Sample records for kp moran rt

  1. KP solitons in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuji Kodama

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of the paper is to provide a survey of our recent studies on soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation. The classification is based on the far-field patterns of the solutions which consist of a finite number of line-solitons. Each soliton solution is then defined by a point of the totally non-negative Grassmann variety which can be parametrized by a unique derangement of the symmetric group of permutations. Our study also includes certain numerical stability problems of those soliton solutions. Numerical simulations of the initial value problems indicate that certain class of initial waves asymptotically approach to these exact solutions of the KP equation. We then discuss an application of our theory to the Mach reflection problem in shallow water. This problem describes the resonant interaction of solitary waves appearing in the reflection of an obliquely incident wave onto a vertical wall, and it predicts an extra-ordinary four-fold amplification of the wave at the wall. There are several numerical studies confirming the prediction, but all indicate disagreements with the KP theory. Contrary to those previous numerical studies, we find that the KP theory actually provides an excellent model to describe the Mach reflection phenomena when the higher order corrections are included to the quasi-two dimensional approximation. We also present laboratory experiments of the Mach reflection recently carried out by Yeh and his colleagues, and show how precisely the KP theory predicts this wave behavior.

  2. XXZ scalar products and KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Jacobi-Trudi-type identity, we show that the scalar product of a general state and a Bethe eigenstate in a finite-length XXZ spin-1/2 chain is (a restriction of) a KP tau function. This leads to a correspondence between the eigenstates and points on Sato's Grassmannian. Each of these points is a function of the rapidities of the corresponding eigenstate, the inhomogeneity variables of the spin chain and the crossing parameter.

  3. City of Moran, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (UtilityHolyrood,Martinsville, VirginiaMiamiMinidoka,MonroeMoran, Kansas

  4. Central Invariants of the Constrained KP Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si-Qi Liu; Youjin Zhang; Xu Zhou

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the central invariants of the bihamiltonian structures of the constrained KP hierarchies, and show that these integrable hierarchies are topological deformations of their hydrodynamic limits.

  5. Weakly nonassociative algebras, Riccati and KP hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been observed that certain nonassociative algebras (called "weakly nonassociative", WNA) determine, via a universal hierarchy of ordinary differential equations, solutions of the KP hierarchy with dependent variable in an associative subalgebra (the middle nucleus). We recall central results and consider a class of WNA algebras for which the hierarchy of ODEs reduces to a matrix Riccati hierarchy, which can be easily solved. The resulting solutions of a matrix KP hierarchy then determine (under a rank 1 condition) solutions of the scalar KP hierarchy. We extend these results to the discrete KP hierarchy. Moreover, we build a bridge from the WNA framework to the Gelfand-Dickey formulation of the KP hierarchy.

  6. q-Deformed KP Hierarchy and q-Deformed Constrained KP Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jingsong He; Yinghua Li; Yi Cheng

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the determinant representation of gauge transformation operator, we have shown that the general form of $\\tau$ function of the $q$-KP hierarchy is a q-deformed generalized Wronskian, which includes the q-deformed Wronskian as a special case. On the basis of these, we study the q-deformed constrained KP ($q$-cKP) hierarchy, i.e. $l$-constraints of $q$-KP hierarchy. Similar to the ordinary constrained KP (cKP) hierarchy, a large class of solutions of $q$-cKP hierarchy can be represented by q-deformed Wronskian determinant of functions satisfying a set of linear $q$-partial differential equations with constant coefficients. We obtained additional conditions for these functions imposed by the constraints. In particular, the effects of $q$-deformation ($q$-effects) in single $q$-soliton from the simplest $\\tau$ function of the $q$-KP hierarchy and in multi-$q$-soliton from one-component $q$-cKP hierarchy, and their dependence of $x$ and $q$, were also presented. Finally, we observe that $q$-soliton tends to the usual soliton of the KP equation when $x\\to 0$ and $q\\to 1$, simultaneously.

  7. Two dimensional KP systems and their solvability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Zheglov

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce new various generalizations of the classical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy in the case of operators in several variables. These generalizations are the candidates for systems that should play the role, analogous to the role of the KP hierarchy in the classical KP theory, in a generalized KP theory. In particular, they should describe flows of some generalized geometric datas, including those described by A.N.Parshin, for certain initial conditions. The unique solvability of the initial value problem for the generalized KP hierarchies is established. The connection of these systems with universal families of isospectral deformations of certain pairs of commuting differential operators is opened. To prove the solvability of the systems we generalize several results from the works of M.Mulase and A.N.Parshin.

