dr. Werner MĂĽller

166

10. 9 erhlt folgende Fassung: Geltungsbereich und Inkrafttreten  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tritt nach der Ge- nehmigung des Rektors mit Wirkung vom 1. Okto- ber 2007 in Kraft. Sie wird im Amtsblatt der Freien Hansestadt Bremen veröffentlicht. Mit Inkrafttre- ten dieser Ordnung tritt die tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rektors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft. Sie wird im Amtsblatt

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

167

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 22.06.2009 Satzung der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main fr die Festset-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zu einem Sommersemester vorsehen, bleiben unberührt. § 3 Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach ihrer in Kraft; sie tritt am 30. April 2010 au�er Kraft. Frankfurt am Main, den 16.06.2009 Prof. Dr. Werner

Mester, Rudolf

168

Nr. 39 Amtsblatt der Freien Hansestadt Bremen vom 16. Mrz 2009 345 Diese nderungsordnung nach der Genehmigung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tritt nach der Genehmi- gung durch den Rektor der Universität Bremen am 1. April 2009 in Kraft. Sie wird,82. § 2 Diese Bekanntmachung tritt am Tage nach ihrer Veröffentlichung in Kraft. Bremen, den 12. Februar

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

169

Categorization Theory and Research in Consumer Psychology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brand image (e.g., Kraft) affect its categori zation? How will the image affect its acceptance? What, services, brands, or other marketing entities, states, or events that appear, to the consumer, related product is introduced with an existing brand name (e.g., Kraft microwave popcorn), how will the existing

Barsalou, Lawrence W.

170

3D structure of Alzheimer's amyloid-{beta}(1-42) fibrils Dbeli, David Schubert, and Roland Riek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D structure of Alzheimer's amyloid-{beta}(1-42) fibrils Döbeli, David Schubert, and Roland Riek.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;3D structure of Alzheimer's amyloid- (1­42) fibrils Thorsten Lu¨ hrs fibrils (2, 3). Only one 3D structure of an engineered amyloid fibril has yet been determined (4), owing

Riek, Roland

171

Published Ahead of Print 26 November 2012. 10.1128/AEM.02736-12.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at transcrip- tional (promoter-engineering) or translational (engineering of the ribosomal binding sites Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new http://journals.asm.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtmlInformation about commercial reprint orders: http://journals.asm.org/site/subscriptions/To subscribe to to another

Zhao, Huimin

172

2000: 31,178 (*1) 2010: 30,344 (*1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,989 Peace & Freedom 42 Republican 8,972 Misc. 75 Independent 521 Decline To State 4,405 Green 92 Libertarian TORO ROAD LAGUNA HILLS, CA 92653 Mayor: Barbara Kogerman Mayor Pro Tem: Andrew Blount Council Members: (949) 707-2600 WEBSITE: www.ci.laguna-hills.ca.us City Manager: (949) 707-2610 Community Development

de Lijser, Peter

173

Check WorkNet often for job vacancies or rely on the e-mail feature to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Check WorkNet often for job vacancies or rely on the e-mail feature to receive a message when a job Bowling Green, OH 43403-0150 419-372-2865 Review Postings Carefully All job vacancies include a job. Access Job Vacancies Using WorkNet Log-in to your MyBGSU portal. Scroll down to Misc Services, located

Moore, Paul A.

174

The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, p. 6,9; Syst. Ceramb., l861j., p. 3!?!?. Lacordaire, Gen. Col., IX, 1872, p. 7!?9, 762. Leng and Hamilton, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., XXIII, 1896, p. ll?. Lagochirus Erichson. LeConte, Smiths. Misc. Coll., XI (265) 1873, p. 337. Horn, Trans. Amer..., ....................... ....... .......................It Characteristics of the Tribe................ .............. .....? Morphological Features.......... ........................... . . . . 6 Phraseology.................................................... 9 Summary...

Dillon, Lawrence S.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

andin vitroAngiotensin II up-regulates soluble epoxide hydrolase in vascular endothelium Hammock, John Y.-J. Shyy, and Yi Zhu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in vivo andin vitroAngiotensin II up-regulates soluble epoxide hydrolase in vascular endothelium cite this article - sign up in the box Rights & Permissions www.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Angiotensin II up-regulates soluble epoxide hydrolase in vascular

Hammock, Bruce D.

176

Role Of Informal Solid Waste Management Sector And Possibilities Of Integration; The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2047 GMT GPC Composition of Urban solid waste in India Organic 40% Recyclable 20% Inert debris 35% Misc. High generation of organics. Recycling Viable option. 75% waste is recyclable (in some form). #12/containers City Dumping site/ other unauthorised dumping sites #12;Waste Composition organic 54% inert debris 25

Columbia University

177

MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

academic information and reports from Banner and Discoverer. Operate basic office equipment including personal computers, printers, copy machine, and fax machine. Arrange for rooms, equipment, and misc. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each

Endres. William J.

178

Advanced Reduction Processes - A New Class of Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity on perchlorate and nitrate degradation were investigated. The effectiveness of the sulfite/UV-L treatment process improved with increasing pH for both perchlorate and nitrate....

Vellanki, Bhanu Prakash

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual Report. October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1996.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 Total Acid Digestion (TAD) Procedure Appendix B. — Qualitycore; Sx, sulfite extract; TAD, total acid digest; OHx,Se from a total acid digest (TAD) of the sample and the sum

Zawislanski, P.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide onto Activated Carbon Fibers: Effect of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These processes include natural gas processing, petroleum refining, petrochemical plants, Kraft mills, coke ovens, and coal gasifiers. H2S concentrations in these processes vary from 0 to 60 vol % (6). The Claus process

Borguet, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CX-004371: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kapstone Kraft Paper Company #3 Paper Machine Steam Efficiency ImprovementsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 11/02/2010Location(s): North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

182

The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Collective effects of intense ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Tajima and Dawson, PRL 43, 267 (1979). Beam -plasma wake field accelerator P. Chen et al, PRL 54, 693. Robertson, PRL, 48, 149 (1982). Thin collective lens R. Kraft, Phys. Fluids, 30, 245 (1987). Thick

183

ORTH/VIM proteins that regulate DNA methylation are functional ubiquitin E3 ligases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORTH/VIM proteins that regulate DNA methylation are functional ubiquitin E3 ligases Edward Kraft1 methylation status in vivo. Keywords: RING, E3 ligase, DNA methylation, ubiquitylation, ORTH/VIM, SRA

Jacobsen, Steve

184

asparaginyl endopeptidase develop: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corporations in this sector. As the main actors in the international coffee chain, companies such as Sara LeeDouwe Egberts, Nestl and Kraft have been pressurised to show...

185

alter spikelet development: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corporations in this sector. As the main actors in the international coffee chain, companies such as Sara LeeDouwe Egberts, Nestl and Kraft have been pressurised to show...

186

araneae zodariidae develop: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corporations in this sector. As the main actors in the international coffee chain, companies such as Sara LeeDouwe Egberts, Nestl and Kraft have been pressurised to show...

187

anopheles gambiae developing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corporations in this sector. As the main actors in the international coffee chain, companies such as Sara LeeDouwe Egberts, Nestl and Kraft have been pressurised to show...

188

Zulassungsordnung der Universitt Heidelberg fr den Bachelorstudiengang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Immatrikulationsordnung der Universität Heidelberg unberührt. § 2 Inkrafttreten/Au�erkrafttreten Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach ihrer Bekanntmachung im Mitteilungsblatt des Rektors in Kraft. Zugleich tritt die Satzung für

Heermann, Dieter W.

189

1/2005 Verkndungsblatt der Universitt Hannover vom 24.02.2005 Seite 43 Das Prsidium der Universitt Hannover hat auf seiner Sitzung am 26.01.2005 gem 37 Abs. 1 Nr. 5.b) NHG die  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

�nderung der Prüfungsordnung für die Studiengänge Produktion und Logistik genehmigt. Die �nderung tritt tritt rückwirkend zum Wintersemester 2004/05 in Kraft. #12;

Vollmer, Heribert

190

Freien Hansestadt Bremen 2013 Verkndet am 10. Juli 2013 Nr. 159  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freien Hansestadt Bremen vom 10. Juli 2013 628 (4) Mit Inkrafttreten dieser Ordnung tritt die Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2013 in Kraft. Sie wird im

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

191

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 18.08.2010 1 Ordnung des Fachbereichs Psychologie und Sportwissenschaften an der Johann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jahr). Artikel II Die Ă?nderung der Bachelorstudiengang tritt am Tage nach Bekanntgabe im UniReport in Kraft. Sie gilt ab Sommersemester 2010. Gleichzeitig tritt die Ordnung ĂĽber den Nachweis der sportlichen

Mester, Rudolf

192

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 19. Dezember 2008 1 Satzung der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main fr die Festset-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vorsehen, bleiben unberührt. § 3 Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach ihrer Bekanntmachung im UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main in Kraft; sie tritt am 30

Mester, Rudolf

193

sprechenden Verffentlichungen bekannt gegeben Die studierbaren Fcher und Fcherkombinationen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Die Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rek- tors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft. Sie Modul ... ist Voraussetzung fĂĽr die Belegung von Modul ..." entfallen. Artikel 2 Die Ă?nderung tritt nach

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

194

Inkrafttreten Diese Ordnung tritt mit Genehmigung durch die Se-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

§ 7 Inkrafttreten Diese Ordnung tritt mit Genehmigung durch die Se- natorin für Bildung und. Artikel 2 Die �nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung des Rek- tors mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2007 in Kraft

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

195

Zweite Satzung zur nderung der Prfungs-und Studienordnung der  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

folgende Fassung: ,,§ 35 Inkrafttreten (1) Diese Satzung tritt am 1. Juli 2008 in Kraft. (2) 1 Wer im, zuletzt geändert durch Satzung vom 2. Dezember 2008." § 2 Diese Satzung tritt mit Wirkung vom 24

Hofmann, Martin

196

FREIEN HANSESTADT BREMEN 2009 Nr. 52Ausgegeben am 27. April 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inkrafttreten (1) Diese Bekanntmachung tritt am Tag nach ihrer Veröffentlichung in Kraft. (2) Gleichzeitig tritt 2 Diese �nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor mit Wirkung vom 1. Oktober 2005

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

197

FREIEN HANSESTADT BREMEN 2008 Nr. 120Ausgegeben am 13. November 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ă?nderungsordnung tritt nach der Genehmi- gung durch den Rektor am 1. April 2008 in Kraft. Sie gilt fĂĽr Studierende Ă?nderungsordnung tritt nach der Genehmi- g

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

198

The Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a softwood kraft black liquor to determine the properties of solubilized lignin that resulted in their phase in the polysaccharide content of the black liquor, an effect of polysaccharide degradation and re- #12;adsorption

199

Figure 2 Collect 5 horizontally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage containers, (e.g., resealable plastic containers) 5% bleach solution Aluminum foil Newspaper, Butcher or Kraft paper Rigid shipping container, (e.g., cardboard box, etc.) Frozen ice packs Packing tape

Mukhtar, Saqib

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical imaging features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to make inferences about unknown attributes or features of the new product, or to form... brand image (e.g., Kraft) affect its categori zation? How will the image affect its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Interne Verffentlichung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autor See other side for an English version Zu Beginn des Jahres 2008 tritt ein neues Urheberrecht.1.2008 in Kraft tritt, wird sich das ändern (§ 137 l Abs. 1 UrhG). In Fällen, in denen ursprünglich alle, übertragen, bevor das neue Urheberrecht in Kraft tritt, also bis spätestens zum 31.12.2007. Dafür reicht die

202

Understanding the Nature and Reactivity of Residual Lignin for Improved Pulping and Bleaching Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most formidable challenges in kraft pulping to produce bleached chemical pulps is how to effectively remove the last 5-10% of lignin while maintaining the fiber quality. To avoid a severe fiber degradation, kraft pulping is usually terminated in the 25-30 kappa number range and then followed by an elementally chlorine free (ECF) or a totally chlorine free (TCF) bleaching sequence to reduce the environmental impacts.

Yuan-Zong Lai

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Growth, survival, distribution, and population estimates of penaeid shrimp in fertilized and unfertilized brackish water ponds receiving thermal effluents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/kg) and per pound (()/lb), and the number or weight of miscellaneous organisms (misc. organ. ) collected at harvest, of white and brown shrimp Mean growth per day and food conversion of white shrimp between samples. F designates fertilized ponds... natural foods over a wide variety of supplemental feeds. A large variety of organic and inorganic fertilizers have been applied at different rates in shrimp culture operations to enhance the natural productivity of the system. The most inexpensive...

Furness, Gary Neal

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Matlab Toolbox for the iRobot Create (MTIC) Version 2.0 (8.25.2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Matlab Toolbox for the iRobot Create (MTIC) Version 2.0 (8.25.2011) Download at: www.usna.edu/Users/weapsys/esposito/roomba.matlab, "Matlab Toolbox for the Create Robot", www.usna.edu/Users/weapsys/esposito/roomba.matlab/, Copyright 2008-2011 Or in BibTex: @MISC{MatlabCreate, author = {Joel M. Esposito and Owen Barton and Josh Koehler and David Lim

Esposito, Joel M.

205

Product consistency test of fully radioactive high-sodium content borosilicate glass K-26 N.V. Ojovan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radioactive waste in a glass matrix. The program was initiated in the mid-70s. Since then pilot and industrial of this glass were produced in the 1980s during a pilot vitrification campaign of radioactive waste fromO - 16.1Na2O - 1.7Fe2O3 - 1.2NaCl - 1.1Na2SO4 - 6.2Misc. The main radioactive contaminant of waste

Sheffield, University of

206

What matters for well-being: Individual perceptions of quality of life before and after important life events.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hygiene 8. Employment: employment, job satisfaction 9. Misc other: Safety, lack of fear, neighbors, pets, other relationships, other positive mentions, other 10. Freedom: freedom, independence 11. Time self: time for self, not too overworked, life... in balance, sleep, no stress 12. Other material: consumption, shopping, getting new things, car, transport, educa- tion (own, children’s, standard of system in general), other material benefits 13. Other personal: Other personal characteristics (not elsewhere...

Scott, Jacqueline; Plagnol, Anke C.

2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop DOE Hydrogen Program Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis & Misc. Earmarks '04 '05 FY 2005 Budget Request = $25.3M FY 2004 Appropriation = $22.6M #12;9 Cost-saving transportation and renewable technologies. #12;3 Hybrids are a Bridge 0 5 10 15 20 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 commercialization decision in 2015 leads to beginning of mass- produced hydrogen fuel cell cars by 2020 #12;5 H2

208

Effects of ionizing radiation on the response of certain photosensitive seeds to red light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and molecular oxygen. Studies of phosphate metabolism (Surrey and Gordon, 1962) and phosphorylation (Gordon and Surrey, 1961) indicate that energy transfer through phosphate esterification plays an important role and may be the key enzymatic reaction in red... spectrum promoting the germination of light-sensitive lettuce seed. Smithsonian Inst. Pubis. Misc. Collections 96: 1-8 ~ 11. Gordon, S. A. , and K. Surrey. 1961. Phosphorylation and red-spectrum photomorphogenesis. ~n Effects of ionizing radiations...

