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Sample records for kp moran rt

  1. moran-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 A Review of the First Year of Operations of ARM's 8-mm Cloud Profiling Radar at the SGP CART Site K. P. Moran, B. E. Martner, and M. J. Post NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program designed the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites to provide researchers with a set of measurements of the state of the

  2. moran-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Processing Techniques Used in the ARM 8-mm Cloud Radars K. P. Moran, R. Lataitis, M. J. Post, B. E. Martner, and D. Welsh National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Strauch Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radars

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... References Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and ... Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ ...

  4. Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reply to Congressman James P. Moran Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran Docket No. EO-05-01: Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran...

  5. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...TR-082 59 Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and ... Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ ...

  6. KP Renewables Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KP Renewables Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: KP Renewables Plc Place: Brentford, Middlesex, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: TW8 9JJ Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy...

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Journal of Atmospheric Science, in press. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, M Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of cloud heights and ...

  8. Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Supporting the Comments from the City of Alexandria on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages | Department of Energy from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia Supporting the Comments from the City of Alexandria on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia Supporting the Comments from the City of Alexandria on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages Docket

  9. JV between KP Renewables and Living Buildings | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KP Renewables and Living Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name: JV between KP Renewables and Living Buildings Place: Brentford, Middlesex, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip:...

  10. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... EE, RC Perez, DD Turner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and ... B Lin, Y Yi, MM Khaiyer, RF Arduini, and GG Mace. 2005. "Advanced retrievals of ...

  11. ARM TR-047

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Clothiaux, EE., MA Miller, RC Perez, DD Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ Rodriguez, T Uttal, JH Mather, CJ Flynn, KL Gaustad, ...

  12. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... et al., April 2009, DOESC-ARMP-09-012 3 3. References Clothiaux, EE, P Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of ...

  13. Microsoft Word - MC3E_Science_Plan_v5_FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Journal of Climate 18(16): 3189-3203. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination of cloud heights and ...

  14. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-139

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Clothiaux, EE, MA Miller, RC Perez, DD Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ Rodriguez, T Uttal, JH Mather, CJ Flynn, KL Gaustad, ...

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 27 - 31, 2006 Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and ... Journal of Applied Meteorology 39:645-665. Dong, X, P Minnis, GG Mace, WL Smith Jr., M ...

  16. ARM TR-008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Journal of Geophysical Research, 110(D15S15) doi:10.10292004JD005042. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective ...

  17. ARM - Value-Added Product (VAP) Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M Deng, M Dunn, RJ Hogan, MP Jensen, GG Mace, SA McFarlane, EJ O'Connor, A Protat, ... Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ ...

  18. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...BF00052831. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, M Miller, and ... Nature 440, doi:10.1038 nature04636. Garrett, TJ, Zhao, C, Dong, X, Mace, GG, & Hobbs, ...

  19. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... M. Jensen et al., March 2008, DOESC-ARMP-08-006 4 2.2 References Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective ...

  20. Microsoft Word - Group3Cloud Properties(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for (a) column clouds and (b) circle clouds. 2.0 References Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and BE Martner. 2000. "Objective determination ...

  1. Microsoft Word - taylor.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... MASA Technical Translation, NASA TT-F-790, 173-181. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, ... Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ ...

  2. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-095 The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 11.0 References Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, KP Moran, RT Marchand, MA Miller, and ... EJ Mlawer, and GG Mace. 2003. "ARM value- added cloud products: Description and status." ...

  3. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... prior to any attempts to enter a government site as shown ... premises are subject to search. (e) Contractor shall ... SF 6432-RT Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for ...

  4. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Control : SF 6432-RT Title: Standard Terms and Conditions ... Any Contractor personnel who will enter a government site to ... premises are subject to search. (e) Contractor will ...

  5. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Control : SF 6432-RT Title: Standard Terms and Conditions ... Any Contractor personnel who will enter a government site to ... premises are subject to search. (e) Contractor shall ...

  6. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RT Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for Acquiring the Services of Sandia Retirees Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release Date: 03/2014 Page 1 of 16 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-RT (3/2014) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR ACQUIRING SERVICES OF SANDIA RETIREES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT McMoran - FE DKT. NO. 13-26-LNG - ORDER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3290 | Department of Energy McMoran - FE DKT. NO. 13-26-LNG - ORDER 3290 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT McMoran - FE DKT. NO. 13-26-LNG - ORDER 3290 PDF icon October 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR MAIN PASS ENERGY HUB, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-114-LNG - ORDER 3220 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR AMERICAN LNG MARKETING LLC - FTA - DKT. 14-209-LNG - ORDER NO. 3601 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR

  8. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RT (04/2015) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR ACQUIRING SERVICES OF SANDIA RETIREES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT BANKRUPTCY CANCELLATION OR TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE CHANGES

  9. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11/17/15 Page 1 of 16 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-RT (11/2015) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR ACQUIRING SERVICES OF SANDIA RETIREES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION)

  10. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02/08/16 Page 1 of 17 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-RT (02/2016) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR ACQUIRING SERVICES OF SANDIA RETIREES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION)

  11. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  12. KP-AP-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AP-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-AP-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia served through the facilities of American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company) and PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM). This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at wholesale of

  13. KP-DEP-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-DEP-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke Energy Progress System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government and Duke Energy Progress (formerly known as Carolina Power & Light Company and hereinafter called the Company) and the

  14. KP-DEP-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-DEP-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke Energy Progress System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government and Duke Energy Progress (formerly known as Carolina Power & Light Company and hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer.

  15. KP-DEP-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-DEP-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke Energy Progress System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government and Duke Energy Progress (formerly known as Carolina Power & Light Company and hereinafter called the Company) and the Customer.

  16. KP-DEP-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-DEP-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke Energy Progress System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and South Carolina served through the transmission facilities of Duke Energy Progress (formerly known as Carolina Power & Light Company and hereinafter called the Company). This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at

  17. KP-NC-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NC-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-NC-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Virginia Power/Duke Energy Progress System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to a contract between the Government and Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Virginia Power) and PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter

  18. KP-Replacement-2-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Replacement-2-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-Replacement-2-B Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Replacement Energy System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in North Carolina and Virginia to whom power is provided pursuant to contracts between the Government and the customer from the John H. Kerr and Philpott Projects (or Kerr-Philpott System). This rate schedule shall be applicable to

  19. KP-VA-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-VA-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Virginia Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM

  20. KP-VA-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-VA-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Virginia Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government, Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC

  1. KP-VA-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-VA-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Virginia Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC

  2. KP-VA-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-VA-4-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Virginia Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia and North Carolina served through the transmission facilities of Virginia Electric and Power Company (hereinafter called the Company) and PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM). This rate schedule shall be applicable to the sale at

  3. KP-AP-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-AP-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia to whom power may be transmitted and scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection

  4. KP-AP-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-AP-2-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia to whom power may be transmitted pursuant to contracts between the Government, American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company), the Company's Transmission Operator, currently PJM Interconnection LLC

  5. KP-AP-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule KP-AP-3-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives (any one of whom is hereinafter called the Customer) in Virginia to whom power may be scheduled pursuant to contracts between the Government, American Electric Power Service Corporation (hereinafter called the Company), PJM Interconnection LLC (hereinafter called PJM), and the Customer. This rate

  6. V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue July 2, 2013 - 12:38am Addthis PROBLEM: ASUS RT-N66U...

  7. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore »the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  8. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore » the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  9. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, Paul R; Dimonte, Guy; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L; Dimonte, Guy; Dai, W; Kares, R. J.

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  10. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude of the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.

  11. Theory of the electronic structure of dilute bismide and bismide-nitride alloys of GaAs: Tight-binding and k.p models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usman, Muhammad; Broderick, Christopher A.; O'Reilly, Eoin P.

    2013-12-04

    The addition of dilute concentrations of bismuth (Bi) into GaAs to form GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1?x} alloys results in a large reduction of the band gap energy (E{sub g}) accompanied by a significant increase of the spin-orbit-splitting energy (?{sub SO}), leading to an E{sub g} < ?{sub SO} regime for x ? 10% which is technologically relevant for the design of highly efficient photonic devices. The quaternary alloy GaBi{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1?x?y} offers further flexibility for band gap tuning, because both nitrogen and bismuth can independently induce band gap reduction. This work reports sp{sup 3}s* tight binding and 14-band k?p models for the study of the electronic structure of GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1?x} and GaBi{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1?x?y} alloys. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  12. WE-G-17A-03: MRIgRT: Quantification of Organ Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanescu, T; Tadic, T; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an MRI-based methodology and tools required for the quantification of organ motion on a dedicated MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A three-room facility, consisting of a TrueBeam 6X linac vault, a 1.5T MR suite and a brachytherapy interventional room, is currently under commissioning at our institution. The MR scanner can move and image in either room for diagnostic and treatment guidance purposes. Methods: A multi-imaging modality (MR, kV) phantom, featuring programmable 3D simple and complex motion trajectories, was used for the validation of several image sorting algorithms. The testing was performed on MRI (e.g. TrueFISP, TurboFLASH), 4D CT and 4D CBCT. The image sorting techniques were based on a) direct image pixel manipulation into columns or rows, b) single and aggregated pixel data tracking and c) using computer vision techniques for global pixel analysis. Subsequently, the motion phantom and sorting algorithms were utilized for commissioning of MR fast imaging techniques for 2D-cine and 4D data rendering. MR imaging protocols were optimized (e.g. readout gradient strength vs. SNR) to minimize the presence of susceptibility-induced distortions, which were reported through phantom experiments and numerical simulations. The system-related distortions were also quantified (dedicated field phantom) and treated as systematic shifts where relevant. Results: Image sorting algorithms were validated for specific MR-based applications such as quantification of organ motion, local data sampling, and 4D MRI for pre-RT delivery with accuracy better than the raw image pixel size (e.g. 1 mm). MR fast imaging sequences were commissioning and imaging strategies were developed to mitigate spatial artifacts with minimal penalty on the image spatial and temporal sampling. Workflows (e.g. liver) were optimized to include the new motion quantification tools for RT planning and daily patient setup verification. Conclusion: Comprehensive methods were developed and validated for the quantification of organ motion with applications in MRI-guided RT.

  13. SU-E-J-42: Customized Deformable Image Registration Using Open-Source Software SlicerRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, J Cifuentes; Chin, L; Pignol, J; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J; Lasso, A; Pinter, C; Fichtinger, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: SlicerRT is a flexible platform that allows the user to incorporate the necessary images registration and processing tools to improve clinical workflow. This work validates the accuracy and the versatility of the deformable image registration algorithm of the free open-source software SlicerRT using a deformable physical pelvic phantom versus available commercial image fusion algorithms. Methods: Optical camera images of nonradiopaque markers implanted in an anatomical pelvic phantom were used to measure the ground-truth deformation and evaluate the theoretical deformations for several DIR algorithms. To perform the registration, full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were obtained and used as fixed and moving images, respectively. The DIR module, found in SlicerRT, used a B-spline deformable image registration with multiple optimization parameters that allowed customization of the registration including a regularization term that controlled the amount of local voxel displacement. The virtual deformation field at the center of the phantom was obtained and compared to the experimental ground-truth values. The parameters of SlicerRT were then varied to improve spatial accuracy. To quantify image similarity, the mean absolute difference (MAD) parameter using Hounsfield units was calculated. In addition, the Dice coefficient of the contoured rectum was evaluated to validate the strength of the algorithm to transfer anatomical contours. Results: Overall, SlicerRT achieved one of the lowest MAD values across the algorithm spectrum, but slightly smaller mean spatial errors in comparison to MIM software (MIM). On the other hand, SlicerRT created higher mean spatial errors than Velocity Medical Solutions (VEL), although obtaining an improvement on the DICE to 0.91. The large spatial errors were attributed to the poor contrast in the prostate bladder interface of the phantom. Conclusion: Based phantom validation, SlicerRT is capable of achieving comparable DIR accuracy to commercial programs such as MIM and VEL.

  14. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael D.; Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A.; Holdsworth, David W.; Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 ; Drangova, Maria; Chen, Jeff; Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 ; Wong, Eugene; Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 2 to 60 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 70 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 50 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 70 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 50, 40 40, and 30 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

  15. DOE/SC-ARM-12-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012 New Climate Measurement Sites h ?QOPQK?* ? * - " ?q " *"- ?l *?G qlH?b " * ?q ?e " "* ? ? - " ?*"-? "?- *"- ? "* Y? ? "? ql?l- " ?e " "* ? - ? ? * ? - *? *?n " *- K? K? ? ? "? ? "* ?- ?f "- ?h ? " ?* ? - M?? ? "? "* ? ? ?*-? ?- *"- ? ?* ? ?- ?QOPRK? ?* ?"" ? -" ? ql ? " *" ? "* ?- ? *? " * ?-

  16. Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Neil B.; Stein, Nicholas F.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M.; Goodman, Karyn; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

  17. Ten polymorphic DNA loci, including five in the rat MHC (RT1) region, form a single linkage group on rat chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remmers, E.F.; Du, Y.; Zha, H.; Goldmuntz, E.A.; Wilder, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    We have described ten markers for polymorphic loci on rat chromosome 20, including five in the rat MHC (RT1) region. These markers formed a single linkage group spanning a recombination distance of 0.40. The markers identified five expressed gene loci - RT1.N1 (thymus leukemia antigen 1), Tnfa (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}), Hspa1 (heat shock protein 70), Ggt1 ({gamma} glutamyl-transferase 1), and Prkacn2 (protein kinase C catalytic subunit binding inhibitor 2), two loci with sequences that are related to expressed genes - RT1.Aw2 (sequence related to a non-RT1A class I {alpha} chain) and Mt21 (sequence related to metallothionein 2), and three anonymous loci - D20Arb548, D20Arb234, and D20Arb249. These polymorphic markers should facilitate mapping studies and genetic monitoring of inbred rat strains. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75?GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  19. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Examples of these causes are (1) acts of God or of the ... shall the Contractor say or do anything that suggests ... Sandia holds California Contractor's Permit Number OH- ...

  20. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Examples of these causes are (1) acts of God or of the ... At no time shall the Contractor say or do anything that ... Sandia holds California Contractor's Permit Number OH- ...

  1. RepoRt B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy and new technologies. It also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development in the Columbia...

  2. Austin(2)-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CAVEX99) R. T. Austin, G. L. Stephens, R. F. McCoy, Jr., R. B. McCoy, and S. D. Miller Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado S....

  3. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCR and SDR (if one is identified in the contract,) within 72 hours of the Contractor's learning of the situation. The Contractor shall cooperate with Sandia and provide...

  4. RepoRt B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and develop emergency backup systems. Biological Opinion Under the Endangered Species Act, BPA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and the Bureau of Reclamation...

  5. fileI8MhKP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. Application of real time transient temperature (RT{sup 3}) program on nuclear power plant HVAC analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Y.; Tomlins, V.A.; Haskell, N.L.; Giffels, F.W.

    1996-08-01

    A database oriented technical analysis program (RT) utilizing a lumped parameter model combined with a finite difference method was developed to concurrently simulate transient temperatures in single or multiple room(s)/area(s). Analyses can be seen for postulated design basis events, such as, 10CFR50 Appendix-R, Loss of Coolant Accident concurrent with Loss of Offsite Power (LOCA/LOOP), Station BlackOut (SBO), and normal station operating conditions. The rate of change of the air temperatures is calculated by explicitly solving a series of energy balance equations with heat sources and sinks that have been described. For building elements with heat absorbing capacity, an explicit Forward Time Central Space (FTCS) model of one dimensional transient heat conduction in a plane element is used to describe the element temperature profile. Heat migration among the rooms/areas is considered not only by means of conduction but also by means of natural convection induced by temperature differences through openings between rooms/areas. The program also provides a means to evaluate existing plant HVAC system performance. The performance and temperature control of local coolers/heaters can be also simulated. The program was used to calculate transient temperature profiles for several buildings and rooms housing safety-related electrical components in PWR and BWR nuclear power plants. Results for a turbine building and reactor building in a BWR nuclear power plant are provided here. Specific calculational areas were defined on the basis of elevation, physical barriers and components/systems. Transient temperature profiles were then determined for the bounding design basis events with winter and summer outdoor air temperatures.

  7. Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO-05-01: I wish to add my voice to the comments submitted on behalf of the City of Alexandria by its legal counsel John B. Britton of Schnader Harrison Segal and Lewis LLP and ...

  8. TU-F-17A-06: Motion Stability and Dosimetric Impact of Spirometer-Based DIBH-RT of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, E; Yang, W; Burnison, M; Mirhadi, A; Hakimian, B; Stephen, S; Robert, R; Yue, Y; Sandler, H; Fraass, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for left-sided breast cancer have increased risk of coronary artery disease. Deep Inhalation Breath Hold assisted RT (DIBH-RT) is shown to increase the geometric separation of the target area and heart, reducing cardiac radiation dose. The purposes of this study are to use Cine MV portal images to determine the stability of spirometer-guided DIBH-RT and examine the dosimetric cardiopulmonary impact of this technique. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with left-sided breast cancer were recruited to the IRB-approved study. Free-breathing (FB) and DIBH-CT's were acquired at simulation. Rigid registration of the FB-CT and DIBH-CT was performed using primarily breast tissue. Treatment plans were created for each FB-CT and DIBH-CT using identical paired tangent fields with field-in-field or electronic compensation techniques. Dosimetric evaluation included mean and maximum (Dmax) doses for the left anterior descending artery (LAD), mean heart dose, and left lung V20. Cine MV portal images were acquired for medial and lateral fields during treatment. Analysis of Cine images involved chest wall segmentation using an algorithm developed in-house. Intra- and inter-fractional chest wall motion were determined through affine registration to the first frame of each Cine. Results: Dose to each cardiac structure evaluated was significantly (p<0.001) reduced with the DIBH plans. Mean heart dose decreased from 2.9(0.96.6) to 1.6(0.65.3) Gy; mean LAD dose from 16.6(343.6) to 7.4(1.732.7) Gy; and LAD Dmax from 35.4 (6.153) to 18.4(2.551.2) Gy. No statistically significant reduction was found for the left lung V20. Average AP and SI median chest wall motion (intrafractional) was 0.1 (SD=0.9) and 0.5 (SD=1.1) mm, respectively. Average AP inter-fractional chest wall motion was 2.0 (SD=1.4) mm. Conclusion: Spirometer-based DIBH treatments of the left breast are reproducible both inter- and intra-fractionally, and provide a statistically and potentially clinically useful dosimetric advantage to cardiac structures.

  9. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

  10. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  11. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer in Antarctica Ice in nanoseconds SUMMER 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 2 Drought dilemmas Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly magazine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a mul- tiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in Albuquerque, New

  12. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closer to fusion Biofuels on tap FALL 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 3 Simulation: Making engineers better Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  13. Simulations of cm-wavelength Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and point source blind sky surveys and predictions for the RT32/OCRA-f and the Hevelius 100-m radio telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, Bartosz; Kus, Andrzej; Birkinshaw, Mark; Wilkinson, Peter E-mail: Mark.Birkinshaw@bristol.ac.uk E-mail: ajk@astro.uni.torun.pl

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of blind surveys for radio sources and galaxy cluster thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (TSZEs) using the four-pair, beam-switched OCRA-f radiometer on the 32-m radio telescope in Poland. The predictions are based on mock maps that include the cosmic microwave background, TSZEs from hydrodynamical simulations of large scale structure formation, and unresolved radio sources. We validate the mock maps against observational data, and examine the limitations imposed by simplified physics. We estimate the effects of source clustering towards galaxy clusters from NVSS source counts around Planck-selected cluster candidates, and include appropriate correlations in our mock maps. The study allows us to quantify the effects of halo line-of-sight alignments, source confusion, and telescope angular resolution on the detections of TSZEs. We perform a similar analysis for the planned 100-m Hevelius radio telescope (RTH) equipped with a 49-beam radio camera and operating at frequencies up to 22 GHz.We find that RT32/OCRA-f will be suitable for small-field blind radio source surveys, and will detect 33{sup +17}{sub ?11} new radio sources brighter than 0.87mJy at 30 GHz in a 1deg{sup 2} field at >5? CL during a one-year, non-continuous, observing campaign, taking account of Polish weather conditions. It is unlikely that any galaxy cluster will be detected at 3? CL in such a survey. A 60-deg{sup 2} survey, with field coverage of 2{sup 2} beams per pixel, at 15 GHz with the RTH, would find <1.5 galaxy clusters per year brighter than 60 ?Jy (at 3? CL), and would detect about 3.4נ10{sup 4} point sources brighter than 1mJy at 5? CL, with confusion causing flux density errors ?<2%(20%) in 68% (95%) of the detected sources.A primary goal of the planned RTH will be a wide-area (? sr) radio source survey at 15 GHz. This survey will detect nearly 3נ10{sup 5} radio sources at 5? CL down to 1.3 mJy, and tens of galaxy clusters, in one year of operation with typical weather conditions. Confusion will affect the measured flux densities by ?<1.5%(16%) for 68% (95%) of the point sources. We also gauge the impact of the RTH by investigating its performance if equipped with the existing RT32 receivers, and the performance of the RT32 equipped with the RTH radio camera.

  14. S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-setting solar power Green jet fuel SUMMER 2008 In this issue: S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 1 0 , N O. 1 Energized Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  15. Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

  16. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. additive manufacturuing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Laboratory engineer Bryan Moran won an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran...

  20. Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equipment manufacturer for the clean energy industry, currently focused on thin-film solar cell production equipment. Coordinates: 47.506225, 19.06482 Show Map Loading...

  1. NEAC-RT ComLtr 11.1.12

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engineering Physics 1500 Engineering Drive Madison WI 53706 Phone: (608) 263-1646 Fax: (608) 263-7451 www.engr.wisc.edu/ep/ Nuclear Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Mechanics Astronautics October 3 0, 2 012 To: Dr. R ichard M eserve, N EAC C hair From: NEAC N uclear R eactor T echnology S ubcommittee Re: Initial R eview o f A dvanced R eactor T echnology O ffice On S eptember 2 4 th , 2 012 o ur S ubcommittee m et w ith t he D oE N uclear R eactors Technologies Office (NE---7) s taff.

  2. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 7: Appendices K--P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J.; Kaplan, M.

    1994-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

  3. WE-B-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Planning II: Cloud Computing in RT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, K; Kagadis, G; Xing, L; McNutt, T

    2014-06-15

    As defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cloud computing is a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. Despite the omnipresent role of computers in radiotherapy, cloud computing has yet to achieve widespread adoption in clinical or research applications, though the transition to such on-demand access is underway. As this transition proceeds, new opportunities for aggregate studies and efficient use of computational resources are set against new challenges in patient privacy protection, data integrity, and management of clinical informatics systems. In this Session, current and future applications of cloud computing and distributed computational resources will be discussed in the context of medical imaging, radiotherapy research, and clinical radiation oncology applications. Learning Objectives: Understand basic concepts of cloud computing. Understand how cloud computing could be used for medical imaging applications. Understand how cloud computing could be employed for radiotherapy research.4. Understand how clinical radiotherapy software applications would function in the cloud.

  4. Preliminary ILAW Formulation Algorithm Description, 24590 LAW RPT-RT-04-0003, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2013-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), has contracted with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to design, construct, and commission the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site (DOE 2000). This plant is designed to operate for 40 years and treat roughly 50 million gallons of mixed hazardous high-level waste (HLW) stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The process involves separating the hight-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions through filtration, leaching, Cs ion exchange, and precipitation. Each fraction will be separately vitrified into borosilicate waste glass. This report documents the initial algorithm for use by Hanford WTP in batching LAW and glass-forming chemicals (GFCs) in the LAW melter feed preparation vessel (MFPV). Algorithm inputs include the chemical analyses of the pretreated LAW in the concentrate receipt vessel (CRV), the volume of the MFPV heel, and the compositions of individual GFCs. In addition to these inputs, uncertainties in the LAW composition and processing parameters are included in the algorithm.

  5. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse Report No. 11. Appendices K-P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  6. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-035.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Burst Facility (PBF)-622 Moran Project Facility Modifications SECTION B. Project Description: The equipment and process for the Moran Project (formerly "PUREX") are documented in Environmental Checklist (EC) INL-14-029 and its revisions. The Moran Project is located at Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC), in building PBF-622. Modifications to PBF-622 are needed to support research and development

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This article, which is a condensed version of Martner and Moran (2000), describes a dual-polarization radar method to remedy the insect contamination problem. Only clouds of...

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dual Polarization Observations on an MMCR: Implementation and First Results K. P. Moran, T. Ayers, B. E. Martner, and M. J. Post National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  9. Magnetic properties of RT2Zn20; R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co, Ru, Os and Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Shuang

    2008-12-15

    It is well known that rare earth intermetallic compounds have versatile, magnetic properties associated with the 4f electrons: a local moment associated with the Hund's rule ground state is formed in general, but a strongly correlated, hybridized state may also appear for specific 4f electronic configuration (eg. for rare earth elements such as Ce or Yb). On the other hand, the conduction electrons in rare earth intermetallic compounds, certainly ones associated with non hybridizing rare earths, usually manifest non-magnetic behavior and can be treated as a normal, non-interacted Fermi liquid, except for some 3d-transition metal rich binary or ternary systems which often manifest strong, itinerant, d electron dominant magnetic behavior. Of particular interest are examples in which the band filling of the conduction electrons puts the system in the vicinity of a Stoner transition: such systems, characterized as nearly or weakly ferromagnet, manifest strongly correlated electronic properties [Moriya, 1985]. For rare earth intermetallic compounds, such systems provide an additional versatility and allow for the study of the behaviors of local moments and hybridized moments which are associated with 4f electron in a correlated conduction electron background.

  10. MHD Structure Analysis by Singular Value Decomposition as a Tool for ECRH RT-Control of Instabilities on FTU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetto, C.; Cirant, S.; Granucci, G.; Lazzaro, E.; Gandini, F.; Esposito, B.

    2009-11-26

    In this work we present the results obtained applying Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on a Mirnov coil array in FTU discharges where experiments on MHD stabilization or disruption avoidance via ECRH were performed. In these shots the mode analysis has been consolidated off line by means of FFT and SXR-tomography. Although the Mirnov setting was not necessarily optimised, results show that the algorithm based on SVD is able to detect the mode with a precision equal or better than the FFT, while acting on a smaller time interval. The short execution time required, even in the present preliminary form, suggests that this analysis can be a suitable tool to be implemented in a real time control chain.

  11. SU-E-T-99: Design and Development of Isocenter Parameter System for CT Simulation Laser Based On DICOM RT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to receive DICOM files from treatment planning system and generate patient isocenter positioning parameter file for CT laser system automatically, this paper presents a method for communication with treatment planning system and calculation of isocenter parameter for each radiation field. Methods: Coordinate transformation and laser positioning file formats were analyzed, isocenter parameter was calculated via data from DICOM CT Data and DICOM RTPLAN file. An in-house software-DicomGenie was developed based on the object-oriented program platform-Qt with DCMTK SDK (Germany OFFIS company DICOM SDK) . DicomGenie was tested for accuracy using Philips CT simulation plan system (Tumor LOC, Philips) and A2J CT positioning laser system (Thorigny Sur Marne, France). Results: DicomGenie successfully established DICOM communication between treatment planning system, DICOM files were received by DicomGenie and patient laser isocenter information was generated accurately. Patient laser parameter data files can be used for for CT laser system directly. Conclusion: In-house software DicomGenie received and extracted DICOM data, isocenter laser positioning data files were created by DicomGenie and can be use for A2J laser positioning system.

  12. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  13. Area 2: Use Of Engineered Nanoparticle-Stabilized CO 2 Foams...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 43 S.S. Adkins, X. Chen, I. Chan, E. Torino, Q.P. Nguyen, A.W. Sanders, K.P. ... 10. Adkins SS, Chen X, Chan I, Torino E, Nguyen QP, Sanders AW, Johnston KP. ...

  14. engineering

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.

    Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran wasn't necessarily...

  15. additive manufacturuing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.

    Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran wasn't necessarily...

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modes and the ARSCL VAP New Merge Strategy Kollias, P.(a), Clothiaux, E.E.(b), Miller, M.A.(c), Johnson, K.L.(c), Widener, K.B.(d), and Moran, K.P.(e), CIRESETL,...

  17. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Linking to the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) RT3D and MT3DMS Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-08

    Linkages to the Groundwater Modeling System have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to more realistically assess the risk to the public of radioactive contaminants at NRC-licensed sites. Common software tools presently in use are limited in that they cannot assess contaminant migration through complex natural environments. The purpose of this initiative is to provide NRC with a licensing safety-analysis tool with sufficient power, flexibility, and utility that it can serve as the primary software platform for analyzing the hazards associated with licensing actions at those complex sites at which the traditional tools are inappropriate. As a tool designed to realistically approximate prospective doses to the public, this initiative addresses NRCs safety-performance goal by confirming that licensing actions do not result in undue risk to the public.

  18. Operation and performance of a 350 kW (100 RT) single-effect/double-lift absorption chiller in a district heating network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweigler, C.J.; Preissner, M.; Demmel, S.; Hellmann, H.M.; Ziegler, F.F.

    1998-10-01

    The efficiency of combined heat, power, and cold production in total energy systems could be improved significantly if absorption chillers were available that could be driven with limited mass flows of low-temperature hot water. In the case of district heat-driven air conditioning, for example, currently available standard absorption chillers are often not applied because they cannot provide the low hot water return temperature and the specific cooling capacity per unit hot water mass flow that are required by many district heating networks. Above all, a drastic increase in the size of the machine (total heat exchanger area) due to low driving temperature differences if of concern in low-temperature applications. A new type of multistage lithium bromide/water absorption chiller has been developed for the summertime operating conditions of district heating networks. It provides large cooling of the district heating water (some 30 K) and large cooling capacity per unit hot water mass flow. Two pilot plants of this novel absorption chiller were designed within the framework of a joint project sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Technology (BMBF), a consortium of 15 district heating utilities, and two manufacturers. The plants have been operated since summer 1996 in the district heating networks of Berlin and Duesseldorf. This paper describes the concept, installation, and control strategy of the two pilot plants, and it surveys the performance and operating experience of the plants under varying practical conditions.

  19. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1471--2164; Other: KP1601050; ERKP695","Journal Article","AM",,"Journal Name: BMC Genomics; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 1","Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL);...

  20. New Environmental Science Division report provides comprehensive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar research programs, visit the EVS website. Reference: Patton, T., L. Almer, H. Hartmann, and K.P. Smith, 2013, An Overview of Potential Environmental, Cultural, and...

  1. Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines: Pipeline Transmission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Background: FG 64 built in 50ies, KP added in 70ies, active mining area over total length PDF icon hpwgwquestissuescampbell.pdf More Documents & Publications Blending Hydrogen ...

  2. The Secretary of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 1,2006 The Honorable James P. Moran U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 205 15 Dear Congressman Moran: Thank you for your December 27,2005, letter concerning my December 20,2005, emergency order in the matter of the Mirant Potomac River Generating Station (DOE Docket No. EO-05-01). In your letter, you requested "that all documents and related material, particularly any operational plan covering compliance with the Clean Air Act, should be available for public review and

  3. APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions Form Form R93D-44 Form R93D...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Instructions Form Form R93D-44 Form R93D-03 Form R93D-59 Instructions Form RT94-02 Form RT94-04 Form RT94-0 Form RT94-03 Form RT94-05 Form RT94-06 Instructions Form...

  4. Island Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: W1J 7BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based coal bed methane company, Island Gas was the subject of a reverse takeover by KP Renewables in...

  5. Thermal Diffusivity and Specific Heat Measurements of Titanium Potassium Perchlorate Titanium Subhydride Potassium Perchlorate 9013 Glass 7052 Glass SB-14 Glass and C-4000 Muscovite Mica Using the Flash Technique.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Paul Elliott; Cooper, Marcia A.

    2015-02-01

    The flash technique was used to measure the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of titanium potassium perchlorate (TKP) ignition powder (33wt% Ti - 67wt% KP) with Ventron sup- plied titanium particles, TKP ignition powder (33wt% Ti - 67wt% KP) with ATK supplied titanium particles, TKP output powder (41wt% Ti - 59wt% KP), and titanium subhydride potassium perchlorate (THKP) (33wt% TiH 1.65 - 67wt% KP) at 25 o C. The influence of density and temperature on the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of TKP with Ventron supplied titanium particles was also investigated. Lastly, the thermal diffusivity and specific heats of 9013 glass, 7052 glass, SB-14 glass, and C-4000 Muscovite mica are presented as a function of temperature up to 300 o C.

  6. Section 105

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The 8-mm Cloud Profiling Radar for the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site: the First 1000 Hours K. Moran, A. Francavilla, D. Hazen, R. Lataitis, B. Martner, D. Merritt, M. J. Post, T. Uttal and D. Welsh National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. Strauch and L. Zhang Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences Boulder,

  7. DOE Tech. Memo. ARM VAP-002.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tech. Memo. ARM VAP-002.1 The ARM Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs) and the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) Value Added Product (VAP) March 4, 2001 Eugene E. Clothiaux, The Pennsylvania State University Mark A. Miller, Brookhaven National Laboratory Robin C. Perez, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory David D. Turner, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kenneth P. Moran, NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory Brooks E. Martner, NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory Thomas P.

  8. Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARM MMCRs: Improved Radar Processor and Dual-Polarization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARM MMCRs: Improved Radar Processor and Dual-Polarization K. P. Moran, B. E. Martner, and K. A. Clark National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. Chanders Science and Technology Corporation Background The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radars (MMCRs) are vertically pointing ground-based Doppler systems, designed for long-term, unattended operations. In spite of very low

  9. MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans K. B. Widener and A. S. Koontz Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K. P. Moran and K. A. Clark National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. Chander STC xxxxxxxxx M. A. Miller and K. L. Johnson Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Abstract In September 2003, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) was upgraded to a new digital

  10. Microsoft Word - Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor Designation in the West

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Jill Moran, BLM (202) 452-5068 Wednesday, November 26, 2008 Bethany Shively, DOE (202) 586-4940 Joe Walsh, USFS (202) 205-1134 Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor Designation in the West WASHINGTON, DC - Four Federal agencies today released a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Final PEIS) proposing to designate more than 6,000 miles of energy transport corridors on Federal lands in 11 Western States. The Department of

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mgmsup 2d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients...

  12. Dynamical mass generation in unquenched QED using the Dyson-Schwinger equations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kızılersü, Ayse; Sizer, Tom; Pennington, Michael R.; Williams, Anthony G.; Williams, Richard

    2015-03-13

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of dynamical mass generation for unquenched QED in four dimensions, in the absence of four-fermion interactions, using the Dyson-Schwinger approach. We begin with an overview of previous investigations of criticality in the quenched approximation. To this we add an analysis using a new fermion-antifermion-boson interaction ansatz, the Kizilersu-Pennington (KP) vertex, developed for an unquenched treatment. After surveying criticality in previous unquenched studies, we investigate the performance of the KP vertex in dynamical mass generation using a renormalized fully unquenched system of equations. This we compare with the results for two hybrid vertices incorporating themore » Curtis-Pennington vertex in the fermion equation. We conclude that the KP vertex is as yet incomplete, and its relative gauge-variance is due to its lack of massive transverse components in its design.« less

  13. SREL Reprint #3109

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 253 Novel polymorphic microsatellites for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) Lee G. Miles1, Sally R. Isberg1,2, Chris Moran1, Cris Hagen3, and Travis C. Glenn3,4 1Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Room 513, RMC Gunn Building, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia 2Porosus Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 86, Palmerston, NT 0831, Australia 3Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 4Department of Environmental Health Science, University of

  14. SREL Reprint #3117

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Cross-species amplification of microsatellites in crocodilians: assessment and applications for the future Lee G. Miles1, Stacey L. Lance2, Sally R. Isberg1,3, Chris Moran1, and Travis C. Glenn2,4 1Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Room 513, RMC Gunn Building, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 3Porosus Pty Ltd, PO Box 86, Palmerston, NT 0831, Australia 4Department of Environmental Health

  15. SREL Reprint #3126

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 A genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) Lee G. Miles1, Sally R. Isberg1,2, Travis C. Glenn3,4, Stacey L. Lance3, Pauline Dalzell5, Peter C. Thomson1, and Chris Moran1 1Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia 2Porosus Pty Ltd, PO Box 86, Palmerston, NT 0831, Australia 3Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 4Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia,

  16. SREL Reprint #3136

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 QTL mapping for two commercial traits in farmed saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) L. G. Miles1, S. R. Isberg1,2, P. C. Thomson1, T. C. Glenn3,4, S. L. Lance3, P. Dalzell1,5, and C. Moran1 1Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. 2Porosus Pty Ltd, PO Box 86, Palmerston, NT 0831, Australia. 3Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA. 4Department of Environmental Health Science and Georgia

  17. SREL Reprint #3209

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Sequencing three crocodilian genomes to illuminate the evolution of archosaurs and amniotes John A. St John1, Edward L. Braun2, Sally R. Isberg3,5, Lee G. Miles5, Amanda Y. Chong5, Jaime Gongora5, Pauline Dalzell4,5, Christopher Moran5, Bertrand Bed'Hom6, Arkhat Abzhanov7, Shane C. Burgess8, Amanda M. Cooksey8, Todd A. Castoe9, Nicholas G. Crawford10, Llewellyn D. Densmore11, Jennifer C. Drew12, Scott V. Edwards7, Brant C. Faircloth13, Matthew K. Fujita7, Matthew J. Greenwold14, Federico G.