  8. Non-differentiability of devil's staircases and dimensions of subsets of Moran sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wenxia

    Non-differentiability of devil's staircases and dimensions of subsets of Moran referred to as the Devil's staircase (for a = 1_3): F (x) = ~([0; x]); x 2 [0; 1

  9. Non-di erentiability of devil's staircases and dimensions of subsets of Moran sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wenxia

    Non-di#11;erentiability of devil's staircases and dimensions of subsets of Moran sets Wenxia Li, #3. Consider the distribution function which is often referred to as the Devil's staircase (for a = 1 3 ): F (x

  10. On rational solutions of multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Tacchella

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive some rational solutions for the multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies generalising an approach by Wilson. Connections with the multicomponent version of the KP/CM correspondence are discussed.

  11. Domain wall partition functions and KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O Foda; M Wheeler; M Zuparic

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that the partition function of the six vertex model on a finite square lattice with domain wall boundary conditions is (a restriction of) a KP tau function and express it as an expectation value of charged free fermions (up to an overall normalization).

  12. Moran et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2010, 10:32 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2288/10/32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Patty

    Moran et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2010, 10:32 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-of-care: data-base derivation John L Moran*1, Patricia J Solomon2 and the Adult Database Management Committee

  13. Random matrices with external source and KP $?$ functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong Wang

    2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we prove that the partition function in the random matrix model with external source is a KP $\\tau$ function.

  14. BKP and CKP revisited: The odd KP system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

    2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Restricting a linear system for the KP hierarchy to those independent variables t\\_n with odd n, its compatibility (Zakharov-Shabat conditions) leads to the "odd KP hierarchy". The latter consists of pairs of equations for two dependent variables, taking values in a (typically noncommutative) associative algebra. If the algebra is commutative, the odd KP hierarchy is known to admit reductions to the BKP and the CKP hierarchy. We approach the odd KP hierarchy and its relation to BKP and CKP in different ways, and address the question whether noncommutative versions of the BKP and the CKP equation (and some of their reductions) exist. In particular, we derive a functional representation of a linear system for the odd KP hierarchy, which in the commutative case produces functional representations of the BKP and CKP hierarchies in terms of a tau function. Furthermore, we consider a functional representation of the KP hierarchy that involves a second (auxiliary) dependent variable and features the odd KP hierarchy directly as a subhierarchy. A method to generate large classes of exact solutions to the KP hierarchy from solutions to a linear matrix ODE system, via a hierarchy of matrix Riccati equations, then also applies to the odd KP hierarchy, and this in turn can be exploited, in particular, to obtain solutions to the BKP and CKP hierarchies.

  15. Algebraic identities associated with KP and AKNS hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Explicit KP and AKNS hierarchy equations can be constructed from a certain set of algebraic identities involving a quasi-shuffle product.

  16. Anonymity and CSP for Voting Systems Murat Moran, James Heather, Steve Schneider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Anonymity and CSP for Voting Systems Murat Moran, James Heather, Steve Schneider Department Processes (CSP). In addition, we formalise conventional voting system with CSP and analyse whether our and the weak anonymity is more suitable specification for the voting processes. Keywords: anonymity, CSP

  17. Elliptic (N,N^\\prime)-Soliton Solutions of the lattice KP Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikarin Yoo-Kong; Frank Nijhoff

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Elliptic soliton solutions, i.e., a hierarchy of functions based on an elliptic seed solution, are constructed using an elliptic Cauchy kernel, for integrable lattice equations of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) type. This comprises the lattice KP, modified KP (mKP) and Schwarzian KP (SKP) equations as well as Hirota's bilinear KP equation, and their successive continuum limits. The reduction to the elliptic soliton solutions of KdV type lattice equations is also discussed.

  18. XXZ scalar products, Miwa variables and discrete KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Foda; G. Schrader

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the quantum/classical integrable model correspondence in the context of inhomogeneous finite length XXZ spin-1/2 chains with periodic boundary conditions and show that the Bethe scalar product of an arbitrary state and a Bethe eigenstate is a discrete KP tau-function. The continuous Miwa variables of discrete KP are the rapidities of the arbitrary state.