Richardson, Billy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Travaux Diriges de XML no Dans ce TP, toujours autour d'Ingrid Bergman, nous proposons une initiation a XSLT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´es de resume ; · realisateur, tir´e de resume ; · date, tir´e de role ; · misc, tir´e de role celui de role ; · resume, avec comme contenu celui de resume ; · autant de alias, que n;resumes> ... resume filmref="f29" img="29.jpg" pdf="29.pdf" realisateur="Jean Renoir"> Polnish countess

Blanc, Olivier

210

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pumps | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation,

211

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercAirCompressors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to:

212

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcEngineHeaters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump

213

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElevators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc

214

Estimates of energy consumption by building type and end use at U.S. Army installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the use of LBNL`s End-use Disaggregation Alogrithm (EDA) to 12 US Army installations nationwide in order to obtain annual estimates of electricity use for all major building types and end uses. The building types include barrack, dining hall, gymnasium, administration, vehicle maintenance, hospital, residential, warehouse, and misc. Up to 8 electric end uses for each type were considered: space cooling, ventilation (air handling units, fans, chilled and hot water pumps), cooking, misc./plugs, refrigeration, exterior and interior lighting, and process loads. Through building simulations, we also obtained estimates of natural gas space heating energy use. Average electricity use for these 12 installations and Fort Hood are: HVAC, misc., and indoor lighting end uses consumed the most electricity (28, 27, and 26% of total[3.8, 3.5, and 3.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}]). Refrigeration, street lighting, exterior lighting, and cooking consumed 7, 7, 3, and 2% of total (0.9, 0.9, 0.4, and 0.3 kWh/ft{sup 2})

Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Proceedings of the black liquor research program review fourth meeting held July 28--30, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research programs, presented at the black liquor review meeting are described. Research topics include the following: Cooperative Program in Kraft Recovery; Black Liquor Physical Properties; Viscosity of Strong Black Liquor; Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor; Molecular Weight Distribution of Kraft Lignin; Black Liquor Droplet Formation Project; Fundamental Studies of Black Liquor Combustion; Black Liquor Combustion Sensors; Flash X-ray Imagining of Black Liquor Sprays; Laser Induced Fluorescence For Process Control In The Pulp and Paper Industry; Recovery Boiler Optimization; Black Liquor Gasification and Use of the Products in Combined-Cycle Cogeneration; Black Liquor Steam Plasma Automization; The B and W Pyrosonic 2000R System; Monsteras Boiler Control System; and Cooperative Program Project Reviews. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Emerson, D. B.; Whitworth, B. A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Fractionation of Loblolly Pine Woodchips Into Pulp For Making Paper Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to test the PureVision biomass fractionation technology for making pulp from loblolly pine. A specific goal was to produce a pulp product that is comparable to pulp produced from the kraft process, while reducing the environmental effects of the kraft process, known to be a highly pollutant process. The overall goal of the project was met by using the biomass fractionation concept for making pulp product. This proof-of-concept study, done with Southern pine pinchips as feedstock, evaluated NaOH concentration and residence time as variables in single-stage cocurrent pulping process. It can be concluded that 1% NaOH is adequate for effective delignification using the PureVision process; this is about ? of that used in the kraft process. Also, the PureVision process does not use sulfur-based chemicals such as N2S and hence, is environmentally more benign.

Kiran Kadam, PhD

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Uroporphyrinogen III Synthase-Product Complex,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis in mammals, nitrite and sulfite assimilation, and methane production in methanogens. Tet of two ALA molecules to form the basic pyrrole structure (porphobilinogen, PBG), and assembly of four PBG pyrroles into a linear tetraypyrrole (hydroxymethylbilane, HMB). Subsequently, uroporphyrino- gen III

Hill, Chris

218

Impacts of Natural Organic Matter on Perchlorate Removal by an Advanced Reduction Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments were conducted to obtain data on the impacts of natural organic matter and light intensity on destruction of perchlorate by the ARPs that use sulfite activated by ultraviolet light produced by low-pressure mercury lamps or KrCl excimer lamps...

Duan, Yuhang

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Nov. 2005, p. 74537460 Vol. 71, No. 11 0099-2240/05/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.71.11.74537460.2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with nitrate and incubated with no electron acceptor, was used for the two time points considered and for both- ganese(IV), nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), dimethyl sulfoxide and soluble hexavalent uranyl (UO2 2 ) and chro- mate (CrO4 2 ) to less soluble and less toxic forms [U

Tebo, Brad

220

Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

Nolan, Paul S. (North Canton, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH); Vecci, Stanley J. (Alliance, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modification of alkaline pulping to facilitate the isolation of aliphatic acids. Part 1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of pine wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pretreating pine chips (Pinus sylvestris) with sodium hydroxide prior to the alkaline delignification kraft, kraft-anthraquinone, and soda-anthraquinone) can facilitate the recovery of the carbohydrate degradation products from alkaline pulping liquors. Under suitable pretreatment conditions large amounts of carbohydrate degradation products (alipahtic acids) were formed relative to lignin. The lignin fraction was composed of comparatively low-molecular-weight fragments. Although the delignification was considerably retarded and the yield (based on wood) was decreased by 1-3%, the properties of the resulting pulp were essentially maintained despite pretreatment. Finally, data are given for the composition of aliphatic acids in liquors resulting from pretreatments.

Alen, R.; Niemelae, K.; Sjoestroem, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994 (Quarter No. 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{lg_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}0), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{lg_bullet}2H{sub 2}0), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides; silica; and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. Currently, the only market for scrubber sludge is for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. This project is developing a process that can produce a high-quality calcium sulfite or gypsum product while keeping process costs low enough that the material produced will be competitive with that from other, more conventional sources. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified gypsum or calcium sulfite product. The separated limestone will be a useful by-product, as it can be recycled to the scrubber, thus boosting the limestone utilization and improving process efficiency. Calcium sulfite will then be oxidized to gypsum, or separated as a salable product in its own right from sludges where it is present in sufficient quantity. The main product of the process will be either gypsum or calcium sulfite, depending on the characteristics of the sludge being processed. These products will be sufficiently pure to be easily marketed, rather that being landfilled.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Use of Energy Management and Control Systems for Performance Monitoring of Retrofit Projects: Preliminary Engineering Survey, USDOE Forrestal and Germantown Facility, Summary Report, USDOE Office of Conservation and Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forrestal Building Summary: Full Proposal 05/02/91 Neat Supplies E.tffo $3,000 Wire $400/1000 4 pr, $150/1000 2 pr $1,000 Misc. Electrical Supplies Neat G&A on Supplies & Materials: $3,408 | Neat Subcontract labor_Estimates: $10,000 Electrician Hot Tap...,000 Electrician Hot Tap Contractor Steam Meter Installer Plumber Neat G&A on Subcontracts: $800 Texas A&M Lqhor $10,000 Supplemental Living Allowance $8,000 Travel to & from job Neat G&A Travel: $4,500 Neat Labor $5,000 Management $3,000 Programming & Engineeering...

Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Bryant, J.; Poyner, B.; McBride, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Pcs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search This

226

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation, search

227

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to: navigation,Information

228

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercCirculationFans | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc Jump to:Information

229

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation Misc JumpSPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating

230

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercFans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation MiscSPElectrtyUsePercFans Jump to:

231

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation MiscSPElectrtyUsePercFans Jump

232

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation MiscSPElectrtyUsePercFans

233

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeComputersServers | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation MiscSPElectrtyUsePercFansInformation

234

File:App easement pdf.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf Jump to:TXATransmissionSiting.pdfCappFS.pdfsource HistoryMisc

235

Chemical Engineering Andrew Zydney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;ChE Employment (2003 at PSU) Merck Dow ExxonMob Air Products Amgen PPG Sunoco Kraft Foods NRC Procter, microelectronics, consumer products, biotechnology, fuels / energy, environmental engineering, etc. ·Chemical Engineers focus on the processes involved in making new products, including chemical reactions

Maranas, Costas

236

Reputation Matters Paula Dyke, ABC, CRMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it well? Internationally ­ ranked by Reputation Institute ·BMW ·Sony ·The Walt Disney Company ·Daimler by Marketing Magazine ·Heinz ·Google ·Kellogg ·Sony ·Kraft ·Tim Hortons ·Campbell ·Canadian Tire ·Subway

Oyet, Alwell

237

The Astrophysical Journal, 722:17351743, 2010 October 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/722/2/1735 C 2010. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or continuously supplied to cluster cores to prevent the formation of cooling flows. A primary candidate--REHEATING THE COOL CORE OF A 3 keV CLUSTER FROM A NUCLEAR OUTBURST at z = 0.246 D. V. Lal1 , R. P. Kraft1 merger event. The temperature across the discontinuities is roughly constant with no signature of a cool

Evans, Dan

238

BIODIVERSITY The geography of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY REVIEW The geography of climate change: implications for conservation biogeography D. J. B. Kraft1 INTRODUCTION It is widely recognized that climate change poses a grave threat., 2007). The impacts of climate change are broadly detectable in many taxa, including shifts in phenology

Kraft, Nathan

239

Who Hires a Rice Jones Graduate School of Business MBA? The following is a list of employers who have hired MBAs from Rice within the past few years. These  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobil FDIC Federal Reserve Bank of New York FMC Technologies General Electric Goldman Sachs Harrah, or individual student outreach. 3M AAA Capital Management Access America Funds American General Life Consulting Imperial Sugar Intel Johnson & Johnson JP Morgan Chase & Co Kalypso KBR Kimberly-Clark KPMG Kraft

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

240

Auszug aus den Amtlichen Bekanntmachungen Nr. 1/2011 -Seite 58 Satzung fr das Zentrum fr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. die Vorschläge für die Erteilung von Lehrauf- trägen. § 5 In-Kraft-Treten Diese Satzung tritt am Tage. Gleichzeitig tritt die Satzung für das Sprachenzentrum der Universität Potsdam vom 29. Juli 1999 (AmBek. UP Nr

Potsdam, Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

28.03.2008 8 Inhaltsverzeichnis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gleichstellung tritt in seiner vorliegenden Fassung mit Wirkung ab 01.04.2008 in Kraft. (2) Er gilt zunächst für (Intensivstudiengang) Uni- versität Göttingen tritt am Tage nach ihrer Bekanntmachung in den Amtlichen Mitteilungen der

Gollisch, Tim

242

Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitt Bonn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, 31. Jg., Nr. 15 vom 8. Juni 2001) tritt mit Wirkung zum 30. September 2016 au�er Kraft." #12;- 4 - Artikel II Diese Satzung tritt am Tag nach ihrer Veröffentlichung in den

Dutz, Hartmut

243

Ordnung zur nderung der Diplomprfungsordnung der Universitt Bremen fr den Studiengang Berufs-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

folgende Fassung: ,,(1) Diese Prüfungsordnung in der Fassung vom 13. Dezember 2006 tritt mit der tritt mit der Genehmigung durch den Rektor in Kraft. Bremen, den 6. März 2007 Der Rektor der Universität

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

244

Satzung der Universitt zu Lbeck zur Festsetzung von Curricularwerten vom 30. Juni 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Au�erkrafttreten Diese Satzung tritt am Tage nach ihrer Bekanntmachung in Kraft. Sie gilt erstmals für die Berech- nung der Aufnahmekapazität zum Studienjahr 2014/15. Gleichzeitig tritt die Satzung der Universi- tät zu

Groppe, Sven

245

Verkndungsblatt der Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitt Hannover vom 19.12.2011 27/2011 Der Fakulttsrat der Fakultt fr Bauingenieurwesen und Geodsie der Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitt Hannover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Das Präsidium hat die �nde- rung am 07.12.2011 gemä� § 37 Abs. 1 Nr. 5. b) NHG genehmigt. Sie tritt am Studiengänge des Bauingenieurwesens tritt zum 30.09.2015 au�er Kraft. #12;

Vollmer, Heribert

246

UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen vom 16. Februar 2009 1 Satzung der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main fr die Fest-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

56 0 56 0 56 0 Artikel 2 Diese �nderung tritt am Tage nach ihrer Bekanntmachung im UniReport Satzungen und Ordnungen der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main in Kraft; sie tritt am 30

Mester, Rudolf

247

Nr . 97 Amtsblatt der Freien Hansestadt Bremen vom 7 . November 2012 793 Ordnung zur nderung der fachspezifischen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

im Diplomstudiengang Er- ziehungswissenschaft immatrikuliert sind . Diese Prü- fungsordnung tritt am ." Artikel 2 Diese �nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 30 . September 2012 in Kraft . Sie CP ge- wichtet ." 8 . In § 8 werden folgende Absätze ergänzt: ,,(7) Zum Wintersemester 2012/13 tritt

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

248

FREIEN HANSESTADT BREMEN 2011 Nr. 66Ausgegeben am 13. August 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mehr auf- genommen . Diese PrĂĽfungsordnung tritt mit Ablauf des 30 . September 2017 auĂ?er Kraft . (6 Satz 2 bleibt unberĂĽhrt ." Artikel 2 Diese Ă?nderung tritt nach der Genehmigung durch den Rektor am 1

Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

249

We report here the auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) response of cellulose based fiber networks. Auxetic materials grow fatter when stretched and are extremely rare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Grammage (g/m2) Source Copy Paper 105±2 75 Office Max OM98043 Copy Paper 30% recycled fibers, 92 brightness, 20 lb. wt. Paperboard 270±2 220 Smead UPC 12043 No. 53LBE 10% recycled fibers, Colored blue folder Handsheet HW 586±28 110 Kraft pulp hardwood, bleached PET Film 144±2 152 HP Premium Inkjet Transparency Film

Das, Suman

250

Offered: Offered: Position(s): Position(s)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center Verso Paper Bachelors Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical engineers will be performing process: Description: Paid/Unpaid: When: Hire International Students: Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical engineers. It is a 2,000 ton/day, fully-integrated mill with four paper machines, a pulp machine, two kraft pulp lines

New Hampshire, University of

251

Coping with Drought on Rangelands: Concluding Remarks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of information disseminated... From David Kraft #12;Reflections · So, this is our socio ecological system · We spheres of interactions of drought Impacts: ­ Biophysical landscape ­ Economic landscape ­ Institutional provoked liquidation ­ 64% of producers are 55 or older & average farm/ranch size of older producers is 75

252

2011-12 UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DECEMBER 1, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education David Kraft, College of Liberal Arts Jonathan Morris, College of Science and Engineering Hayden, advisors, counselors, and extension service workers. Most people stay in this classification or move. The classification was started in 1945 with the passage of the civil service rules by the Regents. In 1984 PELRA

Janssen, Michel

253

Methods for colloid transport visualization in pore networks Naoyuki Ochiai,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methods for colloid transport visualization in pore networks Naoyuki Ochiai,1 Erika L. Kraft,2 visualization in pore networks, Water Resour. Res., 42, W12S06, doi:10.1029/2006WR004961. 1. Introduction [2 fragments, mineral precipitates and organic macromolecules, as well as micro- organisms (e.g., protozoa

Tullos, Desiree

254

Payment list S.No Names Country  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Payment list S.No Names Country 1 A. Bueck Germany 2 A. Kronenburg Germany 3 Achintya Mukhopadhyay Chennai 4 Christoph Kirse Germany 5 Heiko Briesen Germany 6 Jitendra Kumar Germany 7 Mahesh V . Panchagnula Chennai 8 Marchisio, D. L. Italy 9 Markus Kraft UK 10 Martin. A. J. Hartig Germany 11 Menwer M

Srinivasan, N.

255

Primary Research Paper Invertebrate community and stream substrate responses to woody debris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Large-extent physical disturbances, such as ice storms, can produce wide-ranging impacts removal from an ice storm-impacted stream system, NY USA Dana R. Warren* & Clifford E. Kraft Department; ice storm; debris dam; high gradient stream; BACI Abstract We assessed the influence of ice

Kraft, Clifford E.