  18. QER- Comment of E. Winkler

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I am one of many rejecting the idea of the proposed Kinder Moran pipeline. The people don't want to pay for a multibillionaire's expansion of his fossil fuel kingdom. Also, the methane pollution of this form of energy is not "clean energy." And most importantly it is destructive to the earth and the health of the people. As stewards of the planet, we must do better, and we are doing better, with cleaner and more economical forms of energy. Please, have a conscience and a vision. No fracked gas pipeline expansion.

  19. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR AMERICAN LNG MARKETING LLC - FTA - DKT. 14-209-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - ORDER NO. 3601 | Department of Energy AMERICAN LNG MARKETING LLC - FTA - DKT. 14-209-LNG - ORDER NO. 3601 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR AMERICAN LNG MARKETING LLC - FTA - DKT. 14-209-LNG - ORDER NO. 3601 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR AMERICAN LNG MARKETING LLC, FE DKT. 15-19-LNG - ORDER 3656 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Louisiana LNG Energy LLC - FE DKT. NO 14-19-LNG - ORDER 3482 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT McMoran - FE DKT.

  20. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR MAIN PASS ENERGY HUB, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-114-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - ORDER 3220 | Department of Energy MAIN PASS ENERGY HUB, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-114-LNG - ORDER 3220 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR MAIN PASS ENERGY HUB, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-114-LNG - ORDER 3220 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2013 PDF icon April 2013 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT McMoran - FE DKT. NO. 13-26-LNG - ORDER 3290 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR AMERICAN LNG MARKETING LLC - FTA - DKT. 14-209-LNG - ORDER NO. 3601 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Louisiana LNG

  1. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Asit E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index ? on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  2. RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION DEVICES: EFFECTIVENESS IN IMPROVING SAFEGUARDS AT GAS-CENTRIFUGE URANIUM-ENRICHMENT PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOE,J.

    2007-07-08

    Recent advances in radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) have engendered a growing interest among international safeguards experts. Potentially, RFIDs could reduce inspection work, viz. the number of inspections, number of samples, and duration of the visits, and thus improve the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards. This study systematically examined the applications of RFIDs for IAEA safeguards at large gas-centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). These analyses are expected to help identify the requirements and desirable properties for RFIDs, to provide insights into which vulnerabilities matter most, and help formulate the required assurance tests. This work, specifically assesses the application of RFIDs for the ''Option 4'' safeguards approach, proposed by Bruce Moran, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for large gas-centrifuge uranium-enrichment plants. The features of ''Option 4'' safeguards include placing RFIDs on all feed, product and tails (F/P/T) cylinders, along with WID readers in all FP/T stations and accountability scales. Other features of Moran's ''Option 4'' are Mailbox declarations, monitoring of load-cell-based weighing systems at the F/P/T stations and accountability scales, and continuous enrichment monitors. Relevant diversion paths were explored to evaluate how RFIDs improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards. Additionally, the analysis addresses the use of RFIDs in conjunction with video monitoring and neutron detectors in a perimeter-monitoring approach to show that RFIDs can help to detect unidentified cylinders.

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (aka our "shadow" dataset ) with two pairs (SW and LW) of additional RT algorithms: from CAM3 and from GSFC's fvGCM. BBHRP uses AER's SW and LW RRTM codes. How we learn: If the RT...

  4. Experimental Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toto Radiography Toto Radiography AblRT Ablative Rayleigh - Taylor HGR Hydro-growth radiology Vertical axis radiography 2DConA Convergent ablator, 2D image AblRT Ablative...

  5. Homogenization limit for a multiband effective mass model in heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morandi, O.

    2014-06-15

    We study the homogenization limit of a multiband model that describes the quantum mechanical motion of an electron in a quasi-periodic crystal. In this approach, the distance among the atoms that constitute the material (lattice parameter) is considered a small quantity. Our model include the description of materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds, and heterostructures. We derive the effective multiband evolution system in the framework of the kp approach. We study the well posedness of the mathematical problem. We compare the effective mass model with the standard kp models for uniform and non-uniforms crystals. We show that in the limit of vanishing lattice parameter, the particle density obtained by the effective mass model, converges to the exact probability density of the particle.

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation."

  7. Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines: Pipeline Transmission of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen | Department of Energy Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines: Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Questions and Issues on Hydrogen Pipelines: Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Pipping of GH2 Pipeline. Background: FG 64 built in 50ies, KP added in 70ies, active mining area over total length PDF icon hpwgw_questissues_campbell.pdf More Documents & Publications Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion EIS-0487:

  8. A new bidirectional generalization of (2+1)-dimensional matrix k-constrained Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvartatskyi, O. I. Sydorenko, Yu. M.

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a new bidirectional generalization of (2+1)-dimensional k-constrained Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy ((2+1)-BDk-cKPH). This new hierarchy generalizes (2+1)-dimensional k-cKP hierarchy, (t{sub A}, ?{sub B}) and (?{sub A}, ?{sub B}) matrix hierarchies. (2+1)-BDk-cKPH contains a new matrix (1+1)-k-constrained KP hierarchy. Some members of (2+1)-BDk-cKPH are also listed. In particular, it contains matrix generalizations of Davey-Stewartson (DS) systems, (2+1)-dimensional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation and the Nizhnik equation. (2+1)-BDk-cKPH also includes new matrix (2+1)-dimensional generalizations of the Yajima-Oikawa and Melnikov systems. Binary Darboux Transformation Dressing Method is also proposed for construction of exact solutions for equations from (2+1)-BDk-cKPH. As an example the exact form of multi-soliton solutions for vector generalization of the DS system is given.

  9. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  10. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Aleman, Berthe; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Dharmarajan, Kavita; Ng, Andrea; Ricardi, Umberto; Wirth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  11. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Carol L.; Shera, David M.; Lustig, Robert A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  12. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Emily F., E-mail: dunn@humonc.wisc.ed [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Moody, John S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  13. Upfront Androgen Deprivation Therapy With Salvage Radiation May Improve Biochemical Outcomes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Post-Prostatectomy Rising PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Joanne W.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Guzzo, Thomas J.; Wein, Alan J.; Haas, Naomi B.; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to definitive external beam radiation therapy (RT) improves outcomes in higher-risk prostate cancer patients. However, the benefit of ADT with salvage RT in post-prostatectomy patients is not clearly established. Our study compares biochemical outcomes in post-prostatectomy patients who received salvage RT with or without concurrent ADT. Methods and Materials: Of nearly 2,000 post-prostatectomy patients, we reviewed the medical records of 191 patients who received salvage RT at University of Pennsylvania between 1987 and 2007. Follow-up data were obtained by chart review and electronic polling of the institutional laboratory database and Social Security Death Index. Biochemical failure after salvage RT was defined as a prostate-specific antigen of 2.0 ng/mL above the post-RT nadir or the initiation of ADT after completion of salvage RT. Results: One hundred twenty-nine patients received salvage RT alone, and 62 patients received combined ADT and salvage RT. Median follow-up was 5.4 years. Patients who received combined ADT and salvage RT were younger, had higher pathologic Gleason scores, and higher rates of seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node involvement, and pelvic nodal irradiation compared with patients who received salvage RT alone. Patients who received combined therapy had improved biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) compared with patients who received RT alone (p = 0.048). For patients with pathologic Gleason scores {<=}7, combined RT and ADT resulted in significantly improved bPFS compared to RT alone (p = 0.013). Conclusions: These results suggest that initiating ADT during salvage RT in the post-prostatectomy setting may improve bPFS compared with salvage RT alone. However, prospective randomized data are necessary to definitively determine whether hormonal manipulation should be used with salvage RT. Furthermore, the optimal nature and duration of ADT and the patient subgroups in which ADT could provide the most benefit remain open questions.

  14. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which could aid in individualizing therapy, particularly for patients at risk for liver injury after RT.

  15. Historical Trends in the Use of Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Cancers: 1973-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jairam, Vikram; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut; Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut ; Yu, James B.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. Results: RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions: The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT.

  16. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ?6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ?T2b or GS 3+4, ?T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease. In patients with GS 4+3 or T2c disease, the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT did improve FFF.

  17. May 2014 PSERC Webinar: Testing and Validation of Synchrophasor...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    testing synchrophasor devices using a real-time wide area montioring and control test bed. ... Unit Performance Analyzer (PPA) and Real Time Voltage Stability Monitoring (RT-VSM). ...

  18. Forever Fuels Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forever Fuels Ltd Place: Maidenhead, United Kingdom Zip: SL6 8RT Product: Forever Fuels specialises in the distribution and supply of wood pellets for sustainable heating systems....

  19. BPA-2011-00157-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in its entirety. No documents were presented at the meeting. l appreciate the oppo rt unity to assist you. Please contact Laura M. Atterbury, FOIAPrivacy Act Specialist, at...

  20. Watching a Liquid-Crystal Helix Unwind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature dependence of the helical half-pitch scattering profile. Top: Heating from room temperature (RT) to the B4-phase critical temperature (TC 142 C). The peak...

  1. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Olga A.; Anderson, Robin L.; Russell, Prudence A.; Ashley Cox, R.; Ivashkevich, Alesia; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P.; Jacobs, Daphne H.M.; Smith, Jai; Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E.; Ball, David L.; and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using ?-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated ?-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed ?-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  2. Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced performance around the world LANL statistical tools have helped create Reliability Technology (RT), which increases the overall fraction of productive manufacturing...

  3. Nazim Bharmal Anthony Slingo Jeff Settle Gary Robinson Helen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the TOA radiances every 15 min from Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB). * Edwards-Slingo RT code used to calculate consistent flux components. * Or, use measurements...

  4. approved_list

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02-Mar-2001 Exp # Spokesperson Title Days 763X-2 Seweryniak Studies of Sub-ms Proton and a Emitters 4 835-2 Caggiano Spectroscopy of Proton-Unbound States in 26Si - II 4 880X-2 Heinz Preparations Towards a Search for Super-Heavy Elements at ATLAS: Phase I 7 882-2 Doyle Measurement of Helium-3 to Helium-4 Ratios in Isotopically Purified Helium 3 894-2 Cullen Establishing the Deformation of 140Dy from Measurement of the Delayed Decay of the Kp = 8- Isomeric State 6 897-2 Savard Continuation of the

  5. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun, E-mail: tongjun@pku.edu.cn; Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-07

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on kp approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  6. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with kp and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  7. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruheim, Kjersti, E-mail: Kjersti.bruheim@medisin.uio.n [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Guren, Marianne G. [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Dahl, Alv A. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Clinical Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Skovlund, Eva [School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Balteskard, Lise [University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromso (Norway); Carlsen, Erik [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Fossa, Sophie D. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Clinical Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  8. Impact of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Before and After Definitive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Apparently Solitary Plasmacytoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Paul J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Wirth, Andrew; Ryan, Gail; Seymour, John F.; Prince, H. Miles

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on management of patients with apparently isolated plasmacytoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with apparently solitary plasmacytoma who underwent FDG-PET for staging or restaging were identified from a central PET database. They were either candidates for or had received definitive radiation therapy (RT). Results: Seventeen patients had initial staging scans for bone (n = 11) or soft tissue (n = 6) plasmacytomas, and 11 had PET scans after RT. Only 1 of 14 known untreated sites of plasmacytoma was not identified on staging PET (lesion sensitivity = 93%). Three plasmacytomas were excised before PET. Staging PET influenced management in 6 of 17 patients (35%) by showing multiple myeloma (n = 1), discouraging RT after complete resection (n = 1), excluding plasmacytoma at a second site (n = 1), by increasing RT fields (n = 2), or by suggesting sarcoidosis (n = 1). Fifteen of 17 patients with initial staging PET scans received definitive RT. Restaging PET scans after RT showed complete metabolic response in 8 of 11 cases and progressive disease in 2. Two patients with either no response or partial metabolic response had late responses. Staging sestamibi and PET scans were concordant in five of six occasions (one sestamibi scan was false negative). Conclusions: FDG-PET has value for staging and RT planning in plasmacytoma and potentially could have a role in response-assessment after RT. Slow resolution of FDG uptake posttreatment does not necessarily imply an adverse prognosis.

  9. The Influence of Radiation Modality and Lymph Node Dissection on Survival in Early-Stage Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chino, Junzo P., E-mail: junzo.chino@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Jones, Ellen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Caroline, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Berchuck, Andrew; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Havrilesky, Laura J. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Background: The appropriate uses of lymph node dissection (LND) and adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for Stage I endometrial cancer are controversial. We explored the impact of specific RT modalities (whole pelvic RT [WPRT], vaginal brachytherapy [VB]) and LND status on survival. Materials and Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results dataset was queried for all surgically treated International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I endometrial cancers; subjects were stratified into low, intermediate and high risk cohorts using modifications of Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) protocol 99 and PORTEC (Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer) trial criteria. Five-year overall survival was estimated, and comparisons were performed via the log-rank test. Results: A total of 56,360 patients were identified: 70.4% low, 26.2% intermediate, and 3.4% high risk. A total of 41.6% underwent LND and 17.6% adjuvant RT. In low-risk disease, LND was associated with higher survival (93.7 LND vs. 92.7% no LND, p < 0.001), whereas RT was not (91.6% RT vs. 92.9% no RT, p = 0.23). In intermediate-risk disease, LND (82.1% LND vs. 76.5% no LND, p < 0.001) and RT (80.6% RT vs. 74.9% no RT, p < 0.001) were associated with higher survival without differences between RT modalities. In high-risk disease, LND (68.8% LND vs. 54.1% no LND, p < 0.001) and RT (66.9% RT vs. 57.2% no RT, p < 0.001) were associated with increased survival; if LND was not performed, VB alone was inferior to WPRT (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Both WPRT and VB alone are associated with increased survival in the intermediate-risk group. In the high-risk group, in the absence of LND, only WPRT is associated with increased survival. LND was also associated with increased survival.

  10. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  11. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  12. Sequencing of Local Therapy Affects the Pattern of Treatment Failure and Survival in Children With Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S., E-mail: atmaram.pai-panandiker@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Merchant, Thomas E.; Beltran, Chris [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Sharma, Shelly [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Boop, Frederick A. [Department of Surgery, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Jenkins, Jesse J. [Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Helton, Kathleen J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Wright, Karen D.; Broniscer, Alberto [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Kun, Larry E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the pattern of treatment failure associated with current therapeutic paradigms for childhood atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with AT/RT of the central nervous system treated at our institution between 1987 and 2007 were retrospectively evaluated. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and cumulative incidence of local failure were correlated with age, sex, tumor location, extent of disease, and extent of surgical resection. Radiotherapy (RT) sequencing, chemotherapy, dose, timing, and volume administered after resection were also evaluated. Results: Thirty-one patients at a median age of 2.3 years at diagnosis (range, 0.45-16.87 years) were enrolled into protocols that included risk- and age-stratified RT. Craniospinal irradiation with focal tumor bed boost (median dose, 54 Gy) was administered to 18 patients. Gross total resection was achieved in 16. Ten patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. RT was delayed more than 3 months in 20 patients and between 1 and 3 months in 4; 7 patients received immediate postoperative irradiation preceding high-dose alkylator-based chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 48 months, the cumulative incidence of local treatment failure was 37.5% {+-} 9%; progression-free survival was 33.2% {+-} 10%; and OS was 53.5% {+-} 10%. Children receiving delayed RT ({>=}1 month postoperatively) were more likely to experience local failure (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23, p = 0.007); the development of distant metastases before RT increased the risk of progression (HR 3.49, p = 0.006); and any evidence of disease progressionbefore RT decreased OS (HR 20.78, p = 0.004). Disease progression occurred in 52% (11/21) of children with initially localized tumors who underwent gross total resection, and the progression rate increased proportionally with increasing delay from surgery to RT. Conclusions: Delayed RT is associated with a higher rate of local and metastatic disease progression in children with AT/RT. Current treatment regimens for pediatric patients with AT/RT are distinctly age stratified; novel protocols investigating RT volumes and sequencing are needed.

  13. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.

  14. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ionmore » flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.« less

  15. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Vinay Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med.; Wahab, Sherif Abdel; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Ngoma, Twalib; Vanderpuye, Verna; Sowunmi, Anthonia; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph; Jeremic, Branislav

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  16. TU-C-17A-03: An Integrated Contour Evaluation Software Tool Using Supervised Pattern Recognition for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Tan, J; Kavanaugh, J; Dolly, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Anastasio, M; Altman, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) contours delineated either manually or semiautomatically require verification before clinical usage. Manual evaluation is very time consuming. A new integrated software tool using supervised pattern contour recognition was thus developed to facilitate this process. Methods: The contouring tool was developed using an object-oriented programming language C# and application programming interfaces, e.g. visualization toolkit (VTK). The C# language served as the tool design basis. The Accord.Net scientific computing libraries were utilized for the required statistical data processing and pattern recognition, while the VTK was used to build and render 3-D mesh models from critical RT structures in real-time and 360 visualization. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for system self-updating geometry variations of normal structures based on physician-approved RT contours as a training dataset. The inhouse design of supervised PCA-based contour recognition method was used for automatically evaluating contour normality/abnormality. The function for reporting the contour evaluation results was implemented by using C# and Windows Form Designer. Results: The software input was RT simulation images and RT structures from commercial clinical treatment planning systems. Several abilities were demonstrated: automatic assessment of RT contours, file loading/saving of various modality medical images and RT contours, and generation/visualization of 3-D images and anatomical models. Moreover, it supported the 360 rendering of the RT structures in a multi-slice view, which allows physicians to visually check and edit abnormally contoured structures. Conclusion: This new software integrates the supervised learning framework with image processing and graphical visualization modules for RT contour verification. This tool has great potential for facilitating treatment planning with the assistance of an automatic contour evaluation module in avoiding unnecessary manual verification for physicians/dosimetrists. In addition, its nature as a compact and stand-alone tool allows for future extensibility to include additional functions for physicians clinical needs.

  17. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Sren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ?66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  18. Postoperative Radiation Therapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Node-Positive Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji; Liu, Jian; Li, Jiancheng; Zhu, Kunshou; Zheng, Xiongwei; Chen, Mingqiang; Chen, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy plus RT (CRT) for the postoperative treatment of node-positive thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and to determine the incidence and severity of toxic reactions. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 304 patients who had undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymph node dissection for TESCC and were determined by postoperative pathology to have lymph node metastasis without distant hematogenous metastasis. Of these patients, 164 underwent postoperative chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2}, average days 1-3, plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1; 21-day cycle) plus RT (50 Gy), and 140 underwent postoperative RT alone. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for the CRT and RT groups were 47.4% and 38.6%, respectively (P=.030). The distant metastasis rate, the mixed (regional lymph node and distant) metastasis rate, and the overall recurrence rate were significantly lower in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). However, mild and severe early toxic reactions, including neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and gastrointestinal reaction, were significantly more common in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). No significant differences in incidence of late toxic reactions were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our results show that in node-positive TESCC patients, postoperative CRT is significantly more effective than RT alone at increasing the overall survival and decreasing the rates of distant metastasis, mixed metastasis, and overall recurrence. Severe early toxic reactions were more common with CRT than with RT alone, but patients could tolerate CRT.

  19. Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kron, Tomas; Willis, David; Link, Emma; Lehman, Margot; Campbell, Gillian; O'Brien, Peter; Chua, Boon

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dosevolume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dosevolume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

  20. Valproic Acid Use During Radiation Therapy for Glioblastoma Associated With Improved Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Christopher A.; Bishop, Andrew J.; Chang, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Chan, Timothy A.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VA) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor taken by patients with glioblastoma (GB) to manage seizures, and it can modulate the biologic effects of radiation therapy (RT). We investigated whether VA use during RT for GB was associated with overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 544 adults with GB were retrospectively reviewed. Analyses were performed to determine the association of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG RPA) class, seizure history, and concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and AED use during RT with OS. Results: Seizures before the end of RT were noted in 217 (40%) patients, and 403 (74%) were taking an AED during RT; 29 (7%) were taking VA. Median OS in patients taking VA was 16.9 months (vs 13.6 months taking another AED, P=.16). Among patients taking an AED during RT, OS was associated with VA (P=.047; hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-1.07), and RTOG RPA class (P<.0001; HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.37-1.61). Of the 5 most common AEDs, only VA was associated with OS. Median OS of patients receiving VA and TMZ during RT was 23.9 months (vs 15.2 months for patients taking another AED, P=.26). When the analysis was restricted to patients who received concurrent TMZ, VA use was marginally associated with OS (P=.057; HR, 0.54; 95% CI, ?0.09 to 1.17), independently of RTOG RPA class and seizure history. Conclusions: VA use during RT for GB was associated with improved OS, independently of RTOG RPA, seizure history, and concurrent TMZ use. Further studies of treatment that combines HDAC inhibitors and RT are warranted.

  1. Structural transformations in Mn{sub 2}NiGa due to residual stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Sanjay; Maniraj, M.; D'Souza, S. W.; Barman, S. R.; Ranjan, R.

    2010-02-22

    Powder x-ray diffraction study of Mn{sub 2}NiGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy shows the existence of a 7M monoclinic modulated structure at room temperature (RT). The structure of Mn{sub 2}NiGa is found to be highly dependent on residual stress. For higher stress, the structure is tetragonal at RT, and for intermediate stress it is 7M monoclinic. However, only when the stress is considerably relaxed, the structure is cubic, as is expected at RT since the martensitic transition temperature is 230 K.

  2. In-Born Radio Frequency Identification Devices for Safeguards Use at Gas-Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward,R.; Rosenthal,M.

    2009-07-12

    Global expansion of nuclear power has made the need for improved safeguards measures at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs) imperative. One technology under consideration for safeguards applications is Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFIDs). RFIDs have the potential to increase IAEA inspector"s efficiency and effectiveness either by reducing the number of inspection visits necessary or by reducing inspection effort at those visits. This study assesses the use of RFIDs as an integral component of the "Option 4" safeguards approach developed by Bruce Moran, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for a model GCEP [1]. A previous analysis of RFIDs was conducted by Jae Jo, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which evaluated the effectiveness of an RFID tag applied by the facility operator [2]. This paper presents a similar evaluation carried out in the framework of Jos paper, but it is predicated on the assumption that the RFID tag is applied by the manufacturer at the birth of the cylinder, rather than by the operator. Relevant diversion scenarios are examined to determine if RFIDs increase the effectiveness and/ or efficiency of safeguards in these scenarios. Conclusions on the benefits offered to inspectors by using in-born RFID tagging are presented.

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Parameters of Stratus Clouds in ARESE II Austin, R.T. (a), Davis, J.M. (a), Miller, S.D. (b), and Stephens, G.L. (a), Colorado State University, Fort Collins (a), Naval...

  4. BPA-2013-01309-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    records request FOIA request from Ted Sickinger. Doug Johnson Bonneville Power Administration 503-230-5840 Rt'(..'EIVEA) BY BPA FO 1A OFFICE TiltS I DUE DATE: LOG From:...

  5. Katie Antypas The Cori System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ew L BNL C RT --- 3 --- Cori Phase 1 (Data Partition) Summer 2015 * Approximately t he s ame c ompuDng c apability a s H opper u sing Intel Haswell p rocessor * Goals - Replace h...

  6. Monitoring jobs with qs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    running, shown in HHHH:MM:SS (hours : minutes : seconds) STARTSUBTIME The start time stamp (for jobs in *r,t states), the submission time stamp (for jobs in *qw states) TASK If...

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  8. BPA-2015-00676-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calculations made at sea level to 75 other altitudes 6. Reference 6 also contains an Italian formula for the effect of altitude on Rt. These two equations are compared in Figure...

  9. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using the Edwards-Slingo RT code (ES), the radiation measured at TOA by GERB and at the surface from the AMF during its Nigerien deployment is compared with calculations during...

  10. Microsoft Word - Group4CloudtoPrecip(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 114: D11, doi:10.10292008JD011387. Kato, S, GG Mace, EE Clothiaux, JC Liljegren, and RT Austin. 2001. "Doppler cloud radar derived ...

  11. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... March 14-18, 2005 Mlawer, EJ, TR Shippert, CN Long, MA Miller, KL Johnson, DT Troyan, GG Mace, SA Clough, MH Zhang, SC Xie, RT Cederwall, JJ Yio, DR Doelling, DA Rutan, DD ...

  12. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Journal of Geophysical Research 107 (D23), 10.10292000JD000240. Dong, X, P Minnis, GG Mace, WL Smith, Jr., M Poellot, RT Marchand, and AD Rapp. 2002. Comparison of stratus cloud ...

  13. CASL-U-2015-0170-000-a SHIFT: A New Monte Carlo Package Seth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL-U-2015-0170-000-a 2 Shift: MC RT Code What makes Shift an HPC transport code? * Modern framework - Rapid development with C++11, Python, CMake, CTest, ... - Integration...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity. less ...

  15. Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity. less ...

  16. Microsoft Word - Document11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Margaret L ivingstone What A rt C an T ell Us A bout T he Brain Abstract: Artists h ave b ... This study showed that monkeys, like people, use specialized regions of the brain to ...

  17. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and analysis results (7105 -63006) in a 10x10 area centered at SGP and TWP-Darwin sites. Retrieval Algorithm MMCR iwc profiles MWR lwp ECMWF p, T, q, ... RT model...

  18. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  19. Management of Pediatric Myxopapillary Ependymoma: The Role of Adjuvant Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agbahiwe, Harold C.; Wharam, Moody; Batra, Sachin; Cohen, Kenneth; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2013-02-01

    Introduction: Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a rare tumor in children. The primary treatment is gross total resection (GTR), with no clearly defined role for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Published reports, however, suggest that children with MPE present with a more aggressive disease course. The goal of this study was to assess the role of adjuvant RT in pediatric patients with MPE. Methods: Sixteen patients with MPE seen at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) between November 1984 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Fifteen of the patients were evaluable with a mean age of 16.8 years (range, 12-21 years). Kaplan-Meier curves and descriptive statistics were used for analysis. Results: All patients received surgery as the initial treatment modality. Surgery consisted of either a GTR or a subtotal resection (STR). The median dose of adjuvant RT was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-54 Gy). All patients receiving RT were treated at the involved site. After a median follow-up of 7.2 years (range, 0.75-26.4 years), all patients were alive with stable disease. Local control at 5 and 10 years was 62.5% and 30%, respectively, for surgery alone versus 100% at both time points for surgery and adjuvant RT. Fifty percent of the patients receiving surgery alone had local failure. All patients receiving STR alone had local failure compared to 33% of patients receiving GTR alone. One patient in the surgery and adjuvant RT group developed a distant site of recurrence 1 year from diagnosis. No late toxicity was reported at last follow-up, and neurologic symptoms either improved or remained stable following surgery with or without RT. Conclusions: Adjuvant RT improved local control compared to surgery alone and should be considered after surgical resection in pediatric patients with MPE.

  20. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Gary V.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Williams, Melanie; Jiang, Jing; Niu, Jiangong; MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad; Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ?66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, ?, and ?{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEERMedicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEERMedicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  1. Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world LANL statistical tools have helped create Reliability Technology (RT), which increases the overall fraction of productive manufacturing time, or "uptime," for its internal manufacturing lines. April 3, 2012 Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world Reliability Technology (RT) is a comprehensive reliability engineering

  2. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel) [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  3. Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thong, Melissa S.Y., E-mail: M.Thong@uvt.nl [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mols, Floortje [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lemmens, Valery E.P.P. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Harm J.T. [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Roukema, Jan A. [Department of Surgery, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Martijn, Hendrik [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

  4. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Long-term Outcomes of 53 Patients Treated With Conservative Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, Katherine O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh, E-mail: aguadagn@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsai, C. Jillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Feig, Barry W. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zagars, Gunar K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes of conservative surgery and radiation therapy (RT) treatment in patients with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 53 consecutive dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans patients treated with surgery and preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy between 1972 and 2010. Median tumor size was 4 cm (range, 1-25 cm). Seven patients (13%) were treated with preoperative RT (50-50.4 Gy) and 46 patients (87%) with postoperative RT (60-66 Gy). Of the 46 patients receiving postoperative radiation, 3 (7%) had gross disease, 14 (30%) positive margins, 26 (57%) negative margins, and 3 (7%) uncertain margin status. Radiation dose ranged from 50 to 66 Gy (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: At a median follow-up time of 6.5 years (range, 0.5 months-23.5 years), 2 patients (4%) had disease recurrence, and 3 patients (6%) had died. Actuarial overall survival was 98% at both 5 and 10 years. Local control was 98% and 93% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Disease-free survival was 98% and 93% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The presence of fibrosarcomatous change was not associated with increased risk of local or distant relapse (P=.43). One of the patients with a local recurrence had gross residual disease at the time of RT and despite RT to 65 Gy developed both an in-field recurrence and a nodal and distant recurrence 3 months after RT. The other patient with local recurrence was found to have in-field recurrence 10 years after initial treatment. Thirteen percent of patients had an RT complication at 5 and 10 years, and 9% had a moderate or severe complication at 5 and 10 years. Conclusions: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a radioresponsive disease with excellent local control after conservative surgery and radiation therapy. Adjuvant RT should be considered for patients with large or recurrent tumors or when attempts at wide surgical margins would result in significant morbidity.

  5. Surveillance for Western equine encephalitis St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile viruses using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meagher, Robert J.; Ball, Cameron Scott; Langevin, Stanley A.; Fang, Ying; Wheeler, Sarah S.; Coffey, Lark L.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized publicmore » health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3’ untranslated region (3’-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance.« less

  6. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauspy, Jan; Beiner, Mario E.; Harley, Ian; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan; Chapman, William; Le, Lisa W.; Fyles, Anthony; Levin, Wilfred

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. Results: A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p = .02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p = .004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs.

  7. Strain dependence on polarization properties of AlGaN and AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramn; Mita, Seiji; Tweedie, James

    2015-06-08

    Since the band ordering in AlGaN has a profound effect on the performance of UVC light emitting diodes (LEDs) and even determines the feasibility of surface emitting lasers, the polarization properties of emitted light from c-oriented AlGaN and AlGaN-based laser structures were studied over the whole composition range, as well as various strain states, quantum confinements, and carrier densities. A quantitative relationship between the theoretical valence band separation, determined using kp theory, and the experimentally measured degree of polarization is presented. Next to composition, strain was found to have the largest influence on the degree of polarization while all other factors were practically insignificant. The lowest crossover point from the transverse electric to transverse magnetic polarized emission of 245?nm was found for structures pseudomorphically grown on AlN substrates. This finding has significant implications toward the efficiency and feasibility of surface emitting devices below this wavelength.

  8. Self-similar radiation from numerical Rosenau-Hyman compactons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rus, Francisco Villatoro, Francisco R.

    2007-11-10

    The numerical simulation of compactons, solitary waves with compact support, is characterized by the presence of spurious phenomena, as numerically induced radiation, which is illustrated here using four numerical methods applied to the Rosenau-Hyman K(p, p) equation. Both forward and backward radiations are emitted from the compacton presenting a self-similar shape which has been illustrated graphically by the proper scaling. A grid refinement study shows that the amplitude of the radiations decreases as the grid size does, confirming its numerical origin. The front velocity and the amplitude of both radiations have been studied as a function of both the compacton and the numerical parameters. The amplitude of the radiations decreases exponentially in time, being characterized by a nearly constant scaling exponent. An ansatz for both the backward and forward radiations corresponding to a self-similar function characterized by the scaling exponent is suggested by the present numerical results.

  9. Two-dimensional cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary and rogue waves in ultrarelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ata-ur-Rahman; National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 ; Ali, S.; Moslem, W. M.; Mushtaq, A.; Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200

    2013-07-15

    The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary and rogue waves is investigated in a two-dimensional ultrarelativistic degenerate warm dense plasma. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the cylindrical KadomtsevPetviashvili (KP) equation is derived, which can be further transformed into a Kortewegde Vries (KdV) equation. The latter admits a solitary wave solution. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, the KdV equation can be transferred to a nonlinear Schrdinger equation to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified IA wavepackets. The propagation characteristics of the IA solitary and rogue waves are strongly influenced by the variation of different plasma parameters in an ultrarelativistic degenerate dense plasma. The present results might be helpful to understand the nonlinear electrostatic excitations in astrophysical degenerate dense plasmas.

  10. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  11. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    v 6 ; , rg ;I x2.s I F$Z - ' i<G q 7322 : 5;" .f r? r, r; i 2, m it zp i 5 2' TX KP $2 3 2 -I - - ! 1. 3 : P 3 > : : + !, 3 a. n E 3 ; - - - = - - - 21 4 r g n E P- . i! P, rf P* 0 3 0 ch 2 4 1 0 . ' 9 2 s t r w * e I E . a -- l cn . r w cu . 2 P r . s 5 b2 2 8 t= "0 $ : cn ' 1 l ; 6 1 4 : ; co W. : a & . j* w ' t+ P i z c1. , 5 & i p tf -- ' is P ; $ r % tz % - - - = - -- 2 2 F s * ; 7 $ n s 2 K 3 a E rk Pa ml - - - 3 - -. - - - b ;: ; 5 r+ f f t 4. 3 5: n !, 9 : + - - -

  12. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help tailoring therapies to reduce toxicities among patients treated with RT for HNC.

  13. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing; Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province ; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ? Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ? Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ? Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 0.013 vs. 0.622 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 0.045 vs. 0.475 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 0.021 vs. 0.380 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT increases breast cancer cell radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. These findings have salient implications for designing clinical trials using fulvestrant and radiation therapy.

  14. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2?10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 61000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.0610 T) could result in a factor of 2500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  15. Aspirin and Statin Nonuse Associated With Early Biochemical Failure After Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Li, Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To present the largest retrospective series investigating the effect of aspirin and statins, which are hypothesized to have antineoplastic properties, on biochemical failure (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) after prostate radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2006, 2051 men with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive RT alone (median dose, 76 Gy). The rates of aspirin use and statin use (defined as any use at the time of RT or during follow-up) were 36% and 34%, respectively. The primary endpoint of the study was an interval to biochemical failure (IBF) of less than 18 months, which has been shown to be the single strongest predictor of distant metastasis, prostate cancer survival, and overall survival after RT. Patient demographic characteristics and tumor staging factors were assessed with regard to associations with the endpoint. Univariate analysis was performed with the {chi}{sup 2} test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. Multivariable analysis was performed with a multiple logistic regression. Results: The median follow-up was 75 months. Univariate analysis showed that an IBF of less than 18 months was associated with aspirin nonuse (P<.0001), statin nonuse (P<.0001), anticoagulant nonuse (P=.0006), cardiovascular disease (P=.0008), and prostate-specific antigen (continuous) (P=.008) but not with Gleason score, age, RT dose, or T stage. On multivariate analysis, only aspirin nonuse (P=.0012; odds ratio, 2.052 [95% confidence interval, 1.328-3.172]) and statin nonuse (P=.0002; odds ratio, 2.465 [95% confidence interval, 1.529-3.974]) were associated with an IBF of less than 18 months. Conclusions: In patients who received RT for prostate cancer, aspirin or statin nonuse was associated with early biochemical failure, a harbinger of distant metastasis and death. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the optimal dosing and schedule, as well as the relative benefits and risks, of both therapies in combination with RT.