  19. Additional reductions in the k-constrained modified KP hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleksandr Chvartatskyi; Yuriy Sydorenko

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional reductions in the modified k-constrained KP hierarchy are proposed. As a result we obtain generalizations of Kaup-Broer system, Korteweg-de Vries equation and a modification of Korteweg-de Vries equation that belongs to modified k-constrained KP hierarchy. We also propose solution generating technique based on binary Darboux transformations for the obtained equations.

  20. The Multicomponent KP Hierarchy: Differential Fay Identities and Lax Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee-Peng Teo

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we show that four sets of differential Fay identities of an $N$-component KP hierarchy derived from the bilinear relation satisfied by the tau function of the hierarchy are sufficient to derive the auxiliary linear equations for the wave functions. From this, we derive the Lax representation for the $N$-component KP hierarchy, which are equations satisfied by some pseudodifferential operators with matrix coefficients. Besides the Lax equations with respect to the time variables proposed in \\cite{2}, we also obtain a set of equations relating different charge sectors, which can be considered as a generalization of the modified KP hierarchy proposed in \\cite{3}.

  1. A new approach to deformation equations of noncommutative KP hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Partly inspired by Sato's theory of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy, we start with a quite general hierarchy of linear ordinary differential equations in a space of matrices and derive from it a matrix Riccati hierarchy. The latter is then shown to exhibit an underlying 'weakly nonassociative' (WNA) algebra structure, from which we can conclude, refering to previous work, that any solution of the Riccati system also solves the potential KP hierarchy (in the corresponding matrix algebra). We then turn to the case where the components of the matrices are multiplied using a (generalized) star product. Associated with the deformation parameters, there are additional symmetries (flow equations) which enlarge the respective KP hierarchy. They have a compact formulation in terms of the WNA structure. We also present a formulation of the KP hierarchy equations themselves as deformation flow equations.

  2. Rise of Kp Total Cross Section and Universality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muneyuki Ishida; Vernon Barger

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase of the measured hadronic total cross sections at the highest energies is empirically described by squared log of center-of-mass energy sqrt s as sigma(tot)= B (log s)2, consistent with the energy dependence of the Froissart unitarity bound. The coefficient B is argued to have a universal value, but this is not proved directly from QCD. In the previous tests of this universality, the p(pbar)p, pi p, and K p forward scatterings were analyzed independently and found to be consistent with B(pp) = B(pip) = B(Kp), although the determined value of B(Kp) had large uncertainty. In the present work, we have further analyzed forward Kp scattering to obtain a more exact value of B(Kp). Making use of continuous moment sum rules(CMSR) we have fully exploited the information of low-energy scattering data to predict the high-energy behavior of the amplitude hrough duality. The estimation of B(Kp) is improved remarkably, and our result strongly supports the universality of B.

  3. Linearisation of the (M,K)-reduced non-autonomous discrete periodic KP equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinsuke Iwao

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The (M,K)-reduced non-autonomous discrete KP equation is linearised on the Picard group of an algebraic curve. As an application, we construct theta function solutions to the initial value problem of some special discrete KP equation.

  4. Discrete KP equation with self-consistent sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Doliwa; Runliang Lin

    2014-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation with sources obtained recently by the "source generalization" method can be incorporated into the squared eigenfunction symmetry extension procedure. Moreover, using the known correspondence between Darboux-type transformations and additional independent variables, we demonstrate that the equation with sources can be derived from Hirota's discrete KP equations but in a space of higher dimension. In this way we uncover the origin of the source terms as coming from multidimensional consistency of the Hirota system itself.

  5. Quasi-symmetric functions and the KP hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

    2009-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-symmetric functions show up in an approach to solve the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy. This moreover features a new nonassociative product of quasi-symmetric functions that satisfies simple relations with the ordinary product and the outer coproduct. In particular, supplied with this new product and the outer coproduct, the algebra of quasi-symmetric functions becomes an infinitesimal bialgebra. Using these results we derive a sequence of identities in the algebra of quasi-symmetric functions that are in formal correspondence with the equations of the KP hierarchy.