256

COLLEGE OF ACES UNDERGRADUATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pursue your own business, a corporate job, a government specialty, or a research position. Design and drainage, erosion control and the effective utilization of natural resources. TSM Specializations such as Deere & Co., a government agency such as the U.S. EPA, or a company like Kraft Foods. You may

Gilbert, Matthew

257

Applicability of a fog-dispersal system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be considered is the air pollution from the industrial sources in the area. The condensation nuclei from these sources are considerable. The emissions from the copper smel- ter, aluminum smelter, and Kraft pulp mill in the Tacoma area include sodium sulfate...

Fourroux, Melvin Ross

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Moisture Control in Insulated Raised Floor Systems in Southern Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polyisocyanurate foam, open-cell sprayed polyurethane foams of vary- ing vapor permeance, closed-cell sprayed polyurethane foam, and kraft-faced fiberglass batt insulation. Expected Outcomes This research will result Association Southern Forest Products Association Contact Information Samuel V. Glass USDA Forest Service

259

Sulfur Degassing From Volcanoes: Source Conditions, Surveillance, Plume Chemistry and Earth System Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sulfur in magmas owes much to its multiple valence states (-II, 0, IV, VI), speciation (e.g., S2, H2S, SO on the redox chemistry of sulfur: by reducing sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite and sulfate to H2S, or oxidizing sulfur and H2S to sulfate (e.g., Takano et al. 1997; Amend and Shock 2001; Shock et al. 2010

Boyer, Edmond

260

University of Kansas Graduate School theses, 1948-1958  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

managers with special reference to Kansas. M. A. Pol. Sci. 1948. Allen, William Daniel. Investigations of gas spargers by the air oxidation of sodium sulfite solutions. M, S. Chem. Engin. 1956. Allen, William H., Jr. A.n analysis of school philosophies.... Problems of an interior. M. Fine Arts Draw, and Paint. 1953. Alnutt, John Carl. A first semester senior high school course in American lit erature treated reflectively in the light of historical backgrounds. M. A. Ed. 1948. Alsmiller, Hufard G., Jr...

Wilder, Bessie E.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

Separation of the components of flue-gas scrubber sludge by froth flotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. Currently, the major markets for scrubber sludge are for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. Other markets, such as paper manufacture and plastics fillers, have even more stringent quality requirements and will not accept raw sludge at all. In the work described in this paper, several reagents have been examined to determine their ability to selectively improve the flotation of the unreacted limestone contaminant away from the desirable products (calcium sulfite and gypsum). The most success has been achieved using a cationic collector, which shows a higher selectivity between calcium sulfite and calcium carbonate than do the anionic collectors that were studied.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Southern Pine Based on Biorefinery Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program seeks to develop an integrated southern pine wood to biofuels/biomaterials processing facility on the Recipient’s campus, that will test advanced integrated wood processing technologies at the laboratory scale, including: • The generation of the bioethanol from pines residues and hemicelluloses extracted from pine woodchips; • The conversion of extracted woodchips to linerboard and bleach grade pulps; and • The efficient conversion of pine residues, bark and kraft cooking liquor into a useful pyrolysis oil.

Ragauskas, Arthur J; Singh, Preet

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Verkndungsblatt 7|2013 Ausgabedatum 03.06.2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

genehmigt. Sie tritt am Tage nach ihrer hochschulöffentlichen Bekanntmachung im Verkündungsblatt der tritt zum 30.09.2014 au�er Kraft. #12;Verkündungsblatt der Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität �nderung am 08.05.2013 gemä� § 37 Abs. 1 Nr. 5. b) NHG geneh- migt. Sie tritt am Tage nach ihrer

Vollmer, Heribert

267

Univ. Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Wolfgang H. Muller Technische Universitat Berlin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¨ogliche Kraft: Pmax = 78,9 kN (b) Die maximale Schubspannung tritt am Au�enrand des Stabes und berechnet sich erh¨alt man: Bei C tritt nur das Torsionsmoment MD auf. Daraus ergibt sich die Torsionspannung = MD IP D 2 = 16MD D3 (20) Eine Normalspannung xx tritt nicht auf, da es weder Biegemoent noch Normalkraft

Berlin,Technische Universität

268

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions from U.S. pulp and paper mills, 1980-2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of total SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions from U.S. pulp and paper mills were developed from industry-wide surveys conducted at 5-yr intervals from 1980 to 2005. The following conclusions were drawn from these estimates: (1) Total SO{sub 2} emissions from pulp and paper mills were 340,000 t in 2005. Since 1980, SO{sub 2} emissions have decreased steadily. The decline over the 25-yr period was over 60%. Paper production increased by 50% over the same period. (2) Boilers burning coal and oil are the primary source of SO{sub 2} emissions, with minor contributions from black liquor combustion in kraft recovery furnaces and the burning of noncondensable gases in boilers at kraft pulp mills. Factors contributing to the decline in boiler SO{sub 2} emissions include large reductions in residual oil use, recent decreases in coal use, declines in the average sulfur content of residual oil and coal being burned, and increasing use of flue gas desulfurization systems.(3) NOx emissions from pulp and paper mills were 230,000 t in 2005. NOx emissions were fairly constant through 1995, but then declined by 12% in 2000 and an additional 17% between 2000 and 2005. (4) In 2005, boilers accounted for two-thirds of the NOx emissions, and kraft mill sources approximately 30%. Boiler NOx emissions exhibited very little change through 1995, but decreased by one third in the next 10 yr. The lower emissions resulted from declines in fossil fuel use, a reduction in the EPA emission factors for natural gas combustion in boilers without NOx controls, and more widespread use of combustion modifications and add-on NOx control technologies, particularly on coal-fired boilers subject to EPA's NOx SIP call. Total NOx emissions from kraft mill sources changed little over the 25-yr period. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

John E. Pinkerton [National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Quality Program

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fundamental Study of Black Liquor Gasification Kinetics. Quarterly progress report for the period October 1999 to December 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to evaluate the kinetics of gasification of kraft black liquor under laboratory conditions simulating pressurized, oxygen-blown gasification. The significant independent variables are gasifier temperature, black liquor composition particle size, and particle residence time. The authors will quantify their impact on the concentration of major and trace gas phase species, as well as the composition of condensed phase inorganic products, including specification of the Na- and S-containing compounds and overall carbon conversion.

NONE

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Establishment of ultraviolet absorption analysis at 2050 A as a viable indicator of delignification rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UV absorption of diluted black liquor samples at 2050 A and the percent lignin removed from wood (Pinus strobus) during kraft pulping, when plotted against each other, produced a linear relation with a correlation coefficient of 0.961. This result indicated the viability of using UV absorption analysis of black liquor samples in the determination of reaction rate of lignin within the chip.

Bobier, W.D.; Poniatowski, S.E.; Walkinshaw, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fundamental Investigations of C1O2 Delignification - Final Report - 07/10/1996 - 07/09/1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of chlorine dioxide delignification of low kappa kraft pulps and identify new methods of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of this bleaching agent. The approach adopted was to investigate the fundamental structural components of lignin that contribute to delignification reactions with chlorine dioxide. These results were then used to examine new bleaching technologies that will permit enhanced delignification while simultaneously reducing the generation of chlorinated organic compounds.

Ragauskas, Arthur J.; McDonough, T. J.

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

Conceptual design of a black liquor gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1985, Champion International completed a study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in a combined cycle cogeneration system based on gas turbines. That study indicated that gasification had high potential as an alternative to recovery boiler technology and offered many advantages. This paper describes the design of the plant, the construction of the pilot plant, and finally presents data from operation of the plant.

Kelleher, E. G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Direct fuel cell for the production of electricity from lignin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the use of an anthraquinone mediated fuel cell for the direct production of electrical energy from sulfonated lignin and Kraft Black Liquor. The cell produces the equivalent of one kWh for each 2-3 lb sulfonated lignin and 5-8 lb black liquor combustibles. In the case of the sulfonated lignin, chain session occurs during the oxidation process, reducing the molecular weight from ca. 2 x 10/sup 4/ to less than 1000 D.

Weetall, H.H.; Forsyth, B.D.; Hertl, W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy Efficiency Programs for Small and Medium Sized Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.47 0.60 0.73 0.39 16.59 Lumber SIC 24 2.66 2.29 2.9 2.46 7.55 Furniture SIC 25 1.18 1.28 1.20 0.96 18.33 Paper SIC 26 10.84 9.94 12.56 11.91 -9.88 Printing and 0.62 0.73 0.77 0.76 -21.44 Publishing SIC 27 Chemicals SIC 28 9.99 9.51 9.69 10.44 -4....79 0.87 6.16 Related Products SIC 38 Misc. Manufacturing 1.08 1.10 0.93 1.17 -8.10 SIC39 50 ESL-IE-01-05-08 Proceedings from the Twenty-third National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 1-4, 2001 Energy Intensity (Thousand...

Shipley, A. M.; Elliott, R. N.

275

Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pre-extraction–kraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called “near neutral” pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 °C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the “near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the “near-neutral” green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kraft process dominates pulp and paper production worldwide. Black liquor, a mixture of lignin and inorganic chemicals, is generated in this process as fiber is extracted from wood. At most kraft mills today, black liquor is burned in Tomlinson boilers to produce steam for on-site heat and power and to recover the inorganic chemicals for reuse in the process. Globally, the black liquor generation rate is about 85,000 MW{sub fuel} (or 0.5 million tonnes of dry solids per day), with nearly 50% of this in North America. The majority of presently installed Tomlinson boilers will reach the end of their useful lives during the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor-gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher electrical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety, and capital cost benefits for kraft mills. Several companies are pursuing commercialization of black liquor gasification for gas turbine applications. This paper presents results of detailed performance modeling of gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration systems using different black liquor gasifiers modeled on proposed commercial designs.

Consonni, S. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. di Energetica; Larson, E.D.; Keutz, T.G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Berglin, N. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Heat and Power Technology

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Monolithically interconnected GaAs solar cells: A new interconnection technology for high voltage solar cell output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic linear concentrator arrays can benefit from high performance solar cell technologies being developed at AstroPower. Specifically, these are the integration of thin GaAs solar cell and epitaxial lateral overgrowth technologies with the application of monolithically interconnected solar cell (MISC) techniques. This MISC array has several advantages which make it ideal for space concentrator systems. These are high system voltage, reliable low cost monolithically formed interconnections, design flexibility, costs that are independent of array voltage, and low power loss from shorts, opens, and impact damage. This concentrator solar cell will incorporate the benefits of light trapping by growing the device active layers over a low-cost, simple, PECVD deposited silicon/silicon dioxide Bragg reflector. The high voltage-low current output results in minimal 12R losses while properly designing the device allows for minimal shading and resistance losses. It is possible to obtain open circuit voltages as high as 67 volts/cm of solar cell length with existing technology. The projected power density for the high performance device is 5 kW/m for an AMO efficiency of 26% at 1 5X. Concentrator solar cell arrays are necessary to meet the power requirements of specific mission platforms and can supply high voltage power for electric propulsion systems. It is anticipated that the high efficiency, GaAs monolithically interconnected linear concentrator solar cell array will enjoy widespread application for space based solar power needs. Additional applications include remote man-portable or ultra-light unmanned air vehicle (UAV) power supplies where high power per area, high radiation hardness and a high bus voltage or low bus current are important. The monolithic approach has a number of inherent advantages, including reduced cost per interconnect and increased reliability of array connections. There is also a high potential for a large number of consumer products.

Dinetta, L.C.; Hannon, M.H.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 cP in viscosity in comparison to high AA pulp for the oxygen delignification. This difference is also seen for high-kappa SW kraft pulps with an average improvement of {approx}3% in yield and 3 cP in viscosity for low AA high kappa number 50 pulp. Low AA hardwood kappa number 20 pulp had an average improvement of {approx}4% in yield and 6-12 cP in viscosity as compared to high AA pulp. Lower kraft cooking temperature (160 vs. 170 C) in combination with the medium AA provides a practical approach for integrating high kappa pulping of hardwoods (i.e., low rejects) with an advanced extended oxygen delignification stage. ECF pulp bleaching of low and high kappa kraft SW and HW pulps exhibit comparable optical and physical strength properties when bleached D(EPO)D.

Arthur J. Ragauskas

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Exhaust gas clean up process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

Walker, R.J.

1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

Molecular interactions of SO2 with carbonate minerals under co-sequestration conditions: a combined experimental and theoretical study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a combined experimental and theoretical study investigating the reactivity between selected and morphologically important surfaces of carbonate minerals with supercritical CO2 with co-existing H2O and SO2. Trace amounts of SO2 cause formation of CaSO3 in the form of hannebachite in the initial stages of SO2 adsorption and transformation. Atomistic simulations of these initial steps indicate a somewhat catalytic activity of water, which is enhanced by the presence of Magnesium atoms in the mineral surface. Under co-sequestration conditions, traces of water are not likely to cause carbonate dissolution, however the presence of SO2 greatly stabilizes the sulfite product.

Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Relationship between the physical and mineralogical properties of two clays and their bloating characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Water Absorbtion of Clay at 22aC and 100 Percent Relative Humidity 3. Chemical Analysis Using Emission Spectrograph 4. Magnetic Properties of Clays and Aggregates 5. Carbon Analysis 6. Compositions of the Mixed Red Clay Samples 11 13 23 28... capacity of some clays. Successful attempts have 3 been made with lignin sulfite liquor and diesel fuel. ((hen the clay structure is destroyed, 11 large amounts of (OH) are released to react with the exchange ions in the clay. Therefore, the clay...

Abbott, Ute Agnes

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Exhaust gas clean up process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

Walker, Richard J. (McMurray, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The influence of purification protocol and pH on tomato spotted wilt virions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

g of TSWV-L infected peanut leaves in 25 ml of 0. 1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7. 0 with 0. 01 M sodium sulfite. One gram of 600-mesh carborundum was suspended in the mixture, and rubbed onto the tobacco leaves using the pestle which had been used... tested, the virus suspension (1 ml) was added to the respective suspension (25 ml) buffer and 600 mesh carborundum (1. 75 g) was suspended in the diluted virus suspension. The solution was placed in a mortar and stirred with the pestle. The specimen...

Shimek, Christina Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Novel Pulping Technology: Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general objectives of this new project are the same as those described in the original proposal. Conventional kraft pulping technologies will be modified for significant improvements in pulp production, such as strength, bleachability, and yield by using green liquor, a naturally high, kraft mill-derived sulfidity source. Although split white liquor sulfidity and other high sulfidity procedures have the promise of addressing several of the latter important economic needs of pulp mills, they require considerable engineering/capital retrofits, redesigned production methods, and thus add to overall mill expenditures. Green liquor use, however, possesses the required high sulfidity to obtain in general the benefits attributable to higher sulfidity cooking, without the required capital constraints for implementation. Before introduction of green liquor in our industrial operations, a stronger understanding of its fundamental chemical interaction with the lignin and carbohydrates in US hardwood and softwoods must be obtained. In addition, its effect on bleachability, enhancement of pulp properties, and influence on the overall energy and recovery of the mill requires further exploration before the process witnesses widespread mill use in North America. Thus, proof of principle will be accomplished in this work and the consequent effect of green liquor and other high sulfide sources on the pulping and bleaching operations will be explored for US kraft mills. The first year of this project will generate the pertinent information to validate its ability for implementation in US pulping operations, whereas year two will continue this work while proceeding to analyze pulp bleachability and final pulp/paper properties and develop a general economic and feasibility analysis for its eventual implementation in North America.