  16. RTOG 0211: A Phase 1/2 Study of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gefitinib for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Curran, Walter J.; Brachman, David G.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Choucair, Ali; Dolled-Filhart, Marisa; Christiansen, Jason; Gustavson, Mark; Molinaro, Annette; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of CaliforniaSan Diego, La Jolla, California ; Mischel, Paul; Dicker, Adam P.; and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with radiation for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Methods and Materials: Between March 21, 2002, and May 3, 2004, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0211 enrolled 31 and 147 GBM patients in the phase 1 and 2 arms, respectively. Treatment consisted of daily oral gefinitnib started at the time of conventional cranial radiation therapy (RT) and continued post RT for 18 months or until progression. Tissue microarrays from 68 cases were analyzed for EGFR expression. Results: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gefitinib was determined to be 500 mg in patients on non-enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs (non-EIAEDs). All patients in the phase 2 component were treated at a gefitinib dose of 500 mg; patients receiving EIADSs could be escalated to 750 mg. The most common side effects of gefitinib in combination with radiation were dermatologic and gastrointestinal. Median survival was 11.5 months for patients treated per protocol. There was no overall survival benefit for patients treated with gefitinib + RT when compared with a historical cohort of patients treated with RT alone, matched by RTOG recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class distribution. Younger age was significantly associated with better outcome. Per protocol stratification, EGFR expression was not found to be of prognostic value for gefitinib + RT-treated patients. Conclusions: The addition of gefitinib to RT is well tolerated. Median survival of RTOG 0211 patients treated with RT with concurrent and adjuvant gefitinib was similar to that in a historical control cohort treated with radiation alone.

  17. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cerne, Jasmina Z.; Munsell, Mark F.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J.; Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  18. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshy, Matthew, E-mail: mkoshy@umm.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  19. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  20. Imaging Biomarker Dynamics in an Intracranial Murine Glioma Study of Radiation and Antiangiogenic Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Caroline; Jalali, Shahrzad; Foltz, Warren; Burrell, Kelly; Wildgoose, Petra; Lindsay, Patricia; Graves, Christian; Camphausen, Kevin; Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David; Zadeh, Gelareh; Mnard, Cynthia

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need for noninvasive biomarkers to guide individualized spatiotemporal delivery of radiation therapy (RT) and antiangiogenic (AA) therapy for brain tumors. This study explored early biomarkers of response to RT and the AA agent sunitinib (SU), in a murine intracranial glioma model, using serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Mice with MRI-visible tumors were stratified by tumor size into 4 therapy arms: control, RT, SU, and SU plus RT (SURT). Single-fraction conformal RT was delivered using MRI and on-line cone beam computed tomography (CT) guidance. Serial MR images (T2-weighted, diffusion, dynamic contrast-enhanced and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted scans) were acquired biweekly to evaluate tumor volume, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and tumor perfusion and permeability responses (K{sub trans}, K{sub ep}). Results: Mice in all treatment arms survived longer than those in control, with a median survival of 35 days for SURT (P<.0001) and 30 days for RT (P=.009) and SU (P=.01) mice vs 26 days for control mice. At Day 3, ADC rise was greater with RT than without (P=.002). Sunitinib treatment reduced tumor perfusion/permeability values with mean K{sub trans} reduction of 27.6% for SU (P=.04) and 26.3% for SURT (P=.04) mice and mean K{sub ep} reduction of 38.1% for SU (P=.01) and 27.3% for SURT (P=.02) mice. The magnitude of individual mouse ADC responses at Days 3 and 7 correlated with subsequent tumor growth rate R values of ?0.878 (P=.002) and ?0.80 (P=.01), respectively. Conclusions: Early quantitative changes in diffusion and perfusion MRI measures reflect treatment responses soon after starting therapy and thereby raise the potential for these imaging biomarkers to guide adaptive and potentially individualized therapy approaches in the future.

  1. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in patients with brain metastases after RT to the brain, whereas it remained relatively stable in breast cancer patients.

  2. Prevention of Gynecomastia and Breast Pain Caused by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Tamoxifen or Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Bernardes da Silva, Lucas Godoi; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine, in a meta-analysis, whether gynecomastia and breast pain rates in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are reduced if treated with prophylactic radiotherapy (RT) or tamoxifen (TMX). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing RT or TMX with observation for men with prostate cancer using ADT. Results: Six RCTs (three RT trials and three TMX trials, N = 777 patients total) were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs comparing RT vs. observation showed a significant reduction in the incidence of gynecomastia and breast pain rates in patients treated with RT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12-0.37, p < 0.0001, and OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.20-0.57, p < 0.0001, respectively). Use of RT resulted in an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 29.4% and 19.9%, with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 3.4 and 5 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Pooled results from trials comparing TMX vs. observation showed a statistical benefit for breast pain and gynecomastia in favor of TMX arms (OR = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.02-0.08, p < 0.0001 and OR = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.0-0.14, p < 0.00001). TMX resulted in an ARR = 64.1% and 47.6%, with an NNT of 1.56 and 2.1 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Considering adverse effects, TMX was 6 times more adverse effects than RT. Conclusions: Our data have shown that both TMX and RT prevented gynecomastia and breast pain in patients with prostate cancer receiving ADT for prostate cancer. Although TMX was two times more effective in preventing gynecomastia, RT should represent an effective and safe treatment option, to take into account mainly in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or thrombotic diathesis.

  3. The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: Results from Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Delamere, Jennifer; Shippert, Timothy R.; Cole, Jason; Fomin, Boris; Iacono, Michael J.; Jin, Zhonghai; Li, Jiangning; Manners, James; Raisanen, Petri; Rose, Fred; Zhang, Yuanchong; Wilson, Michael J.; Rossow, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from Phase I of the Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC), intended as an evolving and regularly updated reference source for evaluation of radiative transfer (RT) codes used in Global Climate Models. CIRC differs from previous intercomparisons in that it relies on an observationally validated catalogue of cases. The seven CIRC Phase I baseline cases, five cloud-free, and two with overcast liquid clouds, are built around observations by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program that satisfy the goals of Phase I, namely to examine radiative transfer (RT) model performance in realistic, yet not overly complex, atmospheric conditions. In addition to the seven baseline cases, additional idealized "subcases" are also examined to facilitate intrepretation of the causes of model errors. In addition to summarizing individual model performance with respect to reference line-by-line calculations and inter-model differences, we also highlight RT model behavior for conditions of doubled CO2, aspects of utilizing a spectral specification of surface albedo, and the impact of the inclusion of scattering in the thermal infrared. Our analysis suggests that RT models should work towards improving their calculation of diffuse shortwave flux, shortwave absorption, treatment of spectral surface albedo, and shortwave CO2 forcing. On the other hand, LW calculations appear to be significantly closer to the reference results. By enhancing the range of conditions under which participating codes are tested, future CIRC phases will hopefully allow even more rigorous examination of RT code performance.

  4. Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

  5. Effects of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and its influence on the topography of the Fe thin film grown in pulsed laser deposition facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Department of Physics, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan); Rawat, R. S.; Wang, Y.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Zakaullah, M. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-10-15

    The effect of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in laser induced Fe plasma is investigated using time-resolved fast gated imaging. The snow plow and shock wave models are fitted to the experimental results and used to estimate the ablation parameters and the density of gas atoms that interact with the ablated species. It is observed that RT instability develops during the interface deceleration stage and grows for a considerable time for higher laser energy fluence. The effects of RT instabilities formation on the surface topography of the Fe thin films grown in pulsed laser deposition system are investigated (i) using different laser energy fluences for the same wavelength of laser radiation and (ii) using different laser wavelengths keeping the energy fluence fixed. It is concluded that the deposition achieved under turbulent condition leads to less smooth deposition surfaces with bigger sized particle agglomerates or network.

  6. Final Report - ILAW PCT, VHT, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity Model Development, VSL-07R1230-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Cooley, S. K.; Joseph, I.; Pegg, I. L.; Piepel, G. F.; Gan, H.; Muller, I.

    2013-12-17

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by the Test Specifications (24590-LAW-TSP-RT-01-013 Rev.1 and 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-02-001 Rev.0), Test Plans (VSL-02T4800-1 Rev.1 & TP-RPP-WTP-179 Rev.1), and Text Exception (24590-WTP-TEF-RT-03-040). The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  7. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocation reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.

  8. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearse, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  9. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  10. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  11. Outcomes of Patients With Revised Stage I Clear Cell Sarcoma of Kidney Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies 1-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalapurakal, John A., E-mail: j-kalapurakal@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Perlman, Elizabeth J. [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Seibel, Nita L. [Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ritchey, Michael [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)] [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Grundy, Paul E. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)] [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of children with revised stage I clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) using the National Wilms Tumor Study Group (NWTS)-5 staging criteria after multimodality treatment on NWTS 1-5 protocols. Methods and Materials: All CCSK patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study Group protocols had their pathology slides reviewed, and only those determined to have revised stage I tumors according to the NWTS-5 staging criteria were included in the present analysis. All patients were treated with multimodality therapy according to the NWTS 1-5 protocols. Results: A total of 53 children were identified as having stage I CCSK. All patients underwent primary surgery with radical nephrectomy. The chemotherapy regimens used were as follows: regimen A, C, F, or EE in 4 children (8%); regimen DD or DD4A in 33 children (62%); regimen J in 4 children (8%); and regimen I in 12 children (22%). Forty-six patients (87%) received flank radiation therapy (RT). Seven children (13%) did not receive flank RT. The median delay between surgery and the initiation of RT was 9 days (range, 3-61). The median RT dose was 10.8 Gy (range, 10-36). The flank RT doses were as follows: 10.5 or 10.8 Gy in 25 patients (47%), 11-19.9 Gy in 2 patients (4%), 20-29.9 Gy in 9 patients (17%), and 30-40 Gy in 10 patients (19%). The median follow-up for the entire group was 17 years (range, 2-36). The relapse-free and cancer-specific survival rate was 100% at the last follow-up examination. Conclusions: The present results have demonstrated that children with revised stage I CCSK using the NWTS-5 staging criteria have excellent survival rates despite the use of varying RT doses and chemotherapy regimens in the NWTS 1-5 protocols.

  12. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  13. Comparison of real-time and linear-response time-dependent density functional theories for molecular chromophores ranging from sparse to high densities of states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tussupbayev, Samat; Govind, Niranjan; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2015-03-10

    We assess the performance of real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) for the calculation of absorption spectra of 12 organic dye molecules relevant to photovoltaics and dye sensitized solar cells with 8 exchange-correlation functionals (3 traditional, 3 global hybrids, and 2 range-separated hybrids). We compare the calculations with traditional linear-response (LR) TDDFT. In addition, we demonstrate the efficacy of the RT-TDDFT approach to calculate wide absorption spectra of two large chromophores relevant to photovoltaics and molecular switches.

  14. Phase I Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Dose Escalation Study in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 98-03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsien, Christina Moughan, Jennifer; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Purdy, James; Simpson, Joseph; Kresel, John J.; Curran, Walter J.; Diaz, Aidnag; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a Phase I trial the feasibility and toxicity of dose-escalated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) concurrent with chemotherapy in patients with primary supratentorial glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 209 patients were enrolled. All received 46 Gy in 2-Gy fractions to the first planning target volume (PTV{sub 1}), defined as the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.8 cm. A subsequent boost was given to PTV{sub 2}, defined as GTV plus 0.3 cm. Patients were stratified into two groups (Group 1: PTV{sub 2} <75 cm{sup 3}; Group 2: PTV{sub 2} {>=}75 cm{sup 3}). Four RT dose levels were evaluated: 66, 72, 78, and 84 Gy. Carmustine 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given during RT, then every 8 weeks for 6 cycles. Pretreatment characteristics were well balanced. Results: Acute and late Grade 3/4 RT-related toxicities were no more frequent at higher RT dose or with larger tumors. There were no dose-limiting toxicities (acute Grade {>=}3 irreversible central nervous system toxicities) observed on any dose level in either group. On the basis of the absence of dose-limiting toxicities, dose was escalated to 84 Gy in both groups. Late RT necrosis was noted at 66 Gy (1 patient), 72 Gy (2 patients), 78 Gy (2 patients), and 84 Gy (3 patients) in Group 1. In Group 2, late RT necrosis was noted at 78 Gy (1 patient) and 84 Gy (2 patients). Median time to RT necrosis was 8.8 months (range, 5.1-12.5 months). Median survival in Group 1 was 11.6-19.3 months. Median survival in Group 2 was 8.2-13.9 months. Conclusions: Our study shows the feasibility of delivering higher than standard (60 Gy) RT dose with concurrent chemotherapy for primary GBM, with an acceptable risk of late central nervous system toxicity.

  15. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Sarah N.; Wai, Elaine S.; Tan, King; Alexander, Cheryl; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group, RT was associated with 98% local control. DLBCL-leg is a more aggressive disease; the excellent results in the rituximab group suggest it has an important role in management.

  16. DOE/EIA-0202(86/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ uergy Outlook Short-Term Ent,. , Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Out, t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc 3rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy

  17. DOE/EIA-0202(86/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter m Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1986 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term lort-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term -rt-Term -t-Term -Term iiergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy " Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  18. DOE/EIA-0202(87/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term lort-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term rt-Term "t-Term -Term "rerm aergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  19. DOE/EIA-0202(88/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1988 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term ion-Term tort-Term jort-Term ion-Term ort-Term ore-Term rt-Term 't-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  20. Role of Salvage Radiation Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma Who Failed Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Jayant S.; Massey, Christine; Kuruvilla, John; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Keating, Armand; Crump, Michael; Tsang, Richard W.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze, through chart review, the efficacy of salvage radiation therapy (sRT) for relapsed or progressive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients who failed autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Patients and Methods: Among 347 patients with recurrent/refractory HL who received ASCT from 1986-2006, 163 had post-ASCT progression or relapse. Of these, 56 received sRT and form the basis of this report. Median age at sRT was 30 years (range, 17-59 years). Disease was confined to lymph nodes in 27 patients, whereas 24 had both nodal and extranodal disease. Salvage radiation therapy alone was given in 34 patients (61%), and sRT plus chemotherapy was given in 22 (39%). Median interval from ASCT to sRT was 0.8 years (range, 0.1-5.6 years). The median dose was 35 Gy (range, 8-40.3 Gy). The sRT technique was extended-field in 14 patients (25%) and involved-field in 42 (75%). Results: The median follow-up from sRT was 31.3 months (range, 0.2-205.5 months). Overall response rate was 84% (complete response: 36%; partial response: 48%). The median overall survival was 40.8 months (95% confidence interval, 34.2-56.3 months). The 5-year overall survival was 29% (95% confidence interval, 14%-44%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 16%; the 2-year local PFS was 65%, whereas the 2-year systemic PFS was 17%. The 1-year PFS was higher in patients in whom all diseased sites were irradiated (49%) compared with those in whom only the symptomatic site was treated (22%, P=.07). Among 20 alive patients, 5 were disease free (at 6.4, 6.8, 7.4, 7.9, and 17.1 years). Conclusion: For patients with HL who fail ASCT, a selective use of RT provides a durable local control rate of 65% at 2 years and should be considered as part of the standard management plan for the palliation of incurable HL. Occasionally irradiation of truly localized disease can lead to long-term survival.

  1. L E G A L N O T I C E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E G A L N O T I C E Thl« re p o rt w as prepared as an account of Government sponsored work. Neither the United States, nor the Com m ission, nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission; A. Makes any w arranty o r representation, expressed o r Implied, with respect to the accu- racy, com pleteness, o r usefulneas_of the Information contained In th is report, o r that the use o f any inform ation, apparatus, method, o r p ro cess disclosed In this re p o rt may not infringe privately owned

  2. Linear study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a diffusive quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momeni, Mahdi

    2013-08-15

    The linear Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an incompressible quantum plasma is investigated on the basis of quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is shown that the occurrence of RT instability depends on density-temperature inhomogeneity (characteristic lengths) on one hand, and the system layer size on the other. It is also observed that the combined effects of external magnetic field, diffusivity, and quantum pressure significantly modify the dispersion properties of system in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. For any case, the imaginary and real parts of dispersion relation are presented and the possibility and conditions for the instability growth rate are discussed.

  3. DOE/NV/11718-594

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ious arp8w ar,Sw 9 08TFffo Fusa8+rh8- TfMg0 radiSEAntment AqT 6 Tw cv8+rtE Tf 51 0 soil sampsoin aed -0636-641.ropso soil RT, improves moisture relations in the felted crusts. In fluid, the trichomes of Microcoleus vaginatus grow beyond the enclosing sheath, assuming the appearance of Phormidium sp. The chemical composition of the sheath can be demonstrated by the action of hemicellulase, which digests it away, causing a rounding off of cross walls and resulting in fragmentation. Fragments

  4. BPA-2012-01815-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 1:51 PM To: 'A Better Way for BPA Executive Board' Subject: RE: BPA FOIA request RtCE1'El)...

  5. An Experimental and Theoretical Multi-Mbar Study of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegner, B E; Macleod, S G; CYNN, H; Proctor, J; Evans, W J; McMahon, M I; Ackland, G J

    2011-04-13

    We report results from an experimental and theoretical study of the room temperature (RT) compression of the ternary alloy Ti-6Al-4V. In this work, we have extended knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) from 40 GPa to 221 GPa, and observed a different sequence of phase transitions to that reported previously for pure Ti.

  6. Development of efficient time-evolution method based on three-term recurrence relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akama, Tomoko Kobayashi, Osamu; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-05-28

    The advantage of the real-time (RT) propagation method is a direct solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation which describes frequency properties as well as all dynamics of a molecular system composed of electrons and nuclei in quantum physics and chemistry. Its applications have been limited by computational feasibility, as the evaluation of the time-evolution operator is computationally demanding. In this article, a new efficient time-evolution method based on the three-term recurrence relation (3TRR) was proposed to reduce the time-consuming numerical procedure. The basic formula of this approach was derived by introducing a transformation of the operator using the arcsine function. Since this operator transformation causes transformation of time, we derived the relation between original and transformed time. The formula was adapted to assess the performance of the RT time-dependent Hartree-Fock (RT-TDHF) method and the time-dependent density functional theory. Compared to the commonly used fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, our new approach decreased computational time of the RT-TDHF calculation by about factor of four, showing the 3TRR formula to be an efficient time-evolution method for reducing computational cost.

  7. Monitoring external beam radiotherapy using real-time beam visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of a novel radiation therapy monitoring technique that utilizes a flexible scintillating film, common optical detectors, and image processing algorithms for real-time beam visualization (RT-BV). Methods: Scintillating films were formed by mixing Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb (GOS) with silicone and casting the mixture at room temperature. The films were placed in the path of therapeutic beams generated by medical linear accelerators (LINAC). The emitted light was subsequently captured using a CMOS digital camera. Image processing algorithms were used to extract the intensity, shape, and location of the radiation field at various beam energies, dose rates, and collimator locations. The measurement results were compared with known collimator settings to validate the performance of the imaging system. Results: The RT-BV system achieved a sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio to enable real-time monitoring of the LINAC beam at 20 fps with normal ambient lighting in the LINAC room. The RT-BV system successfully identified collimator movements with sub-millimeter resolution. Conclusions: The RT-BV system is capable of localizing radiation therapy beams with sub-millimeter precision and tracking beam movement at video-rate exposure.

  8. Reliability Availability Serviceability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-18

    Our work is aimed at providing a data store for system-level events and presenting a flexible query interface to those events. The work extends the functinality provided by the open source Request Tracker (RT) (http://www.bestpractical.com/rt) project witht the Asset Tracker (AT) addon (http://atwiki.chaka.net). We have developed an Event Tracker add-on to RT and an interface for gathering, dispatching, and inserting system events into Event Tracker. Data sources include data from all components of the system.more » Data is initially sent to a defined set of data filters. The data filters are capable of discarding specified data, throttling input, handling context-sensitive input, passing data through an external shell pipe command, and compressing multiple data enteries into a single event. The filters then pass the data on to an event dispatch engine. The dispatcher can print events to the screen as they happen, track them in the database, forward them on, or pass them on to an external command. By collecting all of the data into a single database, we are able to leverage the Query Builder interface supplied by RT to create, save, and restore almost any kind of query imaginable.« less

  9. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong; Booth, Christopher M.; Mackillop, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  10. Feed'Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by means of theoretical 3-3 DISPLACEMENT ( y i L S . P K - P K ) PHASE LAG (DEGREES) JTHi-i y'l q-tr it T3F- :r;i - p ' 111 H O G m I 1-3 tD 05 rt DISPLACEMENT (MILS PK-PK)...

  11. Section 9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LA, Jan. 14-18, 1991, pp. 11-16. Whitlock, C.H., T.P. Charlock, W.F. Staylor, R.T. Pinker, I. Laszlo, A. Ohmura, H. Gilgen, T. Konzelman, R.C. DiPasquale, C.D. Moats, S.R....

  12. GAX absorption cycle design process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priedeman, D.K.; Christensen, R.N.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents an absorption system design process that relies on computer simulations that are validated by experimental findings. An ammonia-water absorption heat pump cycle at 3 refrigeration tons (RT) and chillers at 3.3 RT and 5 RT (10.5 kW, 11.6 kW, and 17.6 kW) were initially modeled and then built and tested. The experimental results were used to calibrate both the cycle simulation and the component simulations, yielding computer design routines that could accurately predict component and cycle performance. Each system was a generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle, and all were sized for residential and light commercial use, where very little absorption equipment is currently used. The specific findings of the 5 RT (17.6 kW) chiller are presented. Modeling incorporated a heat loss from the gas-fired generator and pressure drops in both the evaporator and absorber. Simulation results and experimental findings agreed closely and validated the modeling method and simulation software.

  13. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  14. Imision, Sohmso~ operatlonr Offloe

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3ayslde, Long fElti, 8. Y. Sylvaaia'o prooorr for pa-oduofng unmiunr pwdor by rtoaimtloa ir rtU1 .kr tha amly mpertal rtqpr and ot thllr tlma it la nof poirible to supply pou with...

  15. Rhabdomyosarcoma Arising in a Previously Irradiated Field: An Analysis of 43 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Nguyen D.; Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2013-03-01

    Patients with soft tissue sarcomas that arise from previously irradiated fields have traditionally been reported to have a poor prognosis. In this report, we examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients who developed a rhabdomyosarcoma in a previously irradiated field (RMS-RIF); we hypothesize that these patients should have a better outcome compared to other postradiation soft tissue sarcomas as these tumors are chemosensitive and radiosensitive. A PubMed search of the literature from 1961-2010 yielded 33 studies with data for patients with RMS-RIF. The study included 43 patients with a median age of 6.5 years at the time of radiation therapy (RT) for the initial tumor. The median RT dose was 48 Gy. The median latency period, the time from RT to development of RMS-RIF, was 8 years. The 3-year overall survival for RMS-RIF was 42%. The 3-year overall survival was 66% for patients receiving chemotherapy and local treatment (surgery and/or RT) compared to 29% for those who had systemic treatment only or local treatment only (P=.049). Other factors associated with increased 3-year overall survival included retinoblastoma initial diagnosis (P<.001), age ?18 years at diagnosis of RMS-RIF (P=.003), favorable site (P=.008), and stage 1 disease (P=.002). Age at time of RMS-RIF, retinoblastoma initial tumor, favorable site, stage 1 disease, and use of both systemic and local treatment were found to be favorable prognostic factors for 3-year overall survival.

  16. DOE/IG-0059 Semiannual Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report to Congress APRIL 1, 2010 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL iii APRiL 1, 2010 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 iii SEMiAnnuAL REPoRT To CongRESS APRiL 1, 2010 - SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 Table of Contents Message from the inspector general ............................................................... 1 Key Accomplishments ....................................................................................... 3 implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

  17. SU-E-T-587: Monte Carlo Versus Ray-Tracing for Treatment Planning Involving CNS Tumors On the MultiPlan System for CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbang, R Teboh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: MultiPlan, the treatment planning system for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery system offers two approaches to dose computation, namely Ray-Tracing (RT), the default technique and Monte Carlo (MC), an option. RT is deterministic, however it accounts for primary heterogeneity only. MC on the other hand has an uncertainty associated with the calculation results. The advantage is that in addition, it accounts for heterogeneity effects on the scattered dose. Not all sites will benefit from MC. The goal of this work was to focus on central nervous system (CNS) tumors and compare dosimetrically, treatment plans computed with RT versus MC. Methods: Treatment plans were computed using both RT and MC for sites covering (a) the brain (b) C-spine (c) upper T-spine (d) lower T-spine (e) L-spine and (f) sacrum. RT was first used to compute clinically valid treatment plans. Then the same treatment parameters, monitor units, beam weights, etc., were used in the MC algorithm to compute the dose distribution. The plans were then compared for tumor coverage to illustrate the difference if any. All MC calculations were performed at a 1% uncertainty. Results: Using the RT technique, the tumor coverage for the brain, C-spine (C3–C7), upper T-spine (T4–T6), lower T-spine (T10), Lspine (L2) and sacrum were 96.8%, 93.1%, 97.2%, 87.3%, 91.1%, and 95.3%. The corresponding tumor coverage based on the MC approach was 98.2%, 95.3%, 87.55%, 88.2%, 92.5%, and 95.3%. It should be noted that the acceptable planning target coverage for our clinical practice is >95%. The coverage can be compromised for spine tumors to spare normal tissues such as the spinal cord. Conclusion: For treatment planning involving the CNS, RT and MC appear to be similar for most sites but for the T-spine area where most of the beams traverse lung tissue. In this case, MC is highly recommended.

  18. Management of Male Breast Cancer in the United States: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Emma C.; DeWitt, Peter; Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the stage-specific management of male breast cancer (MBC) with surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and relate them to outcomes and to female breast cancer (FBC). Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all primary invasive MBC and FBC diagnosed from 1973 to 2008. Analyzable data included age, race, registry, grade, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, type of surgery, and use of RT. Stage was defined as localized (LocD): confined to the breast; regional (RegD): involving skin, chest wall, and/or regional lymph nodes; and distant: M1. The primary endpoint was cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 4276 cases of MBC and 718,587 cases of FBC were identified. Male breast cancer constituted 0.6% of all breast cancer. Comparing MBC with FBC, mastectomy (M) was used in 87.4% versus 38.3%, and breast-conserving surgery in 12.6% versus 52.6% (P<10{sup ?4}). For males with LocD, CSS was not significantly different for the 4.6% treated with lumpectomy/RT versus the 70% treated with M alone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-3.61; P=.57). Postmastectomy RT was delivered in 33% of males with RegD and was not associated with an improvement in CSS (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.88-1.41; P=.37). There was a significant increase in the use of postmastectomy RT in MBC over time: 24.3%, 27.2%, and 36.8% for 1973-1987, 1988-1997, and 1998-2008, respectively (P<.0001). Cause-specific survival for MBC has improved: the largest significant change was identified for men diagnosed in 1998-2008 compared with 1973-1987 (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60-0.88; P=.0004). Conclusions: Surgical management of MBC is dramatically different than for FBC. The majority of males with LocD receive M despite equivalent CSS with lumpectomy/RT. Postmastectomy RT is greatly underutilized in MBC with RegD, although a CSS benefit was not demonstrated. Outcomes for MBC are improving, attributable to improved therapy and its use in this unscreened population.

  19. Long-term follow-up of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as pretreatment assessment in patients who undergo salvage radiotherapy for rising prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagda, Suneel N. . E-mail: snagda@gmail.com; Mohideen, Najeeb; Lo, Simon S.; Khan, Usman B.S.; Dillehay, Gary; Wagner, Robert; Campbell, Steven; Flanigan, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term failure patterns in patients who underwent an {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as part of their pretreatment assessment for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after prostatectomy and subsequently received local radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were referred for evaluation of a rising PSA level after radical prostatectomy. All patients had negative findings for metastatic disease after abdominal/pelvis imaging with CT and isotope bone scans. All patients underwent a capromab pendetide scan, and the sites of uptake were noted. All patients were treated with local prostate bed RT (median dose 66.6 Gy). Results: Of the 58 patients, 20 had biochemical failure (post-RT PSA level >0.2 ng/mL or a rise to greater than the nadir PSA), including 6 patients with positive uptake outside the bed (positive elsewhere). The 4-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rates for patients with negative (53%), positive in the prostate bed alone (45%), or positive elsewhere (74%) scan findings did not differ significantly (p = 0.51). The positive predictive value of the capromab pendetide scan in detecting disease outside the bed was 27%. The capromab pendetide scan status had no effect on bRFS. Those with a pre-RT PSA level of <1 ng/mL had improved bRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: The capromab pendetide scan has a low positive predictive value in patients with positive elsewhere uptake and the 4-year bRFS was similar to that for those who did not exhibit positive elsewhere uptake. Therefore, patients with a postprostatectomy rising PSA level should considered for local RT on the basis of clinicopathologic factors.

  20. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Filippi, Andrea R.; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A.; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  1. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  2. The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Meningeal HemangiopericytomaExperience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Sison, Cristina; Nieto, Jaime; Raifu, Muri; Li, Baoqing

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) on cause-specific survival in patients with meningeal hemangiopericytomas. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1990-2008 was queried for cases of surgically resected central nervous system hemangiopericytoma. Patient demographics, tumor location, and extent of resection were included in the analysis as covariates. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to analyze cause-specific survival. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were associated with cause-specific survival. Results: The mean follow-up time is 7.9 years (95 months). There were 76 patients included in the analysis, of these, 38 (50%) underwent gross total resection (GTR), whereas the other half underwent subtotal resection (STR). Postoperative RT was administered to 42% (16/38) of the patients in the GTR group and 50% (19/38) in the STR group. The 1-year, 10-year, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates were 99%, 75%, and 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, postoperative RT was associated with significantly better survival (HR = 0.269, 95% CI 0.084-0.862; P=.027), in particular for patients who underwent STR (HR = 0.088, 95% CI: 0.015-0.528; P<.008). Conclusions: In the absence of large prospective trials, the current clinical decision-making of hemangiopericytoma is mostly based on retrospective data. We recommend that postoperative RT be considered after subtotal resection for patients who could tolerate it. Based on the current literature, the practical approach is to deliver limited field RT to doses of 50-60 Gy while respecting the normal tissue tolerance. Further investigations are clearly needed to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy.

  3. SU-E-T-398: Feasibility of Automated Tools for Robustness Evaluation of Advanced Photon and Proton Techniques in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H; Liang, X; Kalbasi, A; Lin, A; Ahn, P; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) and photon-based volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have dosimetric advantages in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. However, anatomic or alignment changes during treatment may limit robustness of PBS and VMAT plans. We assess the feasibility of automated deformable registration tools for robustness evaluation in adaptive PBS and VMAT RT of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: We treated 10 patients with bilateral OPC with advanced RT techniques and obtained verification CT scans with physician-reviewed target and OAR contours. We generated 3 advanced RT plans for each patient: proton PBS plan using 2 posterior oblique fields (2F), proton PBS plan using an additional third low-anterior field (3F), and a photon VMAT plan using 2 arcs (Arc). For each of the planning techniques, we forward calculated initial (Ini) plans on the verification scans to create verification (V) plans. We extracted DVH indicators based on physician-generated contours for 2 target and 14 OAR structures to investigate the feasibility of two automated tools (contour propagation (CP) and dose deformation (DD)) as surrogates for routine clinical plan robustness evaluation. For each verification scan, we compared DVH indicators of V, CP and DD plans in a head-to-head fashion using Student's t-test. Results: We performed 39 verification scans; each patient underwent 3 to 6 verification scan. We found no differences in doses to target or OAR structures between V and CP, V and DD, and CP and DD plans across all patients (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Automated robustness evaluation tools, CP and DD, accurately predicted dose distributions of verification (V) plans using physician-generated contours. These tools may be further developed as a potential robustness screening tool in the workflow for adaptive treatment of OPC using advanced RT techniques, reducing the need for physician-generated contours.

  4. Alkane functionalization at ([mu]-Oxo)diiron(III) centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leising, R.A.; Kim, J.; Perez, M.A.; Que, L. Jr. )

    1993-10-20

    The reactivity of ([mu]-oxo)diferric complexes with [sup t]BuOOH (TBHP) for the functionalization of alkanes in CH[sub 3]CN has been investigated as part of our efforts to model dinuclear sites in nonheme iron enzymes. [Fe[sub 2](TPA)[sub 2]O(OAc)](CIO[sub 4])[sub 3] (1) (TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, OAc = acetate) is an efficient catalyst for cyclohexane oxidation, affording cyclohexanol (A, 9 equiv), cyclohexanone (K, 11 equiv), and (tert-butylperoxy)cyclohexane (P, 16 equiv) in 0.25 h at ambient temperature and pressure under an argon atmosphere. The catalyst is remarkably robust, as indicated by the [sup 1]H NMR and UV-vis spectra of the reaction mixture during the catalytic reaction and by its ability to maintain its turnover efficiency with subsequent additions of oxidant. The catalytic mechanism for TBHP utilization was explored by observing the effects of varying the tripodal ligands on the ([mu]-oxo)([mu]-carboxylato)diferric catalysts and varying the bridge on Fe[sub 2]O(TPA)[sub 2] catalysts. The (A + K)/P ratio increased as the ligands became more electron donating. Solvent also played an important role in determining the partitioning of products between A + K and P, with benzonitrile favoring hydroxylated products at the expense of P and pyridine having the opposite effect. 49 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Production of K⁺K⁻ pairs in proton-proton collisions below the Φ meson threshold

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Q. J.; Hartmann, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Gao, H.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Lorentz, B.; et al

    2013-06-12

    The pp→ppK⁺K⁻ reaction was measured below the Φ threshold at a beam energy of 2.568 GeV using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. By assuming that the four-body phase space is distorted only by the product of two-body final-state interactions, fits to a variety of one-dimensional distributions permit the evaluation of differential and total cross sections. The shapes of the distributions in the Kp and Kpp invariant masses are reproduced only if the K⁻p interaction is even stronger than that found at higher energy. The cusp effect in the K⁺K⁻ distribution at the K⁰K¯¯¯⁰ threshold is much more clear and some evidencemore » is also found for coupling between the K⁻p and K¯¯¯⁰n channels. However, the energy dependence of the total cross section cannot be reproduced by considering only a simple product of such pairwise final-state interactions.« less

  6. Effect of the band structure of InGaN/GaN quantum well on the surface plasmon enhanced light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Rong E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Bin E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Guogang; Tao, Tao; Zhuang, Zhe; Zhi, Ting; Zheng, Youdou

    2014-07-07

    The spontaneous emission (SE) of InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structure with silver(Ag) coated on the n-GaN layer has been investigated by using six-by-six K-P method taking into account the electron-hole band structures, the photon density of states of surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and the evanescent fields of SPP. The SE into SPP mode can be remarkably enhanced due to the increase of electron-hole pairs near the Ag by modulating the InGaN/GaN QW structure or increasing the carrier injection. However, the ratio between the total SE rates into SPP mode and free space will approach to saturation or slightly decrease for the optimized structures with various distances between Ag film and QW layer at a high injection carrier density. Furthermore, the Ga-face QW structure has a higher SE rate than the N-face QW structure due to the overlap region of electron-hole pairs nearer to the Ag film.

  7. Postmidnight depletion of the high-energy tail of the quiet plasmasphere

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Katus, Roxanne M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Larsen, Brian A.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Wygant, John R.; Moldwin, Mark B.

    2015-03-06

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument measures the high energy tail of the thermal plasmasphere allowing study of topside ionosphere and inner magnetosphere coupling. We statistically analyze a 22 month period of HOPE data, looking at quiet times with a Kp index of less than 3. We investigate the high energy range of the plasmasphere, which consists of ions at energies between 1-10 eV and contains approximately 5% of total plasmaspheric density. Both the fluxes and partial plasma densities over this energy range show H+ is depleted the most in the post-midnight sector (1-4 MLT), followedmore » by O+ and then He+. The relative depletion of each species across the post-midnight sector is not ordered by mass, which reveals ionospheric influence. We compare our results with keV energy electron data from HOPE and the Van Allen Probes Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument spacecraft potential to rule out spacecraft charging. Our conclusion is that the post-midnight ion disappearance is due to diurnal ionospheric temperature variation and charge exchange processes« less

  8. Proposal of high efficiency solar cells with closely stacked InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P quantum dot superlattices: Analysis of polarized absorption characteristics via intermediateband

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshikawa, H. Kotani, T.; Kuzumoto, Y.; Izumi, M.; Tomomura, Y.; Hamaguchi, C.

    2014-07-07

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures and polarized absorption properties of quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) using widegap matrix material, InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs, for realizing intermediateband solar cells (IBSCs) with twostep photonabsorption. The planewave expanded BurtForeman operator ordered 8band kp theory is used for this calculation, where strain effect and piezoelectric effect are taken into account. We find that the absorption spectra of the second transitions of twostep photonabsorption can be shifted to higher energy region by using In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P, which is latticematched material to GaAs substrate, as a matrix material instead of GaAs. We also find that the transverse magnetic polarized absorption spectra in InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSL with a separate IB from the rest of the conduction minibands can be shifted to higher energy region by decreasing the QD height. As a result, the second transitions of twostep photonabsorption by the sunlight occur efficiently. These results indicate that InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs are suitable material combination of IBSCs toward the realization of ultrahigh efficiency solar cells.