  6. 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report E -1 Bari, R.A., Gordon, D., Moran, D., and Volkow, N.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX E 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report E - 1 Bari, R.A., Gordon, D., Moran, D., and Volkow, N., 1997. Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Health Decision Making at Brookhaven National Laboratory (April 29, 1997). Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1997. Environmental

  7. RT = 219+82*P RT = 469+56*P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hupé, Jean-Michel

    =1574+201*P SR RT=520+184*P 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 4 7 11 Jean-Michel Hupé and Nava Rubin, Center)? ? An energy-based model can explain the preference for sliding to coherence. The model involves the area the thickness of the rings. Thicker rings have a larger intersection area. Accordingly, we find that thicker

  8. Kaonic hydrogen versus the $K^{-}p$ low energy data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cieply; J. Smejkal

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exact solution to the $K^{-}$-proton bound state problem formulated in the momentum space. The 1s level characteristics of the kaonic hydrogen are computed simultaneously with the available low energy $K^{-}p$ data. In the strong interaction sector the meson-baryon interactions are described by means of an effective (chirally motivated) separable potential and its parameters are fitted to the experimental data.

  9. On the construction of the KP line-solitons and their interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbarish Chakravarty; Tim Lewkow; Ken-ichi Maruno

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The line-soliton solutions of the Kadomtsev--Petviashvili (KP) equation are investigated in this article using the tau-function formalism. In particular, the Wronskian and the Grammian forms of the tau-function are discussed, and the equivalence of these two forms are established. Furthermore, the interaction properties of two special types of 2-soliton solutions of the KP equation are studied in details.

  10. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WEAK-LINED T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D William Herbst and Edward C. Moran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WEAK-LINED T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D William Herbst and Edward C. Moran 15D has been detected as an X-ray source in a 95.7 ks exposure from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory archives. A maximum X-ray luminosity of 1:5; 1029 ergs s?1 is derived in the 0.5­8 keV band, corresponding

  11. DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DFTand k.p modellingof the phase transitions of lead and tin halideperovskites for photovoltaic Rennes, UMR 6226, 35042 Rennes, France KeywordsPerovskite, photovoltaic, first-principles calculations, k these hybrid semiconductor photovoltaic cells(HSPC) maydiffer from the one of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC

  12. Universal Whitham hierarchy, dispersionless Hirota equations and multi-component KP hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanehisa Takasaki; Takashi Takebe

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to identify the universal Whitham hierarchy of genus zero with a dispersionless limit of the multi-component KP hierarchy. To this end, the multi-component KP hierarchy is (re)formulated to depend on several discrete variables called ``charges''. These discrete variables play the role of lattice coordinates in underlying Toda field equations. A multi-component version of the so called differential Fay identity are derived from the Hirota equations of the $\\tau$-function of this ``charged'' multi-component KP hierarchy. These multi-component differential Fay identities have a well-defined dispersionless limit (the dispersionless Hirota equations). The dispersionless Hirota equations turn out to be equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for the $S$-functions of the universal Whitham hierarchy. The differential Fay identities themselves are shown to be a generating functional expression of auxiliary linear equations for scalar-valued wave functions of the multi-component KP hierarchy.

  13. Quantum transport in crystals: effective-mass theorem and k.p Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi Barletti; Naoufel Ben Abdallah

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the effective mass approximation and k.p multi-band models, describing quantum evolution of electrons in a crystal lattice, are discussed. Electrons are assumed to move in both a periodic potential and a macroscopic one. The typical period of the periodic potential is assumed to be very small, while the macroscopic potential acts on a much bigger length scale. Such homogenization asymptotic is investigated by using the envelope-function decomposition of the electron wave function. If the external potential is smooth enough, the k.p and effective mass models, well known in solid-state physics, are proved to be close (in strong sense) to the exact dynamics. Moreover, the position density of the electrons is proved to converge weakly to its effective mass approximation.

  14. moran-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. NoremI PreparedCustomer7 Estimating

  15. moran-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. NoremI PreparedCustomer7

  16. With a Cole-Hopf transformation to solutions of the noncommutative KP hierarchy in terms of Wronski matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Folkert Muller-Hoissen

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In case of the KP hierarchy where the dependent variable takes values in an (arbitrary) associative algebra A, it is known that there are solutions which can be expressed in terms of quasideterminants of a Wronski matrix which solves the linear heat hierarchy. We obtain these solutions without the help of quasideterminants in a simple way via solutions of matrix KP hierarchies (over A) and by use of a Cole-Hopf transformation. For this class of exact solutions we work out a correspondence with 'weakly nonassociative' algebras.

  17. Electrical conductivity of open-cell metal foams K.P. Dharmasena and H.N.G. Wadley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    with high heat transfer coefficients.1 Other uses as load-supporting electrochemical storage structures alsoElectrical conductivity of open-cell metal foams K.P. Dharmasena and H.N.G. Wadley Department to represent an open-cell aluminum foam and a simplified electrical resistor network derived to model low

  18. 2010 AnnuAl RepoRt Whitehead Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabatini, David M.