Lucian A. Lucia

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a low-cost froth flotation process that could remove limestone, unburned carbon, and related contaminants from the sludge while recovering the bulk of the calcium sulfite and gypsum. In the current quarter, experiments to remove impurities from the sludge using a water-only cyclone were conducted. The cyclone has been found to be effective for removing the coarser limestone impurities, as well as removing contaminants such as fine gravel and grinding-ball chips. These results show that the cyclone will be very complementary with froth flotation, which mainly removes the very fine impurities.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method of and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from exhaust gases formed by combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for removing sulfur oxides from exhaust gas formed by combustion particularly exhaust gas from an electricity generating power plant. The exhaust gas flows through a reaction zone which operates like a spray dryer. A purifying liquor consisting of an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate and/or sodium bicarbonate is sprayed into the reaction zone, in which the heat content of the exhaust gases causes virtually all of the water content of the purifying liquor to be evaporated. The exhaust gas is subsequently passed through a filter. Anhydrous solids are withdrawn from the reaction zone and the filter and contain at least 75% of sodium sulfite, sodium sulfate and sodium chloride and are processed to form sodium carbonate. To that end the solids are dissolved and sulfite is oxidized to form sulfate so that a solution that contains sodium sulfate and sodium chloride is formed. The sulfate is separated from that solution and the remaining solution is used in the recovery of sodium carbonate by the solvay process.

Voeste, T.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Historical collection of preprints, reprints, working papers, correspondence, and other documents related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This historical collection consists of various letters, correspondence, working papers, reprints, preprints, workshop reports, and news clippings related to the "cold fusion" experiments conducted by Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann. Binders and contents. 1. Laboratory Reprints/Preprints (Laboratory Documents from 9 national Labs. Some original documents); 2. Summary Report by Dr. Duane L. Barney (Articles, Letters, and Reports through 1994 on Cold Fusion. Original Documents); 3. Conference Workshops (Official Documents, schedules, and notes from 4 conferences); 4. HSS&T Hearings, SRI Incident Jan. 1992 (Summary of Cold Fusion Research and reports following SRI Incident. Original Documents); 5. Media 1989 to Present (circa 1995) (Journals, Magazines, Newspapers, and Press Releases from 1989-1995. Some reprints, some original articles/magazines); 6. Science in Service of National Economy aka Manfred's Book (A comprehensive overview of various research being done at Laboratories across the country that could impact the economy); 7. ERAB Information (Comprehensive Report on Cold Fusion Research w/ recommendations on funding and continued research. Original documents); 8. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1989 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion in order of print from 1989. Original documents); 9. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1990-1992 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1990-1992. Original documents); 10. Misc.: Memorandum, Notes, Reports, Summaries, and Updates Chronologically 1993-1995 (Various documents related to Cold Fusion including status reports and research in order of print from 1993-1995. Original documents); 11. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution A-H (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 12. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution I-R (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 13. General: Preprints/Reprints Filed by Institution S-Z (Reports of Research and Conclusion from various universities and institutions.); 14. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries A-F (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 15. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries G-L (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 16. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries M-R (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 17. General: Correspondence, Incoming, Inquiries S-Z (Letters, Correspondence, and Inquiries regarding Cold Fusion and its research. Sorted by Last Name of Author. Original documents); 18. Miscellaneous papers (Investigation of Cold Fusion Phenomena in Deuterated Metals-NCFI Final Report Volumes I. II, and III; June 1991; 4th Annual Conference on Cold Fusion Proceedings: Volumes 1-4; Development of Advanced Concepts for Nuclear Processes in Deuterated Metals; A Comprehensive Report on the research methods, background information, and principles related to Cold Fusion; Cold Fusion Research: November 1989; ERAB report on Cold Fusion Research; Proceedings: Workshop on Anomalous Effects in Deuterided Metals; Workshop designed to generate audio between skeptics and advocates to examine Cold Fusion research results and remaining questions in research methods; Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Overview of Muon Catalyzed Fusion; Grant Application for Cold Fusion Research; Original application to DOE from Prof. Pons that was withdrawn in favor of a new grant proposal).

None

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Apparatus for control of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for reducing mercury in industrial gases such as the flue gas produced by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal adds hydrogen sulfide to the flue gas in or just before a scrubber of the industrial process which contains the wet scrubber. The method and apparatus of the present invention is applicable to installations employing either wet or dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization systems. The present invention uses kraft green liquor as a source for hydrogen sulfide and/or the injection of mineral acids into the green liquor to release vaporous hydrogen sulfide in order to form mercury sulfide solids.

Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), fördelningskoefficienten, mA (-), för ämne A, definierat som )(mol/mnvätskefaseiionkoncentrat )(mol. Med antagandet att xB 1, beräkna på nytt fördelningskoefficienten mA (-) för ämne A. 1304 kraft, F (N), behövs för att dra folier med olika bredder B (m) genom vätskan medan folier är dränkta

Zevenhoven, Ron

293

Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which bums the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ultrafiltration. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning ultrafiltration, the separation of colloids or fine solid materials by filtration through microporous or semi-permeable materials. Citations discuss the use of the ultrafiltration process for removing dissolved toxic metals from groundwater, production of food-grade protein, treating kraft black liquor from pulp and paper processing, decontamination of low-level radioactive waste water, desalination, and hemodialysis. Topics also include ultrafiltration equipment and membrane descriptions. Procedures for preventing fouling and the cleaning of the filtration materials and membranes are also presented. (Contains a minimum of 133 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Black liquor gasification phase 2D final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work conducted by Rockwell International under Amendment 5 to Subcontract STR/DOE-12 of Cooperative Agreement DE-AC-05-80CS40341 between St. Regis Corporation (now Champion International) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The work has been designated Phase 2D of the overall program to differentiate it from prior work under the same subcontract. The overall program is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of and providing design data for the Rockwell process for gasifying Kraft black liquor. In this process, concentrated black liquor is converted into low-Btu fuel gas and reduced melt by reaction with air in a specially designed gasification reactor.

Kohl, A.L.; Stewart, A.E.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ultrafiltration. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning ultrafiltration, the separation of colloids or fine solid materials by filtration through microporous or semi-permeable materials. Citations discuss the use of the ultrafiltration process for removing dissolved toxic metals from groundwater, production of food-grade protein, treating kraft black liquor from pulp and paper processing, decontamination of low-level radioactive waste water, desalination, and hemodialysis. Topics also include ultrafiltration equipment and membrane descriptions. Procedures for preventing fouling and the cleaning of the filtration materials and membranes are also presented. (Contains a minimum of 116 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Ultrafiltration. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning ultrafiltration, the separation of colloids or fine solid materials by filtration through microporous or semi-permeable materials. Citations discuss the use of the ultrafiltration process for removing dissolved toxic metals from groundwater, production of food-grade protein, treating kraft black liquor from pulp and paper processing, decontamination of low-level radioactive waste water, desalination, and hemodialysis. Topics also include ultrafiltration equipment and membrane descriptions. Procedures for preventing fouling and the cleaning of the filtration materials and membranes are also presented. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which burns the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Total organic carbon as an indicator of wood delignification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft pulping experiments were performed in a 12-liter electrically heated laboratory digester to determine pulp yields and residual lignin content (kappa number) as a function of time. Samples of the pulp and the black liquor were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC) content by oxidizing the samples in a combustion furnace and measuring the released CO/sub 2/ gravimetrically. The experimental data on TOC were correlated with kappa number and yield. Results can be explained satisfactorily using a mathematical model based upon the principle of conservation of mass. The TOC content of black liquor appears to be a useful parameter for batch digester control. 17 references.

Genco, J.M.; Hassler, J.C.; Busayasakul, N.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Quality of vacuum packaged lamb retail cuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) provision of an ideal environment for the ag1ng of meat. Materials wh1ch prevent the rapid exchange of gases result in longer storage 11fe of meat than is obta1ned by packaging with more permeable materials (Kraft and Ayres, 1952). Jaye et al. (1962... storage for up to 35 days. Hanna et al. (1976) reported that these coryneform bacteria were species of ~Cba t i d a o hath i ~th rmos ha t m. B. ~th rmos hactu has been reported to be a major constituent of the bacterial flora of vacuum packaged...

Wanstedt, Kristen Gae

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ghosting Authenticity: Characterization in Corporate Speechwriting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the oil or chemical industries, where the top folks are fine in finance or engineering but need to get that message across in normal language and bring out their personality, that’s where the speechwriter comes in. Executives must be smart.... We sat together with two very smart guys from the Kraft R & D Center who were on his staff. And we started talking about innovation; that’s really all. And somebody made this remark: “Invention and innovation don’t happen together.” So I had a point...

Bruss, Kristine S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fermentation and chemical treatment of pulp and paper mill sludge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of chemically treating partially de-ashed pulp and/or paper mill sludge to obtain products of value comprising taking a sample of primary sludge from a Kraft paper mill process, partially de-ashing the primary sludge by physical means, and further treating the primary sludge to obtain the products of value, including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge as a substrate to produce cellulase in an efficient manner using the resulting sludge as the only carbon source and mixtures of inorganic salts as the primary nitrogen source, and including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge to produce ethanol.

Lee, Yoon Y; Wang, Wei; Kang, Li

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

On the characterization and spinning of solvent extracted lignin towards the manufacture of low-cost carbon fiber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: A Kraft hardwood lignin (HWL) and an organic-purified hardwood lignin (HWL-OP) were evaluated as potential precursors for the production of lowcost carbon fibers. It was found that the unpurified HWL exhibited poor spinnability while the HWL-OP exhibited excellent spinnability characteristics. Fibers of various diameters were obtained from the HWL-OP. Thermostabilization studies showed that oxidative stabilization can only be used to convert HWL-OP-based fibers into carbon fibers if extremely low heating rates are applied. Carbonized lignin-based fibers had tensile strength of 0.51 GPa and tensile modulus of 28.6 GPa. VC

Baker, Darren A [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 8, Black-liquor boiler BLB-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a black-liquor recovery boiler equipped with a drybottom electrostatic precipitator for particulate emissions control. Black-liquor recovery boilers are used at kraft pulp mills to produce process steam and to reclaim inorganic chemicals from spent wood pulping liquors. The dioxin/furan emissions test was conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion sources are sources of dioxin and/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Black-liquor recovery boilers are one of 8 combustion-source categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested black-liquor boiler, BLB-C, was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey visit. Boiler BLB-C is considered representative of black-liquor recovery boilers with dry-bottom electrostatic precipitators. The amount of chloride present in the black-liquor circuit at this site is considered intermediate to high relative to that found at other kraft pulp mills. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

Jamgochian, C.L.; Keller, L.E.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Standard Practice for Irradiation of Fresh and Frozen Red Meat and Poultry to Control Pathogens and Other Microorganisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice outlines procedures for the irradiation of fresh or frozen meat and poultry. Note 1—The Codex Alimentarius Commission defines meat as “the edible part of any mammal” and poultry as “any domesticated bird, including chicken, turkeys, ducks, geese, guinea-fowls, or pigeons” (CAC/MISC 5). Note 2—Current U.S. regulations limit the definition of livestock species to cattle, sheep, swine, goat, horse, mule, or other equine and poultry species to chicken, turkey, duck, goose, and guinea (2, 3). 1.2 This practice covers absorbed doses used for inactivation of parasites and reduction of bacterial load in fresh and frozen red meat and poultry. Such doses are typically less than 10 kGy. 1.3 This practice addresses irradiation of pre-packaged product for retail sale or for use as an ingredient in other products. It also addresses the in-line irradiation of unpackaged product. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It i...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium sulfite/sulfate material can be oxidized into a synthetic gypsum that can be used in several markets which include: wallboard manufacturing, plaster, portland cement, and as a soil conditioner. Single stage water-only cycloning removed nearly 50% of the limestone by weight from the scrubber sludge and maintained a weight recovery of 76%. Froth flotation produced a calcium sulfite/sulfate that contained 4.30% limestone by weight with a 71% weight recovery. These methods were successful in removing some of the limestone impurity, but were not able to meet the specifications needed. However, the combination of water-only cycloning and froth flotation provided a clean, useful calcium sulfite/sulfate material with a limestone grade of 1.70% by weight and a total weight recovery of nearly 66%.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Wet electrostatic precipitator eliminates over 90% of previous emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After ten years of searching for an effective air pollution control device, engineers at Teledyne Wah Chang Albany (TWCA) found that zirconium was the best metal in withstanding the gases generated in the manufacturing process of zirconium and hafnium. The best equipment was a two-stage, modular wet electrostatic precipitator to collect the submicron-size particulates in the form of metal oxides, ammonium sulfate, ammonium sulfite and ammonium bisulfite. All nonmetal components of the precipitator were fabricated entirely from industrial grade reinforced thermoset plastics. All metal components, including process water spray components, pipe fittings, and emitting electrodes - to be charged at 45,000 V - were fabricated from zirconium. Stack emission tests indicate the precipitator has eliminated over 90% of previous particulate emissions. Operation has been virtually maintenance free. The zirconium components show no signs of corrosion to date. (DP)

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO{sub 2} and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process. 1 fig.

Smart, N.G.; Wai, C.M.; Lin, Y.; Kwang, Y.H.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO.sub.2, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO.sub.2 and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process.

Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Lin, Yuehe (Moscow, ID); Kwang, Yak Hwa (Moscow, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO[sub 2]; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO[sub 2] with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0 and 100 C at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environmentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed. 16 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

[Unsegmented continuous-flow sample processing and electrochemical detection of gaseous species]. Final report, March 1, 1985--February 28, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goals were a continuous-flow, unsegmented, all-gas carrier and/or a segmented liquid/gas interface system for sample introduction and transport to detection/determination point; a regenerable electrode probe base on redox reactions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with 1, 10-phenanthroline and related ligands; and amperometric/coulometric current measurements providing analyte signals. Gases to be detected included NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}. This report is divided into 3 parts: preparation of new ligands of 1,10-phenanthroline family; glassy carbon surfaces coated with polymeric films prepared from monomeric units of tris[5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline]iron(II); and sulfite oxidase/hexacyanoferrate modified C paste electrode.

Mottola, H.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

[Unsegmented continuous-flow sample processing and electrochemical detection of gaseous species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goals were a continuous-flow, unsegmented, all-gas carrier and/or a segmented liquid/gas interface system for sample introduction and transport to detection/determination point; a regenerable electrode probe base on redox reactions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with 1, 10-phenanthroline and related ligands; and amperometric/coulometric current measurements providing analyte signals. Gases to be detected included NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2]. This report is divided into 3 parts: preparation of new ligands of 1,10-phenanthroline family; glassy carbon surfaces coated with polymeric films prepared from monomeric units of tris[5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline]iron(II); and sulfite oxidase/hexacyanoferrate modified C paste electrode.

Mottola, H.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Control of scale in flue gas scrubbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a flue gas desulfurization system in which sulfur dioxide-containing flue gas is passed in countercurrent flow with an aqueous calcium-bearing scrubbing liquor whereby the sulfur dioxide is removed from the flue gas by being absorbed by the scrubbing liquor and converted to calcium sulfite and/or calcium sulfate. The improvement of minimizing the formation of calcium scale on the surfaces of the system comprises maintaining in the scrubbing liquor about 0.1-25 ppm of a 1:1 diisobutylene-maleic anhydride copolymer having an average molecular weight of 11000. The copolymer is incorporated in the scrubbing liquor as a 10-15% aqueous dispersion.