  9. Postmidnight depletion of the high-energy tail of the quiet plasmasphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Katus, Roxanne M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Larsen, Brian A.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Wygant, John R.; Moldwin, Mark B.

    2015-03-06

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument measures the high energy tail of the thermal plasmasphere allowing study of topside ionosphere and inner magnetosphere coupling. We statistically analyze a 22 month period of HOPE data, looking at quiet times with a Kp index of less than 3. We investigate the high energy range of the plasmasphere, which consists of ions at energies between 1-10 eV and contains approximately 5% of total plasmaspheric density. Both the fluxes and partial plasma densities over this energy range show H+ is depleted the most in the post-midnight sector (1-4 MLT), followed by O+ and then He+. The relative depletion of each species across the post-midnight sector is not ordered by mass, which reveals ionospheric influence. We compare our results with keV energy electron data from HOPE and the Van Allen Probes Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument spacecraft potential to rule out spacecraft charging. Our conclusion is that the post-midnight ion disappearance is due to diurnal ionospheric temperature variation and charge exchange processes

  10. Electronic structure, morphology and emission polarization of enhanced symmetry InAs quantum-dot-like structures grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary?ski, A.; S?k, G.; Musia?, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Gilfert, C.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Capua, A.; Karni, O.; Gready, D.; Eisenstein, G.; Atiya, G.; Kaplan, W. D.; Klling, S.

    2013-09-07

    The optical and structural properties of a new kind of InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dot (QD)-like objects grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. These nanostructures were found to have significantly more symmetrical shapes compared to the commonly obtained dash-like geometries typical of this material system. The enhanced symmetry has been achieved due to the use of an As{sub 2} source and the consequent shorter migration length of the indium atoms. Structural studies based on a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) provided detailed information on both the structure and composition distribution within an individual nanostructure. However, it was not possible to determine the lateral aspect ratio from STEM or APT. To verify the in-plane geometry, electronic structure calculations, including the energy levels and transition oscillator strength for the QDs have been performed using an eight-band kp model and realistic system parameters. The results of calculations were compared to measured polarization-resolved photoluminescence data. On the basis of measured degree of linear polarization of the surface emission, the in-plane shape of the QDs has been assessed proving a substantial increase in lateral symmetry. This results in quantum-dot rather than quantum-dash like properties, consistent with expectations based on the growth conditions and the structural data.

  11. KEPLER-63b: A GIANT PLANET IN A POLAR ORBIT AROUND A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Torres, Guillermo; Carter, Joshua A.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Geary, John C.; Campante, Tiago L.; Chaplin, William J.; Davies, Guy R.; Lund, Mikkel N.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Everett, Mark E.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Horch, Elliott P.; and others

    2013-09-20

    We present the discovery and characterization of a giant planet orbiting the young Sun-like star Kepler-63 (KOI-63, m{sub Kp} = 11.6, T{sub eff} = 5576 K, M{sub *} = 0.98 M{sub ?}). The planet transits every 9.43 days, with apparent depth variations and brightening anomalies caused by large starspots. The planet's radius is 6.1 0.2 R{sub ?}, based on the transit light curve and the estimated stellar parameters. The planet's mass could not be measured with the existing radial-velocity data, due to the high level of stellar activity, but if we assume a circular orbit, then we can place a rough upper bound of 120 M{sub ?} (3?). The host star has a high obliquity (? = 104), based on the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and an analysis of starspot-crossing events. This result is valuable because almost all previous obliquity measurements are for stars with more massive planets and shorter-period orbits. In addition, the polar orbit of the planet combined with an analysis of spot-crossing events reveals a large and persistent polar starspot. Such spots have previously been inferred using Doppler tomography, and predicted in simulations of magnetic activity of young Sun-like stars.

  12. A theoretical analysis of the optical absorption properties in one-dimensional InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Birner, Stefan; Lugli, Paolo; Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2014-04-14

    We present theoretical investigations of miniband structures and optical properties of InAs/GaAs one-dimensional quantum dot superlattices (1D-QDSLs). The calculation is based on the multi-band kp theory, including the conduction and valence band mixing effects, the strain effect, and the piezoelectric effect; all three effects have periodic boundary conditions. We find that both the electronic and optical properties of the 1D-QDSLs show unique states which are different from those of well known single quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wires. We predict that the optical absorption spectra of the 1D-QDSLs strongly depend on the inter-dot spacing because of the inter-dot carrier coupling and changing strain states, which strongly influence the conduction and valence band potentials. The inter-miniband transitions form the absorption bands. Those absorption bands can be tuned from almost continuous (closely stacked QD case) to spike-like shape (almost isolated QD case) by changing the inter-dot spacing. The polarization of the lowest absorption peak for the 1D-QDSLs changes from being parallel to the stacking direction to being perpendicular to the stacking direction as the inter-dot spacing increases. In the case of closely stacked QDs, in-plane anisotropy, especially [110] and [11{sup }0] directions also depend on the inter-dot spacing. Our findings and predictions will provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of QD-based optoelectronic devices.

  13. Tensile-strain and doping enhanced direct bandgap optical transition of n{sup +} doped Ge/GeSi quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, W. J.

    2013-11-14

    Band structures of tensile strained and n{sup +} doped Ge/GeSi quantum wells (QWs) are calculated by multiple-band kp method. The energy dispersion curves of the ? and L conduction subbands are obtained. The effects of tensile strain and n{sup +} doping in Ge on direct bandgap optical gain and spontaneous radiative recombination rate spectra are investigated including the electron leakage from ? to L conduction subbands. Our results show that the optical gain and spontaneous radiative recombination rate can be significantly increased with the tensile strain, n-type doping concentration, and injection carrier density in the Ge QW. The free carrier absorption is calculated and cannot be ignored because of the heavily doped Ge. The pure TM mode polarized net optical gain up to 1153?cm{sup ?1} can be achieved for the Ge/Ge{sub 0.986}Si{sub 0.014} QW with tensile strain of 1.61% and n-type doping concentration of 30??10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}.

  14. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director`s Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  15. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  16. Genomic Prostate Cancer Classifier Predicts Biochemical Failure and Metastases in Patients After Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Den, Robert B.; Feng, Felix Y.; Showalter, Timothy N.; Mishra, Mark V.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Kelly, W. Kevin; Birbe, Ruth C.; McCue, Peter A.; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Yousefi, Kasra; Davicioni, Elai; Knudsen, Karen E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Totest the hypothesis that a genomic classifier (GC) would predict biochemical failure (BF) and distant metastasis (DM) in men receiving radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Among patients who underwent post-RP RT, 139 were identified for pT3 or positive margin, who did not receive neoadjuvant hormones and had paraffin-embedded specimens. Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the highest Gleason grade focus and applied to a high-density-oligonucleotide microarray. Receiver operating characteristic, calibration, cumulative incidence, and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess GC performance for predicting BF and DM after post-RP RT in comparison with clinical nomograms. Results: Thearea under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the Stephenson model was 0.70 for both BF and DM, with addition of GC significantly improving area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to 0.78 and 0.80, respectively. Stratified by GC risk groups, 8-year cumulative incidence was 21%, 48%, and 81% for BF (P<.0001) and for DM was 0, 12%, and 17% (P=.032) for low, intermediate, and high GC, respectively. In multivariable analysis, patients with high GC had a hazard ratio of 8.1 and 14.3 for BF and DM. In patients with intermediate or high GC, those irradiated with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA ?0.2ng/mL) had median BF survival of >8years, compared with <4years for patients with detectable PSA (>0.2ng/mL) before initiation of RT. At 8years, the DM cumulative incidence for patients with high GC and RT with undetectable PSA was 3%, compared with 23% with detectable PSA (P=.03). No outcome differences were observed for low GC between the treatment groups. Conclusion: The GC predicted BF and metastasis after post-RP irradiation. Patients withlower GC risk may benefit from delayed RT, as opposed to those with higher GC; however, this needs prospective validation. Genomic-based models may be useful forimproved decision-making for treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

  17. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.370.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.13.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  18. SU-C-17A-05: Quantification of Intra-Fraction Motion of Breast Tumors Using Cine-MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heijst, T van; Philippens, M; Bongard, D van den; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Kleijnen, J; Hartogh, M den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables direct characterization of intra-fraction motion ofbreast tumors, due to high softtissue contrast and geometric accuracy. The purpose is to analyzethis motion in early-stage breast-cancer patients using pre-operative supine cine-MRI. Methods: MRI was performed in 12 female early-stage breast-cancer patients on a 1.5-T Ingenia (Philips)wide-bore scanner in supine radiotherapy (RT) position, prior to breast-conserving surgery. Twotwodimensional (2D) T2-weighted balanced fast-field echo (cine-MRI) sequences were added tothe RT protocol, oriented through the tumor. They were alternately acquired in the transverse andsagittal planes, every 0.3 s during 1 min. A radiation oncologist delineated gross target volumes(GTVs) on 3D contrast-enhanced MRI. Clinical target volumes (CTV = GTV + 15 mm isotropic)were generated and transferred onto the fifth time-slice of the time-series, to which subsequents lices were registered using a non-rigid Bspline algorithm; delineations were transformed accordingly. To evaluate intra-fraction CTV motion, deformation fields between the transformed delineations were derived to acquire the distance ensuring 95% surface coverage during scanning(P95%), for all in-plane directions: anteriorposterior (AP), left-right (LR), and caudal-cranial(CC). Information on LR was derived from transverse scans, CC from sagittal scans, AP fromboth sets. Results: Time-series with registration errors - induced by motion artifacts - were excluded by visual inspection. For our analysis, 11 transverse, and 8 sagittal time-series were taken into account. Themedian P95% calculated in AP (19 series), CC (8), and LR (11) was 1.8 mm (range: 0.94.8), 1.7mm (0.83.6), and 1.0 mm (0.63.5), respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fraction motion analysis of breast tumors was achieved using cine-MRI. These first results show that in supine RT position, motion amplitudes are limited. This information can be used for adaptive RT planning, and to develop preoperative partial-breast RT strategies, such asablative RT for early-stage breast-cancer patients.

  19. The oxidation-reduction kinetics of palladium powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munir, Z.A.; Coombs, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The cyclic oxidation-reduction of submicrometer sized palladium powder was investigated over the temperature range 848 to 923 K. The total oxygen uptake decreased with increasing number of cycles as a consequence of sintering. Sintering was restricted to the reduction steps in these cycles. The relationships for the rate constants of the oxidation and reduction processes are, respectively, (1.04)10/sup 6/ exp(-(74.1)10/sup 3//RT), and (7.63)10/sup 12/ exp(-(207.9)10/sup 3//RT). The activation energies for the oxidation of palladium powder and the reduction of palladium oxide are 74.1 and 207.9 kJ mol/sup -1/, respectively.

  20. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-11

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframesincentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  1. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khudik, V. Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2014-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  2. Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

  3. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  4. TU-A-BRF-01: MR Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanescu, T; Balter, J; Nyholm, T; Lagendijk, J

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the development of new technologies focused on the deeper integration of MR in radiotherapy. The innovations span from image data acquisition and post-processing to clinical implementation of MR-guided RT systems and workflow development. The session is intended to provide a review of the key and most recent advancements. Targeted discussions will cover topics which currently define the concept of MR-guided radiotherapy including a) system commissioning, quality control and safety, b) MR data manipulation for dose computations and treatment simulation, c) quantification/management of organ motion and treatment delivery guidance. Learning Objectives: Understand the concept and specifics of MR-guided radiotherapy; Understand the requirements for system integration in clinical workflow; Become familiar with the proposed strategies for system commissioning, RT planning and delivery guidance.

  5. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V.; Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk ; Baksht, R. B.; Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450?ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, RayleighTaylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

  6. DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /E/A- 0202( 83//Q J Sh or t-T er m En er gy O ut lo ok a to m Quar terly Proje ction s Febru ary 1983 Ene rgy Info rma tion Adm inist ratio n Was hing ton, D.C. t rt jrt .or t lor t lor t .lor t- ior t- ior t <.o rt ort . m .er m -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -T erm -T erm -T erm Nrm ue rgy En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg

  7. Final Report - Sulfate Solubility in RPP-WTP HLW Glasses, VSL-06R6780-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Feng, A.; Gan, H.; Kot, W. K.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-HLW-TSP-RT-01-006 Rev 1, Test Plans VSL-02T7800-1 Rev 1 and Test Exceptions 24590-HLW-TEF-RT-05-00007. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and were conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  8. Unleashing the Power of ORPS g A Desk Guide to The Occurrence Reporting and Processing System and How to Get the Information You Need

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unleashing the Power of ORPS A Desk Guide to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) and How to Get the Information You Need U S D E PA RT M E N T O F E N E RGY O F F I C E O F ES H R E P O RT I N G A N D A N A LYS I S ( AU - 2 3 ) 11/24/2015 1 Introduction to ORPS The Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) is a system designed to assist users to submit, collect, transmit, update, and sign the occurrence reports required by DOE O 232.2 Admin Chg 1, Occurrence Reporting

  9. Final Report - DuraMelter 100 Tests to Support LAW Glass Formulation Correlation Development, VSL-06R6480-1, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-12-03

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by Test Specifications 24590-LAW-TSP-RT-04-004, Rev. 0, Test Plans VSL-05T5480-1, Rev. 0 and Text Exceptions 24590-LAW-TEF-RT-05-00002. The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and was conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  10. Effects of Contact Resistance on Electrical Conductivity Measurements of SiC-Based Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Henager, Charles H.

    2012-04-17

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from RT to ~700C. The specific contact resistance values (Rc) behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc >~1000 ?-cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ~1-10 ?-cm2 at 700C. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ~0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by ~1/2.

  11. Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-06-30

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ?973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ?1000 ? cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ?110 ? cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ?0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

  12. Collison-induced rototranslational absorption spectra of H/sub 2/-He pairs at temperatures from 40 to 3000 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, J.; Frommhold, L.; Birnbaum, G.

    1988-03-01

    The zeroth, first, and second spectral moments of the rototranslational collision-induced absorption (RT CIA) spectra of hydrogen-helium mixtures are calculated from the fundamental theory, for temperatures from 40 to 3000 K. With the help of simple analytical functions of three parameters and the information given, the RT CIA spectra of H/sub 2/-He pairs can be generated on computers of small capacity, with rms deviations from exact quantum profiles of not more than a few percent. Such representations of the CIA spectra are of interest for work related to the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The theoretical spectra are in close agreement with existing laboratory measurements at various temperatures from about 77 to 3000 K. 28 references.

  13. SU-E-T-291: Sensitivity of a Simple 2D EPID in Vivo Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peca, S; Brown, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: As radiotherapy (RT) increases in complexity, so does motivation for in vivo dosimetry (IVD), which may detect errors such as: setup, beam shaping and dose delivered. We have recently developed an easy-toimplement method for two-dimensional IVD based on images taken with the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in cine mode during treatment. The purpose of this work is to characterize its sensitivity to possible RT delivery errors. Methods: We introduced a series of modifications to a simple RT field (1010, 100MU, 300RR, 20cm homogeneous phantom) to simulate errors. These modifications included multi-leaf collimator (MLC) position, number of MUs, and collimator angle. We quantified the sensitivity to inhomogeneities by inserting variable amounts of solid lung and bone. Finally we delivered realistic fields to an anthropomorphic phantom to estimate sensitivity to gantry angle and setup errors. Results: Our EPIDIVD is sensitive to MLC positioning errors of 1mm and 3mm in the closed and open directions respectively, and to 3% MU variations. Sensitivity to collimator angle depends on field shape irregularity; in the case of a 10x10 field, we are sensitive to errors of 0.8. The sensitivity to inhomogeneities is limited by the nature of MV imaging: approximately 1% signal change is noted when switching 5cm of water to equal amounts of bone or lung. This suggests that the EPID-IVD is likely not sensitive to small setup or gantry angle errors, as confirmed by anthropomorphic tests. Conclusion: We have characterized a simple method of 2D dose reconstruction at isocenter depth inside the patient, which is sensitive to possible RT delivery errors. This method may be useful as a secondary safety check, to prevent large errors from being carried on to following fractions, and to record delivered dose. By using readily available hardware, it is easily implemented and may prove especially useful in centers with limited resources.

  14. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association - Wind Energy Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Tribal Energy Program Review November 18, 2008 By Bruce Wright Connie Fredenberg Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association "The Birthplace of the Wind" Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, Inc. * 150 mph gusts * Extreme Turbulence Potential * Corrosive Salt Spray World Class Wind: A Mixed Blessing Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, Inc. LOGISTICS * Anchorage to Nikolski is 916 air miles for $1,316 rt. * During the fishing season a refundable ticket

  15. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world April 3, 2012 Billion dollar manufacturing savings and new menufacturing jobs in the U.S result from LANL reliability engineering The Procter and Gamble Company (P&G) develops and launches consumer product innovations focused on improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world. Reliability Technology (RT) is a comprehensive reliability engineering system developed by P&G to increase the overall

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of ARM Cloud Property Observations with CRM Simulations Xu, K.-M. (a), Cederwall, R.T. (b), Xie, S.C. (b), and Yio, J.J. (b), NASA Langley Research Center (a), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The cloud property observations are compared with cloud-resolving model simulated cloud properties in this study, using the Summer 1997 Intensive Observation Period (IOP) data of the ARM program. Midlatitude

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Assessment of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path Using Clear-sky Data Marchand, R.T. and Ackerman, T.P., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The ARM radiometers make measurements at two frequencies. These two measurements are used to infer two quantities, the total column vapor and liquid water. Both microwave emission frequencies respond to both the liquid and vapor, but one channel is more sensitive to vapor (23.8 GHz)

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Comparison of the Characteristics of Cirrus from Doppler Radar Measurements at the ARM Sites and the CRYSTAL Field Experiment Laribee-Dowd, K. (a), Mace, G. G. (a), and Marchand, R.T. (b), University of Utah (a) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting By studying the statistics of Doppler velocities in cirrus clouds, the characteristics of cirrus formed through recent injection of ice into the uppertroposphere by deep

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  1. Re

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.5 (SAM v 6.5) 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e as t 24 v e rt ical l aye rs w it h grids...

  2. Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg ; Olsson, Caroline; Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg ; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Al-Abany, Massoud; Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Tucker, Susan; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar; Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

  3. Reproductive Status at First Diagnosis Influences Risk of Radiation-Induced Second Primary Contralateral Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Jennifer D.; Boice, John D.; Stovall, Marilyn; Reiner, Anne S.; Bernstein, Leslie; John, Esther M.; Lynch, Charles F.; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Knight, Julia A.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W.; Smith, Susan A.; Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Shore, Roy E.; Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Our study examined whether reproductive and hormonal factors before, at the time of, or after radiation treatment for a first primary breast cancer modify the risk of radiation-induced second primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The Women's Environmental, Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study is a multicenter, population-based study of 708 women (cases) with asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and 1399 women (controls) with unilateral breast cancer. Radiotherapy (RT) records, coupled with anthropomorphic phantom simulations, were used to estimate quadrant-specific radiation dose to the contralateral breast for each patient. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to assess the relationship between reproductive factors and risk of CBC. Results: Women who were nulliparous at diagnosis and exposed to {>=}1 Gy to the contralateral breast had a greater risk for CBC than did matched unexposed nulliparous women (RR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0). No increased risk was seen in RT-exposed parous women (RR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.4). Women treated with RT who later became pregnant (8 cases and 9 controls) had a greater risk for CBC (RR = 6.0; 95% CI, 1.3-28.4) than unexposed women (4 cases and 7 controls) who also became pregnant. The association of radiation with risk of CBC did not vary by number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, or menopausal status at the time of first breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusion: Nulliparous women treated with RT were at an increased risk for CBC. Although based on small numbers, women who become pregnant after first diagnosis also seem to be at an increased risk for radiation-induced CBC.

  4. Effects of Irradiation on Brain Vasculature Using an In Situ Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawaski, Janice A.; Gaber, M. Waleed; Sabek, Omaima M.; Wilson, Christy M.; Duntsch, Christopher D.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Damage to normal tissue is a limiting factor in clinical radiotherapy (RT). We tested the hypothesis that the presence of tumor alters the response of normal tissues to irradiation using a rat in situ brain tumor model. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy was used with a rat cranial window to assess the in situ effect of rat C6 glioma on peritumoral tissue with and without RT. The RT regimen included 40 Gy at 8 Gy/day starting Day 5 after tumor implant. Endpoints included blood-brain barrier permeability, clearance index, leukocyte-endothelial interactions and staining for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) glial fibrillary acidic protein, and apoptosis. To characterize the system response to RT, animal survival and tumor surface area and volume were measured. Sham experiments were performed on similar animals implanted with basement membrane matrix absent of tumor cells. Results: The presence of tumor alone increases permeability but has little effect on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and astrogliosis. Radiation alone increases tissue permeability, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and astrogliosis. The highest levels of permeability and cell adhesion were seen in the model that combined tumor and irradiation; however, the presence of tumor appeared to reduce the volume of rolling leukocytes. Unirradiated tumor and peritumoral tissue had poor clearance. Irradiated tumor and peritumoral tissue had a similar clearance index to irradiated and unirradiated sham-implanted animals. Radiation reduces the presence of VEGF in peritumoral normal tissues but did not affect the amount of apoptosis in the normal tissue. Apoptosis was identified in the tumor tissue with and without radiation. Conclusions: We developed a novel approach to demonstrate that the presence of the tumor in a rat intracranial model alters the response of normal tissues to irradiation.

  5. DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- <ort- ort Tt- .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  6. DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  7. DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  8. DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  9. DOE/EIA-0202(85/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1985 Published: August 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort iort iort '.ort ort Tt .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  10. DOE/EIA-0202(86/3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1986 t rt ort .ort lort lort nort iort lort \ort ort Tt "t- . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Enbrgy ^nergy -OJ.VJUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  11. DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  12. Membrane Applications at Ceramatec

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Membrane Applications at Ceramatec Solid Electrolyte Ion Conductors CO 2 to Syngas GTL Advanced Batteries oxygen Fluorine Hydrogen Alkali metals Specialty Chemicals Waste Remediation Disinfection Chemicals Sensors Agro- chemicals Organo- metallics Biofuels Commercial Pilot Bench Next Generation - Ceramic membrane devices Historical Effort:  Crystalline alkali ions (Li, K, Na) conducting membranes * Selective and conductive at low temperatures (R.T. to 150 o C) * Material development and

  13. Experimental Highlights - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    news / experimental highlights / 2016 Experimental Highlights - 2016 February Astrophysicist Fields Questions about NIF Shots Studying Shocks on the Rebound A NIF campaign aimed at measuring the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in a twice-shocked interface is producing new insights into the turbulent conditions that exist under circumstances ranging from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions to supernova explosions. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities occur

  14. Microsoft Word - Errata for the Pressure and Vacuum Systems Safety Supplement 3-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SYSTEM TURNOVER FORM PS-9 Pressure System Number: Pressure System Name: OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS: IN-SERVICE INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS: Piping Vessels Relief Valves Component Component ISI Category ISI Type (VT, UT, RT, etc) ISI Frequency Special ISI Requirements: System Owner name and signature: Date: Design Authority name and signature Date Design Authority shall forward this form to the Pressure Systems Committee Designee for filing and updating the operating pressure

  15. WTP Calculation Sheet: Determining the LAW Glass Former Constituents and Amounts for G2 and Acm Models. 24590-LAW-M4C-LFP-00002, Rev. B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-16

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the LAW glass former recipe and additives with their respective amounts. The methodology and equations contained herein are to be used in the G2 and ACM models until better information is supplied by R&T efforts. This revision includes calculations that determines the mass and volume of the bulk chemicals/minerals needed per batch. Plus, it contains calculations (for the G2 model) to help prevent overflow in LAW Feed Preparation Vessel.

  16. Erlotinib Versus Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Rimner, Andreas; Shi, Weiji; Riely, Gregory J.; Beal, Kathryn; Yu, Helena A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Abraham J.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Radiation therapy (RT) is the principal modality in the treatment of patients with brain metastases (BM). However, given the activity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the central nervous system, it is uncertain whether upfront brain RT is necessary for patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma with BM. Methods and Materials: Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma and newly diagnosed BM were identified. Results: 222 patients were identified. Exclusion criteria included prior erlotinib use, presence of a de novo erlotinib resistance mutation, or incomplete data. Of the remaining 110 patients, 63 were treated with erlotinib, 32 with whole brain RT (WBRT), and 15 with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The median overall survival (OS) for the whole cohort was 33 months. There was no significant difference in OS between the WBRT and erlotinib groups (median, 35 vs 26 months; P=.62), whereas patients treated with SRS had a longer OS than did those in the erlotinib group (median, 64 months; P=.004). The median time to intracranial progression was 17 months. There was a longer time to intracranial progression in patients who received WBRT than in those who received erlotinib upfront (median, 24 vs 16 months, P=.04). Patients in the erlotinib or SRS group were more likely to experience intracranial failure as a component of first failure, whereas WBRT patients were more likely to experience failure outside the brain (P=.004). Conclusions: The survival of patients with EGFR-mutant adenocarcinoma with BM is notably long, whether they receive upfront erlotinib or brain RT. We observed longer intracranial control with WBRT, even though the WBRT patients had a higher burden of intracranial disease. Despite the equivalent survival between the WBRT and erlotinib group, this study underscores the role of WBRT in producing durable intracranial control in comparison with a targeted biologic agent with known central nervous system activity.

  17. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Vapiwala, Neha; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  18. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  19. TO: F FROH: SUBJEC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  20. TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  1. May 12, 2011, Visiting Speakers Program Events - Special Report - Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SpeciAl RepoRt counterfeit parts: increasing Awareness and Developing countermeasures March 2011 Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures March 2011 © 2010 Aerospace Industries Association of America, Inc. 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1700, Arlington, Virginia 22209 n www.aia-aerospace.org Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures i December 2010 Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures Counterfeiting has a

  2. Microsoft Word - 01 - Cover.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Expeditionary Readiness Training (ExpeRT) Course Expansion Final Environmental Assessment Creech Air Force Base June 2006 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ACC Air Combat Command AEF Air and Space Expeditionary Force AETC Air Education and Training Command AFB Air Force Base AFI Air Force Instruction AFMC Air Force Materiel Command AIRFA American Indian Religious Freedom Act AMC Air Mobility Command ANG Air National Guard ARPA Archaeological Resources Protection Act ATC Air Traffic Control tower BAQ

  3. The effects of early time laser drive on hydrodynamic instability growth in National Ignition Facility implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. L.; Clark, D. S.; Suter, L. J.; Masse, L. P.

    2014-09-15

    Defects on inertial confinement fusion capsule surfaces can seed hydrodynamic instability growth and adversely affect capsule performance. The dynamics of shocks launched during the early period of x-ray driven National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions determine whether perturbations will grow inward or outward at peak implosion velocity and final compression. In particular, the strength of the first shock, launched at the beginning of the laser pulse, plays an important role in determining Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) oscillations on the ablation front. These surface oscillations can couple to the capsule interior through subsequent shocks before experiencing Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth. We compare radiation hydrodynamic simulations of NIF implosions to analytic theories of the ablative RM and RT instabilities to illustrate how early time laser strength can alter peak velocity growth. We develop a model that couples the RM and RT implosion phases and captures key features of full simulations. We also show how three key parameters can control the modal demarcation between outward and inward growth.

  4. Effect of Grain Refinement on the Mechanical Behaviour of an Al6061 Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Valle, E.; Sabirov, I.; Murashkin, M. Yu.; Valiev, R. Z.; Bobruk, E. V.; Perez-Prado, M. T.

    2011-05-04

    A solution treated coarse grained (CG) Al6061 was subjected to high pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature resulting in the formation of a homogeneous ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure with an average grain size of 170 nm. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). The as-HPT UFG Al6061 alloy shows an increased strength at both RT and LNT. The decrease of testing temperature results in increased flow stress and in enhanced elongation to failure in both CG and UFG samples. The ratio {sigma}{sub y}{sup LNT}/{sigma}{sub y}{sup RT} was found to be larger for the CG Al6061 than for the UFG Al6061. Both surface relief and fracture surface observations were performed. The effect of the grain size and of the testing temperature on the mechanical behaviour of the Al6061 alloy is analyzed in detail. It is suggested that the solute atoms play an important role in the plastic deformation of the UFG Al6061 alloy.

  5. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocationmore » reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.« less

  6. Metrics of closed world of Friedmann, agitated by electric charge (towards a theory electromagnetic Friedmanns)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markov, M.A.; Frolov, V.P.

    1986-06-10

    The generalization is considered of the well-known Tolman problem to the case of electrically charged dust-like matter of the central symmetrical system. The first integrals of the correspondent system of the Einstein-Maxwell equations are found. The problem is specificated in such a way that with the full charge of the system going to zero, the metrics of the closed Friedman world arises. Such a system is considered at the initial moment, that of maximal enlargement. With any nonvanishing but no-matter-how-small value of the electric charge, the metrics is unclosed. The metrics of the almost-Friedmanian part of the world allows the continuation through the narrow manhole (at the small charge) as the Nordstroem Reissner metrics with the parameters m/sub O/ sq rt (chi) = e/sub o/. The expression for the electric potential in the manhole phi/sub h/ = c-squared/sq rt chi does not depend upon the value of the electric charge. The radius of the manhole r/sub h/ = e/sub O/ sq. rt (chi)/ c-squared increases with the increase of the charge. The state of the manhole as given by the classical description appears as essentially unstable from the quantum-physics viewpoint. The production of various pairs in the enormous electric fields of the manhole gives rise to the polarisation of the latter up to effective charge Z < 137e irrespective of the initial (no matter how great) charge of the system.

  7. A high capability teleoperated vehicle for hazardous applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudar, A.M.; Witherspoon, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing a high performance teleoperated vehicle for use in radioactive and hazardous environments. The three-wheeled vehicle incorporates a highly dexterous 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF), hydraulically-powered manipulator made by Schilling Development, Inc. The teleoperator is called Little MoRT (MObile Radio-controlled Teleoperator) and is a modified version of a commercially available, battery-powered, warehouse vehicle. Little MoRT is controlled remotely by a universal robot controller either through a radio frequency link or a tethered cable. Six video cameras and a microphone provide the operator with audio-visual feedback of the vehicle and its surrounding environment. The vehicle also incorporates a hydraulic power unit consisting of a propane-driven engine for powering the Schilling manipulator. Little MoRT is capable of operating in outdoor as well as indoor environments and is well suited for decontamination and decommissioning activities such as dismantling, sorting, and surveying of radioactive waste.

  8. 2014_Q1.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    W We We We el lc lc lc com om om o e e e e t to to to to t t t t th he he he he J J J J Jan an an anua ua ua uary ry ry ry y M M -M M Mar ar ar ar h ch ch ch ch 2 2 2 2 201 01 01 01 014 4 4 4 4 i is is is issu su su sue e e e f of of of of t t t t th he he he he U U U U U S S S .S .S. . D De De De Depa pa pa pa p rt rt rt rtme me me ment nt nt nt o o o of f f f f En En En Ener er er ergy gy gy gy gy ( ( ( ( ( ( O DO DO DO DO ) E) E) E) E) ) Of Of Of Offi fi fi fi ce ce ce o o of f f f L Le Le

  9. SU-E-J-16: A Review of the Magnitude of Patient Imaging Shifts in Relation to Departmental Policy Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, M; Sansourekidou, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate how changes in imaging policy affect the magnitude of shifts applied to patients. Methods: In June 2012, the department's imaging policy was altered to require that any shifts derived from imaging throughout the course of treatment shall be considered systematic only after they were validated with two data points that are consistent in the same direction. Multiple additions and clarifications to the imaging policy were implemented throughout the course of the data collection, but they were mostly of administrative nature. Entered shifts were documented in MOSAIQ (Elekta AB) through the localization offset. The MOSAIQ database was queried to identify a possible trend. A total of 25,670 entries were analyzed, including four linear accelerators with a combination of MV planar, kV planar and kV three dimensional imaging. The monthly average of the magnitude of the vector was used. Plan relative offsets were excluded. During the evaluated period of time, one of the satellite facilities acquired and implemented Vision RT (AlignRT Inc). Results: After the new policy was implemented the shifts variance and standard deviation decreased. The decrease is linear with time elapsed. Vision RT implementation at one satellite facility reduced the number of overall shifts, specifically for breast patients. Conclusion: Changes in imaging policy have a significant effect on the magnitude of shifts applied to patients. Using two statistical points before applying a shift as persistent decreased the overall magnitude of the shifts applied to patients.

  10. Daily Sodium Butyrate Enema for the Prevention of Radiation Proctitis in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Radiation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Placebo-Controlled Dose-Finding Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggio, Angelo; Magli, Alessandro; Rancati, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Valvo, Francesca; Fellin, Giovanni; Ricardi, Umberto; Munoz, Fernando; Cosentino, Dorian; Cazzaniga, Luigi Franco; Valdagni, Riccardo; Vavassori, Vittorio

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of sodium butyrate enemas (NABUREN) in prostate cancer radiation therapy (RT) in reducing the incidence, severity, and duration of acute RT-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: 166 patients, randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups (rectal sodium butyrate 1 g, 2 g, or 4 g daily or placebo), were treated with NABUREN during and 2 weeks after RT. The grade of proctitis was registered in a daily diary. The correlation between NABUREN and proctitis was investigated through χ{sup 2} statistics. The toxicity endpoints considered were as follows: total number of days with grade ≥1 proctitis (≥G1); total number of days with grade ≥2 proctitis (≥G2); ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis lasting at least 3 and 5 consecutive days starting from week 4 (≥G1+3d, ≥G2+3d); damaging effects of RT on rectal mucosa as measured by endoscopy. The relationship between endpoints and pretreatment morbidities, hormonal therapy, presence of diabetes or hypertension, abdominal surgery, or hemorrhoids was investigated by univariate analysis. Results: The patients were randomly allocated to the 4 arms. No difference in the distribution of comorbidities among the arms was observed (P>.09). The mean ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis were 7.8 and 4.9 for placebo and 8.9 and 4.7 for the NABUREN group, respectively. No favorable trend in reduction of incidence, severity, and duration of ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis was observed with NABUREN use. In univariate analysis, ≥G1+3d toxicity was found to be related to hemorrhoids (P=.008), and a slight correlation was found between ≥G2 proctitis and hormonal therapy (P=.06). The RT effects on rectal mucosa as based on endoscopic assessment were mainly related to diabetes (P<.01). Endoscopy data at 6 week showed no significant difference between the placebo and butyrate arms. The other investigated endpoints were not correlated with any of the clinical risk factors analyzed. Conclusion: There was no evidence of efficacy of NABUREN in reducing the incidence, severity, and duration of acute radiation proctitis. There was a correlation between some endpoints and clinical risk factors.

  11. Radiation Therapy in Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma With Positron Emission Tomography Positivity After Rituximab Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Giunta, Francesca; Bellò, Marilena; Chiappella, Annalisa; Caracciolo, Daniele; Zotta, Michela; Douroukas, Anastasios; Ragona, Riccardo; Vitolo, Umberto; Bisi, Gianni; Ricardi, Umberto

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation therapy (RT) in patients affected with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) with residual {sup 18}fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG-PET)-positive disease after rituximab chemotherapy (R-CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients treated with R-CT and RT, all with {sup 18}FDG-PET scan at diagnosis and before RT, were included. All {sup 18}FDG-PET scans were reviewed, and responses were classified according to the Deauville 5-point scoring system. Outcomes measures were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), estimated for the whole cohort and for subgroups according to {sup 18}FDG-PET score after R-CT. Results: The median follow-up time was 40.9 months. Three patients were assigned to Deauville score 1 (8.1%), 9 to score 2 (24.3%), 7 to score 3 (19%), 14 to score 4 (37.8%), and 4 to score 5 (10.8%). After RT, all patients with score 3-4 experienced a complete response (CR). Among patients with score 5, 1 was in CR (25%), 2 had persistent positivity (50%), and 1 showed progressive disease (25%). A total of 4 patients experienced progression or relapse: 1 of 33 (3%) with scores 1-4, and 3 of 4 (75%) with score 5. The 3-year OS and PFS of the whole cohort were 89.8% and 88.7%, respectively. OS was significantly different between scores 1-3 and scores 4-5 (100% vs 77% at 3 years, P<.05). Patients with a score of 5 had a significantly worse outcome than did all other patients (OS at 2 years, 33.3% vs 100%). Conclusions: Approximately 50% of PMBCL patients show residual disease at {sup 18}FDG-PET scan after R-CT. RT is able to convert to CR approximately 85% of these patients, but those with a Deauville score of 5 (10%) appear at high risk of progression and death, and they might be candidates for intensified programs.