    2010 AnnuAl RepoRt Whitehead Institute #12;Fueled by insatiable curiosity, unparalleled intellect lab) PAGE 19 Alberto Salguero Quiles. PAGE 20 Yuxiong Feng (Gupta lab) PAGE 21 Reprinted from Cell, Mitalipova M, Isacson O, Jaenisch R, "Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells free

  19. thE DEan'S REpoRt Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    been set for the College to attract an exceptional new dean who will build upon our strengths and takethE DEan'S REpoRt Sustainable Future MBa Student Sophia Bromfield is positioning herself at the forefront of sustainable business practices through new Scheller Center. #12;hope Wilson, director

  20. Parallel Picoliter RT-PCR Assays Using Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Parallel Picoliter RT-PCR Assays Using Microfluidics Joshua S. Marcus,, W. French Anderson The development of microfluidic tools for high-throughput nucleic acid analysis has become a burgeoning area of research in the post-genome era. Here, we have developed a microfluidic chip to perform 72 parallel 450-p

  1. Search for Theta+ via K+p -> pi+X reaction with a 1.2 GeV/c K+ beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Miwa; S. Dairaku; D. Nakajima; for the KEK-PS E559 Collaboration

    2008-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Theta+ was searched for via the K+p -> pi+X reaction using the 1.2 GeV/c K+ beam at the K6 beam line of the KEK-PS 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron. In the missing mass spectrum of the K+p -> pi+X reaction, no clear peak structure was observed. Therefore a 90 % C.L. upper limit of 3.5 ub/sr was derived for the differential cross section averaged over 2degree to 22degree in the laboratory frame of the K+p -> pi+Theta+ reaction. This upper limit is much smaller than the theoretical calculation for the t-channel process where a K0* is exchanged. From the present result, either the t-channel process is excluded or the coupling constant of g_{K*N\\Theta} is quite small.

  2. Vapor deposition of platinum alloyed nickel aluminide coatings Z. Yu , K.P. Dharmasena, D.D. Hass, H.N.G. Wadley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Vapor deposition of platinum alloyed nickel aluminide coatings Z. Yu , K.P. Dharmasena, D.D. Hass at high temperature. It requires the chemical vapor deposition of aluminum on a nickel rich superalloy substrate that has been pre-coated with several microns of electrodeposited platinum. Here, we show

  3. IH'.O), u.s. DEP.-'.RT1IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DEP.-'.RT1IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlJINATION RECIPIENT:City of Orlando PROJECT TITLE : City of Orlando - SOW (S) Page 1 of2 STATE: FL Funding...

  4. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, Paul R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockefeller, Gabriel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kares, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  5. RtS>-l-2437 Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    131+Xe132. This conversion is of importance in the calculation of the total Xe generation duringRtS«>-l»-2437 3*- if, -. Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of Xe and Kr in Fission Gas 4* #12;RIS?-M-2437 UTILIZATION OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF Xe AND Kr IN FISSION GAS RELEASE

  6. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 2012 AnnuAl RepoRt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Center for environmental Science has had a long history of studying Maryland's unique ecosystems from treatment and remediation, and aquaculture food sources with less environmental impact. I am proudUniversity of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 2012 AnnuAl RepoRt #12;annUal rEport 2012

  7. FY2010 AnnuAl RepoRt eDA university Center program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaswani, Namrata

    ..................................................................................................... 15 3.1.3. Economic Assessment Process.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration EDA Grant No. 05-66-05033 #12;2 Abstract ThiS ANNUAl REPoRT of ThE ECoNomiC DEvEloPmENT ADmiNiSTRATioN-UNivERSiTy CENTER (EDA-UC) PRoGRAm PRovi

  8. A RT I C L E S Protein complexes containing CYFIP/Sra/PIR121

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    A RT I C L E S Protein complexes containing CYFIP/Sra/PIR121 coordinate Arf1 and Rac1 signalling CYFIP (cytoplasmic fragile-X mental retardation interacting protein; Sra, PIR121), a clathrin heavy) and CYFIP1 and CYFIP2 (also known as Sra1 and PIR121, respectively)19 , which interact with the fragile