Thomas, P.A.; Dewitt-Dick, D.B.

1987-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

316

Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

Kim, Sang-Hoon, Christina Harzman, John K. Davis, Rachel Hutcheson, Joan B. Broderick, Terence L. Marsh, James M. Tiedje.

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Kinetics of gasification of black liquor char by steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the steam gasification kinetics of kraft black liquor char that were studied in a thermogravimetric analysis reactor. The effect of steam and hydrogen concentration on gasification rate can be described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetics. An activation energy of 210 kJ/mol was obtained. Methane formation was negligible, and H{sub 2}S was the major gaseous sulfur-containing product obtained over the temperature range studied, 873-973 K. The CO{sub 2} concentration was higher than calculated for the water-shift reaction at equilibrium. A gasification mechanism is proposed whereby CO{sub 2} is one of the primary gasification products.

Li, J.; van Heiningen, A.R.P. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, McGill Univ., Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Montreal, Quebec (CA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, J.S.; Westmoreland, C.G.

1982-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, Jr., James S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Westmoreland, Clyde G. (Rockwood, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thailand's gas line underway: coating a major achievement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using primarily local personnel and materials, Bredero Price International's Thai pipe-coating plant has prepared some 374 miles of 34 and 28-in. pipe for service in the Gulf of Thailand gas-pipeline project. The enamel-coating shop cleaned, primed and coated all the pipe with coal-tar enamel, glass-fiber mat, felt, and a kraft-paper outer wrap; the cement-coating facility then added a concrete-weight coating to the portion of the pipe earmarked for offshore duty. Scheduled for a 1981 completion, the pipeline will initially carry 250 million CF/day to power-generating plants in Bangpakong and South Bangkok; the volume transported will eventually reach 500 million CF/day when addition offshore production is tied in to the line and an offshore compressor station added.

Hale, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Cracking and Corrosion of Composite Tubes in Black Liquor Recovery Boiler Primary Air Ports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black liquor recovery boilers are an essential part of kraft mills. Their design and operating procedures have changed over time with the goal of providing improved boiler performance. These performance improvements are frequently associated with an increase in heat flux and/or operating temperature with a subsequent increase in the demand on structural materials associated with operation at higher temperatures and/or in more corrosive environments. Improvements in structural materials have therefore been required. In most cases the alternate materials have provided acceptable solutions. However, in some cases the alternate materials have solved the original problem but introduced new issues. This report addresses the performance of materials in the tubes forming primary air port openings and, particularly, the problems associated with use of stainless steel clad carbon steel tubes and the solutions that have been identified.

Keiser, James R.; Singbeil, Douglas L.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Kish, Joseph R.; Yuan, Jerry; Frederick, Laurie A.; Choudhury, Kimberly A.; Gorog, J. Peter; Jetté, Francois R.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Singh, Prett M.; Maziasz, Phillip J.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Study of soluble scale fouling control in high solids black liquor concentrators. Progress report, quarter 5 (October 1, 1999 - December 31, 1999)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this quarter, work has finally resumed on the black liquor solubility experiments, but no new data have been generated. The crystallization experiments with inorganic model solutions have been completed, and crystallization experiments with kraft black liquor have been started. The Annular Test Cell apparatus is now fully operational, while construction of the falling film evaporator pilot plant is nearly complete. Startup of this unit is planned for late in Quarter 6. In the CFD model development work, the relaxation of simplifying assumptions in the falling film model have been completed, and expressions were developed to estimate film velocity/film Reynolds number relations. Also, thin film data taken for a range of conventional fluids were compared to predictions using selected methods, and attempts were initiated to extrapolate to approximate black liquor evaporator conditions.

W.J. Frederick; F. Chen; G. Hsieh; S. Lien; R.W. Murphy; R.W. Rousseau; W. Schmidl

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Materials for the pulp and paper industry. Section 1: Development of materials for black liquor recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black liquor recovery boilers are essential components of kraft pulp and paper mills because they are a critical element of the system used to recover the pulping chemicals required in the kraft pulping process. In addition, the steam produced in these boilers is used to generate a significant portion of the electrical power used in the mill. Recovery boilers require the largest capital investment of any individual component of a paper mill, and these boilers are a major source of material problems in a mill. The walls and floors of these boilers are constructed of tube panels that circulate high pressure water. Molten salts (smelt) accumulate on the floor of recovery boilers, and leakage of water into the boiler can result in a violent explosion when the leaked water instantly vaporizes upon contacting the molten smelt. Because corrosion of the conventionally-used carbon steel tubing was found to be excessive in the lower section of recovery boilers, use of stainless steel/carbon steel co-extruded tubing was adopted for boiler walls to lessen corrosion and reduce the likelihood of smelt/water explosions. Eventually, this co-extruded or composite (as it is known in the industry) tubing was selected for use as a portion or all of the floor of recovery boilers, particularly those operating at pressures > 6.2 MPa (900 psi), because of the corrosion problems encountered in carbon steel floor tubes. Since neither the cause of the cracking nor an effective solution has been identified, this program was established to develop a thorough understanding of the degradation that occurs in the composite tubing used for walls and floors. This is being accomplished through a program that includes collection and review of technical reports, examination of unexposed and cracked tubes from boiler floors, computer modeling to predict residual stresses under operating conditions, and operation of laboratory tests to study corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and thermal fatigue.

Keiser, J.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Payzant, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. [Stanford University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hwang, Chaichi [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruan, Chuanmin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Fendorf, Scott [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current generation of laccase has a broad spectrum of operating parameters. Nonetheless, the development of future genetically engineered laccases with enhanced temperature, pH and redox potentials will dramatically improve the overall process. A second challenge for LMS bleaching technologies is the need to develop effective, catalytic mediators. From the literature we already know this is feasible since ABTS and some inorganic mediators are catalytic. Unfortunately, the mediators that exhibit catalytic properties do not exhibit significant delignification properties and this is a challenge for future research studies. Potential short-term mill application of laccase has been recently reported by Felby132 and Chandra133 as they have demonstrated that the physical properties of linerboard can be improved when exposed to laccase without a chemical mediator. In addition, xxx has shown that the addition of laccase to the whitewater of the paper machine has several benefits for the removal of colloidal materials. Finally, this research program has presented important features on the delignification chemistry of LMS{sub NHA} and LMS{sub VA} that, in the opinion of the author, are momentous contributions to the overall LMS chemistry/biochemistry knowledge base which will continue to have future benefits.

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project investigated methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Two processes were studied, both separately and in combination: Water-only cycloning, and froth flotation. A large fraction (30--40%) of the impurities in the sludge are contained in the coarser, higher-density particles, which are readily removed using a water-only cyclone. Much of the remaining impurities are hydrophobic, and can be removed by froth flotation. A combined cyclone/froth flotation process has been found to be suitable for producing a high-purity product from scrubber sludge at low cost.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a dependable technique for analysis of scrubber sludge, so that it would be possible to determine exactly how well a particular purification process was working. This technique was then used to characterize the sludge from a particular Illinois power station. In the current quarter, studies were carried out using froth flotation to produce a product that could be oxidized to high-purity gypsum. These experiments have been quite successful, due to certain properties of the limestone impurity that makes it easier to remove by this method than was expected.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Banerjee, D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Field-Scale Evaluation of Biological Uranium Reduction and Reoxidation in the Near-Source Zone at the NABIR Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have now added ethanol intermittently for over 700 days. Ethanol has been added weekly with each injection lasting for a few days. We are now observing: (1) Uranium immobilization at 700-2000 mg/kg. Baseline levels before remediation were 30-500 mg/kg. (2) Uranium concentrations in groundwater at the monitoring wells have fallen below the U.S. drinking water standard (30 ppb). This is an important milestone. (3) XANES analyses for day 535 indicate 51% U(IV) at the inner loop injection well, 35% U(IV) at MLS well 101-2, and 28% U(IV) at the extraction well. These numbers indicate that U(IV) reduction is not localized to the injection well, and is spreading through the aquifer. (4) We have had success removing trace levels of oxygen from recirculated water by addition of sulfite and related compounds. These compounds also provide the added benefit that in removing oxygen that themselves are oxidized to sulfate, an important electron acceptor needed for maintenance of our system.

Criddle, Craig S.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Quarterly report No. 9, November 17, 1992--February 16, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CZD process involves injecting a finely atomized slurry of reactive lime into the flue gas duct work of a coal-fired utility boiler. The principle of the confined zone is to form a wet zone of slurry droplets in the middle of the duct confined in an envelope of hot gas between the wet zone and the duct walls. The lime slurry reacts with part of the SO{sub 2} in the gas, and the reaction products dry to form solid particles. A solids collector, typically on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) downstream from the point of injection, captures the reaction products along with the fly ash entrained in the flue gas. The waste product is composed of magnesium and calcium sulfite and sulfate, with some excess lime. This product mixed with fly ash is self-stabilizing because of the excess lime values, and thus tends to retain heavy metals in insoluble forms within the fly ash. The demonstration is being conducted at Penelec`s Seward Station, Unit No. 15. This boiler is a 147 MWe coal-fired unit, which utilizes Pennsylvania bituminous coal (approximately 1.2 to 2.5% sulfur). Progress is described for the ninth quarter.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex., was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from ?-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least 52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0. Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within ?-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P ? 0.0001). This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable

Yun-juan Chang; Aaron D. Peacock; Philip E. Long; John R. Stephen; James P. Mckinley; Sarah J. Macnaughton; A. K. M. Anwar Hussain; Arnold M. Saxton; David C. White

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

SUGAMA,T.

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ion chromatographic analysis of oil shale leachates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work an investigation of the use of ion chromatography to determine environmentally significant anions present in oil shale leachates was undertaken. Nadkarni et al. have used ion chromatography to separate and quantify halogen, sulfur and nitrogen species in oil shales after combustion in a Parr bomb. Potts and Potas used ion chromatography to monitor inorganic ions in cooling tower wastewater from coal gasification. Wallace and coworkers have used ion chromatography to determine anions encountered in retort wastewaters. The ions of interest in this work were the ions of sulfur oxides including sulfite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), dithionite (S{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), dithionate (S{sub 2}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), peroxyodisulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}}), and tetrathionate (S{sub 4}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), and thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}), sulfide (S{sup 2{minus}}) hydrosulfide (HS{sup {minus}}), cyanide (CN{sup {minus}}), thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}), and cyanate (OCN{sup {minus}}). A literature search was completed and a leaching procedure developed. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Butler, N.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Methane production from ozonated pulp mill effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was made of the production of methane from desugared spent sulfite liquor (SSL) reacted with ozone. The ozonated SSL was fed continuously to three anaerobic fermenters for three months as the sole source of carbon and energy. The fermenters were inoculated with anaerobic bacteria obtained from sewage sludge and acclimated for 1 month in ozonated SSL prior to continuous fermentation. Chemical and biological parameters such as COD, BOD, total sulfur content, redox potential, pH, fatty acid composition, and methane bacteria populations were monitored to determine changes in the SSL during fermentation. Methane production from ozone-treated SSL averaged 1.7 liters/ liter or 17 ml of CH/sub 4/ produced/gram of volatile solids fed. Fatty acis analysis of fermenter effluent indicated a net production of 58 mM/ liter of acetate during ozonated SSL fermentation. This acetic acid production shows future potential for further fermentation by protein-producing yeast. Although the rate of conversion of volatile solids to CH/sub 4/ in this process was not competitive with domestic or agricultural waste digesters, this study did indicate the potential benefits of ozonating organic wastes for increased methane fermentation yields.

Bremmon, C.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

POLYPHENYLENESULFIED/MONTOMORILLONITE CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE COATINGS: THEIR EFFICACY IN PROTECTING STEEL AGAINST CORROSION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale montomorillonite (MMT) clay fillers became dispersed in a polyphenylenesulfied (PPS) matrix through the processes of octadecylamine (ODA) intercalation {yields} molten PPS co-intercalation {yields} exfoliation. Cooling this molten exfoliated material led to the formation of a PPS/MMT nanocomposite. The MMT nanofiller conferred three advanced properties on the semi-crystalline PPS: First, it raised its melting point by nearly 40 C to 290 C; second, it increased its crystallization energy, implying that an excellent adherence of the nanofillers surfaces to PPS in terms of a good interfacial bond; and, third, it abated the degree of its hydrothermal oxidation due to sulfide {yields} sulfite linkage transformations. When this advanced PPS nanocomposite was used as a corrosion-preventing coating for carbon steel in a simulated geothermal environment at 300 C, a coating of {approx}150 {micro}m thickness adequately protected the steel against hot brine-caused corrosion. In contrast, an MMT-free PPS coating of similar thickness was not nearly as effective in mitigating corrosion as was the nanocompsite; in fact, the uptake of corrosive ionic electrolyte by the unmodified coating increased with an extending exposure time.

SUGAMA, T.; GAWLIK, K.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Solidification/stabilization of toxic metal wastes using coke and coal combustion by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of a special rubber waste, NISCO Cyclone Ash (NCA), which contains substantial calcium oxide and calcium sulfites/sulfates for solidification/stabilization (S/S) of toxic metal wastes. The mineralogical compositions of the NCA and a class ``C`` fly ash have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Hydrated mixtures of these wastes have been examined by XRD and found to form ettringite. Low concentrations of As (15 {micro}g ml{sup {minus}1}), Ba (500 {micro}g ml{sup {minus}1}), Pb (15 {micro}g ml{sup {minus}1}), and Zn (1,000 {micro}g ml{sup {minus}1}) were added to these hydrated mixtures and found to be successfully immobilized and solidified, as determined by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). In addition, the mineralogy, chemistry and leaching characteristics of these combined waste products and their interactions with toxic metals are discussed.

Vempati, R.K.; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Chinthala, A.K.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States); Beeghly, J.H. [Dravo Lime, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Dravo Lime, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effects of oxygen on fracturing fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability of polysaccharide gels at high temperature is limited by such factors as pH, mechanical degradation, and oxidants. Oxygen is unavoidably placed in fracturing fluids through dissolution of air. To prevent premature degradation of the fracturing fluid by this oxidant, oxygen scavengers are commonly used. In this paper, the effects of oxygen and various oxygen scavengers on gel stability will be presented. Mechanical removal of oxygen resulted in surprisingly stable fracturing gels at 275 F. However, chemical removal of oxygen gave mixed results. Test data from sodium thiosulfate, sodium sulfite, and sodium erythorbate used as oxygen scavengers/gel stabilizers showed that the efficiency of oxygen removal from gels did not directly coincide with the viscosity retention of the gel, and large excesses of additives were necessary to provide optimum gel stabilization. The inability of some oxygen scavengers to stabilize the gel was the result of products created from the interaction of oxygen with the oxygen scavenger, which in turn, produced species that degraded the gel. The ideal oxygen scavenger should provide superior gel stabilization without creating detrimental side reaction products. Of the materials tested, sodium thiosulfate appeared to be the most beneficial.