  12. Does Response to Induction Chemotherapy Predict Survival for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? Secondary Analysis of RTOG 8804/8808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Moughan, Jennifer M.S.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Cox, James D.; Sause, William T.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) improves survival compared with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LANSCLC) patients with good prognostic factors. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is superior to ICT followed by RT. The question arises whether ICT response predicts the outcome of patients subsequently treated with CCRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1992, 194 LANSCLC patients were treated prospectively with ICT (two cycles of vinblastine and cisplatin) and then CCRT (cisplatin plus 63 Gy for 7 weeks) in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8804 trial (n = 30) or ICT and then RT (60 Gy/6 wk) on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8808 trial (n = 164). Of the 194 patients, 183 were evaluable and 141 had undergone a postinduction assessment. The overall survival (OS) of those with complete remission (CR) or partial remission (PR) was compared with that of patients with stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD) after ICT. Results: Of the 141 patients, 6, 30, 99, and 6 had CR, PR, SD, and PD, respectively. The log-rank test showed a significant difference (p <0.0001) in OS when the response groups were compared (CR/PR vs. SD/PD). On univariate and multivariate analyses, a trend was seen toward a response to ICT with OS (p = 0.097 and p = 0.06, respectively). A squamous histologic type was associated with worse OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.031 and p = 0.018, respectively). SD/PD plus a squamous histologic type had a hazard ratio of 2.25 vs. CR/PR plus a nonsquamous histologic type (p = 0.007) on covariate analysis. Conclusion: The response to ICT was associated with a significant survival difference when the response groups were compared. A response to ICT showed a trend toward, but was not predictive of, improved OS in LANSCLC patients. Patients with SD/PD after ICT and a squamous histologic type had the poorest OS. These data suggest that patients with squamous LANSCLC might benefit from immediate RT or CCRT.

  13. Phase I Trial Using Patupilone (Epothilone B) and Concurrent Radiotherapy for Central Nervous System Malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogh, Shannon; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Curran, Walter J.; Bonanni, Roseann; Axelrod, Rita; Andrews, David; Dicker, Adam P.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Based on preclinical data indicating the radiosensitizing potential of epothilone B, the present study was designed to evaluate the toxicity and response rate of patupilone, an epothilone B, with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of central nervous system malignancies. Methods and Materials: The present Phase I study evaluated the toxicities associated with patupilone combined with RT to establish the maximal tolerated dose. Eligible patients had recurrent gliomas (n = 10) primary (n = 5) or metastatic (n = 17) brain tumors. Dose escalation occurred if no dose-limiting toxicities, defined as any Grade 4-5 toxicity or Grade 3 toxicity requiring hospitalization, occurred during treatment. Results: Of 14 patients, 5 were treated with weekly patupilone at 1.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 4 at 2.5 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1 at 4 mg/m{sup 2}. Of 18 patients, 7 were treated in the 6-mg/m{sup 2} group, 6 in the 8-mg/m{sup 2} group, and 5 in the 10-mg/m{sup 2} group. Primary central nervous system malignancies received RT to a median dose of 60 Gy. Central nervous system metastases received whole brain RT to a median dose of 37.4 Gy, and patients with recurrent gliomas underwent stereotactic RT to a median dose of 37.5 Gy. One dose-limiting toxicity (pneumonia) was observed in group receiving 8-mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks. At the subsequent dose level (10 mg/m{sup 2}), two Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities occurred (renal failure and pulmonary hemorrhage); thus, 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks was the maximal tolerated dose and the recommended Phase II dose. Conclusion: Combined with a variety of radiation doses and fractionation schedules, concurrent patupilone was well tolerated and safe, with a maximal tolerated dose of 8 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks.

  14. TU-F-12A-04: Differential Radiation Avoidance of Functional Liver Regions Defined by 99mTc-Sulfur Colloid SPECT/CT with Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, S; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G; Vesselle, H; Nyflot, M; Apisarnthanarax, S; Saini, J; Wong, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients is conventionally planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in hepatic function, which may increase risk of radiation-induced liver disease. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton radiotherapy (pRT) plans were generated to differentially decrease dose to functional liver volumes (FLV) defined on [{sup 99m}Tc]sulfur colloid (SC) SPECT/CT images (functional avoidance plans) and compared against conventional pRT plans. Methods: Three HCC patients underwent SC SPECT/CT scans for pRT planning acquired 15 min post injection over 24 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM following scatter, collimator, and exhale CT attenuation correction. Functional liver volumes (FLV) were defined by liver:spleen uptake ratio thresholds (43% to 90% maximum). Planning objectives to FLV were based on mean SC SPECT uptake ratio relative to GTV-subtracted liver and inversely scaled to mean liver dose of 20 Gy. PTV target coverage (V{sub 95}) was matched between conventional and functional avoidance plans. PBS pRT plans were optimized in RayStation for single field uniform dose (SFUD) and systematically perturbed to verify robustness to uncertainty in range, setup, and motion. Relative differences in FLV DVH and target dose heterogeneity (D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D50 were assessed. Results: For similar liver dose between functional avoidance and conventional PBS pRT plans (D{sub mean}?5% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?1% difference), dose to functional liver volumes were lower in avoidance plans but varied in magnitude across patients (FLV{sub 70%max} D{sub mean}?26% difference, V{sub 18Gy}?8% difference). Higher PTV dose heterogeneity in avoidance plans was associated with lower functional liver dose, particularly for the largest lesion [(D{sub 2}-D{sub 98})/D{sub 50}=13%, FLV{sub 90%max}=50% difference]. Conclusion: Differential avoidance of functional liver regions defined on sulfur colloid SPECT/CT is feasible with proton therapy. The magnitude of benefit appears to be patient specific and dependent on tumor location, size, and proximity to functional volumes. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients may validate the clinical utility of functional avoidance planning of HCC radiotherapy.

  15. SU-E-T-224: Is Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Method Necessary for Cyberknife Brain Treatment Planning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L; Fourkal, E; Hayes, S; Jin, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric difference resulted in using the pencil beam algorithm instead of Monte Carlo (MC) methods for tumors adjacent to the skull. Methods: We retrospectively calculated the dosimetric differences between RT and MC algorithms for brain tumors treated with CyberKnife located adjacent to the skull for 18 patients (total of 27 tumors). The median tumor sizes was 0.53-cc (range 0.018-cc to 26.2-cc). The absolute mean distance from the tumor to the skull was 2.11 mm (range - 17.0 mm to 9.2 mm). The dosimetric variables examined include the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the target, the target coverage (TC) and conformality index. The MC calculation used the same MUs as the RT dose calculation without further normalization and 1% statistical uncertainty. The differences were analyzed by tumor size and distance from the skull. Results: The TC was generally reduced with the MC calculation (24 out of 27 cases). The average difference in TC between RT and MC was 3.3% (range 0.0% to 23.5%). When the TC was deemed unacceptable, the plans were re-normalized in order to increase the TC to 99%. This resulted in a 6.9% maximum change in the prescription isodose line. The maximum changes in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 5.4 %, 7.7%, and 8.4%, respectively, before re-normalization. When the TC was analyzed with regards to target size, it was found that the worst coverage occurred with the smaller targets (0.018-cc). When the TC was analyzed with regards to the distance to the skull, there was no correlation between proximity to the skull and TC between the RT and MC plans. Conclusions: For smaller targets (< 4.0-cc), MC should be used to re-evaluate the dose coverage after RT is used for the initial dose calculation in order to ensure target coverage.

  16. SU-E-T-198: Hippocampal-Sparing Radiotherapy (HSRT) for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlop, A; Welsh, L; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Bhide, S; Newbold, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that decline in cognitive function following brain radiotherapy (RT) is related to the radiation dose delivered to the hippocampi. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using IMRT to generate HSRT plans in HNC. Methods: A planning study was undertaken for ten representative patients with HNC previously treated with radical (chemo)-RT using standard IMRT techniques. The hippocampi were delineated according to the RTOG hippocampal contouring atlas, on a T1w- MRI scan that was registered with the RT planning CT. LINAC-based, clinically acceptable, HSRT plans were generated and assessed using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. Results: Using a VMAT technique, a reduction in hippocampal dose was achievable in six cases. For these cases, the EQD2-D40% of the bilateral hippocampi was significantly reduced by HSRT (p = 0.006) from a median of 18.8Gy (range 14.4–34.6) to 6.5 Gy (4.2–9.5) for the delivered and HSRT plans respectively. Plans were also generated using a fixed-field IMRT technique with non-coplanar beams that were designed to avoid the bilateral hippocampi, resulting in a median EQD2-D40% of 11.2Gy (8.0–14.5). Both HSRT techniques also resulted in lower doses to the whole brain, brain stem, and cerebellum. The HSRT plans resulted in higher doses to some regions of non-contoured normaltissue, but the magnitude of these dose differences is unlikely to be of clinical significance in terms of acute and late toxicity. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible, in many cases, to adapt treatment plans for HNC to significantly reduce dose to the hippocampi. This reduction in dose would be predicted to Resultin a significant reduction in the probability of subsequent decline in cognitive function following RT. Our results point towards the need for the collection of prospective data on cognitive outcomes for the HNC patient population treated with radical (chemo)-RT.

  17. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  18. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy.

  19. Analyzes Data from Semiconductor Wafers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-07-23

    This program analyzes reflectance data from semiconductor wafers taken during the deposition or evolution of a thin film, typically via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is used to determine the growth rate and optical constants of the deposited thin films using a virtual interface concept. Growth rates and optical constants of multiple-layer structures is possible by selecting appropriate sections in the reflectance vs time waveform. No prior information or estimatesmore » of growth rates and materials properties is required if an absolute reflectance waveform is used. If the optical constants of a thin film are known, then the growth rate may be extracted from a relative reflectance data set. The analysis is valid for either s or p polarized light at any incidence angle and wavelength. The analysis package is contained within an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The program is based on the algorighm described in the following two publications: W.G. Breiland and K.P. Killen, J. Appl. Phys. 78 (1995) 6726, and W. G. Breiland, H.Q. Hou, B.E. Hammons, and J.F. Klem, Proc. XXVIII SOTAPOCS Symp. Electrochem. Soc. San Diego, May 3-8, 1998. It relies on the fact that any multiple-layer system has a reflectance spectrum that is mathematically equivalent to a single-layer thin film on a virtual substrate. The program fits the thin film reflectance with five adjustable parameters: 1) growth rate, 2) real part of complex refractive index, 3) imaginary part of refractive index, 4) amplitude of virtual interface reflectance, 5) phase of virtual interface reflectance.« less

  20. Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  1. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the kp method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 . The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  2. AZD5438, an Inhibitor of Cdk1, 2, and 9, Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghavan, Pavithra; Tumati, Vasu; Yu Lan; Chan, Norman; Tomimatsu, Nozomi; Burma, Sandeep; Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas ; Bristow, Robert G.; Saha, Debabrata; Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dallas, Texas

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the primary modalities for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to the intrinsic radiation resistance of these tumors, many patients experience RT failure, which leads to considerable tumor progression including regional lymph node and distant metastasis. This preclinical study evaluated the efficacy of a new-generation cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor, AZD5438, as a radiosensitizer in several NSCLC models that are specifically resistant to conventional fractionated RT. Methods and Materials: The combined effect of ionizing radiation and AZD5438, a highly specific inhibitor of Cdk1, 2, and 9, was determined in vitro by surviving fraction, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and homologous recombination (HR) assays in 3 NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1299, and H460). For in vivo studies, human xenograft animal models in athymic nude mice were used. Results: Treatment of NSCLC cells with AZD5438 significantly augmented cellular radiosensitivity (dose enhancement ratio rangeing from 1.4 to 1.75). The degree of radiosensitization by AZD5438 was greater in radioresistant cell lines (A549 and H1299). Radiosensitivity was enhanced specifically through inhibition of Cdk1, prolonged G{sub 2}-M arrest, inhibition of HR, delayed DNA DSB repair, and increased apoptosis. Combined treatment with AZD5438 and irradiation also enhanced tumor growth delay, with an enhancement factor ranging from 1.2-1.7. Conclusions: This study supports the evaluation of newer generation Cdk inhibitors, such as AZD5438, as potent radiosensitizers in NSCLC models, especially in tumors that demonstrate variable intrinsic radiation responses.

  3. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, K. G.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Lawson, J. E.; Mozulay, R.; Sichta, P.; Tchilinguirian, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber security concerns require updating the operating system from Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) v4 to RedHawk (based on RHEL) v6. While the basic control system continues to use the General Atomics Plasma Control System (GA PCS), the effort to forwardmore » port the entire software package to run under 64-bit Linux instead of 32-bit Linux included PCS modifications subsequently shared with GA and other PCS users. Software updates focused on three key areas: (1) code modernization through coding standards (C99/C11), (2) code portability and maintainability through use of the GA PCS code generator, and (3) support of 64-bit platforms. Central to the control system upgrade is the use of a complete real time (RT) Linux platform provided by Concurrent Computer Corporation, consisting of a computer (iHawk), an operating system and drivers (RedHawk), and RT tools (NightStar). Strong vendor support coupled with an extensive RT toolset influenced this decision. The new real-time Linux platform, I/O, and software engineering will foster enhanced capability and performance for NSTX-U plasma control.« less

  4. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huddart, Robert A.; Hall, Emma; Hussain, Syed A.; Jenkins, Peter; Rawlings, Christine; Tremlett, Jean; Crundwell, Malcolm; Adab, Fawzi A.; Sheehan, Denise; Syndikus, Isabel; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; James, Nicholas D.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT ? sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval ?7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (?12.8%, 14.6%) in the per-protocol population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  5. Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Jordan A.; Wang, Andrew Z.; University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC ; Hoffman, Karen E.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Rosenman, Julian G.; University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC ; Carpenter, William R.; Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC ; Godley, Paul A.; Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC ; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of <25%, 25%-50%, and >50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with <25% likelihood, and T3-T4 patients had 18% higher odds. Prostatectomy use increased in recent years. Patients aged 76-80 years were likely to be managed conservatively, even those with a >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3-T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely extraprostatic disease. Because more than half of prostate cancer patients do not consult with a radiation oncologist, a multidisciplinary consultation may affect the treatment decision-making process.

  6. An Empirical Study on Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Traci L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Prowant, Matthew S.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-09-01

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for inspecting nuclear power plant (NPP) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate UT techniques to assess their ability to detect, locate, size, and characterize fabrication flaws in typical NPP weldments. This particular study focused on the evaluation of four carbon steel pipe-to-pipe welds on specimens that ranged in thicknesses from 19.05 mm (0.75 in.) to 27.8 mm (1.094 in.) and were 355.6 mm (14.0 in.) or 406.4 mm (16.0 in.) in diameter. The pipe welds contained both implanted (intentional) fabrication flaws as well as bonus (unintentional) flaws throughout the entire thickness of the weld and the adjacent base material. The fabrication flaws were a combination of planar and volumetric flaw types, including incomplete fusion, incomplete penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array UT (PA UT) techniques applied primarily for detection and length sizing of the flaws. Radiographic examinations were also conducted on the specimens with RT detection and length sizing results being used to establish true state. This paper will discuss the comparison of UT and RT (true state) detection results conducted to date along with a discussion on the technical gaps that need to be addressed before these methods can be used interchangeably for repair and replacement activities for NPP components.

  7. A Novel Method for Predicting Late Genitourinary Toxicity After Prostate Radiation Therapy and the Need for Age-Based Risk-Adapted Dose Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Alcantara, Pino; Li, Linna; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-07-15

    Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dosevolume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpoint was grade ?2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ?3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ?2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (? 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P<.05) in multivariable analysis. Overall, bladder wall CPE values were higher than solid bladder values. The AUHC for bladder wall provided the greatest discrimination for late bladder toxicity when compared with alternative DVH points, with CPE values of 0.68 for age ?68 years and 0.81 for age >68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ?2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored.

  8. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, David Howland [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lin, Hyun K [STONY BROOK UNIV.; Iwerks, Justin G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gliman, James G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic Instability, which occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical) which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale Invariant formulation, and non Ideal (i.e. experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We Interpret mathematical theories of existence and non-uniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations, in other words indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as non unique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, In the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and PrandtJ numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength Initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to playa role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing In different proportions In these two different contexts.

  9. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer After Definitive Radiation Therapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. of China (China); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O'Reilly, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gold, Kathryn A. [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiation therapy for stages I to III NSCLC between 2004 and 2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results: Of 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of RP grade ?2 seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; P=.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from RP grade ?2 among patients who received a low (?20-Gy) MLD (P<.01) or were male (P=.04). Conclusions: A trend toward reduction in symptomatic RP among patients taking ACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, although certain subgroups may benefit from use (ie, male patients and those receiving low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP.

  10. Correlation of a hypoxia based tumor control model with observed local control rates in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avanzo, Michele; Stancanello, Joseph; Franchin, Giovanni; Sartor, Giovanna; Jena, Rajesh; Drigo, Annalisa; Dassie, Andrea; Gigante, Marco; Capra, Elvira

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To extend the application of current radiation therapy (RT) based tumor control probability (TCP) models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) to include the effects of hypoxia and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: A TCP model is described based on the linear-quadratic model modified to account for repopulation, chemotherapy, heterogeneity of dose to the tumor, and hypoxia. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters exert the greatest influence on the uncertainty of modeled TCP. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, the values of specific radiobiological parameters were set to nominal values reported in the literature for NPC or head and neck tumors. The remaining radiobiological parameters were determined by fitting TCP to clinical local control data from published randomized studies using both RT and CRT. Validation of the model was performed by comparison of estimated TCP and average overall local control rate (LCR) for 45 patients treated at the institution with conventional linear-accelerator-based or helical tomotherapy based intensity-modulated RT and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the model is most sensitive to the radiosensitivity term {alpha} and the dose per fraction. The estimated values of {alpha} and OER from data fitting were 0.396 Gy{sup -1} and 1.417. The model estimate of TCP (average 90.9%, range 26.9%-99.2%) showed good correlation with the LCR (86.7%). Conclusions: The model implemented in this work provides clinicians with a useful tool to predict the success rate of treatment, optimize treatment plans, and compare the effects of multimodality therapy.

  11. Breast Cancer Patients With 10 or More Involved Axillary Lymph Nodes Treated by Multimodality Therapy: Influence of Clinical Presentation on Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geara, Fady B. . E-mail: fg00@aub.edu.lb; Nasr, Elie; Tucker, Susan L.; Charafeddine, Maya; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Eid, Toufic; Abbas, Jaber; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Issa, Philip; El Saghir, Nagi

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor control and survival for breast cancer patients with 10 or more positive lymph nodes without systemic disease, treated by adjuvant radiation alone or combined-modality therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 309 consecutive patients with these characteristics who received locoregional radiotherapy (RT) at our institution. The majority of patients had clinical Stage II or IIIA-B disease (43% and 48%, respectively). The median number of positive axillary lymph nodes was 15 (range, 10-78). Adjuvant therapy consisted of RT alone, with or without chemotherapy, tamoxifen, and/or ovarian castration. Results: The overall 5-year and 10-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 20% and 7%, respectively. Median DFS was higher for patients with Stage I-II compared with those with Stage IIIABC (28 vs. 19 months; p = 0.006). Median DFS for patients aged {<=}35 years was lower than that of older patients (12 vs. 24 months; p < 0.0001). Patients treated with a combination therapy had a higher 5-year DFS rate compared with those treated by RT alone (26% vs. 11%; p 0.03). In multivariate analysis, clinical stage (III vs. I, II; relative risk = 1.8, p = 0.002) and age ({<=}35 vs. others; relative risk = 2.6, p <0.001) were found to be independent variables for DFS. Conclusion: This retrospective data analysis identified young age and advanced clinical stage as pertinent and independent clinical prognostic factors for breast cancer patients with advanced axillary disease (10 or more involved nodes). These factors can be used for further prognostic classification.

  12. Impact of Intraluminal Brachytherapy on Survival Outcome for Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer: A Propensity-Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Oikawa, Hirobumi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kanesaka, Naoto; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Kosugi, Takashi; Hatano, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masao; Ito, Yoshinori; Takayama, Makoto; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Imai, Michiko; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether adding intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) to definitive radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable biliary tract cancer has a positive impact on survival outcome. Methods and Materials: The original cohort comprised 209 patients, including 153 who underwent external beam RT (EBRT) alone and 56 who received both ILBT and EBRT. By matching propensity scores, 56 pairs (112 patients) consisting of 1 patient with and 1 patient without ILBT were selected. They were well balanced in terms of sex, age, performance status, clinical stage, jaundice, and addition of chemotherapy. The impact of ILBT on overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC) was investigated. Results: The 2-year OS rates were 31% for the ILBT+group and 40% for theILBTgroup(P=.862). The 2-year DSS rates were 42% for the ILBT+group and 41% for the ILBT group (P=.288). The 2-year LC rates were 65% for theILBT+group and 35% for the ILBT group (P=.094). Three of the 4 sensitivity analyses showed a significantly better LC for the ILBT+group (P=.010, .025, .049), and another showed a marginally better LC (P=.068), and none of the sensitivity analyses showed any statistically significant differences in OS or DSS. Conclusions: In the treatment for unresectable biliary tract cancer, the addition of ILBT to RT has no impact on OS or DSS but is associated with better LC. Therefore, the role of ILBT should be addressed by other measures than survival benefit, for example, by less toxicity, prolonged biliary tract patency decreasing the needfor further palliative interventions, or patient quality of life.

  13. Predicting the Risk of Secondary Lung Malignancies Associated With Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, John; Shuryak, Igor; Xu Yanguang; Clifford Chao, K.S.; Brenner, David J.; Burri, Ryan J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The risk of secondary lung malignancy (SLM) is a significant concern for women treated with whole-breast radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. In this study, a biologically based secondary malignancy model was used to quantify the risk of secondary lung malignancies (SLMs) associated with several common methods of delivering whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Both supine and prone computed tomography simulations of 15 women with early breast cancer were used to generate standard fractionated and hypofractionated whole-breast RT treatment plans for each patient. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the ipsilateral breast and lung were calculated for each patient on each plan. A model of spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis was used to determine the relative risks of SLMs for the different treatment techniques. Results: A higher risk of SLMs was predicted for supine breast irradiation when compared with prone breast irradiation for both the standard fractionation and hypofractionation schedules (relative risk [RR] = 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.30-2.88, and RR = 2.68, 95% CI = 2.39-2.98, respectively). No difference in risk of SLMs was noted between standard fractionation and hypofractionation schedules in either the supine position (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.97-1.14) or the prone position (RR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.88-1.15). Conclusions: Compared with supine whole-breast irradiation, prone breast irradiation is associated with a significantly lower predicted risk of secondary lung malignancy. In this modeling study, fractionation schedule did not have an impact on the risk of SLMs in women treated with whole-breast RT for early breast cancer.

  14. B R O O K H A V E N L E C T U R E SERIES Symmetry Principles in Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    956 (T-397) 1 / > (J > 1 B R O O K H A V E N L E C T U R E SERIES Symmetry Principles in Physics C.N. Y A N G Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton ^^rt^"" Number 50 October 1 3, 1965 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Associated Universities, Inc. under contract with the United States Atomic Energy Commission DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. FOREWORD The Brookhaven

  15. SREL Reprint #3265

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Effects of timber harvesting on terrestrial survival of pond-breeding amphibians Brian D. Todd1, Sean M. Blomquist2, Elizabeth B. Harper3, and Michael S. Osbourn4 1Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616, USA 2US Fish and Wildlife Service, 14000 W. State Route 2, Oak Harbor, OH 43449, USA 3Paul Smith's College, Rt. 30 & 86, Paul Smiths, NY 12970-0265, USA 4University of Missouri, Division of Biological

  16. Titanium Alloys - Some

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLM of Aluminium and Titanium Alloys - Some lessons learned Presented by: Dr Chris Tuck § Nottingham Background § Lattice Design § Investigating Density § Investigating Laser Spatter § Mechanical Properties § Heat Treatments effects § Bringing it all together Contents 3 3DPRG Staff § Group established in 1992 on RP and RT § Began AM research in 2000 § Began Multifunctional AM in 2011 § Over 70 staff and Post-Grads dedicated to AM § Currently have

  17. Assessing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dental disease in minutes Understanding climate change Keeping watch on the world SPRING 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 1 Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Three-Year Cloud Climatology for the Southern Great Plains Site Marchand, R.T. (a), Ackerman, T.P. (a), and Clothiaux, E.E. (b), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a), Pennsylvania State University (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting In 1999 we presented a poster on radar-derived macrophyscial cloud statistics for the ARM SGP site for the two years 1997 and 1998. This year we extend those results with additional data from 1999. In addition to previous

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Facility Clough, S.A. (a), Delamere, J.S. (a), Mlawer, E.J. (a), Cederwall, R.T. (b), Revercomb, H. (c), Tobin, D. (c), Turner, D.D. (c), Knuteson, R.O. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Kiedron, P.W. (d), Ellingson, R.G. (e), Krueger, S.K. (f), Mace, G.G. (f), Shippert, T. (g), and Zhang, M.H.(h), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (a), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (b), University of Wisconsin-Madison (c),

  20. 1.TIF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 OF 11 DOCUMENT #: DOE/EIS-0113 TITLE: Final EIS Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes MULTNOMAH MONTHLYMEETING Religious Smaetyaf Friend., fpuakeral No rt h lesions Yeedy Meeting `ISl25.E Stark Straef, Portland, OR gnI5 Clerk J ... t nations. Treasurer Michael Well. Mr. R. A. Holton U.S.Departmentof Energy Richland Opemdom Office P.O. Box 550 Rieldxna,WA 99752 Dear Mr. Holton, No 2.3.2.8 and in. RE c il - CCE RL AUG 11966 p15^ - ^nmiDfrsioro July M, 1986 Moodily

  1. Bladder Cancer Patterns of Pelvic Failure: Implications for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Brian C.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; He Jiwei; Vaughn, David J.; Keefe, Stephen M.; Vapiwala, Neha; Deville, Curtiland; Bekelman, Justin E.; Tucker, Kai; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Local-regional failures (LFs) after cystectomy with or without chemotherapy are common in locally advanced disease. Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) could reduce LFs, but toxicity has discouraged its use. Modern RT techniques with improved normal tissue sparing have rekindled interest but require knowledge of pelvic failure patterns to design treatment volumes. Methods and Materials: Five-year LF rates after radical cystectomy plus pelvic node dissection with or without chemotherapy were determined for 8 pelvic sites among 442 urothelial bladder carcinoma patients. The impact of pathologic stage, margin status, nodal involvement, and extent of node dissection on failure patterns was assessed using competing risk analysis. We calculated the percentage of patients whose sites of LF would have been completely encompassed within various hypothetical clinical target volumes (CTVs) for postoperative radiation. Results: Compared with stage {<=}pT2, stage {>=}pT3 patients had higher 5-year LF rates in virtually all pelvic sites. Among stage {>=}pT3 patients, margin status significantly altered the failure pattern whereas extent of node dissection and nodal positivity did not. In stage {>=}pT3 patients with negative margins, failure occurred predominantly in the iliac/obturator nodes and uncommonly in the cystectomy bed and/or presacral nodes. Of these patients in whom failure subsequently occurred, 76% would have had all LF sites encompassed within CTVs covering only the iliac/obturator nodes. In stage {>=}pT3 with positive margins, cystectomy bed and/or presacral nodal failures increased significantly. Only 57% of such patients had all LF sites within CTVs limited to the iliac/obturator nodes, but including the cystectomy bed and presacral nodes in the CTV when margins were positive increased the percentage of LFs encompassed to 91%. Conclusions: Patterns of failure within the pelvis are summarized to facilitate design of adjuvant RT protocols. These data suggest that RT should target at least the iliac/obturator nodes in stage {>=}pT3 with negative margins; coverage of the presacral nodes and cystectomy bed may be necessary for stage {>=}pT3 with positive margins.

  2. Quadrennial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 RepoRt on the FiRst Quadrennial Technology review QTr Message froM the secretary of energy | i QUaDrennIaL technoLogy reVIeW 2011 Message froM the secretary of energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the United States Department of Energy today, our nation is at a cross road. While we have the world's greatest innovation ma- chine, countries around the world are moving aggressively to lead in the clean energy economy. We can either lead in the development of the clean energy economy or we can stand

  3. I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    I _ _ ORNL-6161 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Critical Experiments With Mixed Plutonium-Uranium Nitrate Solutions Having Pu:(Pu-I-U) Ratios Greater than 0.5 , R.T. Primm,III R. C. Lloyd , E.D. Clayton OPERATED BY E_;_rr:_ilLrl_;3_QI=TH_ I:X:)CUlulIE.N'I'" B LJNa-_;,;":"_" MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY L I ORNL-- 6161 ORNL-6161 Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS WITH MIXED PLUTONIUM-URANIUM NITRATE

  4. Using GPCM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Copyright RBAC, Inc., 2012. GPCM is a trademark owned by RT7K, LLC, and is used with its permission. Using GPCM ® to Model LNG Exports from the US Gulf Coast Robert Brooks, Ph.D., President, RBAC, Inc. March 2, 2012 As the gas industry rolled into the 21 st century, natural gas production was beginning to decline and the outlook for production looked rather bleak. A small upsurge due to the advent of coal-bed methane development had begun to play out and it looked like the future lay in LNG

  5. Enron Documents

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1999 rDEC- 15--B ]S-48 P. 02/21 December 14.1398 Vol. 5. No. SD tandard & Poors' kmRP'M ITILITIESl :- g PERS PECTVES | BH ~I UWhy Is ectric Restrturing Moving So Slowly in States? A the begi6s d 199S. Siamrd & PWfs iwpd between ne rulatory boj,. th Amore Ccaporior. ~3 b f^ rlWdiTr!- atalrtgenbardawmuldadptericemsam- Cmmwiion ACC. and Arizna's two maor OUs. 4 " -" = ' - 1*;n siit ionlt^ ddu teared clstt mrvwy. Leg AinaRt PbliSAniceCo. aod T-Tsn ,Eleaic Pori Co. .::* _.;is __ ..

  6. Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials:

  7. pN0(i+) Breast Cancer: Treatment Patterns, Locoregional Recurrence, and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karam, Irene; Lesperance, Maria F.; Berrang, Tanya; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott; Truong, Pauline T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To examine treatment patterns, recurrence, and survival outcomes in patients with pN0(i+) breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5999 women with AJCC (6th edition) pT1-3, pN0-N1a, M0 breast cancer diagnosed between 2003 and 2006. Of these, 4342 (72%) had pN0, 96 (2%) had pN0(i+), 349 (6%) had pNmic (micrometastases >0.2 mm to ?2 mm), and 1212 (20%) had pN1a (1-3 positive macroscopic nodes) disease. Treatment characteristics and 5-year Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence (RR), locoregional recurrence (LRR), and overall survival were compared between nodal subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. A 1:3 case-match analysis examined outcomes in pN0(i+) cases compared with pN0 controls matched for similar tumor and treatment characteristics. Results: Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Adjuvant systemic therapy use increased with nodal stage: 81%, 92%, 95%, and 94% in pN0, pN0(i+), pNmic, and pN1a disease, respectively (P<.001). Nodal radiation therapy (RT) use also increased with nodal stage: 1.7% in pN0, 27% in pN0(i+), 33% in pNmic, and 63% in pN1a cohorts (P<.001). Five-year Kaplan-Meier outcomes in pN0 versus pN0(i+) cases were as follows: local recurrence 1.7% versus 3.7% (P=.20), RR 0.5% versus 2.2% (P=.02), and LRR 2.1% versus 5.8% (P=.02). There were no RR events in 26 patients with pN0(i+) disease who received nodal RT and 2 RR events in 70 patients who did not receive nodal RT. On multivariable analysis, pN0(i+) was not associated with worse locoregional control or survival. On case-match analysis, LRR and overall survival were similar between pN0(i+) and matched pN0 counterparts. Conclusions: Nodal involvement with isolated tumor cells is not a significant prognostic factor for LRR or survival in this study's multivariable and case-match analyses. These data do not support the routine use of nodal RT in the setting of pN0(i+) disease. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal locoregional management for women with pN0(i+) breast cancer.

  8. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  9. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  10. DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  11. DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  12. DOE/EIA-0202(85/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook OBIS Quarterly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook OBIS Quarterly Projections October 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort aort iort iort <.ort ort Tt .-m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  13. DOE/EIA-0202(86/2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ Outlook Short-Term Exit,. . Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .-m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy OuU t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc jrt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  14. DOE/EIA-0202(87/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term ion-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term Tt-Term ".-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  15. DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    |83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook Volume 1-Quarterly Projections May 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort lOrt iort '.ort- ort Tt . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  16. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D. Critical experiments with mixed plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions having Pu:(Pu + U) ratios greater than 0.5 Primm, R.T. III [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]; Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] High density arrays of

  17. Microsoft Word - EXEC-2013-007595 revisions made 2-5-2014.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R A C R Fe Stra Res Ann Cal Report t ebruar ate ser nua end to Con ry 2014 egic rve al R dar gress 4 Unite c Pe Rep r Y ed State etr por ear es Dep Washi role rt fo r 20 artmen ington, eum or 012 nt of E , D.C. 2 m 2 nergy 20585 Department of Energy | February 2014 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Annual Report for Calendar Year 2012 | Page i Message from the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Fossil Energy Section 165 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6245), as amended,

  18. Best Practices for Emergency Response to Incidents Involving Electric Vehicles Battery Hazards: A Report on Full-Scale Testing Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices for Emergency Response to Incidents Involving Electric Vehicles Battery Hazards: A Report on Full-Scale Testing Results Final Report Prepared by: R. Thomas Long Jr., P.E., CFEI Andrew F. Blum, P.E., CFEI Thomas J. Bress, Ph.D., P.E., CRE Benjamin R.T. Cotts, Ph.D. Exponent, Inc. 17000 Science Drive, Suite 200 Bowie, MD 20715 © June 2013 Fire Protection Research Foundation THE FIRE PROTECTION RESEARCH FOUNDATION ONE BATTERYMARCH PARK QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A. 02169-7471

  19. The FIonorable W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . L1 >.t,,:.r*. L * . .* -+rT[ $ @ . . . 8, r ' ! f? , 13% ii&-q 4 ;' ;' . 0; .' - .s* I -- 8 ..h! ,z * _ The Secretary of Energi' . Washington, bC 20585 . * & 3hTap. *-. October 10, 1997 ' , :- 1 . , The FIonorable W illiam S. Cohen a: .. Secretary ofDefense se . Washington, D.C. 203Oi .. . , JkarMr.Secietaxy ~ , ; , * _ ' . The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would

  20. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    em IVIL, u-3 1' 1L, I -' I ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 1. H.# fL22 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. Sample Nor& 3 Date Collected- 5117 by --Route to CES CES r Location IQJKER-PEMJNS Co- Type of Sample-waternalyzed for F Alpha Remarks -&I GG -- u - Beta Samples of water discharged to river during Steam clean- No, Ra ing of equipment. Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description (RT Please analyze for gm/U/gal. BP-1 P- RO-Kneader BP-2 K-

  1. GlNTRM FILES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : .; GlNTRM FILES .- Red Rwtaaie!a .=?%A .-m JJullen mtoxges8ntuuo -006 .017 .olb J-m .021 .OLt .Ol2 *Jeta Lhh .029 .0X9 ,026 ~k~exwteethaae~oyeencloee~ttothxflcmrof bUckaide. After the deccxmdnatimpxcblarrrro mlved.the rt8tma dt&itO lo- &ctioacoilrpasdistuEeed. 1. . ,, -. . . ' The conparty visited 3~ciali.z.e~ ja the a.ppLicatica of Znductiw beat. The purpose of this trip wa s to advise on haaBh and safety measures for the preoceeptance testing of inductioo heat treating equipment

  2. UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY C O M M ISSION WASHINGTON 25. D. C.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    w - 1 .' " . . . - --,.* : * . UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY C O M M ISSION WASHINGTON 25. D. C. $. _,._^. :\ SOUFtCE K47'FXIAL LICPJWS Liaense No. C-3Ll7 D8tidr kmmber 10, 1%5 SouthamRwwarah Inatituta 917 south 20th 3-t BlrRdngh88 5, Alabaa Attontlon: Hr. Ibak8 WhIta, Jr. Oontlom onr Pursuant to tbo At0810 IBerm Aot of 19% ard Saotion 163.21 of thr, Co& of Faderal Regulrtlon8, fit18 10 - Atonlc B m rgy, Chaptar 1, P*rt 40 - Cbntrolof Sourco Xakrlal,~u are horubylla~srd to ncalrcr powem

  3. United States Government Department of Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    f 1325.0 (05-931 8gw j '/ United States Government Department of Energy -A ,4, o memorandum r't9 ' DATE: JAN 2 4 1995 l., REPTLYTO EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) 0 O, '\ SBJECT: Documents Pertaining to Sites Being Evaluated in the Formerly Utilized c/.,Jo Sites Remedial Action Program 0 - TO: .'5 3 E. Osheim, OH r. / ~' The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Is evaluating d _ 3p the activities of a number of companies which may have been involved with radiological

  4. M'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    M' i. l-2 C-CT NO. AT(30-1)4405, hi. lo. 9 SUPPLEMENTALAGRE?WM THIS SUPPLEMENTAL AGREXUENT , entered into theloth day of February 195Lr by and between TEE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA'~lnafter referred & as the 'Government"), ar represented by the UNITED STATES ATOMIC l!3l8GY CQ4MISSfON (hereinafter referred to as the Wmmi~el~ri@), and BUDGW(RT BRASS COMPANY (hereinafter referred to ae the Qmtractor"); UITHESSETH THAT: WHERElls, the Governmen t and the Contractor entered Into Contract

  5. EP-32

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    f\l p :.; . I, 18 fin.3 . d eb 3 -f-i-& ?L rT 4 FE8 0 8 1982 EP-32 5 00~~ betignation of Acid and Pueblo Canyons Site, Los Alamos, )(ew Mexico Frank Coffman Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs, NE-30 -. Attached are 10 copies of the report Vadiological Survey of a Former Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatrent Plant (TA-45) and the Effluent Receiving Areas of Acid, Pueblo, and Los A?amos Canyons, Los Alamos, New Mexico" sub- mitted in November 1981

  6. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for more definitive surgery.