  9. RT-Based Administrative Models for Community Cyber Security Information Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    RT-Based Administrative Models for Community Cyber Security Information Sharing Ravi Sandhu, Khalid Zaman Bijon, Xin Jin, and Ram Krishnan Institute for Cyber Security & Department of Computer Science Institute for Cyber Security & Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Texas at San

  10. LAL/RT 04-03 THE TESLA HIGH POWER COUPLER PROGRAM AT ORSAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LAL/RT 04-03 April 2004 1 THE TESLA HIGH POWER COUPLER PROGRAM AT ORSAY T. Garvey, H. Borie, L, Université de Paris-Sud, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay, France Abstract Within the general TESLA collaboration-Orsay are centred on the development of RF input couplers for the cavities of the TESLA linear collider study

  11. Low Power RT-Level Synthesis Techniques: A Tutorial Massoud Pedram and Afshin Abdollahi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    1 Low Power RT-Level Synthesis Techniques: A Tutorial Massoud Pedram and Afshin Abdollahi Dept. of Electrical Engineering University of Southern California Abstract ­ Power consumption and power others. And, while the primary method used to date for reducing power has been supply voltage reduction

  12. Power Minimization Techniques at the RT-Level and Afshin Abdollahi and Massoud Pedram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    1 Power Minimization Techniques at the RT-Level and Below Afshin Abdollahi and Massoud Pedram Dept. of Electrical Engineering University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089 U.S.A. Abstract ­ Power consumption and power-related issues have become a first-order concern for most designs and loom

  13. Dermot Moran List of Publications2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ISBN: 0-74-5621228-X/ ISBN: 0-7456-2122-8 (pbk). Reviews: Stephen Mulhall, `Tangled Roots of Original Gorner) `Gnomic Truth: A Review Article,' Milltown Studies 47 (2001), pp. 96-105 (Tom Wilson) Professor. 93-100 (Tom Rockmore) Thesis Eleven Vol. 69 No. 1 (May 2002), pp. 99-126 (Andrew Dawson) Psychologist

  14. Dermot Moran List of Publications2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Reviews: i. Stephen Mulhall, `Tangled Roots of Original Thoughts,' Times Higher Education Supplement, (7th 47 (2001), pp. 96-105 (Tom Wilson) xiv. `The Many Faces of Phenomenology A Critical Notice (March 2003), pp. 93-100 (Tom Rockmore) xv. Thesis Eleven Vol. 69 No. 1 (May 2002), pp. 99-126 (Andrew

  15. Practice Problems Moran & Shapiro, 5th Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by calculating the work for an adiabatic & reversible (isentropic) pump, and apply a pump efficiency of 70CoolingWater, boiler mFlueGas, etc. 3 #12;Start by filling in the STATES column h1 and s1 = Table A-4 s2s = s1 x2s

  16. Extra Problems Moran & Shapiro, 5th Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BTU (OK) jQLoj = QHi Wnet = 800 480 = 320 BTU 2nd Law 480 800 = 0:60 = real R = 0:75(irreversible) (b) 1st Law Wnet = Qnet = QHi jQLoj = 800 200 = 600 BTU 600 = Wnet BTU (OK) 2nd Law 600 800 = 0:75 = real = rev = 1 500o R 2000oR = 0:75(reversible) (c) 1st Law QHi

  17. Practice Problems Moran & Shapiro, 5th Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F 1.6766 1.6576 to obtain h1 = 1433.2 BTU/lbm s1 = 1.6458 BTU/lbm-o R We always start by calculating the adiabatic and reversible (=isentropic) 1 #12;reference case (turb = 100%) first s2s = s1 = 1.6458 BTU/lbm-o R p2 = 3 psia = sg = 1.8861 BTU/lbm-o R s2s

  18. Experimental confirmation of the Lambda(1405) Ansatz from resonant formation of a K-p quasi-bound state in K- absorption by 3He and 4He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar Esmaili; Yoshinori Akaishi; Toshimitsu Yamazaki

    2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sigma-pi invariant-mass spectra in the resonant capture of K- at rest in 4He, 3He and d are calculated by a coupled-channel procedure for a K-p quasi-bound state of an arbitrary chosen mass (M) and width (Gamma). A chi2 analysis of old 4He bubble chamber data shows a dominance of the s-orbit absorption, and yielded M = 1405.5 ^(+1.4)_(-1) MeV/c2 and Gamma = 26 ^(+4)_(-3) MeV, where a possible population of Sigma0(1385) and also a small p-orbit capture contribution are taken into account. This result confirms the Lambda(1405) ansatz, whereas recent chiral-SU(3) predictions (M ~ 1420 MeV/c2) are excluded. A more stringent test by using a 3He target is proposed .