Walker, M.L.; Shuchart, C.E.; Yaritz, J.G.; Norman, L.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coolside waste management demonstration OCDO grant agreement No. CDO/D-902-9. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to evaluate the potential utilization in road construction of wastes produced from the Coolside, LIMB (limestone injection multi-stage burner) and FBC (fluidized-bed combustion) processes, and to specify criteria for landfill disposal of waste from the Coolside process. These three processes are considered to be clean coal technologies. The Coolside process involves injecting an aqueous slurry of hydrated lime into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater in a coal-fired boiler. The hydrated lime captures sulfur dioxide from the flue gas producing anhydrous calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate, which are collected along with the unused hydrated lime and fly ash. The LIMB process involves injection of lime or hydrated lime directly into the furnace to capture sulfur dioxide. The waste consists principally of anhydrous calcium sulfate, lime, and fly ash. Both processes were demonstrated successfully at the Edgewater Station of Ohio Edison in Lorrain, OH, from 1989 to 1992. Circulating fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a commercial technology which combines steam generation with SO{sub 2} control by burning coal in a circulating bed of limestone. The waste, chemically similar to LIMB waste, is produced by bleed-off of the bed material and by collection of the flue dust. All three processes produce a dry solid waste, which must either be used or disposed of and managed to ensure environmental compliance and economic feasibility. The project was completed in June 1996.

Wu, M.; Winschel, R.A. [CONSOL Inc., Library, PA (United States). Research & Development

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactivity of sandstones was studied under conditions relevant to the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in the context of carbon geosequestration. The emphasis of the study was on the reactivity of iron-bearing minerals when exposed to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2. Flow through and batch experiments were conducted. Results indicate that sandstones, irrespective of their mineralogy, are not reactive when exposed to pure scCO2 or scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2 under conditions simulating the environment near the injection point (flow through experiments). However, sandstones are reactive under conditions simulating the edge of the injected CO2 plume or ahead of the plume (batch experiments). Sandstones containing hematite (red sandstone) are particularly reactive. The composition of the reaction products is strongly dependent on the composition of the aqueous phase. The presence of dissolved sulfide leads to the conversion of hematite into pyrite and siderite. The relative amount of the pyrite and siderite is influenced by the ionic strength of the solution. Little reactivity is observed when sulfite is present in the aqueous phase. Sandstones without hematite (grey sandstones) show little reactivity regardless of the solution composition.

Schoonen, Martin A. [Stony Brook University] (ORCID:0000000271331160)

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the experimental combustion evaluations to several specific technologies that can be used with HAT technology. After 5 years of extensive research and development, P&W is pleased to report that the HAT Technology Development Program goals have been achieved. With 0 to 10 percent steam addition, emissions achieved during this program featured less than 8 ppm NO{sub x}, less than 16 ppm CO, and unburned hydrocarbons corrected to 15 percent O{sub 2} for an FT8 engine operating between 0 and 120 F with 65 to 100 percent power at any day.

Richard Tuthill

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Vapor pressure and boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors: Predictive models with statistical approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibria and boiling point elevation of slash pine kraft black liquors over a wide range of solid concentrations (up to 85% solids) has been studied. The liquors are from a statistically designed pulping experiment for pulping slash pine in a pilot scale digester with four cooking variables of effective alkali, sulfidity, cooking time, and cooking temperature. It was found that boiling point elevation of black liquors is pressure dependent, and this dependency is more significant at higher solids concentrations. The boiling point elevation data at different solids contents (at a fixed pressure) were correlated to the dissolved solids (S/(1 {minus} S)) in black liquor. Due to the solubility limit of some of the salts in black liquor, a change in the slope of the boiling point elevation as a function of the dissolved solids was observed at a concentration of around 65% solids. An empirical method was developed to describe the boiling point elevation of each liquor as a function of pressure and solids mass fraction. The boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors was correlated quantitatively to the pulping variables, using different statistical procedures. These predictive models can be applied to determine the boiling point rise (and boiling point) of slash pine black liquors at processing conditions from the knowledge of pulping variables. The results are presented, and their utility is discussed.

Zaman, A.A.; McNally, T.W.; Fricke, A.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effect of sulfidity on the corrosivity of white, green, and black liquors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion testing was performed in white, green, and black liquors from a kraft mill. The liquors were modified in composition to simulate conditions of high (40%) sulfidity and low (30%) sulfidity, and then heated in laboratory autoclaves to the temperatures of the respective tanks from which the samples were taken. Specimens of carbon and stainless steels were exposed under free corrosion potential conditions, and their corrosion rates determined from weight loss measurements. In white, green, 45% solids black, and flash tank liquors, active corrosion rates for the carbon steels were typically 20 to 75% higher in the higher sulfidity liquors. In 15% solids weak black liquor there was no appreciable difference in corrosion rates, with carbon steels remaining passive in both low and high sulfidity. In 26% solids intermediate black liquor there were large increases in the corrosion rates of carbon steel between low and high sulfidity liquors, resulting from a change from passive to active conditions. Stainless steels UNS S30403, S32304, and S31803 had very low corrosion rates in all the liquors tested, regardless of sulfidity.

Wensley, A.; Champagne, P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 5 contains model validation simulations and comparison with data.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Combined biomass and black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration at pulp and paper mills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft pulp and paper mills generate large quantities of black liquor and byproduct biomass suitable for gasification. These fuels are used today for onsite cogeneration of heat and power in boiler/steam turbine systems. Gasification technologies under development would enable these fuels to be used in gas turbines. This paper reports results of detailed full-load performance modeling of pulp-mill cogeneration systems based on gasifier/gas turbine technologies. Pressurized, oxygen-blown black liquor gasification, the most advanced of proposed commercial black liquor gasifier designs, is considered, together with three alternative biomass gasifier designs under commercial development (high-pressure air-blown, low-pressure air-blown, and low-pressure indirectly-heated). Heavy-duty industrial gas turbines of the 70-MW{sub e} and 25-MW {sub e} class are included in the analysis. Results indicate that gasification-based cogeneration with biomass-derived fuels would transform a typical pulp mill into significant power exporter and would also offer possibilities for net reductions in emissions of carbon dioxide relative to present practice.

Larson, E.D.; Kreutz, T.G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies; Consonni, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

New industrial heat pump applications to an integrated thermomechanical pulp and paper mill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of pinch technology US industries in an early screening study done by TENSA Services (DOE/ID/12583-1) identified potential for heat pumps in several industrial sectors. Among these, processes with large evaporation units were found to be some of the most promising sectors for advanced heat pump placement. This report summarizes the results of a study for Bowater Incorporated, Carolina Division. The units selected for this study are the thermo-mechanical pulper (TMP), kraft digester, evaporators, boiler feed water (BFW) train and pulp dryer. Based on the present level of operation, the following recommendations are made: 1. Install a mechanical vapor compression (MVR) heat pump between the TMP mill and {number sign}3 evaporator. This heat pump will compress the 22 psig steam from the TMP heat recovery system and use it to replace about 70% of the 60 psig steam required in {number sign} evaporator. The boiler feed water heat losses (in the low pressure deaerator) will be supplied by heat available in the TMR's zero psig vent steam. 2. Study the digester to verify the practicality of installing an MVR heat pump which will compress the dirty weapons from the cyclone separator. The compressed vapors can be directly injected into the digester and thus reduce the 135 psig steam consumption. 31 figs., 9 tabs.

none,

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Controlled black liquor viscosity reduction through salting-in  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black liquor viscosity increases exponentially with solids content and therefore causes processing problems for the paper industry by being a limiting factor in the Kraft pulp process. This study investigates a new approach for achieving viscosity reduction by salting-in black liquor through the addition of thiocyanate salts. These salts generally increase the solubility of the polymer constituents in black liquor, leading to a decrease in its viscosity. Several thiocyanate salts capable of reducing liquor viscosity by more than two orders of magnitude have been identified, with viscosity reduction greatest at high solids content. Salting-in of black liquor depends on the cation paired with the thiocyanate anion, as well as on solution pH and temperature. Comparative studies reveal the most effective viscosity-reducing agent of the series examined and that lignin plays an important role in the viscosity behavior of both unmodified and salted-in black liquor at high solids concentrations. These experimental findings are interpreted in terms of the underlying principles that describe salting-in and how it affects aqueous solution structure.

Roberts, J.E.; Khan, S.A.; Spontak, R.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Proceedings of the black liquor research program review fifth meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 14--17, 1988 the participants and invited guests of the Cooperative Program in Kraft Recovery gathered in Charleston, South Carolina, to review progress on four major black liquor research programs being executed at the Institute of Paper Chemistry, the University of Maine, the National Bureau of Standards, and the University of Florida. These programs include: (1) Black Liquor Properties; (2) Black Liquor Droplet Formation; (3) Black Liquor Nozzle Evaluation; and (4) Black Liquor Combustion. In addition to the objectives of previous meetings, this meeting made a direct attempt to gather ideas on how to improve our ability to move from new technology concepts to commercial implementation. Also attached is the agenda for the Charleston meeting. The first two days were involved with updates and reviews of the four major black liquor programs. A half day was spent discussing pathways to implementation and developing thoughts on what industry, DOE and academia could do to facilitate commercial implementation of the research results. This publication is a summary of the presentations made in Charleston and the industry responses to the research work. Readers are cautioned that the contents are in-progress updates on the status of the research and do not represent referred technical papers. Any questions regarding the content should be referred to the principal investigators of the project.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Deconstruction of Lignin Model Compounds and Biomass-Derived Lignin using Layered Double Hydroxide Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is an underutilized value stream in current biomass conversion technologies because there exist no economic and technically feasible routes for lignin depolymerization and upgrading. Base-catalyzed deconstruction (BCD) has been applied for lignin depolymerization (e.g., the Kraft process) in the pulp and paper industry for more than a century using aqueous-phase media. However, these efforts require treatment to neutralize the resulting streams, which adds significantly to the cost of lignin deconstruction. To circumvent the need for downstream treatment, here we report recent advances in the synthesis of layered double hydroxide and metal oxide catalysts to be applied to the BCD of lignin. These catalysts may prove more cost-effective than liquid-phase, non-recyclable base, and their use obviates downstream processing steps such as neutralization. Synthetic procedures for various transition-metal containing catalysts, detailed kinetics measurements using lignin model compounds, and results of the application of these catalysts to biomass-derived lignin will be presented.

Chmely, S. C.; McKinney, K. A.; Lawrence, K. R.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Beckham, G. T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coliquefaction of coal and black liquor to environmentally acceptable liquid fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work in the laboratories has demonstrated that addition to lignin to coal during liquefaction significantly increases the depolymerization of coal and enhances the quality of the liquid products. It is believed that thermolysis of the lignin results in the formation of phenoxyl and other reactive radicals at temperatures too low for significant thermolysis of the coal matrix; such radicals are effective and active intermediates that depolymerize coal by cleaving methylene bridges. It has been reported that alkali is also effective for extraction of liquids from coal. The work presented here combines these two reactive agents by utilizing the black liquor waste stream from the Kraft pulping process for coal depolymerization. That waste stream contains large amounts of lignin and sodium hydroxide, as well as other components. To permit comparative evaluations of the extent of coal depolymerization by coprocessing coal and black liquor, reference runs were performed with tetralin alone, sodium hydroxide in tetralin, and lignin in tetralin. Results indicated that the sodium hydroxide-tetralin system resulted in almost 67% conversion at 375 C, 1 hour. The black liquor system exhibited a lower conversion of 60%, indicating some inhibition of the depolymerization reactions by components in the black liquor.

Kim, J. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lalvani, S.B.; Muchmore, C.B.; Akash, B.A. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy minimization of separation processes using conventional/membrane hybrid systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify the general principles governing the choice of hybrid separation systems over straight membrane or straight nonmembrane systems and to do so by examining practical applications (process design and economics). Our focus was to examine the energy consumption characteristics and overall cost factors of the membrane and nonmembrane technologies that cause hybrid systems to be preferred over nonhybrid systems. We evaluated four cases studies, chosen on the basis of likelihood of commercial viability of a hybrid system and magnitude of energy savings: (1) propane/propylene separation; (2) removal of nitrogen from natural gas; (3) concentration of Kraft black liquor; and (4)solvent deasphalting. For propane/propylene splitting, the membrane proved to be superior to distillation in both thermodynamic efficiency and processing cost (PC) when the product was 95% pure propylene. However, to produce higher purity products, the membrane alone could not perform the separation, and a membrane/distillation hybrid was required. In these cases, there is an optimum amount of separation to be accomplished by the membrane (expressed as the fraction of the total availability change of the membrane/distillation hybrid that takes place in the membrane and defined as {phi}{sub m}, the thermodynamic extent of separation). Qualitative and quantitative guidelines are discussed with regard to choosing a hybrid system. 54 refs., 66 figs., 36 tabs.

Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effect of ionic liquid treatment on the structures of lignins in solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solution structures of three types of isolated lignin - organosolv (OS), Kraft (K), and low sulfonate (LS) - before and after treatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) over a concentration range of 0.3-2.4 wt %. The results indicate that each of these lignins is comprised of aggregates of well-defined basal subunits, the shapes and sizes of which, in D{sub 2}O and DMSO-d{sub 6}, are revealed using these techniques. LS lignin contains a substantial amount of nanometer-scale individual subunits. In aqueous solution these subunits have a well-defined elongated shape described well by ellipsoidal and cylindrical models. At low concentration the subunits are highly expanded in alkaline solution, and the effect is screened with increasing concentration. OS lignin dissolved in DMSO was found to consist of a narrow distribution of aggregates with average radius 200 {+-} 30 nm. K lignin in DMSO consists of aggregates with a very broad size distribution. After ionic liquid (IL) treatment, LS lignin subunits in alkaline solution maintained the elongated shape but were reduced in size. IL treatment of OS and K lignins led to the release of nanometer-scale subunits with well-defined size and shape.

Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Kent, Michael S [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Varanasi, Patanjali [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Dibble, Dean [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Singh, Seema [Joint Bioenergy Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermoflexus hugenholtzii gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, microaerophilic, filamentous bacterium representing a novel class in the Chloroflexi, Thermoflexia classis nov., and description of Thermoflexaceae fam. nov. and Thermoflexales ord. nov.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermophilic, filamentous, heterotrophic bacterium designated strain JAD2T was isolated from sediment of Great Boiling Spring in Nevada, USA. Cells had an average diameter of 0.3 µm and length of 4.0 µm, and formed filaments typically ranging in length from 20 µm to 200 µm. Filaments were negative for the Gram stain reaction, spores were not formed, and motility was not observed. The optimum temperature for growth was 75 °C with a range from 67.5-75 °C, and the optimum pH for growth was 6.75 with a range from 6.5-7.75. Peptone, tryptone or yeast extract were able to support growth when supplemented with a vitamin solution, but no growth was observed using a variety of defined organic substrates. Strain JAD2T was a facultative microaerophile, with optimal growth at 1% v/v O2 and an upper limit of 8% O2, and anaerobic growth was stimulated by fumarate but inhibited by sulfite and elemental sulfur. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C16:0, C19:0, C18:0, C20:0, and C19:1. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3%. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses using 16S rRNA gene sequences and other conserved genes placed JAD2T and other members of the yet-uncultivated GAL35 group within the phylum Chloroflexi, but not within any existing class in this phylum. These results indicate that strain JAD2T is the first cultivated representative of a new lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi, for which we propose the name Thermoflexus hugenholtzii gen. nov., sp. nov., type strain JAD2T, within Thermoflexia classis nov., Thermoflexales ord. nov., and Thermoflexaceae fam. nov.

Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Gevorkian, Jonathan; Despujos, Fairuz; Cole, Jesse; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen J.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hedlund, Brian P.