  7. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  8. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT.

  9. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    955L'Enfm Plnm,S.ry.. Washin@ on,D.C. 200242174, Tekphone:(202)488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 j 23 September 1987 I ccA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown; Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITI:S MA.a-05 kl p.o- The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepared in accordance. - rtL.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation

  10. I I)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I) c Y LI c L II I Y c m c m ic w m c F OAK RtDGE NATIONAl LABORATORY QBfilATEO fly ~TIN MANIETTA ENEaGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNUEO STATES DEPARTMENT of ENERGY ., / "I <: Li i * m . ORNL/TM-10439 RESULTS OF THE INDOOR RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE W . R. GRACE CO. CURTIS BAY SITE BALTIMORE, MARYLAND W . D. Cottrell R. D. Foley C. A. Johnson This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Techni-

  11. IvPE-cEAEs?nILE!! P

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cw-rent: _______ rT--- Owner contacted 0 yes J7' j-r~~; if ye.. date contacted ___ IvPE-cEAEs?nILE!! P Research & Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Prime ,!Z! Subcontract& JZl Purchase Order q Facility Type q Manufacturing q University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- [7 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee,

  12. SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY Lfcfi0n 31, I?%7 STGTE m rtE!xm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM #% HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE S#W MC&TED W P4DlOKTIVIN kmvi t+mi BkcTmam

  13. Atom Probe Tomography Examination of Carbon Redistribution in Quenched and Tempered 4340 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Amy J.; Miller, Michael K.; Alexander, David J.; Field, Robert D.; Clarke, Kester D.

    2012-08-07

    Quenching and tempering produces a wide range of mechanical properties in medium carbon, low alloyed steels - Study fragmentation behavior as a function of heat-treatment. Subtle microstructural changes accompany the mechanical property changes that result from quenching and tempering - Characterize the location and distribution of carbon and alloying elements in the microstructure using atom probe tomography (APT). Perform complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tempering influences the mechanical properties and fragmentation of quenched 4340 (hemi-shaped samples). APT revealed carbon-enriched features that contain a maximum of {approx}12-14 at.% carbon after quenching to RT (the level of carbon is perhaps associated with the extent of autotempering). TEM confirmed the presence of twinned martensite and indicates {var_epsilon} ({eta}) transition carbides after oil quenching to RT. Tempering at 325 C resulted in carbon-enriched plates (> 25 at.% C) with no significant element partitioning (transition carbides?). Tempering at 450 C and 575 C resulted in cementite ({approx} 25 at.% C) during late stage tempering; Cr, Mn, Mo partitioned to cementite and Si partitioned to ferrite. Tempering at 575 C resulted in P segregation at cementite interfaces and the formation of Cottrell atmospheres.

  14. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-04

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a? to 3:3a? have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmorelevel using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a? by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.less

  15. Syntheses and studies of acetylenic polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yiwei, Ding

    1994-03-03

    Based on new diiodo aryl compounds a series of novel soluble polymers, poly(2,5-dialkoxy-1,4-phenyleneethynylene)s (PPE polymers) were synthesized using palladium-catalysis. The molecular weights (MW) range from 8,000 to 40,000. Properties such as absorption, fluorescence, and conductivity were studied. A PPE polymer with butoxy side chain exhibits a weak electrical conductivity ({sigma} = 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) after doping with AsF{sub 5}. Absorption spectra in THF solution at room temperature (RT) show a maximum at 440 nm. However, absorption spectra of PPE polymers in the film state at (RT) show a maximum at 480 nm. PPE polymer-based light emitting diode (LED) devices have been prepared; greenish light from these LED devices can be observed. Poly(ethynylene-p-arylene-ethynylene-silylene)s were synthesized through the same palladium-catalyzed polymerization; MWs are between 6,000 and 82,000. Absorption and fluorescence were studied. Some of these polymers exhibit thermotropic liquid crystalline properties. In addition, nonlinear optical properties were briefly examined. Poly(silylene-ethynylene) homopolymers as well as alternating copolymers were synthesized through a novel palladium-catalyzed polymerization; MWs range from 56 {times} 10{sup 3} to 5.3 {times} 10{sup 3}. Thermal stability of these was also investigated; char yields range from 56 to 83%. One of these polymers exhibits thermotropic liquid crystalline properties.

  16. High reliability plastic packaging for microelectronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.; Tuck, M.

    1997-07-01

    Goal was Assembly Test Chips (ATCs) which could be used for evaluating plastic encapsulation technologies. Circuits were demonstrated for measuring Au-Al wirebond and Al metal corrosion failure rates during accelerated temperature and humidity testing. The test circuits on the ATC02.5 chip were very sensitive to extrinsic or processing induced failure rates. Accelerated aging experiments were conducted with unpassivated triple track Al structures on the ATC02.6 chip; the unpassivated tracks were found to be very sensitive to particulate contamination. Some modifications to existing circuitry were suggested. The piezoresistive stress sensing circuitry designed for the ATC04 test chip was found suitable for determining the change in the state of mechanical stress at the die when both initial and final measurements were made near room temperature (RT). Attempt to measure thermal stress between RT and a typical polymer glass transition temperature failed because of excessive die resistor- substrate leakage currents at the high temperature end; suitable circuitry changes were developed to overcome this problem. One temperature and humidity experiment was conducted with Sandia developed static radom access memory parts to examine non-corrosion CMOS failures; this objective was not achieved, but corrosion failure at the metal to Si contacts on the die surface could be detected. This 2-year effort resulted in new designs for test circuits which could be used on an advanced ATC for reliability assessment in Defense Programs electronics development projects.

  17. Raster-scanning serial protein crystallography using micro- and nano-focused synchrotron beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Brewster, Aaron S.; Kapp, Ulrike; Shilova, Anastasya; Weinhausen, Britta; Burghammer, Manfred; Colletier, Jacques -Philippe

    2015-04-25

    High-resolution structural information was obtained from lysozyme microcrystals (20 µm in the largest dimension) using raster-scanning serial protein crystallography on micro- and nano-focused beamlines at the ESRF. Data were collected at room temperature (RT) from crystals sandwiched between two silicon nitride wafers, thereby preventing their drying, while limiting background scattering and sample consumption. In order to identify crystal hits, new multi-processing and GUI-driven Python-based pre-analysis software was developed, named NanoPeakCell, that was able to read data from a variety of crystallographic image formats. Further data processing was carried out using CrystFEL, and the resultant structures were refined to 1.7 Åmore » resolution. The data demonstrate the feasibility of RT raster-scanning serial micro- and nano-protein crystallography at synchrotrons and validate it as an alternative approach for the collection of high-resolution structural data from micro-sized crystals. Advantages of the proposed approach are its thriftiness, its handling-free nature, the reduced amount of sample required, the adjustable hit rate, the high indexing rate and the minimization of background scattering.« less

  18. OCT4A contributes to the stemness and multi-potency of human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (hUCB-MSCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Kwang-Won; Lee, Sae-Rom; Bhandari, Dilli Ram; Roh, Kyoung-Hwan; Park, Sang-Bum; So, Ah-Young; Jung, Ji-Won; Seo, Min-Soo; Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tumor Biology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University 151-742, Seoul ; Kang, Soo-Kyung; Laboratory of Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University 151-742, Seoul ; Lee, Yong-Soon; Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tumor Biology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University 151-742, Seoul ; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tumor Biology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University 151-742, Seoul

    2009-06-19

    The OCT4A gene, a POU homeodomain transcription factor, has been shown to be expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESC) as well as hUCB-MSCs. In this study, the roles played by OCT4A in hUCB-MSCs were determined by stably inhibiting OCT4A with lenti-viral vector-based small hairpin RNA (shRNA). A decreased rate of cell proliferation was observed in OCT4-inhibited hUCB-MSCs. Down-regulation of CCNA2 expression in OCT4-inhibited hUCB-MSCs was confirmed by RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR analysis in three genetically independent hUCB-MSC clones. Adipogenic differentiation was also suppressed in OCT4-inhibited hUCB-MSCs. The up-regulation of DTX1 and down-regulation of HDAC1, 2, and 4 expressions may be related to this differentiation deformity. The expression of other transcription factors, including SOX2, REX1 and c-MYC, was also affected by OCT4 inhibition in hUCB-MSCs. In conclusion, these finding suggest that OCT4A performs functionally conserved roles in hUCB-MSCs, making its expression biologically important for ex vivo culture of hUCB-MSCs.

  19. Health status of young children with cancer following discontinuation of therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastore, G.; Zurlo, M.G.; Acquaviva, A.; Calculli, G.; Castello, M.; Ceci, A.; Di Tullio, M.L.; Gandus, S.; Macchia, P.; Di Montezemolo, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports late effects and health status of 198 children who had cancer or leukemia diagnosed under 2 years of age and their therapies electively withdrawn. This series (92 neuroblastoma (NBL), 57 Wilms' tumor (WT), 46 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 3 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) was followed for 1-12 years after discontinuation of therapy. Thirty-three children were diagnosed before 1973, 92 between 1973 and 1977, and 73 after 1977 in 16 Italian Pediatric Oncology Centers. As of December 1983, 176 children were reported to be alive and without evidence of primary cancer by physicians responsible for their care. One child died from a second primary tumor, two from late recurrences of the primary cancer, and three from other causes; eight were alive with evidence of primary cancer; and eight were lost to follow-up. Kyphoscoliosis was found in 22 children and other musculoskeletal anomalies in 8. Neurological sequelae were observed in 8 of 35 children with ALL treated with radiotherapy (RT) and intrathecal methotrexate. All but one were in continuous complete remission when they developed seizures (three cases), leukoencephalopathy (three cases), or intracerebral calcifications (two cases). One child had cardiomyopathy and subsequently died from cardiac failure: he had received doxorubicin (400 mg/m2) and mediastinal RT (13 Gy) for NBL. Growth impairments were observed in children with NBL and WT.

  20. An Optimized Autoregressive Forecast Error Generator for Wind and Load Uncertainty Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Mello, Phillip; Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents a first-order autoregressive algorithm to generate real-time (RT), hour-ahead (HA), and day-ahead (DA) wind and load forecast errors. The methodology aims at producing random wind and load forecast time series reflecting the autocorrelation and cross-correlation of historical forecast data sets. Five statistical characteristics are considered: the means, standard deviations, autocorrelations, and cross-correlations. A stochastic optimization routine is developed to minimize the differences between the statistical characteristics of the generated time series and the targeted ones. An optimal set of parameters are obtained and used to produce the RT, HA, and DA forecasts in due order of succession. This method, although implemented as the first-order regressive random forecast error generator, can be extended to higher-order. Results show that the methodology produces random series with desired statistics derived from real data sets provided by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The wind and load forecast error generator is currently used in wind integration studies to generate wind and load inputs for stochastic planning processes. Our future studies will focus on reflecting the diurnal and seasonal differences of the wind and load statistics and implementing them in the random forecast generator.

  1. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in the Repairs of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2006-02-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw size and density distribution for the population of U.S. reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict vessel specific flaw rates for use in probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that estimate vessel failure probability. Considerable progress has been made on the construction of an engineering data base of fabrication flaws in U.S. nuclear RPVs. The fabrication processes and product forms used to construct U.S. RPVs are represented in the data base. A validation methodology has been developed for characterizing the flaws for size, shape, orientation, and composition. The relevance of construction records has been established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. The fabrication flaws were detected in material removed from cancelled nuclear power plants using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, and validated by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing. This paper describes research that has generated data on welding flaws, which indicated that the largest flaws occur in weld repairs. Recent research results confirm that repair flaws are complex in composition and may include cracks on the repair ends. Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear power plant components requires radiographic examinations (RT) of welds and requires repairs for RT indications that exceed code acceptable sizes. PNNL has previously obtained the complete construction records for two RPVs. Analysis of these records show a significant change in repair frequency.

  2. Zinc protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from Cr(III)(phenanthroline){sub 3}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankaramanivel, Sundararaj; Rajaram, Anantanarayanan; Rajaram, Rama

    2010-03-15

    We have studied the effect of Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} [(tris(1,10-phenanthroline) chromium(III) chloride)] on lymphocytes in order to find out if metallothioneins (MTs) are produced in the process. We also investigated whether zinc pretreatment is able to protect cells from apoptosis reported to occur for this compound. Our results indicate that MT synthesis is induced by Cr(III)(phen){sub 3}, and it has been identified as the MT-3 isoform through RT-PCR which has not been reported earlier. By zinc pretreatment, this apoptosis is reversed as inferred from cytotoxicity studies, Annexin-V/PI staining, ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and DNA fragmentation pattern and ultrastructural investigations using TEM and SEM. The zinc pretreatment reduces the amount of ROS produced by Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} . The MT-1a and 1b synthesized by zinc (also evidenced through RT-PCR experiments) is possibly able to scavenge ROS which is one of the early signaling molecules that lead to apoptosis. Zinc pretreatment also reverses the changes in downstream signaling events such as mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP levels and the activation of caspase-3. This is the first report on the induction of MT-3 in lymphocytes due to a metal stress or any other stimuli. Even though MT-3 is synthesized here, apoptosis still occurs due to ROS production on Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} exposure when the cells have not been primed with zinc.

  3. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-04

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a? to 3:3a? have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a? by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  4. Momentum-independent reflectionless transmission in the non-Hermitian time-reversal symmetric system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.Z.; Song, Z.

    2013-12-15

    We theoretically study the non-Hermitian systems, the non-Hermiticity of which arises from the unequal hopping amplitude (UHA) dimers. The distinguishing features of these models are that they have full real spectra if all of the eigenvectors are time-reversal (T) symmetric rather than parity-time-reversal (PT) symmetric, and that their Hermitian counterparts are shown to be an experimentally accessible system, which have the same topological structures as that of the original ones but modulated hopping amplitudes within the unbroken region. Under the reflectionless transmission condition, the scattering behavior of momentum-independent reflectionless transmission (RT) can be achieved in the concerned non-Hermitian system. This peculiar feature indicates that, for a certain class of non-Hermitian systems with a balanced combination of the RT dimers, the defects can appear fully invisible to an outside observer. -- Highlights: We investigate the non-Hermitian system with time reversal symmetry. The Hermitian counterpart is experimentally accessible system. The behavior of momentum-independent reflectionless transmission can be achieved. A balanced combination of reflectionless transmission dimers leads to invisibility. It paves an alternative way for the design of invisible cloaking devices.

  5. A Population-Based Study of the Fractionation of Postlumpectomy Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, Allison; Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario ; Kong, Weidong; Whelan, Timothy; Mackillop, William J.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal fractionation schedule of post lumpectomy radiation therapy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to describe the fractionation of post-lumpectomy radiation therapy (RT) in Ontario, before and after the seminal Ontario Clinical Oncology Group (OCOG) trial, which showed the equivalence of 16- and 25-fraction schedules. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted by linking electronic treatment records to a population-based cancer registry. The study population included all patients who underwent lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in Ontario, Canada, between 1984 and 2008. Results: Over the study period, 41,747 breast cancer patients received post lumpectomy radiation therapy to the breast only. Both 16- and 25-fraction schedules were commonly used throughout the study period. In the early 1980s, shorter fractionation schedules were used in >80% of cases. Between 1985 and 1995, the proportion of patients treated with shorter fractionation decreased to 48%. After completion of the OCOG trial, shorter fractionation schemes were once again widely adopted across Ontario, and are currently used in about 71% of cases; however, large intercenter variations in fractionation persisted. Conclusions: The use of shorter schedules of post lumpectomy RT in Ontario increased after completion of the OCOG trial, but the trial had a less normative effect on practice than expected.

  6. Determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H by hydrogen depth profiling with a tritium imaging plate technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higaki, M.; Otsuka, T.; Hashizume, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Ezato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2015-03-15

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) and an oxide dispersion strengthened F82H (ODS-F82H) have been determined from depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen with a tritium imaging plate technique (TIPT) in the temperature range from 298 K to 523 K. Data on hydrogen diffusion coefficients, D, in F82H, are summarized as D [m{sup 2}*s{sup -1}] =1.1*10{sup -7}exp(-16[kJ mol{sup -1}]/RT). The present data indicate almost no trapping effect on hydrogen diffusion due to an excess entry of energetic hydrogen by the plasma loading, which results in saturation of the trapping sites at the surface and even in the bulk. In the case of ODS-F82H, data of hydrogen diffusion coefficients are summarized as D [m{sup 2}*s{sup -1}] =2.2*10{sup -7}exp(-30[kJ mol{sup -1}]/RT) indicating a remarkable trapping effect on hydrogen diffusion caused by tiny oxide particles (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the bulk of F82H. Such oxide particles introduced in the bulk may play an effective role not only on enhancement of mechanical strength but also on suppression of hydrogen penetration by plasma loading.

  7. FFACO-DOENV--964 Rev2.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T R O D U C T I O N T h is F e d e ra l F a c il it y A g re e m e n t a n d C o n se n t O rd e r (A g re e m e n t) is m a d e a n d e n te re d in to b y a n d a m o n g th e S ta te o f N e v a d a , a c ti n g b y a n d th ro u g h th e D e p a rt m e n t o f C o n se rv a ti o n a n d N a tu ra l R e so u rc e s, D iv is io n o f E n v ir o n m e n ta l P ro te c ti o n (N D E P ), th e U n it e d S ta te s D e p a rt m e n t o f E n e rg y (D O E ), a n d th e U n it e d S ta te s D e p a

  8. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  9. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  10. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  11. A Novel Risk Stratification to Predict Local-Regional Failures in Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder After Radical Cystectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Brian C.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; He Jiwei; Keefe, Stephen M.; Tucker, Kai; Bekelman, Justin E.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Vaughn, David J.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Local-regional failures (LF) following radical cystectomy (RC) plus pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) with or without chemotherapy for invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma are more common than previously reported. Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) could reduce LF but currently has no defined role because of previously reported morbidity. Modern techniques with improved normal tissue sparing have rekindled interest in RT. We assessed the risk of LF and determined those factors that predict recurrence to facilitate patient selection for future adjuvant RT trials. Methods and Materials: From 1990-2008, 442 patients with urothelial bladder carcinoma at University of Pennsylvania were prospectively followed after RC plus PLND with or without chemotherapy with routine pelvic computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred thirty (29%) patients received chemotherapy. LF was any pelvic failure detected before or within 3 months of distant failure. Competing risk analyses identified factors predicting increased LF risk. Results: On univariate analysis, pathologic stage {>=}pT3, <10 nodes removed, positive margins, positive nodes, hydronephrosis, lymphovascular invasion, and mixed histology significantly predicted LF; node density was marginally predictive, but use of chemotherapy, number of positive nodes, type of surgical diversion, age, gender, race, smoking history, and body mass index were not. On multivariate analysis, only stage {>=}pT3 and <10 nodes removed were significant independent LF predictors with hazard ratios of 3.17 and 2.37, respectively (P<.01). Analysis identified 3 patient subgroups with significantly different LF risks: low-risk ({<=}pT2), intermediate-risk ({>=}pT3 and {>=}10 nodes removed), and high-risk ({>=}pT3 and <10 nodes) with 5-year LF rates of 8%, 23%, and 42%, respectively (P<.01). Conclusions: This series using routine CT and MRI surveillance to detect LF confirms that such failures are relatively common in cases of locally advanced disease and provides a rubric based on pathological stage and number of nodes removed that stratifies patients into 3 groups with significantly different LF risks to simplify patient selection for future adjuvant radiation therapy trials.

  12. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, Yinbin; Ye, Bei; Mei, Zhigang; Hofman, Gerard; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident-tolerant alternative for uranium dioxide.

  13. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.; Andersen, Jon A. L.; Edmund, Jens M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are not uniquely related to electron density. To solve the task, voxel-based or atlas-based models have typically been used. The voxel-based models require a specialized dual ultrashort echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization and the atlas-based models require deformable registrations of conventional MRI scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods: The data consisted of CT and MRI scans of five cranial RT patients. To compare the performance of the different methods, a nested cross validation was done to find optimal model parameters for all the methods. Voxel-wise and geometric evaluations of the pCTs were done. Furthermore, a radiologic evaluation based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results: The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric, and radiologic agreement with the real CT, closely followed by the atlas-based method. In terms of the dosimetric accuracy, the patch-based method had average deviations of less than 0.5% in measures related to target coverage. Conclusions: We showed that a patch-based method could generate an accurate pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and atlas-based methods and showed a promising potential for RT of the brain based only on MRI.

  14. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical significance.

  15. Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-10-27

    This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

  16. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    1998-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  17. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen, CH)

    1996-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  18. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Ries, Harald (Villigen PSI, CH)

    2000-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  19. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  20. Section 34

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x ' j N r'1 C xr j N s'1 A &1 rs N s (2 &2 x ) 2 ' C xx & j N r,s'1 C xr C xs A &1 rs F(x) ' exp(&x 2 / R 2 c ) % e < exp(&x 2 / R 2 n ) Session Papers 149 (1) (2) (3) Estimation of Errors in Objectively Analyzed Fields and Sensitivity to Number and Spacing of Stations M.J. Leach, J.J. Yio, and R.T. Cederwall Atmospheric Science Division Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Motivation Single-column models (SCMs) are designed to test param-

  1. A discussion on the origin of quantum probabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holik, Federico; Departamento de Matemtica - Ciclo Bsico Comn, Universidad de Buenos Aires - Pabelln III, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires ; Senz, Manuel; Plastino, Angel

    2014-01-15

    We study the origin of quantum probabilities as arising from non-Boolean propositional-operational structures. We apply the method developed by Cox to non distributive lattices and develop an alternative formulation of non-Kolmogorovian probability measures for quantum mechanics. By generalizing the method presented in previous works, we outline a general framework for the deduction of probabilities in general propositional structures represented by lattices (including the non-distributive case). -- Highlights: Several recent works use a derivation similar to that of R.T. Cox to obtain quantum probabilities. We apply Coxs method to the lattice of subspaces of the Hilbert space. We obtain a derivation of quantum probabilities which includes mixed states. The method presented in this work is susceptible to generalization. It includes quantum mechanics and classical mechanics as particular cases.

  2. Three-Stage Production Cost Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Benefits of Intra-Hour Scheduling between Balancing Authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Hunsaker, Matthew; Guo, Tao

    2015-07-30

    This paper introduces a Production Cost Modeling (PCM) approach to evaluate the benefits of intra-hour scheduling between Balancing Authorities (BAs). The system operation is modeled in a three-stage sequential manner: day ahead (DA)-hour ahead (HA)-real time (RT). In addition to contingency reserve, each BA will need to carry out “up” and “down” load following and regulation reserve capacity requirements in the DA and HA time frames. In the real-time simulation, only contingency and regulation reserves are carried out as load following is deployed. To model current real-time operation with hourly schedules, a new constraint was introduced to force each BA net exchange schedule deviation from HA schedules to be within NERC ACE limits. Case studies that investigate the benefits of moving from hourly exchange schedules between WECC BAs into 10-min exchange schedules under two different levels of wind and solar penetration (11% and 33%) are presented.

  3. Voyager 2 observations of plasmas and flows out to 104 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J. D.; Decker, R. B. E-mail: robert.decker@apljhu.edu

    2014-09-10

    Voyager 2 has crossed through 20 AU of the heliosheath; assuming the same heliosheath thickness as at Voyager 1, it is now two-thirds of the way to the heliopause. The plasma data are generally of good quality, although the increasing flow angle of the plasma makes analysis more difficult. The average plasma speed has remained constant but the flow angles have increased to almost 60 in the RT plane and to almost 30 in the RN plane. The average density and thermal speed have been constant since a density increase observed in 2011. Comparison of V2 plasma flows derived from plasma science experiment (PLS) data and Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) proton anisotropies give good agreement except when heavy ion contributions or non-convective proton anisotropies are observed in the LECP data.

  4. Research Report SC-RR-710673

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    m 5 1fi?2 ^-*Trr^ r(V Ttr- Research Report SC-RR-710673 Way 1972 APPLICATION OF HEXANITROSTILBENE (HNS) IN EXPLOSIVE COMPONENTS mm Alfred C. Schwarz Explosive Components Division, 1914 Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque *OJ SANDIA LABORATORIES O P F ' ' - ' ' ' ' c n cf\R - t u t I i M J T c n ' ^ T A i c c rtTr\Mi( P M c a n v ^^^-l^«|l;';ln'w Hv c / i \ j o i A r n n p n o f l 7 i O N | A L B U Q U E R O U E N E W MEXICO LIVERMGRF ** A'"*'**'t>>;iA Issued by Sandia Corparaiion, 3

  5. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    petrol Witnessing a birth WINTER 2008 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 4 Sunshine to petrol Beauty, molecules deep A l l i a n c e s > Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main

  6. O and H diffusion in uraninite: Implications for fluid-uraninite interactions, nuclear waste disposal, and nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayek, Mostafa [University of Manitoba, Canada; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bostick, Debra A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients for oxygen and hydrogen were determined from a series of natural uraninite H2O experiments between 50 and 700 C. Under hydrous conditions there are two diffusion mechanisms: (1) an initial extremely fast-path diffusion mechanism that overprinted the oxygen isotopic composition of the entire crystals regardless of temperature and (2) a slower volume-diffusive mechanism dominated by defect clusters that displace or eject nearest neighbor oxygen atoms to form two interstitial sites and two partial vacancies, and by vacancy migration. Using the volume diffusion coefficients in the temperature range of 400 600 C, diffusion coefficients for oxygen can be represented by D = 1.90e5 exp (123,382 J/RT) cm2/s and for temperatures between 100 and 300 C the diffusion coefficients can be represented by D = 1.95e10 exp (62484 J/ RT) cm2/s, where the activation energies for uraninite are 123.4 and 62.5 kJ/mol, respectively. Hydrogen diffusion in uraninite appears to be controlled by similar mechanisms as oxygen. Using the volume diffusion coefficients for temperatures between 50 and 700 C, diffusion coefficients for hydrogen can be represented by D = 9.28e6 exp (156,528 J/RT) cm2/s for temperatures between 450 and 700 C and D = 1.39e14 exp (34518 J/RT) cm2/s for temperatures between 50 and 400 C, where the activation energies for uraninite are 156.5 and 34.5 kJ/mol, respectively. Results from these new experiments have implications for isotopic exchange during natural UO2 water interactions. The exceptionally low d18O values of natural uraninites (i.e. 32& to 19.5&) from unconformity-type uranium deposits in Saskatchewan, in conjunction with theoretical and experimental uraninite water and UO3 water fractionation factors, suggest that primary uranium mineralization is not in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with coeval clay and silicate minerals. The low d18O values have been interpreted as resulting from the low temperature overprinting of primary uranium mineralization in the presence of relatively modern meteoric fluids having d18O values of ca. 18&, despite petrographic and U Pb isotope data that indicate limited alteration. Our data show that the anomalously low oxygen isotopic composition of the uraninite from the Athabasca Basin can be due to meteoric water overprinting under reducing conditions, and meteoric water or groundwater can significantly affect the oxygen isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository, with minimal change to the chemical composition or texture. Moreover, the rather fast oxygen and hydrogen diffusion coefficients for uraninite, especially at low temperatures, suggest that oxygen and hydrogen diffusion may impart characteristic isotopic signals that can be used to track the route of fissile material.

  7. Magnetic properties of ??MnO{sub 2} and Co-doped ??MnO{sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stella, C. Soundararajan, N. Ramachandran, K.

    2014-04-24

    ??MnO{sub 2} and Co-doped ??MnO{sub 2} nanowires (NWs) were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The structural characterization by XRD revealed the tetragonal structure of ??MnO{sub 2}. The formation of one dimensional (1D) NWs of pure and Co-doped ??MnO{sub 2} was confirmed from SEM. From UV-Vis absorption spectra, it is found that both pure and Co-doped ??MnO{sub 2} NWs showed blue shift compared to bulk, which revealed the quantum confinement in the synthesized samples. The magnetic properties were analyzed by VSM, which suggest that pure and doped ??MnO{sub 2} exhibit ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature (RT)

  8. Combined Heating and Power Using Microturbines in a Major Urban Hotel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweetser, Richard; Wagner, Timothy; Leslie, Neil; Stovall, Therese K

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a cooperative effort to install and operate a Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at a major hotel in San Francisco, CA. The packaged CHP System integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller was directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, and could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 Refrigeration Tons (RT) of chilled water at a 59oF (15oC) ambient temperature. For the year, the CHP efficiency was 54 percent. Significant lessons learned from this test and verification project are discussed as well as measured performance and economic considerations.

  9. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosfjord, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

  10. Validation of detailed thermal hydraulic models used for LMR safety and for improvement of technical specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed steady-state and transient coolant temperatures and flow rates from an operating reactor have been used to validate the multiple pin model in the SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor systems analysis code. This multiple pin capability can be used for explicit calculations of axial and lateral temperature distributions within individual subassemblies. Thermocouples at a number of axial locations and in a number of different coolant sub-channels m the XXO9 instrumented subassembly in the EBR-II reactor provided temperature data from the Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT) series. Flow meter data for XXO9 and for the overall system are also available from these tests. Results of consistent SASSYS-1 multiple pin analyses for both the SHRT-45 loss-of-flow-without-scram-test and the S14RT-17 protected loss-of-flow test agree well with the experimental data, providing validation of the SASSYS-1 code over a wide range of conditions.

  11. CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lo&&-, : i e r : gtdlm FILLS March 12, 1956 ~'RII~~~~~I~~D~.,A~ICAW~~TMDRLBS, CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M .D. c. E. aahwun ObJcrativr oi THpt On !iUesd8y, Fabmerg 28,19!36, th@ lILQMetallurgMalD@p~rtJmnt beipn bzdquotting green ult-ll( blend on e 350 ton hydmulla prau 8t the Ura &i&nnrlug DivUiou of Ameria8n Steel muUdPae8, c&alMatl, Ohio. Approll'tely a,ooo pound8 of greeu ult ub briqumtte4 bw13ry 8 -rioa of mvea day,. Par the pwpou ofwalutlngexpo88mmmafpemmm8 linrelvmd

  12. D&TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    *. ( ARGONNE RATIONAL 1-Ci3ORATORY . 1 D&TX 7. my 19, 1349 70 t. Z. ROse at L, Em &=i*p~~4 DVur;uM hLl%L ?bvs -Lcs . FReti c. c. Fqpr an2 2. E. sulu+rr fis2 S*crep t & fbQ s-e: of the ?atagel DrFAm%un !! 1 0 * the >rt &Fz=z d t& &men of ScieJce & >&7*-z 4-q 2s'; %rZion 0C the ZLLS~~~ of Science a2 31~52-37 fo2 T&imcyyg c.=A+=< he-< - ,,a uas c:cgetes ALL 12, 1SL9. Z 0 sor;~~,-~-lioi! c.jme s 'm&-go& ~WC& c ",& d*cg&A

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  18. PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

  19. Photoemission Study of the Rare Earth Intermetallic Compounds: RNi2Ge2 (R=Eu, Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jongik Park

    2004-12-19

    EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are two members of the RT{sub 2}X{sub 2} (R = rare earth, T = transition metal and X = Si, Ge) family of intermetallic compounds, which has been studied since the early 1980s. These ternary rare-earth intermetallic compounds with the tetragonal ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure are known for their wide variety of magnetic properties, Extensive studies of the RT{sub 2}X{sub 2} series can be found in Refs [ 1,2,3]. The magnetic properties of the rare-earth nickel germanides RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} were recently studied in more detail [4]. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the electronic structure (both valence band and shallow core levels) of single crystals of EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and to check the assumptions that the f electrons are non-interacting and, consequently, the rigid-band model for these crystals would work [11], using synchrotron radiation because, to the best of our knowledge, no photoemission measurements on those have been reported. Photoemission spectroscopy has been widely used to study the detailed electronic structure of metals and alloys, and especially angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven to be a powerful technique for investigating Fermi surfaces (FSs) of single-crystal compounds.

  20. Urine acidification has no effect on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling or epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in rat urinary bladder urothelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achanzar, William E. Moyer, Carolyn F.; Marthaler, Laura T.; Gullo, Russell; Chen, Shen-Jue; French, Michele H.; Watson, Linda M.; Rhodes, James W.; Kozlosky, John C.; White, Melvin R.; Foster, William R.; Burgun, James J.; Car, Bruce D.; Cosma, Gregory N.; Dominick, Mark A.

    2007-09-15

    We previously reported prevention of urolithiasis and associated rat urinary bladder tumors by urine acidification (via diet acidification) in male rats treated with the dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha}/{gamma} agonist muraglitazar. Because urine acidification could potentially alter PPAR signaling and/or cellular proliferation in urothelium, we evaluated urothelial cell PPAR{alpha}, PPAR{delta}, PPAR{gamma}, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, PPAR signaling, and urothelial cell proliferation in rats fed either a normal or an acidified diet for 5, 18, or 33 days. A subset of rats in the 18-day study also received 63 mg/kg of the PPAR{gamma} agonist pioglitazone daily for the final 3 days to directly assess the effects of diet acidification on responsiveness to PPAR{gamma} agonism. Urothelial cell PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} expression and signaling were evaluated in the 18- and 33-day studies by immunohistochemical assessment of PPAR protein (33-day study only) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurement of PPAR-regulated gene expression. In the 5-day study, EGFR expression and phosphorylation status were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining and egfr and akt2 mRNA levels were assessed by qRT-PCR. Diet acidification did not alter PPAR{alpha}, {delta}, or {gamma} mRNA or protein expression, PPAR{alpha}- or {gamma}-regulated gene expression, total or phosphorylated EGFR protein, egfr or akt2 gene expression, or proliferation in urothelium. Moreover, diet acidification had no effect on pioglitazone-induced changes in urothelial PPAR{gamma}-regulated gene expression. These results support the contention that urine acidification does not prevent PPAR{gamma} agonist-induced bladder tumors by altering PPAR{alpha}, {gamma}, or EGFR expression or PPAR signaling in rat bladder urothelium.

  1. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melchior, M; Salinas Aranda, F; Sciutto, S; Dodat, D; Larragueta, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use was reduced to a few hours.