  19. BLIND RT60 ESTIMATION ROBUST ACROSS ROOM SIZES AND SOURCE DISTANCES Baldwin Dumortier1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    BLIND RT60 ESTIMATION ROBUST ACROSS ROOM SIZES AND SOURCE DISTANCES Baldwin Dumortier1 be blindly es- timated from a speech or music signal. Current methods often implicitly assume sound sources. This paper features two contributions. Firstly, we propose a blind RT60 estimation method

  20. Chemical composition and RT[sub NDT] determinations for Midland weld WF-70

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Swain, R.L.; Miller, M.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy-Section Steal Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series has the objective to investigate the affects of radiation on the fracture toughness of the low-upper-shelf submerged-arc welds (B W designation WF-70) in the reactor pressure vessel of the canceled Midland Unit 1 nuclear plant. This report discusses determination of variations in chemical composition And reference temperature (RT[sub NDT]) throughout the welds. Specimens were machined from different sections and through thickness locations in both the beltline and nozzle course welds. The nil-ductility transition temperatures ranged from [minus]40 to [minus]60[degrees]C ([minus]40 and [minus]76[degrees]F) while the RT[sub NDT]S, controlled by the Charpy behavior, varied from [minus]20 to 37[degrees]C ([minus]4 to 99[degrees]F). The upper-shelf energies varied from 77 to 108 J (57 to 80 ft-lb). The combined data revealed a mean 41-J (30-ft-lb) temperature of [minus]8[degrees]C (17[degrees]F) with a mean upper-shelf energy of 88 J (65 ft-lb). The copper contents range from 0.21 to 0.34 wt % in the beltline weld and from 0.37 to 0.46 wt % in the nozzle course weld. Atom probe field ion microscope analyses indicated substantial depletion of copper in the matrix but no evidence of copper clustering. Statistical analyses of the Charpy and chemical composition results as well as interpretation of the ASME procedures for RT[sub NDT] determination are discussed.

  1. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 2 to 60 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 70 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 50 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 70 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 50, 40 40, and 30 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

  2. Oceanography Vol.21, No.392 W o r k s h o p r e p o rt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    limits the extent of carbon sequestration from the atmo- sphere. The mechanisms controlling both the impact of ongoing climate and ocean circulation changes on this carbon sequestration. To identify gapsOceanography Vol.21, No.392 W o r k s h o p r e p o rt Controls on organic Carbon export

  3. Detection of GRB 090618 with RT-2 Experiment Onboard the Coronas-Photon Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Agrawal, V K; Chakrabarti, S K; Nandi, A; Debnath, D; Kotoch, T B; Sarkar, R; Chidambaram, T R; Vinod, P; Sreekumar, S; Kotov, Y D; Buslov, A S; Yurov, V N; Tyshkevich, V G; Arkhangelskij, A I; Zyatkov, R A; Naik, Sachindra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRB 090618 using the RT-2 Experiment onboard the Coronas-Photon satellite. GRB 090618 shows multiple peaks and a detailed study of the temporal structure as a function of energy is carried out. As the GRB was incident at an angle of 77 degree to the detector axis, we have generated appropriate response functions of the detectors to derive the spectrum of this GRB. We have augmented these results using the publicly available data from the Swift BAT detector and show that a combined spectral analysis can measure the spectral parameters quite accurately. We also attempt a spectral and timing analysis of individual peaks and find evidence for a systematic change in the pulse emission characteristics for the successive pulses. In particular, we find that the peak energy of the spectrum, E_p, is found to monotonically decrease with time, for the successive pulses of this GRB.