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO[sub x] to molecular nitrogen (N[sub 2]) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO[sub x] emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO[sub x]. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO[sub 4], an injection temperature of about 1230[degrees]C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H[sub 2]0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

Not Available

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Environmental monitoring quarterly report No. 9, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO{sub 4}, an injection temperature of about 1230{degrees}C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H{sub 2}0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

Not Available

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Quarterly report No. 7, May 1, 1992--August 16, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CZD process involves injecting a finely atomized slurry of reactive lime into the flue gas duct work of a coal-fired utility boiler. The principle of the confined zone is to form a wet zone of slurry droplets in the middle of the duct confined in an envelope of hot gas between the wet zone and the duct walls. The lime slurry reacts with part of the SO{sub 2} in the gas, and the reaction products dry to form solid particles. A solids collector, typically an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) downstream from the point of injection, captures the reaction products along with the fly ash entrained in the flue gas. The features that distinguish the CZD process from other similar injection processes are: (1) Injection of an alkaline slurry directly into the duct, instead of injection of dry solids into the duct ahead of a fabric filter. (2) Use of an ultrafine calcium/magnesium hydroxide, type S pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime. This commercial product is made from plentiful, naturally occurring dolomite. (3) Low residence time, made possible by the high effective surface area of the Type S lime. (4) Localized dispersion of the reagent. (5) Improved electrostatic precipitator performance via gas conditioning from the increased water vapor content, and lower temperatures. The waste product is composed of magnesium and calcium sulfite and sulfate, with some excess lime. This product mixed with fly ash is self-stabilizing because of the excess lime values, and thus tends to retain heavy metals in insoluble forms within the fly ash.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of U(VI) to U(TV) plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex,, was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from F-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least,52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0, Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within F-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (less than or equal to 302 ppb) samples. One Desulfotomaculum like sequence cluster overwhelmingly dominated high-U (> 1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P= 0.0001), This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable tolerance and adaptation to high levels of uranium and suggests the organism's possible involvement in natural attenuation of uranium. The in situ activity level of Desulfotomaculum in uranium-contaminated environments and its comparison to the activities of other SRB and other functional groups should be an important area for future research.

Chang, Yun-Juan (Unknown); Peacock, A D. (Tennessee, Univ Of); Long, Philip E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephen, John R. (Unknown); McKinley, James P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Mcnaughton, Sarah J. (Unknown); Hussain, A K M A.; Saxton, A M.; White, D C. (Unknown)

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, also showed similar +42 Da modifications in the same pathway. Here, we discuss our methods and implications of potential trimethylation in the D. vulgaris sulfate reduction pathway.

Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Kinetics of the reaction of iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present simultaneously, the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under the gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2} only, being affected mainly by the relative humidity. The sulfation of sorbents can be described by the surface coverage model and the model equations derived for the latter case. When both O{sub 2} and NOx, were present, the sulfation of sorbents was greatly enhanced, forming a great amount of sulfate in addition to sulfite. The surface coverage model is still valid in this case, but the model equations obtained show a more marked effect of relative humidity and negligible effects of SO{sub 2} concentration and temperature on the reaction. The effect of sorbent composition on the reaction kinetics was entirely represented by the effects of the initial specific surface area (S{sub g0}) and the Ca molar content (M{sup -1}) of sorbent. The initial conversion rate of sorbent increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}, and the ultimate conversion increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}M{sup -1}. The model equations obtained in this work are applicable to describe the kinetics of the sulfation of the sorbents in the low-temperature dry and semidry fine gas desulfurization processes either with an upstream NOx, removal unit or without.111

Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M. [Industrial Technological Research Institute, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of aHydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources hasbecome a major environmental and human health concern in many parts ofthe world. Our objectives were to employ both culture andculture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbialcommunity structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate adiesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normaloperating conditions, 97 to 99 percent of total hydrocarbons were removedwith only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultureswere isolated from the treatment unit (96 percent which utilized dieselconstituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20 percent of theisolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas.Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with mostbelonging to the infinity, beta and gamma subdivision of theProteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the geneticconstitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple timepoints with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probesfor genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemicalcycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using anisothermal phi29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, andhybridized to the arrays in 50 percent formimide overnight at 50 degreesC. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course oftreatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbialcommunity. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation(including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane,biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genesinvolved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases[nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB],potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase[pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE,nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds werealso present, indicating abroad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated theearly establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic andanaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediationprocess.

Rodriguez-Martinez, E.M.; Perez, Ernie X.; Schadt, ChristopherW.; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deya, Arturo A.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Determination of thiol functional groups on bacteria and natural organic matter in environmental systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic thiols (R-SH) are known to react and form complexes with some toxic soft metals such as mercury (Hg) in both biotic and abiotic systems. However, a clear understanding of these interactions is currently limited because quantifying thiols in environmental matrices is difficult due to their low abundance, susceptibility to oxidation, and measurement interference by non-thiol compounds in samples. Here, we report a fluorescence-labeling method using a maleimide containing probe, ThioGlo-1 (TG-1), to determine total thiols directly on bacterial cells and natural organic matter (NOM). We systematically evaluated the optimal thiol labeling conditions and interference from organic compounds such as disulfide, methionine, thiourea, and amine, and inorganic ions such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, and SCN-, and found that the method is highly sensitive and selective. Only relatively high levels of sulfide (S2-) and sulfite (SO32-) significantly interfere with the thiol analysis. The method was successful in determining thiols in a bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and its mutants in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The measured value of ~2.1 104 thiols cell-1 (or ~0.07 mol g-1 wet cells) is in good agreement with that observed during reactions between Hg and PCA cells. Using the standard addition, we determined the total thiols of two reference NOM samples, the reduced Elliot soil humic acid and Suwanee River NOM, to be 3.6 and 0.7 mol g-1, respectively, consistent with those obtained based on their reactions with Hg.

Anandha Rao, Balaji [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Biopulping: A new energy-saving technology for papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biopulping is defined as the treatment of wood chips with lignin-degrading fungi prior to pulping. Fungal pretreatment prior to mechanical pulping reduces electrical energy requirements during refining or increases mill throughput, improves paper strength, reduces the pitch content, reduces cooking time for sulfite pulping, and reduces the environmental impact of pulping. The recent work involved scaling up the biopulping process towards the industrial level, investigating both the engineering and economic feasibility of the technology. The authors envision the process to be done in either a chip-pile or silo-based system for which several factors need to be considered. These factors include the degree of decontamination, a hospitable environment for the fungus, and the overall process economics. Currently, treatment of the chips with low pressure steam is sufficient for decontamination. Furthermore, a simple, forced ventilation system can be used to maintain the proper temperature, humidity, and moisture content throughout the chip bed, thus promoting uniform growth of the fungus. The pilot-scale trial resulted in the successful treatment of 4 tons, of wood chips (dry weight basis) with results comparable to those on a laboratory scale. For mechanical pulping, a 2-week treatment results in approximately 30% energy savings that, considering the additional equipment and operating costs, results in an overall savings of $9 to $20/ton of pulp in a chip-pile system. The other benefits that biopulping confers improve the economics considerably A larger, 40-ton trial was also successful, with energy savings and paper properties comparable with the laboratory scale.

Scott, G.M.; Akhtar, M.; Lentz, M.J.; Kirk, T.K.; Swaney, R.; Shipley, D.F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a continental hot spring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strain of a thermophilic, anaerobic, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/AS-Y7{sup T}; DSM 11255), was isolated from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and New Zealand. The gram-positive-staining cells occurred singly or in pairs as straight to slightly curved rods, 0.3 to 0.4 by 1.6 to 2.7 {mu}m, with rounded ends and exhibited a tumbling motility. Spores were not observed. The temperature range for growth was 50 to 74{degrees}C with an optimum at 65{degrees}C. The pH range for growth at 65{degrees}C was from 5.5 to 7.6, with an optimum at 6.0 to 6.2. The organism coupled the oxidation of glycerol to reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as an electron acceptor. In the presence as well as in the absence of Fe(III) and in the presence of CO{sub 2}, glycerol was metabolized by incomplete oxidation to acetate as the only organic metabolic product; no H{sub 2} was produced during growth. The organism utilized glycerol, lactate, 1,2-propanediol, glycerate, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, mannose, and yeast extract as substrates. In the presence of Fe(III) the bacterium utilized molecular hydrogen. The organism reduced 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid, fumarate (to succinate), and thiosulfate (to elemental sulfur) but did not reduce MnO{sub 2}, nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur. The G+C content of the DNA was 41 mol% (as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography). The 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis placed the isolated strain as a member of a new genus within the gram-type positive Bacillus-Clostridium subphylum.

Slobodkin, A.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Reysenbach, A.L. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. “syngas”) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950°C), but was limited to pressures below about 5 bar. It is desirable however to operate BLG at 20-30 bar for efficiency reasons related to either firing the syngas in a turbine, or catalytically forming liquid fuels. This work focused on achieving high direct causticizing yields at 20 bars pressure. The titanate direct causticizing reactions are inhibited by CO2. Previous work has shown that the partial pressure of CO2 should be kept below about 0.5 bar in order for the process to work. This translates to a total reactor pressure limit of about 5 bar for airblown BLG, and only 2 bar for O2-blown BLG. In this work a process was developed in which the CO2 partial pressure could be manipulated to a level under 0.5 bar with the total system pressure at 10 bar during O2-blown BLG. This fell short of our 20 bar goal but still represents a substantial increase in the pressure limit. A material and energy balance was performed, as well as first-pass economics based on capital and utilities costs. Compared to a reference case of using BLG with a conventional lime cycle [Larson, 2003], the IRR and NVP were estimated for further replacing the lime kiln with direct causticizing. The economics are strongly dependent on the price of lime kiln fuel. At $6/mmBTU the lime cycle is the clear choice. At $8/mmBTU the NPV is $10M with IRR of 17%. At $12/mmBTU the NPV is $45M with IRR of 36%. To further increase the total allowable pressure, the CO2 could be further decreased by further decreasing the temperature. Testing should be done at 750C. Also a small pilot should be built.

Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.’s and three (3) MSc’s, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

Malcolm J. Andrews

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT D-GLU (DIRECTED-GREEN LIQ-UOR UTILIZATION) PULPING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of the project was to retrofit the front end (pulp house) of a commercial kraft pulping mill to accommodate a mill green liquor (GL) impregna-tion/soak/exposure and accrue downstream physical and chemical benefits while prin-cipally reducing the energy footprint of the mill. A major player in the mill contrib-uting to excessive energy costs is the lime kiln. The project was intended to offload the energy (oil or natural gas) demands of the kiln by by-passing the causticization/slaking site in the recovery area and directly using green liquor as a pulping medium for wood. Scope: The project was run in two distinct, yet mutually compatible, phases: Phase 1 was the pre-commercial or laboratory phase in which NC State University and the Insti-tute of Paper Science and Technology (at the Georgia Institute of Technology) ran the pulping and associated experiments, while Phase 2 was the mill scale trial. The first tri-al was run at the now defunct Evergreen Pulp Mill in Samoa, CA and lead to a partial retrofit of the mill that was not completed because it went bankrupt and the work was no longer the low-hanging fruit on the tree for the new management. The second trial was run at the MeadWestvaco Pulp Mill in Evedale, TX which for all intents and pur-poses was a success. They were able to fully retrofit the mill, ran the trial, studied the pulp properties, and gave us conclusions.

Lucia, Lucian A

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 5: Appendix V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 2: Appendix I, Section 5, and Appendix II, Section 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 4: Appendix IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kraft sulfite misc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 3: Appendix II, Sections 2 & 3 and Appendix III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler; and (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Measurement of black liquor surface tension: Technical report No. 3. [Black liquor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface tension and density of two kraft black liquors were measured at a series of temperatures, from a minimum value when gas bubbles can be blown into the liquor to a maximum value near the elevated boiling point of a particular sample. Available methods for the measurement of surface tension were evaluated critically and, as a result, the maximum bubble pressure method was selected. Varying the flow rate of the gas changes the frequency of bubble formation and thereby the age of the surface. The parameter has been utilized by many researchers to monitor the diffusion of low surface energy components (e.g., surfactants) to the liquid/air interface. The effect of bubble frequency when tested with a few pure liquids, indicated that the dynamics of bubble formation had to be further examined to separate out inertial and viscous effects from purely surface tension related pressure. The pressure versus flow rate data were extrapolated to zero flow rate and surface tension and density were calculated using these extrapolated values. As expected, surface tension decreased with increasing temperature for all the samples. Surface tension decreases with increasing solids content (when compared with the value for water) to a certain level (about 20%) and it starts to increase again. The decrease in surface tension in the dilute black liquor, is probably due to the decrease in the concentration of water, which has a high surface tension value. The occurrence of the minimum is probably due to the effect of inorganic components dominating over the effect of surfactants and other components. Reduction in the solubilities of the inorganics, promotion of micelles of the surfactants and reduction in the diffusion of surfactants to the surface, also could contribute to this phenomenon. 54 refs., 54 figs., 12 tabs.

Krishnagopalan, J.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 1: Main Text and Appendix I, Sections 1-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished at the end of the first five years and documented in a comprehensive report on that work (DOE/CE/40936-T3, 1996). A critical review of recovery boiler modeling, carried out in 1995, concluded that further enhancements of the model were needed to make reliable predictions of key output variables. In addition, there was a need for sufficient understanding of fouling and plugging processes to allow model outputs to be interpreted in terms of the effect on plugging and fouling. As a result, the project was restructured and reinitiated at the end of October 1995, and was completed in June 1997. The entire project is now complete and this report summarizes all of the work done on the project since it was restructured. The key tasks to be accomplished under the restructured project were to (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes; (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the results; (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquor submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the U.S. kraft pulp industry.

T.M. Grace, W.J. Frederick, M. Salcudean, R.A. Wessel

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25°C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are proposed for future activities. Electrolysis membranes that permit higher temperatures and lower voltages are attainable. The oxygen half cycle will need further development and improvement.