  2. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  3. SU-D-19A-07: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Plesiotherapy and Electron Beam Therapy for Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, A; Jacob, D; Andreou, K; Raben, A; Chen, H; Koprowski, C; Mourtada, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large superficial (skin, soft tissue sarcoma) lesions located on curved areas are hard to treat with electrons. The Freiburg Flap (Nucletron, Netherlands) is a flexible mesh style surface which can be easily shaped to fit curved surfaces for reproducible HDR fraction delivery. To understand the fundamental dosimetric differences, a dosimetric comparison was made between HDR plesiotherapy (Freiburg applicator for lesions over 4cm) and external electron beam radiotherapy over cases with varying target curvature (both stylized and clinical cases). Methods: Four stylized cases with variable complexity were created using artificial DICOM axial CT slices and RT structures (a square and three curved structures on a 4.5cm radius cylinder). They were planned using Oncentra v4.3 and exported to Pinnacle v9.6 for electrons planning. The HDR source dwell positions were optimized for the best coverage of the targets using graphical optimization. Electron treatment plans were created in Pinnacle using the same CT and RT structures of three HDR cases with surface lesions previously treated with the Freiburg flap. The En face electron plans used 6-12 MeV electrons and 0.51 cm bolus was added to increase surface dose. The electron plans were prescribed to an isodose line to conform to the target. Results: For all lesions, the average target dose coverage was similar (D90ave of 100% for HDR vs 101% for electrons). For lesions with high curvature, the HDR coverage was better (D90 102% vs D90 97% for electron). For all cases, adjacent structures high dose region was lower for HDR than electrons (D1cc 100% for HDR vs D1cc 111% for electrons). Conclusion: HDR plesiotherapy offers excellent target conformity for superficial targets similar to electrons. However, for lesions with complex curved surfaces, HDR has the advantage to achieve better dose distributions using graphical optimization to spare adjacent normal tissue while maximizing target coverage.

  4. Interface characterization of epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shouguo; Ward, R. C. C.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Kohn, A.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, J.; Liu, H. F.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2012-01-01

    Following predictions by first-principles theory of huge tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), measured magnetoresistance (MR) ratio about 200% at room temperature (RT) have been reported in MgO-based epitaxial MTJs. Recently, MR ratio of about 600% has been reported at RT in MgO-based amorphous MTJs with core structure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB grown by magnetron sputtering with amorphous CoFeB layers. The sputtered CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs shows a great potential application in spintronic devices. Although epitaxial structure will probably not be used in devices, it remains an excellent model system to compare theoretical calculations with experimental results and to enhance our understanding of the spin dependent tunneling. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results clearly indicate that the interfacial structure plays a crucial role on coherent tunneling across single crystalMgO barrier, especially in epitaxial MgO-based MTJs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Surface X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectra, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism have been used for interface characterization. However, no consistent viewpoint has been reached, and this is still an open issue. In this article, recent studies on the interface characterization in MgO-based epitaxial MTJs will be introduced, with a focus on research by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and spin dependent tunneling spectroscopy.

  5. Measurement of single-target spin asymmetries in the electroproduction of negative pions in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic reaction n{up_arrow}(e,e'{pi}{sup -})X on a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiranjib Dutta

    2010-06-01

    The experiment E06010 measured the target single spin asymmetry (SSA) in the semiinclusive deep inelastic (SIDIS) n{up_arrow}(e, e'{pi}{sup -})X reaction with a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target as an e#11;ective neutron target. This is the very #12;rst independent measurement of the neutron SSA, following the measurements at HERMES and COMPASS on the proton and the deuteron. The experiment acquired data in Hall A at Je#11;erson Laboratory with a continuous electron beam of energy 5.9 GeV, probing the valence quark region, with x = 0.13 {rt_arrow} 0.41, at Q{sup 2} = 1.31 {rt_arrow} 3.1 GeV{sup 2}. The two contributing mechanisms to the measured asymmetry, viz, the Collins effect and the Sivers effect can be realized through the variation of the asymmetry as a function of the Collins and Sivers angles. The neutron Collins and Sivers moments, associated with the azimuthal angular modulations, are extracted from the measured asymmetry for the very #12;first time and are presented in this thesis. The kinematics of this experiment is comparable to the HERMES proton measurement. However, the COMPASS measurements on deuteron and proton are in the low-x region. The results of this experiment are crucial as the first step toward the extraction of quark transversity and Sivers distribution functions in SIDIS. With the existing results on proton and deuteron, these new results on neutron will provide powerful constraints on the transversity and Sivers distributions of both the u and d-quarks in the valence region.

  6. Multifocal Glioblastoma Multiforme: Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Progression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Andrel, Jocelyn; Andrews, David W.; Curran, Walter J.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Werner-Wasik, Maria

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the progression patterns in patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme who had undergone whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), the historical standard, versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and to identify predictive treatment and pretreatment factors. Methods and Materials: The records of 50 patients with multifocal glioblastoma multiforme treated with RT were reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed using survival methods and the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression method. Results: The mean age was 61 years, and 71% had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score of {>=}70. Of the 50 patients, 32% underwent WBRT and 68%, three-dimensional conformal RT. Progression was local in all evaluable patients, as determined by imaging in 38 patients and early neurologic progression in 12. The median time to progression (TTP) was 3.1 months, and the median survival time (MST) was 8.1 months. The significant independent predictors of TTP on multivariate analysis were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.001), the extent of surgery (p = 0.040), a radiation dose <60 Gy (p = 0.027), and the lack of chemotherapy (p = 0.001). The significant independent predictors of a reduced MST were a KPS score <70 (p = 0.022) and the absence of salvage surgery (p = 0.011) and salvage chemotherapy (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Local progression was observed in all patients. On multivariate analysis, no significant difference was found in the TTP or MST between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and WBRT. The KPS was a consistent independent predictor of both TTP and MST. On the basis of the progression pattern, we do not recommend WBRT as a mandatory component of the treatment of multifocal glioblastoma multi0011for.

  7. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laaksomaa, Marko; Kapanen, Mika; Tulijoki, Tapio; Peltola, Seppo; Hydynmaa, Simo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ? 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ? 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients.

  8. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stphanie; Bournaud, Frdric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiationin addition to the often considered small-scale energy depositionon the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (?6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup 1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ? 10{sup 2} {sup } {sup 3} cm{sup 3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ? 0.3-10 cm{sup 3})which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  9. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xian 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  10. Physical properties of bifunctional BST/LSMO nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltran-Huarac, Juan, E-mail: baristary26@gmail.com; Morell, Gerardo [Institute for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936 (United States); Martinez, Ricardo [Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Cayey Campus, Cayey, Puerto Rico 00737 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    We report the fabrication of bifunctional nanocomposites consisting of ferroelectric Ba{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) and ferromagnetic La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) at different concentrations via a high-temperature solid state route. The structural, dielectric, electrical, magnetodielectric (MD), magnetoelectric (ME) and magnetic properties of BST/LSMO nanocomposites were systematically investigated over a wide range of temperatures and frequencies. The X-Ray Diffraction analyses reveal the nanocrystalline nature of the heterostructures, wherein both perovskite phases co-exist. No parasitic phases were observed. The study of the dielectric properties shows that the nanocomposites exhibit relaxor ferroelectric character, with ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition temperatures around 287292?K that do not follow the Curie-Weiss law. The electrical measurements indicate that ac conductivities of the nanocomposites follow the Jonscher's universal power law, with activation energies of 0.420.63?eV based on Arrhenius-type behavior at high temperatures. The nanocomposites exhibit well-defined ferromagnetic hysteresis loops at room temperature (RT). The MD and ME measurements at RT indicate that BST/LSMO exhibits a nonlinear ME effect at low frequencies, with a threshold near 0.5?T. The magnetocapacitance (MC{sub p}) measurements evidence a quadratic dependence on magnetic field, further confirming the multiferroic nature of BST/LSMO. The order of MC{sub p} was found to be ?7% per Tesla. The analysis of the MC{sub p} measurements indicates that one of the BST/LSMO compositions studied can be considered as a new multiferroic compound.

  11. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  12. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  13. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgier, Celine; Pessoa, Eduardo Lima; Dunant, Ariane; Heymann, Steve; Spielmann, Marc; Uzan, Catherine; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Arriagada, Rodrigo; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  14. SU-E-T-296: Single Field Per Day Vs. Multiple Fields Per Day and the Impact On BED in Proton Therapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grantham, K; Wooten, H; Zhao, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A common practice, in proton therapy, is to deliver a rotating subset of fields from the treatment plan for the daily fractions. This study compares the impact this practice has on the biological effective dose (BED) versus delivering all planned fields daily. Methods: For two scenarios (a phantom with a geometry approximating the anatomy of a prostate treatment with opposing lateral beams, and a clinical 3-field brain treatment), treatment plans were produced in Eclipse (Varian) to simulate delivery of one, two, and three fields per fraction. The RT-Dose file, structure set, and α/β ratios were processed using in-house MATLAB code to return a new RT-Dose file containing the BED (including a proton RBE of 1.1) which was imported back into Eclipse for analysis. Results: For targets and regions of field overlap in the treatment plan, BED is not affected by delivery regimen. In the phantom, BED in the femoral heads showed increased by 20% when a single field was used rather than two fields. In the brain treatment, the minimum BED to the left optic nerve and the pituitary gland increased by 13% and 10% respectively, for a one-field regime compared to three-fields per fraction. Comparing the two-field and threefield regimes, the optic nerve BED was not significantly affected and the minimum pituitary BED was 4% higher for two fields per day. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionation effects, in regions of non-overlap of fields, significantly increase the BED to the involved tissues by as much as 20%. Care should be taken to avoid inadvertently sacrificing plan effectiveness in the interest of reduced treatment time.

  15. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  16. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  17. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  18. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete response after ABVD-based chemotherapy.

  19. Five Year Results of US Intergroup/RTOG 9704 With Postoperative CA 19-9 {<=}90 U/mL and Comparison to the CONKO-001 Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Adam C.; Winter, Kathryn; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Benson, Alan B.; MacDonald, John; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9704 was the largest randomized trial to use adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. This report analyzes 5-year survival by serum level of tumor marker CA 19-9 of {<=}90 vs >90 U/mL and compares results to the those of the CONKO-001 trial. Methods and Materials: CA 19-9 expression was analyzed as a dichotomized variable ({<=}90 vs >90 U/mL). Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify the impact of the CA 19-9 value on overall survival (OS). Actuarial estimates of OS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Both univariate (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.3, P<.0001) and multivariate (HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 2.2-4.2, P<.0001) analyses demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in OS for CA 19-9 serum level of {>=}90 U/mL. For patients in the gemcitabine (Gem) treatment arm with CA 19-9 <90 U/mL, median survival was 21 months. For patients with CA 19-9 {>=}90 U/mL, this number dropped to 10 months. In patients with pancreatic head tumors in the Gem treatment arm with RT quality assurance per protocol and CA 19-9 of <90 U/mL, median survival and 5-year rate were 24 months and 34%. In comparison, the median survival and 5-year OS rate for patients in the Gem arm of the CONKO trial were 22 months and 21%. Conclusions: This analysis demonstrates that patients with postresection CA 19-9 values {>=}90 U/mL had a significantly worse survival. Patients with pancreatic head tumors treated with Gem with CA 19-9 serum level of <90 U/mL and per protocol RT had favorable survival compared to that seen in the CONKO trial. CA 19-9 is a stratification factor for the current RTOG adjuvant pancreas trial (0848).

  20. Apelin-13-induced proliferation and migration induced of rat vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by the upregulation of Egr-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qi-Feng; Yu, Hong-Wei; You, Lu; Liu, Ming-Xin; Li, Ke-Yan; Department of Cardiology, Jinzhou Central Hospital, Jinzhou 121001 ; Tao, Gui-Zhou

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: The mechanism underlying the effects of Apelin-13 on VSMC was investigated. Apelin-13 induced VSMC migration, proliferation and Egr-1 and OPN upregulation. These effects were inhibited by the Egr-1 specific deoxyribozyme, ED5. The effects of Apelin-13 on VSMC are mediated via Egr-1 upregulation. These data will help in attempts to prevent and treat vascular remodeling diseases. -- Abstract: Apelin-13 plays an important role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs); however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Egr-1 is a nuclear transcription factor, which is considered to be the critical initiating factor of the processes of VSMC proliferation and migration. Egr-1 is known to regulate the expression of osteopontin (OPN), which is a marker of the phenotypic modulation that is a necessary condition of VSMC proliferation and migration. We hypothesized that the role of Apelin-13 is mediated via upregulation of Egr-1. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the effects of Apelin-13 treatment on Egr-1 mRNA and protein expression in A10 rat aortic VSMCs by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results showed that, Apelin-13 upregulated the expression of Egr-1. Furthermore, treatment with the extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, inhibited the upregulation of Egr-1 by Apelin-13. In addition, this upregulation was inhibited by treatment of VSMCs with the Egr-1 specific deoxyribozyme ED5 (DNAenzyme/10-23 DRz). Furthermore, ED5 treatment was found to significantly inhibit Apelin-13-induced migration and proliferation of VSMCs using transwell and MTT assays, respectively. The evaluation of OPN mRNA and protein expression levels by RT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that ED5 treatment also inhibited Apelin-13-induced OPN upregulation. The results of this study indicated that Apelin-13 upregulates Egr-1 via ERK. Furthermore, Apelin-13 induced the proliferation and migration of VSMCs as well as the upregulation of OPN via the upregulation of Egr-1. These results will provide an important theoretical and experimental basis for the control of inappropriate remodeling of vessel walls, and will hopefully lead to the prevention and treatment of vascular remodeling diseases.

  1. A two transition state model for radical-molecule reactions : applications to isomeric branching in the OH-isoprene reaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, E. E.; North, S. W.; Georgievskii, Y.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemistry; Texas A&M Univ.; SNL

    2007-06-28

    A two transition state model is applied to the prediction of the isomeric branching in the addition of hydroxyl radical to isoprene. The outer transition state is treated with phase space theory fitted to long-range transition state theory calculations on an electrostatic potential energy surface. High-level quantum chemical estimates are applied to the treatment of the inner transition state. A one-dimensional master equation based on an analytic reduction from two-dimensions for a particular statistical assumption about the rotational part of the energy transfer kernel is employed in the calculation of the pressure dependence of the addition process. We find that an accurate treatment of the two separate transition state regions, at the energy and angular momentum resolved level, is essential to the prediction of the temperature dependence of the addition rate. The transition from a dominant outer transition state to a dominant inner transition state is shown to occur at about 275 K, with significant effects from both transition states over the 30-500 K temperature range. Modest adjustments in the ab initio predicted inner saddle point energies yield predictions that are in quantitative agreement with the available high-pressure limit experimental observations and qualitative agreement with those in the falloff regime. The theoretically predicted capture rate is reproduced to within 10% by the expression [1.71 x 10-10(T/298)-2.58 exp(-608.6/RT) + 5.47 x 10-11(T/298)-1.78 exp(-97.3/RT); with R = 1.987 and T in K] cm3 molecule-1 s-1 over the 30-500 K range. A 300 K branching ratio of 0.67:0.02:0.02:0.29 was determined for formation of the four possible OH-isoprene adduct isomers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature. An Arrhenius activation energy of -0.77 kcal/mol was determined for the high-pressure addition rate constants around 300 K.

  2. Conceptual Design, Implementation and Commissioning of Data Acquisition and Control System for Negative Ion Source at IPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, Jignesh; Gahlaut, A.; Bansal, G.; Parmar, K. G.; Pandya, K.; Chakraborty, A.; Yadav, Ratnakar; Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-09-26

    Negative ion Experimental facility has been setup at IPR. The facility consists of a RF based negative ion source (ROBIN)--procured under a license agreement with IPP Garching, as a replica of BATMAN, presently operating in IPP, 100 kW 1 MHz RF generators and a set of low and high voltage power supplies, vacuum system and diagnostics. 35 keV 10A H- beam is expected from this setup. Automated successful operation of the system requires an advanced, rugged, time proven and flexible control system. Further the data generated in the experimental phase needs to be acquired, monitored and analyzed to verify and judge the system performance. In the present test bed, this is done using a combination of PLC based control system and a PXI based data acquisition system. The control system consists of three different Siemens PLC systems viz. (1) S-7 400 PLC as a Master Control, (2) S-7 300 PLC for Vacuum system control and (3) C-7 PLC for RF generator control. Master control PLC directly controls all the subsystems except the Vacuum system and RF generator. The Vacuum system and RF generator have their own dedicated PLCs (S-7 300 and C-7 respectively). Further, these two PLC systems work as a slave for the Master control PLC system. Communication between PLC S-7 400, S-7 300 and central control room computer is done through Industrial Ethernet (IE). Control program and GUI are developed in Siemens Step-7 PLC programming software and Wincc SCADA software, respectively. There are approximately 150 analog and 200 digital control and monitoring signals required to perform complete closed loop control of the system. Since the source floats at high potential ({approx}35 kV); a combination of galvanic and fiber optic isolation has been implemented. PXI based Data Acquisition system (DAS) is a combination of PXI RT (Real time) system, front end signal conditioning electronics, host system and DAQ program. All the acquisition signals coming from various sub-systems are connected and acquired by the PXI RT system, through only fiber optics link for signal conditioning, electrical isolation and better noise immunity. Real time and Host application programs are developed in LabVIEW and the data shall be stored with a facility of online display of selected parameters. Mathematical calculations and report generation will take place at the end of each beam shot. The paper describes in detail about the design approach, implementation strategy, program development, commissioning and operational test result of ROBIN through a data acquisition and control system.

  3. Ion beam synthesis of SiGe alloy layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Seongil

    1994-05-01

    Procedures required for minimizing structural defects generated during ion beam synthesis of SiGe alloy layers were studied. Synthesis of 200 mm SiGe alloy layers by implantation of 120-keV Ge ions into <100> oriented Si wafers yielded various Ge peak concentrations after the following doses, 2{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}, 3{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} (mid), and 5{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} (high). Following implantation, solid phase epitaxial (SPE) annealing in ambient N2 at 800C for 1 hr. resulted in only slight redistribution of the Ge. Two kinds of extended defects were observed in alloy layers over 3{times}l0{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}cm dose at room temperature (RT): end-of-range (EOR) dislocation loops and strain-induced stacking faults. Density of EOR dislocation loops was much lower in alloys produced by 77K implantation than by RT implantation. Decreasing the dose to obtain 5 at% peak Ge concentration prevents strain relaxation, while those SPE layers with more than 7 at% Ge peak show high densities of misfit- induced stacking faults. Sequential implantation of C following high dose Ge implantation (12 at% Ge peak concentration in layer) brought about a remarkable decrease in density of misfit-induced stacking faults. For peak implanted C > 0.55 at%, stacking fault generation in the epitaxial layer was suppressed, owing to strain compensation by C atoms in the SiGe lattice. A SiGe alloy layer with 0.9 at% C peak concentration under a 12 at% Ge peak exhibited the best microstructure. Results indicate that optimum Ge/C ratio for strain compensation is between 11 and 22. The interface between amorphous and regrown phases (a/c interface) had a dramatic morphology change during its migration to the surface. Initial <100> planar interface decomposes into a <111> faceted interface, changing the growth kinetics; this is associated with strain relaxation by stacking fault formation on (111) planes in the a/c interface.

  4. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and significant plastic deformation during compressi on . On the other hand, the micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited brittle f racture in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 3um Al 2 O 3 particles fractured into pieces without observable plastic deformation in compression. Particle deformation behaviors will be used to inform Al 2 O 3 coating deposition parameters and particle - particle bonding in the consolidated Al 2 O 3 coatings.

  5. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, N. Andres; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris; Walker, Gail R.; Padgett, Kyle; Roy, Bhaswati; Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold; Stoyanova, Radka

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on metabolic information.

  6. Risk Factors for Regional Nodal Relapse in Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, Lucy; Kirby, Anna; Crichton, Siobhan; Gillett, Cheryl; Cane, Paul; Fentiman, Ian; Sawyer, Elinor

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In many centers, supraclavicular fossa radiotherapy (SCF RT) is not routinely offered to breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes. We aimed to identify a subgroup of these patients who are at high risk of supra or infraclavicular fossa relapse (SCFR) such that they can be offered SCFRT at the time of diagnosis to improve long term locoregional control. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of the pathological features of 1,065 cases of invasive breast cancer with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients underwent radical breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. A total of 45% of patients received adjuvant chest wall/breast RT. No patients received adjuvant SCFRT. The primary outcome was SCFR. Secondary outcomes were chest wall/breast recurrence, distant metastasis, all death, and breast-cancer specific death. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to calculate actuarial event rates and survival functions compared using log-rank tests. Multivariate analyses (MVA) of factors associated with outcome were conducted using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Median follow-up was 9.7 years. SCFR rate was 9.2%. Median time from primary diagnosis to SCFR was 3.4 years (range, 0.7-14.4 years). SCFR was associated with significantly lower 10-year survival (18% vs. 65%; p < 0.001). Higher grade and number of positive lymph nodes were the most significant predictors of SCFR on MVA (p < 0.001). 10 year SCFR rates were less than 1% in all patients with Grade 1 cancers compared with 30% in those having Grade 3 cancers with three positive lymph nodes. Additional factors associated with SCFR on univariate analysis but not on MVA included larger nodal deposits (p = 0.002) and proportion of positive nodes (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes have a heterogenous risk of SCFR. Patients with two to three positive axillary nodes and/or high-grade disease may warrant consideration of SCFRT.

  7. Automated genomic context analysis and experimental validation platform for discovery of prokaryote transcriptional regulator functions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martí-Arbona, Ricardo; Mu, Fangping; Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Wren, Melinda S.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2014-12-18

    The clustering of genes in a pathway and the co-location of functionally related genes is widely recognized in prokaryotes. We used these characteristics to predict the metabolic involvement for a Transcriptional Regulator (TR) of unknown function, identified and confirmed its biological activity. A software tool that identifies the genes encoded within a defined genomic neighborhood for the subject TR and its homologs was developed. The output lists of genes in the genetic neighborhoods, their annotated functions, the reactants/products, and identifies the metabolic pathway in which the encoded-proteins function. When a set of TRs of known function was analyzed, we observedmore » that their homologs frequently had conserved genomic neighborhoods that co-located the metabolically related genes regulated by the subject TR. We postulate that TR effectors are metabolites in the identified pathways; indeed the known effectors were present. We analyzed Bxe_B3018 from Burkholderia xenovorans, a TR of unknown function and predicted that this TR was related to the glycine, threonine and serine degradation. We tested the binding of metabolites in these pathways and for those that bound, their ability to modulate TR binding to its specific DNA operator sequence. Using rtPCR, we confirmed that methylglyoxal was an effector of Bxe_3018.« less

  8. Automated genomic context analysis and experimental validation platform for discovery of prokaryote transcriptional regulator functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mart-Arbona, Ricardo; Mu, Fangping; Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Wren, Melinda S.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Unkefer, Pat J.

    2014-12-18

    The clustering of genes in a pathway and the co-location of functionally related genes is widely recognized in prokaryotes. We used these characteristics to predict the metabolic involvement for a Transcriptional Regulator (TR) of unknown function, identified and confirmed its biological activity. A software tool that identifies the genes encoded within a defined genomic neighborhood for the subject TR and its homologs was developed. The output lists of genes in the genetic neighborhoods, their annotated functions, the reactants/products, and identifies the metabolic pathway in which the encoded-proteins function. When a set of TRs of known function was analyzed, we observed that their homologs frequently had conserved genomic neighborhoods that co-located the metabolically related genes regulated by the subject TR. We postulate that TR effectors are metabolites in the identified pathways; indeed the known effectors were present. We analyzed Bxe_B3018 from Burkholderia xenovorans, a TR of unknown function and predicted that this TR was related to the glycine, threonine and serine degradation. We tested the binding of metabolites in these pathways and for those that bound, their ability to modulate TR binding to its specific DNA operator sequence. Using rtPCR, we confirmed that methylglyoxal was an effector of Bxe_3018.

  9. Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Becerra, Rocio; Diaz, Lorenza; Camacho, Javier; Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica; Ortiz, Cindy Sharon; Avila, Euclides; Bargallo, Enrique; Arrecillas, Myrna; Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando

    2010-02-01

    Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

  10. In situ X-ray diffraction strain-controlled study of TiNbZr and TiNbTa shape memory alloys: crystal lattice and transformation features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinskiy, S.; Prokoshkin, S.; Brailovski, V.; Inaekyan, K.; Korotitskiy, A.

    2014-02-15

    Phase and structure transformations in biomedical Ti21.8Nb6.0Zr (TNZ) and Ti19.7Nb5.8Ta (TNT) shape memory alloys (at.%) under and without load in the ? 150 to 100 S temperature range are studied in situ using an original tensile module for a low-temperature chamber of an X-ray diffractometer. Alpha?- and beta-phase lattice parameters, the crystallographic resource of recovery strain, phase and structure transformation sequences, and microstress appearance and disappearance are examined, compared and discussed. For both alloys, the crystallographic resource of recovery strain decreases with temperature increase to become 4.5% for TNZ and 2.5% for TNT alloy (at RT). Loading at low temperatures leads to additional ??-phase formation and reorientation. Heating under load, as compared to strain-free heating, affects the reverse transformation sequence of both alloys in different ways. For TNZ alloy, strain-free heating results in simultaneous ??? and ???? transformations, whereas during heating under stress, they are sequential: ? + ???? precedes ????. For TNT alloy, strain-free heating results in reverse ???? transformation, whereas during heating under stress, ???? transformation is preceded by ??-phase reorientation. - Highlights: Comparative in situ XRD analysis of TiNbZr(Ta) shape memory alloys is realized. Lattice parameters of ?- and ??-phases are calculated in the ? 150 to + 100 C range. The higher the temperature, the lower the ???? transformation strain. Loading at low temperatures results in ??-phase formation and reorientation. Transformation sequences upon heating with and without loading are different.

  11. A thermo-mechanical correlation with driving forces for hcp martensite and twin formations in the FeMnC system exhibiting multicomposition sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakano, Jinichiro

    2013-03-15

    Thermodynamic properties of the Fe-Mn-C system were investigated by using an analytical model constructed by a CALPHAD approach. Stacking fault energy (SFE) of the fcc structure with respect to the hcp phase was always constant at T0, independent of composition and temperature when the other related parameters were assumed to be constant. Experimental limits for the thermal hcp formation and the mechanical (deformation-induced) hcp formation were separated by the SFE at T0. The driving force for the fcc to hcp transition, defined as a dimensionless value dGm/(RT), was determined in the presence of Fe-rich and Mn-rich composition sets in each phase. Carbon tended to partition to the Mn-rich phase rather than to the Fe-rich phase for the studied compositions. The obtained results revealed a thermo-mechanical correlation with empirical yield strength, maximum true stress and maximum true strain. The proportionality between thermodynamics and mechanical properties is discussed.

  12. Increased Production of Fatty Acids and Triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by Enhancing Expressions of Fatty Acid Synthesis-Related Genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Culley, David E.; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R.; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa

    2013-01-01

    Microbial production of fats and oils is being developedas a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillusoryzae. Examination of the A.oryzaegenome demonstrates that it contains twofatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhancedthe expressionof fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with thepromoter fromthe constitutively highly expressedgene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthasegenes we successfullyincreasedtheproduction of fatty acids and triglyceridesby more than two fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesteraseincreasedproductivity to a lesser extent.Increasing expression ofacetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored usingquantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our data demonstrates that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids.

  13. Multiplexed Molecular Assays for Rapid Rule-Out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-Arani, P; Thissen, J; Olivas, J; Carillo, C; Chinn, C; Rasmussen, M; Messenger, S; Suer, L; Smith, S M; Tammero, L; Vitalis, E; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Hindson, B J; Hietala, S; Crossley, B; Mcbride, M

    2007-06-26

    A nucleic acid-based multiplexed assay was developed that combines detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with rule-out assays for two other foreign animal diseases and four domestic animal diseases that cause vesicular or ulcerative lesions indistinguishable from FMDV infection in cattle, sheep and swine. The FMDV 'look-alike' diagnostic assay panel contains five PCR and twelve reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) signatures for a total of seventeen simultaneous PCR amplifications for seven diseases plus incorporating four internal assay controls. It was developed and optimized to amplify both DNA and RNA viruses simultaneously in a single tube and employs Luminex{trademark} liquid array technology. Assay development including selection of appropriate controls, a comparison of signature performance in single and multiplex testing against target nucleic acids, as well of limits of detection for each of the individual signatures is presented. While this assay is a prototype and by no means a comprehensive test for FMDV 'look-alike' viruses, an assay of this type is envisioned to have benefit to a laboratory network in routine surveillance and possibly for post-outbreak proof of freedom from foot-and-mouth disease.

  14. Utilizing toxicogenomic data to understand chemical mechanism of action in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Vickie S.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Hester, Susan; Segal, Deborah; Chiu, Weihsueh; Thompson, Chad M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    The predominant role of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment, thus far, has been one of augmentation of more traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicology data. This article focuses on the current available examples of instances where toxicogenomic data has been evaluated in human health risk assessment (e.g., acetochlor and arsenicals) which have been limited to the application of toxicogenomic data to inform mechanism of action. This article reviews the regulatory policy backdrop and highlights important efforts to ultimately achieve regulatory acceptance. A number of research efforts on specific chemicals that were designed for risk assessment purposes have employed mechanism or mode of action hypothesis testing and generating strategies. The strides made by large scale efforts to utilize toxicogenomic data in screening, testing, and risk assessment are also discussed. These efforts include both the refinement of methodologies for performing toxicogenomics studies and analysis of the resultant data sets. The current issues limiting the application of toxicogenomics to define mode or mechanism of action in risk assessment are discussed together with interrelated research needs. In summary, as chemical risk assessment moves away from a single mechanism of action approach toward a toxicity pathway-based paradigm, we envision that toxicogenomic data from multiple technologies (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, supportive RT-PCR studies) can be used in conjunction with one another to understand the complexities of multiple, and possibly interacting, pathways affected by chemicals which will impact human health risk assessment.

  15. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  16. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  17. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln⁡Χ=-α (ΔG_rxn^° (T_C ))/(RT_C )+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG_rxn^° (T_C ). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of T_C between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  18. Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

    2007-09-30

    US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

  19. Integrating Solar PV in Utility System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, A.; Botterud, A.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Hodge, B-M.; Heany, M.

    2013-10-31

    This study develops a systematic framework for estimating the increase in operating costs due to uncertainty and variability in renewable resources, uses the framework to quantify the integration costs associated with sub-hourly solar power variability and uncertainty, and shows how changes in system operations may affect these costs. Toward this end, we present a statistical method for estimating the required balancing reserves to maintain system reliability along with a model for commitment and dispatch of the portfolio of thermal and renewable resources at different stages of system operations. We estimate the costs of sub-hourly solar variability, short-term forecast errors, and day-ahead (DA) forecast errors as the difference in production costs between a case with realistic PV (i.e., subhourly solar variability and uncertainty are fully included in the modeling) and a case with well behaved PV (i.e., PV is assumed to have no sub-hourly variability and can be perfectly forecasted). In addition, we highlight current practices that allow utilities to compensate for the issues encountered at the sub-hourly time frame with increased levels of PV penetration. In this analysis we use the analytical framework to simulate utility operations with increasing deployment of PV in a case study of Arizona Public Service Company (APS), a utility in the southwestern United States. In our analysis, we focus on three processes that are important in understanding the management of PV variability and uncertainty in power system operations. First, we represent the decisions made the day before the operating day through a DA commitment model that relies on imperfect DA forecasts of load and wind as well as PV generation. Second, we represent the decisions made by schedulers in the operating day through hour-ahead (HA) scheduling. Peaking units can be committed or decommitted in the HA schedules and online units can be redispatched using forecasts that are improved relative to DA forecasts, but still imperfect. Finally, we represent decisions within the operating hour by schedulers and transmission system operators as real-time (RT) balancing. We simulate the DA and HA scheduling processes with a detailed unit-commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) optimization model. This model creates a least-cost dispatch and commitment plan for the conventional generating units using forecasts and reserve requirements as inputs. We consider only the generation units and load of the utility in this analysis; we do not consider opportunities to trade power with neighboring utilities. We also do not consider provision of reserves from renewables or from demand-side options. We estimate dynamic reserve requirements in order to meet reliability requirements in the RT operations, considering the uncertainty and variability in load, solar PV, and wind resources. Balancing reserve requirements are based on the 2.5th and 97.5th percentile of 1-min deviations from the HA schedule in a previous year. We then simulate RT deployment of balancing reserves using a separate minute-by-minute simulation of deviations from the HA schedules in the operating year. In the simulations we assume that balancing reserves can be fully deployed in 10 min. The minute-by-minute deviations account for HA forecasting errors and the actual variability of the load, wind, and solar generation. Using these minute-by-minute deviations and deployment of balancing reserves, we evaluate the impact of PV on system reliability through the calculation of the standard reliability metric called Control Performance Standard 2 (CPS2). Broadly speaking, the CPS2 score measures the percentage of 10-min periods in which a balancing area is able to balance supply and demand within a specific threshold. Compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) reliability standards requires that the CPS2 score must exceed 90% (i.e., the balancing area must maintain adequate balance for 90% of the 10-min periods). The combination of representing DA forecast errors in the DA commitments, using 1-min PV data to simulate RT balancing, and estimates of reliability performance through the CPS2 metric, all factors that are important to operating systems with increasing amounts of PV, makes this study unique in its scope.

  20. Evaluation of a performance appraisal framework for radiation therapists in planning and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Jillian; Bridge, Pete; Brown, Elizabeth; Lusk, Ryan; Ferrari-Anderson, Janet

    2015-06-15

    Constantly evolving technology and techniques within radiation therapy require practitioners to maintain a continuous approach to professional development and training. Systems of performance appraisal and adoption of regular feedback mechanisms are vital to support this development yet frequently lack structure and rely on informal peer support. A Radiation Therapy Performance Appraisal Framework (RT-PAF) for radiation therapists in planning and simulation was developed to define expectations of practice and promote a supportive and objective culture of performance and skills appraisal. Evaluation of the framework was conducted via an anonymous online survey tool. Nine peer reviewers and fourteen recipients provided feedback on its effectiveness and the challenges and limitations of the approach. Findings from the evaluation were positive and suggested that both groups gained benefit from and expressed a strong interest in embedding the approach more routinely. Respondents identified common challenges related to the limited ability to implement suggested development strategies; this was strongly associated with time and rostering issues. This framework successfully defined expectations for practice and provided a fair and objective feedback process that focussed on skills development. It empowered staff to maintain their skills and reach their professional potential. Management support, particularly in regard to provision of protected time was highlighted as critical to the framework's ongoing success. The demonstrated benefits arising in terms of staff satisfaction and development highlight the importance of this commitment to the modern radiation therapy workforce.

  1. Oxidative stress induced lipid accumulation via SREBP1c activation in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiya, Mika; Hiraishi, Ako; Touyama, Maiko [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Sakamoto, Kazuichi [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)], E-mail: sakamoto@biol.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2008-10-31

    SREBP1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c) is a metabolic-syndrome-associated transcription factor that controls fatty acid biosynthesis under glucose/insulin stimulation. Oxidative stress increases lipid accumulation, which promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, we know little about the role of oxidative stress in fatty acid biosynthesis. To clarify the action of oxidative stress in lipid accumulation via SREBP1c, we examined SREBP1c activity in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated mammalian cells. We introduced a luciferase reporter plasmid carrying the SREBP1c-binding site into HepG2 or COS-7 cells. With increasing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose, SREBP1c transcriptional activity increased in HepG2 cells but declined in COS-7 cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of SREBP1c gene or of SREBP1c-regulated genes rose H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose-dependently in HepG2 cells but dropped in COS-7 cells. Lipid accumulation and levels of the nuclear form of SREBP1c increased in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HepG2 cells. ROS may stimulate lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells via SREBP1c activation.

  2. O Oc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oc ct to ob be er r 1 1, , 2 20 01 12 2 - - M Ma ar rc ch h 3 31 1, , 2 20 01 13 3 D DO OE E/ /I IG G- -0 00 06 64 4 U U . . S S . . D DE EP PA AR RT TM ME EN NT T O OF F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y O O F F F F I I C C E E O O F F I I N N S S P P E E C C T T O O R R G G E E N N E E R R A A L L S S S e e e m m m i i i a a a n n n n n n u u u a a a l l l R R R e e e p p p o o o r r r t t t t t t o o o C C C o o o n n n g g g r r r e e e s s s s s s Ta ble of Contents Inspector General's Message

  3. X-ray tomographic in-service inspection of girth welds - The European project TomoWELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewert, Uwe Redmer, Bernhard Walter, David Thiessenhusen, Kai-Uwe Bellon, Carsten; Nicholson, P. Ian; Clarke, Alan L.; Finke-Hrknen, Klaus-Peter

    2015-03-31

    The new standard 'ISO 17636-2:2013: Non-destructive testing of welds - Radiographic testing - Part 2: X- and gamma-ray techniques with digital detectors', defines the practice for radiographic inspection of welded pipes for manufacturing and in-service inspection. It is applied in Europe for inspections of pipe welds in nuclear power plants as well as in chemical plants and allows a faster inspection with digital detector arrays (DDA) than with film. Nevertheless, it does not allow the evaluation of the depth and shape of volumetric and planar indications. In 2001 a planar tomography scanner, TomoCAR, was introduced for mechanized radiographic testing (RT) inspection and non-destructive measurement of cross sections. The project TomoWELD is based on a new concept of the scan geometry, an enhanced GPU based reconstruction, and the application of a new generation of photon counting DDAs based on CdTe crystal CMOS hybrids. The new detector permits the selection of energy thresholds to obtain an optimum energy range and reduction of the influence of scattered radiation. The concept and first measurements are presented. Flaw depth and shape of volumetric and planar irregularities can be determined.

  4. Modelling of the Arc-Jet Plasma Flow in the SR5 Nozzle Using a Thermochemical Nonequilibrium and a State-to-State Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lino da Silva, M.; Passarinho, F.; Alexandrova, T.; Dudeck, M.

    2005-05-16

    A numerical code has been set-up for estimating the relative importance of the different nonequilibrium physical-chemical processes in the SR5 facility arc-jet plasma generator. The code assumes a quasi-1D description of the flow in the plasma generator convergent-divergent nozzle, allowing the modelling of a large array of processes at low computational cost. The center streamline of the flow is simulated in the nozzle throat where arc energy input is treated as a constant energy input. This center streamline is not assumed to be affected by nozzle walls cooling in the diverging section. Chemical, V-T, V-V, V-D and R-T processes are taken into account for CO2-N2 and N2-O2 flows. The results for a CO2-N2 flow show that rotational equilibrium and near vibrational equilibrium are reached in the nozzle throat, and that the sudden expansion in the diverging section leads to a freezing of chemical compositions and vibrational temperatures, and also rotational nonequilibrium. Only chemical processes are found to affect sensibly the flow macroscopic parameters. Finally a comparison with a state-to-state model for an N2-O2 flow in the diverging section proved that some differences between the vibrational temperatures could be expected due to non-Boltzmann vibrational levels distributions. This is particularly true for the O2 first vibrational temperature.

  5. A theoretical analysis of the reaction between ethyl and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Miller; Stephen J. Klippenstein; Stuart H. Robertson

    2000-12-13

    Using a combination of electronic-structure theory, variational transition-state theory, and solutions to the time-dependent master equation, the authors have studied the kinetics of the title reaction theoretically over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The agreement between theory and experiment is quite good. By comparing the theoretical and experimental results describing the kinetic behavior, they have been able to deduce a value for the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}-O{sub 2} bond energy of {approximately}34 kcal/mole and a value for the exit-channel transition-state energy of {minus}4.3 kcal/mole (measured from reactants). These numbers compare favorably with the electronic-structure theory predictions of 33.9 kcal/mole and {minus}3.0 kcal/mole, respectively. The master-equation solutions show three distinct temperature regimes for the reaction, discussed extensively in the paper. Above T {approx} 700 K, the reaction can be written as an elementary step, C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + O{sub 2} {leftrightarrow} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + HO{sub 2}, with the rate coefficient, k(T) = 3.19 x 10{sup {minus}17} T{sup 1.02} exp(2035/RT) cm{sup 3}/molec.-sec., independent of pressure even though the intermediate collision complex may suffer a large number of collisions.

  6. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  7. Strained flamelets for turbulent premixed flames II: Laboratory flame results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolla, H.; Swaminathan, N. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The predictive ability of strained flamelets model for turbulent premixed flames is assessed using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) calculations of laboratory flames covering a wide range of conditions. Reactant-to-product (RtP) opposed flow laminar flames parametrised using the scalar dissipation rate of reaction progress variable are used as strained flamelets. Two turbulent flames: a rod stabilised V-flame studied by Robin et al. [Combust. Flame 153 (2008) 288-315] and a set of pilot stabilised Bunsen flames studied by Chen et al. [Combust. Flame 107 (1996) 223-244] are calculated using a single set of model parameters. The V-flame corresponds to the corrugated flamelets regime. The strained flamelet model and an unstrained flamelet model yield similar predictions which are in good agreement with experimental measurements for this flame. On the other hand, for the Bunsen flames which are in the thin reaction zones regime, the unstrained flamelet model predicts a smaller flame brush compared to experiment. The predictions of the strained flamelets model allowing for fluid-dynamics stretch induced attenuation of the chemical reaction are in good agreement with the experimental data. This model predictions of major and minor species are also in good agreement with experimental data. The results demonstrate that the strained flamelets model using the scalar dissipation rate can be used across the combustion regimes. (author)

  8. Absence of correlation between Sry polymorphisms and XY sex reversal caused by the M.m. domesticus Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, C.; Nagamine, C.M. [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Winkinig, H.; Weichenhan, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)] [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    Mus musculus domesticus Y chromosomes (Y{sup DOM} Chrs) vary in their ability to induce testes in the strain C57BL/6J. In severe cases, XY females develop (XY{sup DOM} sex reversal). To identify the molecular basis for the sex reversal, a 2.7-kb region of Sry, the testis-determining gene, was sequenced from Y{sup DOM} Chrs linked to normal testis determination, transient sex reversal, and severe sex reversal. Four mutations were identified. However, no correlation exists between these mutations and severity of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. RT-PCR identified Sry transcripts in XY{sup DOM} sex-reversed fetal gonads at 11 d.p.c., the age when Sry is hypothesized to function. In addition, no correlation exists between XY{sup DOM} sex reversal and copy numbers of pSx1, a Y-repetitive sequence whose deletion is linked to XY sex reversal. We conclude that SRY protein variants, blockade of Sry transcription, and deletion of pSx1 sequences are not the underlying causes of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. 63 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Structural and microstructural changes in monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} during the ball-milling with stainless steel assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanic, G. . E-mail: stefanic@irb.hr; Music, S.; Gajovic, A.

    2006-04-13

    High-energy ball-milling of monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} was performed in air using the planetary ball mill with a stainless steel milling assembly. Structural and microstructural changes during the ball-milling were monitored using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results of line broadening analysis indicated a decrease in the crystallite size and an increase in the microstrains with the ball-milling time increased up to {approx}150 min. The results of quantitative phase analysis indicated the presence of a very small amount of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} phase in this early stage of ball-milling. The onset of m-ZrO{sub 2} {sup {yields}} t-ZrO{sub 2} transition occurred between 10 and 15 h of ball-milling, which resulted in a complete transition after 20 h of ball-milling. Further ball-milling caused a decrease of the t-ZrO{sub 2} lattice parameters followed by a probable transition into c-ZrO{sub 2}. It was concluded that the stabilization of t- and c-ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs at RT can be attributed to the incorporation of aliovalent cations (Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+}) introduced into the sample due to the wear and oxidation of the milling media.

  10. Pulse radiolysis studies of the reaction of nitrogen dioxide with the vitamin B?? complexes Cob(II)alamin and nitrocobalamin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brasch, Nicola E.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Dassanayake, Rohan S.

    2014-10-06

    Although now recognized to be an important reactive nitrogen species in biological systems that modifies the structures of proteins, DNA and lipids, there few studies on the reactivity of ?NO2, including the reactions between ?NO2 and transition metal complexes. We report kinetic studies on the reaction of ?NO2 with two forms of vitamin B12 cob(II)alamin and nitrocobalamin. UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC analysis of the product solution show that ?NO2 cleanly oxidizes the metal center of cob(II)alamin to form nitrocobalamin, with a second-order rate constant of (3.5 0.3) 10? M? s ? (pH 7.0 and 9.0, RT, I = 0.20 M). The stoichiometry of the reaction is 1:1. No reaction is detected by UV-vis spectroscopy and by HPLC analysis of the product solution when nitrocobalamin is exposed to up to 2.0 mol equiv.?NO2.

  11. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 ?M. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 ?M were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  12. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Surgery Followed by Local Brain Radiotherapy and Surgery Followed by Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Single Brain Metastasis: Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ohno, Makoto; Sumi, Minako; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRT (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.

  13. Construction and biological activities of the first infectious cDNA clones of the genus Foveavirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Baozhong; Venkataraman, Srividhya; Li, Caihong; Wang, Weizhou; Dayan-Glick, Cathy; Mawassi, Munir

    2013-01-20

    Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV, genus Foveavirus, family Betaflexiviridae) is one of the most prevalent viruses in grapevines and is associated with three distinct diseases: rupestris stem pitting, vein necrosis and Syrah decline. Little is known about the biology and pathological properties of GRSPaV. In this work, we engineered a full-length infectious cDNA clone for GRSPaV and a GFP-tagged variant, both under the transcriptional control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. We demonstrated that these cDNA clones were infectious in grapevines and Nicotiana benthamiana through fluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno electron microscopy. Interestingly, GRSPaV does not cause systemic infection in four of the most commonly used herbaceous plants, even in the presence of the movement proteins of two other viruses which are known to complement numerous movement-defective viruses. These infectious clones are the first of members of Foveavirus which would allow further investigations into mechanisms governing different aspects of replication for GRSPaV and perhaps related viruses.

  14. Analysis of Leaf and Root Transcriptome of Soil Grown Avena barbata Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swarbreck, St; phanie; Lindquist, Erika; Ackerly, David; Andersen, Gary

    2011-02-01

    Slender wild oat (Avena barbata) is an annual grass dominant in many grassland ecosystems in Mediterranean climate. This species has been the subject of ecological studies that aim at understanding the effect of global climate change on grassland ecosystems and the genetic basis for adaptation under varying environmental conditions. We present the sequencing and analysis of cDNA libraries constructed from leaf and root samples collected from A. barbata grown on natural soil and under varying rainfall patterns. More than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated using both GS 454-FLX pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing, and these tags were assembled into consensus sequences. We identified numerous candidate polymorphic markers in the dataset, providing possibilities for linking the genomic and the existing genetic information for A. barbata. Using the digital northern method, we showed that genes involved in photosynthesis were down regulated under high rainfall while stress- related genes were up regulated. We also identified a number of genes unique to the root library with unknown function. Real-time RT-PCR was used to confirm the root specificity of some of these transcripts such as two genes encoding O-methyl transferase. Also we showed differential expression under three water levels. Through a combination of Sanger and 454-based sequencing technologies, we were able to generate a large set of transcribed sequences for A. barbata. This dataset provides a platform for further studies of this important wild grass species

  15. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Li; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong ; Kong, Beihua; Sheng, Xiugui; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-04-09

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34{sup +} cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  16. IGF-1R and ErbB3/HER3 contribute to enhanced proliferation and carcinogenesis in trastuzumab-resistant ovarian cancer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Yanhan; Department of Immunology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing 100850 ; Zhang, Yan; Qiao, Chunxia; Liu, Guijun; Zhao, Qing; Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 ; Zhou, Tingting; Chen, Guojiang; Li, Yali; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Qiuping; Peng, Hui; Cardiovascular Drug Research Center, Institute of Health and Environmental Medicine, Beijing 100850

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: We established trastuzumab-resistant cell line SKOV3/T. SKOV3/T enhances proliferation and in vivo carcinogenesis. IGF-1R and HER3 genes were up-regulated in SKOV3/T based on microarray analysis. Targeting IGF-1R and/or HER3 inhibited the proliferation of SKOV3/T. Therapies targeting IGF-1R and HER3 might be effective in ovarian cancer. -- Abstract: Trastuzumab (Herceptin) has demonstrated clinical potential in several types of HER2-overexpressing human cancers. However, primary and acquired resistance occurs in many HER2-positive patients with regimens. To investigate the possible mechanism of acquired therapeutic resistance to trastuzumab, we have developed a preclinical model of human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3/T, with the distinctive feature of stronger carcinogenesis. The differences in gene expression between parental and the resistant cells were explored by microarray analysis, of which IGF-1R and HER3 were detected to be key molecules in action. Their correctness was validated by follow-up experiments of RT-PCR, shRNA-mediated knockdown, downstream signal activation, cell cycle distribution and survival. These results suggest that IGF-1R and HER3 differentially regulate trastuzumab resistance and could be promising targets for trastuzumab therapy in ovarian cancer.

  17. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  18. hnRNP L binds to CA repeats in the 3'UTR of bcl-2 mRNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lim, Mi-Hyun; Youn, Dong-Ye [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun [Department of Medical Science, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medical Science, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Young Soo [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Brain Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Brain Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tsujimoto, Yoshihide [Department of Medical Genetics, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Medical Genetics, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Lee, Jeong-Hwa, E-mail: leejh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-08

    We previously reported that the CA-repeat sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of bcl-2 mRNA is involved in the decay of bcl-2 mRNA. However, the trans-acting factor for the CA element in bcl-2 mRNA remains unidentified. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L), an intron splicing factor, has been reported to bind to CA repeats and CA clusters in the 3'UTR of several genes. We reported herein that the CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA have the potential to form a distinct ribonuclear protein complex in cytoplasmic extracts of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (REMSA). A super-shift assay using the hnRNP L antibody completely shifted the complex. Immunoprecipitation with the hnRNP L antibody and MCF-7 cells followed by RT-PCR revealed that hnRNP L interacts with endogenous bcl-2 mRNA in vivo. Furthermore, the suppression of hnRNP L in MCF-7 cells by the transfection of siRNA for hnRNP L resulted in a delay in the degradation of RNA transcripts including CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between hnRNPL and CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA participates in destabilizing bcl-2 mRNA.

  19. DAx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r .*, J ".t , hj rk - DAx Jtdp -I 0 ' ,, i$i? m ;, ;. ESE p L, 21, ).,.G,,YlZ -w F M M c, !. ?Z-=S i%Df J,- :. ?i2& . ti. _ xri ?M SE t.' C z 39-&i stz-eet Fe-rbc;t.e L s;zewr A YI *- co2;$r-:-c' ,;c=;, & the 3ybb SFe& T&*-ehczfc Lnc!E:8ks 502 s*y-,"r=c rte2 ~2 i=GJwe ;ieAL*c--e ih ' ,be =a- ,y,z-t -._ **c -4 Qd"& F-5 Cs??lS' ,e' L XT 7, 3949. CCP L' s.S bt-""d -c, f oaf 22 ' ,be ba.a, tjg ,e$, cn$ op e-;_uf ~r:,t re>. >iz cs kriLcLt.ti on

  20. Low doses ionizing radiation enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Low doses ionizing irradiation would enhance the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation induced morphologic changes in breast cancer cells. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation led to upregulation of mesenchymal markers and down-regulation of epithelial markers. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation increased migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process cellular morphologic and molecular alterations facilitate cell invasion. We hypothesized that low dose ionizing irradiation (LDIR) enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. The effects of LDIR on cellular morphology and the EMT markers of MCF-7 breast cancer cells were analyzed by western blot/RT-PCR and migration/invasion was examined using the transwell assay. We found that LDIR led to the phenotypic changes of EMT in MCF-7 cells and down-regulation of epithelial differentiation markers and transcriptional induction of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, the radiated cells demonstrated enhanced migration/invasion MCF-7 cells compared with non-radiated cells. In summary, LDIR promotes the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These findings may ultimately provide a new targeted approach for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of radiation in breast cancer.

  1. Pulse radiolysis studies of the reaction of nitrogen dioxide with the vitamin B₁₂ complexes Cob(II)alamin and nitrocobalamin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brasch, Nicola E.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Dassanayake, Rohan S.

    2014-10-06

    Although now recognized to be an important reactive nitrogen species in biological systems that modifies the structures of proteins, DNA and lipids, there few studies on the reactivity of ˙NO2, including the reactions between ˙NO2 and transition metal complexes. We report kinetic studies on the reaction of ˙NO2 with two forms of vitamin B12 – cob(II)alamin and nitrocobalamin. UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC analysis of the product solution show that ˙NO2 cleanly oxidizes the metal center of cob(II)alamin to form nitrocobalamin, with a second-order rate constant of (3.5 ± 0.3) × 10⁸ M⁻¹ s ⁻¹ (pH 7.0 and 9.0, RT, Imore » = 0.20 M). The stoichiometry of the reaction is 1:1. No reaction is detected by UV-vis spectroscopy and by HPLC analysis of the product solution when nitrocobalamin is exposed to up to 2.0 mol equiv.˙NO2.« less

  2. Impact of thermal annealing on bulk InGaAsSbN materials grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. W.; Mawst, L. J.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. J.; Kuech, T. F.; Wells, N. P.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Sin, Y.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Moss, S. C.

    2014-02-03

    Two different thermal annealing techniques (rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and in-situ post-growth annealing in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) chamber) were employed to investigate their impact on the optical characteristics of double-heterostructures (DH) of InGaAsSbN/GaAs and on the performance of single-junction solar cell structures, all grown by MOVPE. We find that an optimized RTA procedure leads to a similar improvement in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity compared with material employing a multi-step optimized anneal within the MOVPE reactor. Time-resolved photoluminescence techniques at low temperature (LT) and room temperature (RT) were performed to characterize the carrier dynamics in bulk InGaAsSbN layers. Room temperature carrier lifetimes were found to be similar for both annealing methods, although the LT-PL (16?K) measurements of the MOVPE-annealed sample found longer lifetimes than the RTA-annealed sample (680?ps vs. 260?ps) for the PL measurement energy of 1.24?eV. InGaAsSbN-based single junction solar cells processed with the optimized RTA procedure exhibited an enhancement of the electrical performance, such as improvements in open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and efficiency over solar cells subjected to the in-situ MOVPE annealing technique.

  3. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  4. One-step synthesis of lightly doped porous silicon nanowires in HF/AgNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Fan; State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 ; Li, Meicheng; Su Zhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou 215123 ; Song, Dandan; Yu, Hang; Jiang, Bing; Li, Yingfeng

    2012-12-15

    One-step synthesis of lightly doped porous silicon nanowire arrays was achieved by etching the silicon wafer in HF/AgNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at room temperature. The lightly doped porous silicon nanowires (pNWs) have circular nanopores on the sidewall, which can emit strong green fluorescence. The surface morphologies of these nanowires could be controlled by simply adjusting the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which influences the distribution of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) along the nanowire axis. A mechanism based on Ag NPs-induced lateral etching of nanowires was proposed to explain the formation of pNWs. The controllable and widely applicable synthesis of pNWs will open their potential application to nanoscale photoluminescence devices. - Graphical abstract: The one-step synthesis of porous silicon nanowire arrays is achieved by chemical etching of the lightly doped p-type Si (100) wafer at room temperature. These nanowires exhibit strong green photoluminescence. SEM, TEM, HRTEM and photoluminescence images of pNWs. The scale bars of SEM, TEM HRTEM and photoluminescence are 10 {mu}m, 20 nm, 10 nm, and 1 {mu}m, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple one-step synthesis of lightly doped porous silicon nanowire arrays is achieved at RT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Etching process and mechanism are illustrated with etching model from a novel standpoint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As-prepared porous silicon nanowire emits strong green fluorescence, proving unique property.

  5. Changes in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in cisplatin-induced acute renal failure after treatment of JBP485 in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tao, E-mail: liutaomedical@qq.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China)] [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Meng, Qiang, E-mail: mengq531@yahoo.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Wang, Changyuan, E-mail: wangcyuan@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Liu, Qi, E-mail: llaqii@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Guo, Xinjin, E-mail: guo.xinjin@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China)] [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Sun, Huijun, E-mail: sunhuijun@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Peng, Jinyong, E-mail: jinyongpeng2005@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); and others

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cyclo-trans-4-L-hydroxyprolyl-L-serine (JBP485) on acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cisplatin is related to change in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in rats. JBP485 reduced creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and indoxyl sulfate (IS) in plasma and malondialdehyde (MDA) in kidney, and recovered the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cisplatin-treated rats. The plasma concentration of PAH (para-aminohippurate) determined by LCMS/MS was increased markedly after intravenous administration of cisplatin, whereas cumulative urinary excretion of PAH and the uptake of PAH in kidney slices were significantly decreased. qRT-PCR and Western-blot showed a decrease in mRNA and protein of Oat1 and Oat3, an increase in mRNA and protein of Mrp2 in cisplatin-treated rats, and an increase in IS (a uremic toxin) after co-treatment with JBP485. It indicated that JBP485 promoted urinary excretion of toxins by upregulating renal Mrp2. This therefore gives in part the explanation about the mechanism by which JBP485 improves ARF induced by cisplatin in rats. -- Highlights: ? Cisplatin induces acute renal failure (ARF). ? The expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 were changed during ARF. ? The regulated expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 is an adaptive protected response. ? JBP485 could facilitate the adaptive protective action.

  6. Characterization of a novel chromosome 5 neural cadherin exhibiting an unusual genomic organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, S.; Selig, S.; Kunkel, L.M. |

    1994-09-01

    In order to analyze the SMA locus on 5q13, yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from the region were used to directly select for expressed cDNAs from brain, muscle, and spinal cord. Among the cDNAs selected, a single one, c41, showed significant homology to a family of cell adhesion molecules called cadherins. Using c41, a 320 bp fragment, two types of full length cDNAs were acquired. The most abundant type (90% of clones) has a short open reading frame of only 110 amino acids in a transcript of 4.5 kb. The second type, 8B1, has a large open reading frame of 794 amino acids containing all the typical characteristics of a cadherin gene. The short open reading frame of c41 is found at near identity within the 8B1 open reading frame. Northern blot analysis of 8B1 reveals a 4.4 kb transcript which is expressed in various regions of the brain, as well as the testis, and at lower levels in the ovary and kidney. c41, however, shows no defined band on Northern Blots. RT-PCR reveals greater than 10-fold levels of the c41 transcript relative to 8B1. By FISH and Southern blotting analysis, the c41 sequence appears to be duplicated several times in the SMA region and once in 5p. In contrast the 8B1 transcript maps only to 5p13-14. The instability of the YACs and phages from the SMA region suggests that the clustering of many copies of the c41 locus may lead to recombination and subsequent deletions of the DNA - a possible mechanism for disrupting the SMA locus. We are currently studying what role if any these two novel related transcripts play in the etiology of the SMA phenotype.

  7. Extended model for Richtmyer-Meshkov mix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-11-18

    We examine four Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) experiments on shock-generated turbulent mix and find them to be in good agreement with our earlier simple model in which the growth rate h of the mixing layer following a shock or reshock is constant and given by 2{alpha}A{Delta}v, independent of initial conditions h{sub 0}. Here A is the Atwood number ({rho}{sub B}-{rho}{sub A})/({rho}{sub B} + {rho}{sub A}), {rho}{sub A,B} are the densities of the two fluids, {Delta}V is the jump in velocity induced by the shock or reshock, and {alpha} is the constant measured in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments: {alpha}{sup bubble} {approx} 0.05-0.07, {alpha}{sup spike} {approx} (1.8-2.5){alpha}{sup bubble} for A {approx} 0.7-1.0. In the extended model the growth rate beings to day after a time t*, when h = h*, slowing down from h = h{sub 0} + 2{alpha}A{Delta}vt to h {approx} t{sup {theta}} behavior, with {theta}{sup bubble} {approx} 0.25 and {theta}{sup spike} {approx} 0.36 for A {approx} 0.7. They ascribe this change-over to loss of memory of the direction of the shock or reshock, signaling transition from highly directional to isotropic turbulence. In the simplest extension of the model h*/h{sub 0} is independent of {Delta}v and depends only on A. They find that h*/h{sub 0} {approx} 2.5-3.5 for A {approx} 0.7-1.0.

  8. Nuclear localization of DMP1 proteins suggests a role in intracellular signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siyam, Arwa; Department of Endodontology, Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University, 3223 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140-5007 ; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Mues, Gabriele; Stevens, Roy; D'Souza, Rena N.; Lu, Yongbo

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of DMP1 in various cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-synchronized cells show either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of DMP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear DMP1 is restricted to the nucleoplasm but absent in the nucleolus. -- Abstract: Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts/osteocytes and plays an essential role in tooth and bone mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. It is debatable whether DMP1, in addition to its function in the extracellular matrix, can enter the nucleus and function as a transcription factor. To better understand its function, we examined the nuclear localization of endogenous and exogenous DMP1 in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and 17IIA11 odontoblast-like cells. RT-PCR analyses showed the expression of endogenous Dmp1 in all three cell lines, while Western-blot analysis detected a major DMP1 protein band corresponding to the 57 kDa C-terminal fragment generated by proteolytic processing of the secreted full-length DMP1. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that non-synchronized cells presented two subpopulations with either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of endogenous DMP1. In addition, cells transfected with a construct expressing HA-tagged full-length DMP1 also showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of the exogenous DMP1 when examined with an antibody against the HA tag. Furthermore, nuclear DMP1 was restricted to the nucleoplasm but was absent in the nucleolus. In conclusion, these findings suggest that, apart from its role as a constituent of dentin and bone matrix, DMP1 might play a regulatory role in the nucleus.

  9. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel; Azorin, Inmaculada; Sirera, Rafael; Martinez-Dolz, Luis; Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R.; Salvador, Antonio; Portoles, Manuel

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  10. A computational investigation of diesel and biodiesel combustion and NOx formation in a light-duty compression ignition engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zihan; Srinivasan, Kalyan K.; Krishnan, Sundar R.; Som, Sibendu

    2012-04-24

    Diesel and biodiesel combustion in a multi-cylinder light duty diesel engine were simulated during a closed cycle (from IVC to EVO), using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE, coupled with detailed chemical kinetics. The computational domain was constructed based on engine geometry and compression ratio measurements. A skeletal n-heptane-based diesel mechanism developed by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and a reduced biodiesel mechanism derived and validated by Luo and co-workers were applied to model the combustion chemistry. The biodiesel mechanism contains 89 species and 364 reactions and uses methyl decanoate, methyl-9- decenoate, and n-heptane as the surrogate fuel mixture. The Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) spray breakup model for diesel and biodiesel was calibrated to account for the differences in physical properties of the fuels which result in variations in atomization and spray development characteristics. The simulations were able to capture the experimentally observed pressure and apparent heat release rate trends for both the fuels over a range of engine loads (BMEPs from 2.5 to 10 bar) and fuel injection timings (from 0???° BTDC to 10???° BTDC), thus validating the overall modeling approach as well as the chemical kinetic models of diesel and biodiesel surrogates. Moreover, quantitative NOx predictions for diesel combustion and qualitative NOx predictions for biodiesel combustion were obtained with the CFD simulations and the in-cylinder temperature trends were correlated to the NOx trends."

  11. Phase stability study of Bi{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.85-x}Ae{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (x = 0 and Ae = Ba{sub 0.28}; Ca{sub 0.17}) perovskites by in-situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksson, A.K.; Eriksson, S.G.; Chapon, L.C.; Knee, C.S.

    2010-12-15

    The oxygen deficient perovskites, Bi{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.85-x}Ae{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}}, x = 0 and Ae{sub x} = Ba{sub 0.28}, Ca{sub 0.17}, were studied with in-situ neutron powder diffraction and combined TGA/DSC in order to investigate their behaviour at elevated temperatures in oxidising conditions. The phase stability of the I4/mmm supercell structure adopted by Bi{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.85}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} is shown to be dependent on temperature and the oxygen content of the phase, with three structural events, at T {approx} 250, 590 and 880 {sup o}C, detected. The first transition occurs as the perovskite supercell vanishes due to oxygen absorption; the second transition is also associated with oxidation and involves the decomposition of the perovskite phase via an exothermic process to yield a dominant hexagonal phase. Finally, at T {approx} 900 {sup o}C the perovskite phase re-forms. For the Ba and Ca containing materials the decomposition to the hexagonal phase occurs at T {approx} 600 {sup o}C and {approx} 650 {sup o}C respectively. The presence of Ca at the A-site is found to stabilise the I4/mmm supercell structure in the range RT - 650 {sup o}C. The antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic transitions occur at T{sub N} {approx} 250 {sup o}C, T{sub N} {approx} 175 {sup o}C and T{sub N} {approx} 145 {sup o}C for the samples with Ae{sub x} = Ba{sub 0.28}, x = 0 and Ae{sub x} = Ca{sub 0.17}, respectively.

  12. SU-D-BRF-04: Digital Tomosynthesis for Improved Daily Setup in Treatment of Liver Lesions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, H; Jones, B; Miften, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Daily localization of liver lesions with cone-beam CT (CBCT) is difficult due to poor image quality caused by scatter, respiratory motion, and the lack of radiographic contrast between the liver parenchyma and the lesion(s). Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is investigated as a modality to improve liver visualization and lesion/parenchyma contrast for daily setup. Methods: An in-house tool was developed to generate DTS images using a point-by-point filtered back-projection method from on-board CBCT projection data. DTS image planes are generated in a user defined orientation to visualize the anatomy at various depths. Reference DTS images are obtained from forward projection of the planning CT dataset at each projection angle. The CBCT DTS image set can then be registered to the reference DTS image set as a means for localization. Contour data from the planning CT's associate RT Structure file and forward projected similarly to the planning CT data. DTS images are created for each contoured structure, which can then be overlaid onto the DTS images for organ volume visualization. Results: High resolution DTS images generated from CBCT projections show fine anatomical detail, including small blood vessels, within the patient. However, the reference DTS images generated from forward projection of the planning CT lacks this level of detail due to the low resolution of the CT voxels as compared to the pixel size in the projection images; typically 1mm-by-1mm-by-3mm (lat, vrt, lng) for the planning CT vs. 0.4mm-by-0.4mm for CBCT projections. Overlaying of the contours onto the DTS image allows for visualization of structures of interest. Conclusion: The ability to generate DTS images over a limited range of projection angles allows for reduction in the amount of respiratory motion within each acquisition. DTS may provide improved visualization of structures and lesions as compared to CBCT for highly mobile tumors.

  13. Toxicogenomic outcomes predictive of forestomach carcinogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene: Relevance to human cancer risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labib, Sarah Guo, Charles H. Williams, Andrew Yauk, Carole L. White, Paul A. Halappanavar, Sabina

    2013-12-01

    Forestomach tumors are observed in mice exposed to environmental carcinogens. However, the relevance of this data to humans is controversial because humans lack a forestomach. We hypothesize that an understanding of early molecular changes after exposure to a carcinogen in the forestomach will provide mode-of-action information to evaluate the applicability of forestomach cancers to human cancer risk assessment. In the present study we exposed mice to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental carcinogen commonly associated with tumors of the rodent forestomach. Toxicogenomic tools were used to profile gene expression response in the forestomach. Adult MutaMouse males were orally exposed to 25, 50, and 75 mg BaP/kg-body-weight/day for 28 consecutive days. The forestomach was collected three days post-exposure. DNA microarrays, real-time RT-qPCR arrays, and protein analyses were employed to characterize responses in the forestomach. Microarray results showed altered expression of 414 genes across all treatment groups ( 1.5 fold; false discovery rate adjusted P ? 0.05). Significant downregulation of genes associated with phase II xenobiotic metabolism and increased expression of genes implicated in antigen processing and presentation, immune response, chemotaxis, and keratinocyte differentiation were observed in treated groups in a dose-dependent manner. A systematic comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the forestomach from the present study to differentially expressed genes identified in human diseases including human gastrointestinal tract cancers using the NextBio Human Disease Atlas showed significant commonalities between the two models. Our results provide molecular evidence supporting the use of the mouse forestomach model to evaluate chemically-induced gastrointestinal carcinogenesis in humans. - Highlights: Benzo(a)pyrene-mediated transcriptomic response in the forestomach was examined. The immunoproteosome subunits and MHC class I pathway were the most affected. Keratinocyte differentiation associated gene expression changes were dose-dependent. Molecular similarities exist between cancers of the forestomach and human stomach.

  14. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate induces oxidative stress responses in human placental cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetz, Lauren M.; Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S.; Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang; Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-04-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 ?M MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 ?M MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. - Highlights: ? MEHP increased reactive oxygen species, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase activity. ? MEHP induced expression of PTGS2, a gene important in pregnancy and parturition ? MEHP treatment resulted in differential expression of GLRX2, TXNRD1, and DHCR24.

  15. Microstructures, magnetic and electric properties of diluted magnetic semiconductors InTe{sub 1?x} Fe{sub x} (Co{sub x})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Sayed, Karimat; Sedeek, K.; Heiba, Z.K.; Hantour, H.H.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? The prepared InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} was found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature and can be characterized as diluted magnetic semiconductors. ? The presence of staking faults, various types of defects, strained lattice, grain boundaries and the impurity of minor non-magnetic phase were suggested to participate in high temperature ferromagnetism. - Abstract: InTe compound doped by 10% of Fe or Co respectively was synthesized. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Kiethley electrometer were used for characterizing the prepared samples. XRD show the presence of InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} or InTe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1} together with minor In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} phase. InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} is ferromagnetic with high Curie and high blocking temperature, while InTe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1} is antiferromagnetic with two high Neels temperatures. ?RT of InTe{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1} and InTe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1} are greater than those of InTe. The higher conductivity is due to the higher carrier's density obtained from the interaction of the sp-d orbitals, of the electric and magnetic system. The presence of In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} minor phase and different kinds of defects are taking major roles in the formation of high Tc ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism.

  16. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  17. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rancourt, Raymond C. Veress, Livia A. Ahmad, Aftab Hendry-Hofer, Tara B. Rioux, Jacqueline S. Garlick, Rhonda B. White, Carl W.

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombinantithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. Rats given TFPI had improved tissue oxygenation, and mortality was prevented.

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing in Bixa orellana to identify genes involved in methylerythritol phosphate, carotenoid and bixin biosynthesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cárdenas-Conejo, Yair; Carballo-Uicab, Víctor; Lieberman, Meric; Aguilar-Espinosa, Margarita; Comai, Luca; Rivera-Madrid, Renata

    2015-10-28

    Bixin or annatto is a commercially important natural orange-red pigment derived from lycopene that is produced and stored in seeds of Bixa orellana L. An enzymatic pathway for bixin biosynthesis was inferred from homology of putative proteins encoded by differentially expressed seed cDNAs. Some activities were later validated in a heterologous system. Nevertheless, much of the pathway remains to be clarified. For example, it is essential to identify the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) and carotenoid pathways genes. In order to investigate the MEP, carotenoid, and bixin pathways genes, total RNA from young leaves and two different developmental stages of seeds frommore » B. orellana were used for the construction of indexed mRNA libraries, sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform and assembled de novo using Velvet, CLC Genomics Workbench and CAP3 software. A total of 52,549 contigs were obtained with average length of 1,924 bp. Two phylogenetic analyses of inferred proteins, in one case encoded by thirteen general, single-copy cDNAs, in the other from carotenoid and MEP cDNAs, indicated that B. orellana is closely related to sister Malvales species cacao and cotton. Using homology, we identified 7 and 14 core gene products from the MEP and carotenoid pathways, respectively. Surprisingly, previously defined bixin pathway cDNAs were not present in our transcriptome. Here we propose a new set of gene products involved in bixin pathway. In conclusion, the identification and qRT-PCR quantification of cDNAs involved in annatto production suggest a hypothetical model for bixin biosynthesis that involve coordinated activation of some MEP, carotenoid and bixin pathway genes. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating these pathways and will facilitate the genetic improvement of B. orellana.« less

  19. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi, E-mail: roudkenar@ibto.ir [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Halabian, Raheleh [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourani, Mohammad Reza [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masroori, Nasser [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Majid [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  20. SU-E-T-51: Bayesian Network Models for Radiotherapy Error Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalet, A; Phillips, M; Gennari, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a probabilistic model of radiotherapy plans using Bayesian networks that will detect potential errors in radiation delivery. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with medical physicists and other domain experts were employed to generate a set of layered nodes and arcs forming a Bayesian Network (BN) which encapsulates relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies. Concepts in the final network were limited to those whose parameters are represented in the institutional database at a level significant enough to develop mathematical distributions. The concept-relation knowledge base was constructed using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and translated into Hugin Expert Bayes Network files via the the RHugin package in the R statistical programming language. A subset of de-identified data derived from a Mosaiq relational database representing 1937 unique prescription cases was processed and pre-screened for errors and then used by the Hugin implementation of the Estimation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for machine learning all parameter distributions. Individual networks were generated for each of several commonly treated anatomic regions identified by ICD-9 neoplasm categories including lung, brain, lymphoma, and female breast. Results: The resulting Bayesian networks represent a large part of the probabilistic knowledge inherent in treatment planning. By populating the networks entirely with data captured from a clinical oncology information management system over the course of several years of normal practice, we were able to create accurate probability tables with no additional time spent by experts or clinicians. These probabilistic descriptions of the treatment planning allow one to check if a treatment plan is within the normal scope of practice, given some initial set of clinical evidence and thereby detect for potential outliers to be flagged for further investigation. Conclusion: The networks developed here support the use of probabilistic models into clinical chart checking for improved detection of potential errors in RT plans.