Taylor, Robin [SAIC] [SAIC; Davenport, Roger [SAIC] [SAIC; Talbot, Jan [UCSD] [UCSD; Herz, Richard [UCSD] [UCSD; Genders, David [Electrosynthesis Co.] [Electrosynthesis Co.; Symons, Peter [Electrosynthesis Co.] [Electrosynthesis Co.; Brown, Lloyd [TChemE] [TChemE

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear-Driven Copper-Based Hybrid Thermo/Electro Chemical Cycle for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a worldwide need for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, hydrogen gas has become a primary focus of energy researchers as a promising substitute of nonrenewable energy sources. For instance, use of hydrogen gas in fuel cells has received special technological interest particularly from the transportation sector, which is presently dominated by fuel oil. It is not only gaseous hydrogen that is in demand, but the need for liquid hydrogen is growing as well. For example, the aerospace industry uses liquid hydrogen as fuel for space shuttles. The use of liquid hydrogen during a single space shuttle launch requires about 15,000 gallons per minute, which is equivalent to about forty-five hydrogen trailers, each with 13,000 gallons capacity. The hydrogen required to support a single Mars mission would be at least ten times that required for one space shuttle launch. In this work, we provide mass and energy balances, major equipment sizing, and costing of a hybrid CuO-CuSO{sub 4} plant with 1000 MW (30,240 kg/hr) H{sub 2} production capacity. With a 90% annual availability factor, the estimated hydrogen production rate is about 238,412 tons annually, the predicted plant efficiency is about 36%, and the estimated hydrogen production cost is about $4.0/kg (not including storage and transportation costs). In addition to hydrogen production, the proposed plant generates oxygen gas as a byproduct with an estimated flowrate of about 241,920 kg/hr (equivalent to 1,907,297 tons annually). We also propose a novel technology for separating SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} from O{sub 2} using a battery of redundant fixed-bed reactors containing CuO impregnated in porous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). This technology accommodates online regeneration of the CuO. Other practical approaches for gaseous separation are also examined including use of ceramic membranes, liquefaction, and regenerable wet scrubbing with slurried magnesium oxide or solutions of sodium salts such as sodium sulfite and sodium hydroxide. Finally, we discuss the applicability of high-temperature nuclear reactors as an ideal fit to providing thermal energy and electricity required for operating the hybrid thermochemical plant with high overall system efficiency. (authors)

Khalil, Yehia F.; Rostkowski, Katherine H. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Design of Refractory Linings for Balanced Energy Efficiency, Uptime, and Capacity in Lime Kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rotary kilns used by the pulp and paper industry to regenerate lime in the Kraft process are very energy intensive. Throughout the 90 s, in response to increasing fuel prices, the industry used back up insulation in conjunction with the high alumina brick used to line the burning zones of their kilns. While this improved energy efficiency, the practice of installing insulating brick behind the working lining increased the inner wall temperatures. In the worst case, due to the increased temperatures, rapid brick failures occurred causing unscheduled outages and expensive repairs. Despite these issues, for the most part, the industry continued to use insulating refractory linings in that the energy savings were large enough to offset any increase in the cost of maintaining the refractory lining. Due to the dramatic decline in the price of natural gas in some areas combined with mounting pressures to increasing production of existing assets, over the last decade, many mills are focusing more on increasing the uptime of their kilns as opposed to energy savings. To this end, a growing number of mills are using basic (magnesia based) brick instead of high alumina brick to line the burning zone of the kiln since the lime mud does not react with these bricks at the operating temperatures of the burning zone of the kiln. In the extreme case, a few mills have chosen to install basic brick in the front end of the kiln running a length equivalent to 10 diameters. While the use of basic brick can increase the uptime of the kiln and reduce the cost to maintain the refractory lining, it does dramatically increase the heat losses resulting from the increased operating temperatures of the shell. Also, over long periods of time operating at these high temperatures, damage can occur in the shell. There are tradeoffs between energy efficiency, capacity and uptime. When fuel prices are very high, it makes sense to insulate the lining. When fuel prices are lower, trading some thermal efficiency for increased uptime and capacity seems reasonable. This paper considers a number of refractory linings in an effort to develop optimized operating strategies that balance these factors. In addition to considering a range of refractory materials, the paper examines other factors such as the chain area, discharge dams and other operating variables that impact the service life of the refractory lining. The paper provides recommendations that will help mill personnel develop a strategy to select a refractory lining that is optimized for their specific situation.

Gorog, John Peter [ORNL; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Walker, Harold [Refratechnik North America, Inc.; Leary, William R [ORNL; Ellis, Murray [Australian Paper, Co.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline (octane or decane) at low temperature and ambient pressure via treatment with a TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase system consisting of the fuel as the first phase and a water/tertiary butanol second phase. The DBTs are oxidized to sulphones (or sulfoxides), which then completely extract into the water/t-butanol phase. Treatment of commercial diesel spiked with DBT under the same conditions results in compete DBT oxidation. In contrast with the octane and decane experiments, removal to the water/t-butanol phase is not yet complete and is being further optimized. Analysis by the sulfur specific GC-FPD technique suggests that >70% sulfur compounds are removed from unspiked diesel after one treatment. Further treatments are being investigated. The GC-FPD results will be checked by total sulfur analysis methodology.

Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

David Liscinsky

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

A process for the preparation of cysteine from cystine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention in one aspect relates to a process for the simultaneous removal of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 from a fluid stream comprising mixtures thereof and in another aspect relates to the separation, use and/or regeneration of various chemicals contaminated or spent in the process and which includes the steps of: (A) contacting the fluid stream at a temperature of between about 105.degree. and 180.degree. C. with a liquid aqueous slurry or solution comprising an effective amount of an iron chelate of an amino acid moiety having at least one --SH group; (B) separating the fluid stream from the particulates formed in step (A) comprising the chelate of the amino acid moiety and fly ash; (C) washing and separating the particulates of step (B) with an aqeous solution having a pH value of between about 5 to 8; (D) subsequently washing and separating the particulates of step (C) with a strongly acidic aqueous solution having a pH value of between about 1 to 3; (E) washing and separating the particulates of step (D) with an basic aqueous solution having a pH value of between about 9 to 12; (F) optionally adding additional amino acid moiety, iron (II) and alkali to the aqueous liquid from step (D) to produce an aqueous solution or slurry similar to that in step (A) having a pH value of between about 4 to 12; and (G) recycling the aqueous slurry of step (F) to the contacting zone of step (A). Steps (D) and (E) can be carried out in the reverse sequence, however the preferred order is (D) and then (E). In a preferred embodiment the present invention provides an improved process for the preparation (regeneration) of cysteine from cystine, which includes reacting an aqueous solution of cystine at a pH of between about 9 to 13 with a reducing agent selected from hydrogen sulfide or alkali metal sulfides, sulfur dioxide, an alkali metal sulfite or mixtures thereof for a time and at a temperature effective to cleave and reduce the cystine to cysteine with subsequent recovery of the cysteine. In another preferred embodiment the present invention provides a process for the removal of NO.sub.x, SO.sub.2 and particulates from a fluid stream which includes the steps of (A) injecting into a reaction zone an aqueous solution itself comprising (i) an amino acid moiety selected from those described above; (ii) iron (II) ion; and (iii) an alkali, wherein the aqueous solution has a pH of between about 4 and 11; followed by solids separation and washing as is described in steps (B), (C), (D) and (E) above. The overall process is useful to reduce acid rain components from combustion gas sources.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, David K. (Oakland, CA); Griffiths, Elizabeth A. (Morristown, NJ); Littlejohn, David (Oakland, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of antibodies and enzymes containing disulfide bonds and requiring folding/post-translational modification. With only limited time remaining in the Phase I schedule, a single construct was made to produce MnP with this system. The enzyme was produced in the soluble fraction of the cell lysate, but no activity was measured. MnP from the existing recombinant source was used to act on lignin. The lignin was from a Kraft process and had a molecular weight of about 10,000 Da. Using 1000 Da dialysis membranes and UV-visible spectroscopy, no modification of either lignin was evident in the dialysate or the retentate. Assays using 2,6 dimethoxy phenol (DMP) as a substrate showed consistent activity throughout the project. In summary, these results fell far short of our expectations. A Phase II proposal was not submitted. Possible reasons for the failure of peroxisomal targeting include destruction by native hydrogen peroxide, native proteases, or unforeseen causes. The AbSci system was only lighted tested and further work may yield a strain with active enzyme. The lack of evidence for lignin modification may be due to the techniques employed. NMR or GC-MS studies may reveal evidence of modification.

Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

396

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

Carbon-carbon bond cleavage of 1,2-hydroxy ethers b7 vanadium(V) dipicolinate complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of alternatives to current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals is becoming increasingly important due to concerns over climate change, growing world energy demand, and energy security issues. Using non-food derived biomass to produce renewable feedstocks for chemicals and fuels is a particularly attractive possibility. However, the majority of biomass is in the form of lignocellulose, which is often not fully utilized due to difficulties associated with breaking down both lignin and cellulose. Recently, a number of methods have been reported to transform cellulose directly into more valuable materials such as glucose, sorbitol, 5-(chloromethyl)furfural, and ethylene glycol. Less progress has been made with selective transformations of lignin, which is typically treated in paper and forest industries by kraft pulping (sodium hydroxide/sodium sulfide) or incineration. Our group has begun investigating aerobic oxidative C-C bond cleavage catalyzed by dipicolinate vanadium complexes, with the idea that a selective C-C cleavage reaction of this type could be used to produce valuable chemicals or intermediates from cellulose or lignin. Lignin is a randomized polymer containing methoxylated phenoxy propanol units. A number of different linkages occur naturally; one of the most prevalent is the {beta}-O-4 linkage shown in Figure 1, containing a C-C bond with 1,2-hydroxy ether substituents. While the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-diols has been reported for a number of metals, including vanadium, iron, manganese, ruthenium, and polyoxometalate complexes, C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-hydroxy ethers is much less common. We report herein vanadium-mediated cleavage of C-C bonds between alcohol and ether functionalities in several lignin model complexes. In order to explore the scope and potential of vanadium complexes to effect oxidative C-C bond cleavage in 1,2-hydroxy ethers, we examined the reactivity of the lignin model complexes pinacol monomethyl ether (A), 2-phenoxyethanol (B), and 1,2-diphenyl-2-methoxyethanol (C) (Figure 1). Reaction of (dipic)V{sup V}(O)O{sup i}Pr (1a) or (dipic)V{sup v}(O)OEt (lb) with A, B, or C in acetonitrile yielded new vanadium(V) complexes where the alcohol-ether ligand was bound in a chelating fashion. From the reaction of 1b with pinacol monomethyl ether (A) in acetonitrile solution, (dipic)V{sup v}(O)(pinOMe) (2) (PinOMe = 2,3-dimethyl-3-methoxy-2-butanoxide) was isolated in 61 % yield. Reaction of 1b with 2-phenoxyethanol (B) in acetonitrile gave the new complex (dipic)V{sup v}(O)(OPE) (3) (OPE = 2-phenoxyethoxide), which was isolated in 76% yield. In a similar fashion, 1a reacted with 1,2-diphenyl-2-methoxyethanol (C) to give (dipic)V(O)(DPME) (4) (DPME = 1,2-diphenyl-2-methoxyethoxide), which was isolated in 39% yield. Complexes 2, 3, and 4 were characterized by {sup 1}H NMR and IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and X-ray crystallography. Compared to the previously reported vanadium(V) pinacolate complex (dipic)V(O)(pinOH) the X-ray structure of complex 2 reveals a slightly shorter V = O bond, 1.573(2) {angstrom} vs 1.588(2) {angstrom} for the pinOH structure. Complexes 3 and 4 display similar vanadium oxo bond distances of 1.568(2) {angstrom} and 1.576(2) {angstrom}, respectively. All three complexes show longer bonds to the ether-oxygen trans to the oxo (2.388(2) {angstrom} for 2, 2.547(2) {angstrom} for 3, and 2.438(2) {angstrom} for 4) than to the hydroxy-oxygen in the pinOH structure (2.252(2) {angstrom}).

Hanson, Susan K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorn, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, R Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of an Acoustic Sensor for On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2-Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1989 the U.S. Department of Energy has supported development of advanced coal gasification technology. The Wabash River and TECO IGCC demonstration projects supported by the DOE have demonstrated the ability of these plants to achieve high levels of energy efficiency and extremely low emissions of hazardous pollutants. However, a continuing challenge for this technology is the tradeoff between high carbon conversion which requires operation with high internal gas temperatures, and limited refractory life which is exacerbated by those high operating temperatures. Attempts to control internal gas temperature so as to operate these gasifiers at the optimum temperature have been hampered by the lack of a reliable technology for measuring internal gas temperatures. Thermocouples have serious survival problems and provide useful temperature information for only a few days or weeks after startup before burning out. For this reason, the Department of Energy has funded several research projects to develop more robust and reliable temperature measurement approaches for use in coal gasifiers. Enertechnix has developed a line of acoustic gas temperature sensors for use in coal-fired electric utility boilers, kraft recovery boilers, cement kilns and petrochemical process heaters. Acoustic pyrometry provides several significant advantages for gas temperature measurement in hostile process environments. First, it is non-intrusive so survival of the measurement components is not a serious problem. Second, it provides a line-of-sight average temperature rather than a point measurement, so the measured temperature is more representative of the process conditions than those provided by thermocouples. Unlike radiation pyrometers, the measured temperature is a linear average over the full path rather than a complicated function of gas temperature and the exponential Beer's law. For this reason, acoustic pyrometry is well suited to tomography allowing detailed temperature maps to be created through the use of multiple path measurements in a plane. Therefore, acoustic pyrometry is an attractive choice for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier. The objective of this project is to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project is organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consists of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that can be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consists of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the lab and at a gasifier facility, and developing a conceptual design for an engineering prototype sensor. The third phase consists of designing and fabricating the engineering prototype, testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier, and conducting extended field trials to demonstrate sensor performance and investigate the ability to im

Peter Ariessohn; Hans Hornung

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded project on materials for industrial heat recovery systems included four research tasks: materials for aluminum melting furnace recuperator tubes, materials and operational changes to prevent cracking and corrosion of the co-extruded tubes that form primary air ports in black liquor recovery boilers, the cause of and means to prevent corrosion of carbon steel tubes in the mid-furnace area of recovery boilers, and materials and operational changes to prevent corrosion and cracking of recovery boiler superheater tubes. Results from studies on the latter two topics are given in this report while separate reports on results for the first two tasks have already been published. Accelerated, localized corrosion has been observed in the mid-furnace area of kraft recovery boilers. This corrosion of the carbon steel waterwall tubes is typically observed in the vicinity of the upper level of air ports where the stainless clad co-extruded wall tubes used in the lower portion of the boiler are welded to the carbon steel tubes that extend from this transition point or “cut line” to the top of the boiler. Corrosion patterns generally vary from one boiler to another depending on boiler design and operating parameters, but the corrosion is almost always found within a few meters of the cut line and often much closer than that. This localized corrosion results in tube wall thinning that can reach the level where the integrity of the tube is at risk. Collection and analysis of gas samples from various areas near the waterwall surface showed reducing and sulfidizing gases were present in the areas where corrosion was accelerated. However, collection of samples from the same areas at intervals over a two year period showed the gaseous environment in the mid-furnace section can cycle between oxidizing and reducing conditions. These fluctuations are thought to be due to gas flow instabilities and they result in an unstable or a less protective scale on the carbon steel tubes. Also, these fluctuating air flow patterns can result in deposition of black liquor on the wall tubes, and during periods when deposition is high, there is a noticeable increase in the concentrations of sulfur-bearing gases like hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. Laboratory studies have shown that chromized and aluminized surface treatments on carbon steel improve the resistance to sulfidation attack. Studies of superheater corrosion and cracking have included laboratory analyses of cracked tubes, laboratory corrosion studies designed to simulate the superheater environment and field tests to study the movement of superheater tubes and to expose a corrosion probe to assess the corrosion behavior of alternate superheater alloys, particularly alloys that would be used for superheaters operating at higher temperatures and higher pressures than most current boilers. In the laboratory corrosion studies, samples of six alternate materials were immersed in an aggressive, low melting point salt mixture and exposed for times up to 336 h, at temperatures of 510, 530 or 560°C in an inert or reactive cover gas. Using weight change and results of metallographic examination, the samples were graded on their resistance to the various environments. For the superheater corrosion probe studies, samples of the same six materials were exposed on an air-cooled corrosion probe exposed in the superheater section of a recovery boiler for 1000 h. Post exposure examination showed cracking and/or subsurface attack in the samples exposed at the higher temperatures with the attack being more severe for samples 13 exposed above the first melting temperature of the deposits that collected on the superheater tubes. From these superheater studies, a ranking was developed for the six materials tested. The task addressing cracking and corrosion of primary air port tubes that was part of this project produced results that have been extensively implemented in recovery boilers in North America, the Nordic countries and many other parts of the world. By utilizing these results, boilers ar

Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z