  4. Regional measurements of /sup 14/Cmisonidazole distribution and blood flow in subcutaneous RT-9 experimental tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasberg, R.; Horowitz, M.; Strong, J.; Molnar, P.; Patlak, C.; Owens, E.; Fenstermacher, J.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional (/sup 14/C)misonidazole-derived radioactivity (MISO*) was measured by quantitative autoradiography in s.c. RT-9 experimental tumors 0.5, 2, and 4 h after an i.v. bolus (25 mg) and constant infusion (10 mg/h) in rats. Misonidazole (MISO) concentration in plasma, tumor, and other tissues was also measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The distribution of MISO* in the tumors always resulted in a characteristic pattern with high peripheral and low central values. The high-activity regions in the tumor rim achieved tissue: plasma MISO* activity ratios of 0.97 and 2.2 by 0.5 and 4 h, respectively; for central tumor regions, this ratio was 0.20 and 0.32 for the same periods, respectively. The limited distribution of MISO* to central tumor regions could be correlated to low values of blood flow (measured with (/sup 131/I)iodoantipyrine) and to diffusion from peripheral tumor regions. Low blood flow in the central regions of these tumors will significantly limit the distribution of MISO and other drugs to viable-appearing cells in these areas and could account in part for the failures of chemotherapy in certain solid tumors. Pharmacokinetic modeling indicates that 1 to 9 h may be necessary for MISO concentrations in some tumor regions to reach 50% of that in plasma.

  5. STR82: combined string and user-interface library for VAX/VMS, RSX-11M, and RT-11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbarini, J.P. Jr.

    1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined string and user interface library was written to aid programmers in writing portable code. The library has been implemented under Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX/VMS, RSX-11M, and RT-11 operations systems for use with FORTRAN programs. This is a reference manual for STR82 which is a library containing string routines and user interface routines. Versions of the library exist for use with VAX-FORTRAN programs running under VAX/VMS and for use with either FORTRAN IV-PLUS or FORTRAN IV programs using PDP-11's running RSX-11M or RT-11. The manual is for programmers using the library on one or more of these systems. Included are the logical functions of the routines and their calling sequences.

  6. WSU foUndation/2006-2007 2006-2007 annUaL REPoRt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    WSU foUndation/2006-2007 2006-2007 annUaL REPoRt #12;2 WSU foUndation/2006-2007 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 LEttER fRoM tHE PRESidEnt 4 fEatURE StoRiES 10 finanCiaL REPoRt 14 foUndation LEadERSHiP 17 HonoR RoLL of donoRS 8 LaUREatES 22 BEnEfaCtoRS 38 PRESidEnt'S aSSoCiatES 49 LEGaCY aSSoCiatES 52 CoRPoRationS, foUndationS

  7. Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

  8. Energy Dependence of $K/?$, $p/?$, and $K/p$ Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions from $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; R. Esha; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy-ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical $K/\\pi$, $p/\\pi$, and $K/p$ fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0-5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies $\\rm \\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable $\\rm \

  9. STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1278 http://financialaid.uoregon.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon #12;STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon

  10. Safety evaluation of a recombinant plasmin derivative lacking kringles 2-5 and rt-PA in a rat model of transient ischemic stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine 2012, 4:102012 References 1. NINDS (rt-PA Stroke Study Group): Tissueactivator for acute ischemic stroke. N Engl J Med 1995, 333:

  11. Assignment of the human RT6 gene to 11q13 by PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Kuehl, M.; Thiele, H.G.; Singh, S. (Univ. Hospital, Hamburg (Germany)); Van Heyningen, V. (Medical Research Council, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Hoovers, J. (Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Grzeschik, K.H. (Univ. of Marburg (Germany))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RT6 is a T cell membrane protein that has attracted interest because a defect in RT6 expression is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune type I diabetes in DP-BB rats and NOD mice. Using PCR screening of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization, the authors have determined that the gene for the human RT6 homologue is located at 11q13, centromeric to the gene for tyrosinase (TYR, albino locus) and telomeric to that for fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4). The data suggest that the human RT6 gene constitutes a new linkage group with TYR and the gene for olfactory marker protein (OMP) on 11q, which has a counterpart in mouse chromosome 7. Thus, in the human, the RT6 locus is dissociated from the hemoglobin [beta] chain locus (HBB) and its neighboring conserved linkage group at 11q15, in contrast to the mouse, in which RT6 shows a tighter linkage to Hbb than to Tyr. The results support the conclusion that there has been considerable intrachromosomal reshuffling of linked genes since the divergence of primates and rodents. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Dermot Moran Conference Presentations since 1979 CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Australasian Phenomenology and Hermeneutics Association (APHA) in collaboration with Philosophy at Murdoch-world. Australasian Phenomenology and Hermeneutics Association (APHA) in collaboration with Philosophy at Murdoch

  13. Mechanistic Evaluation of the Pros and Cons of Digital RT-LAMP for HIV1 Viral Load Quantification on a Microfluidic Device and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    to manipulate many single molecules in parallel through a two-step digital process. In the first step weMechanistic Evaluation of the Pros and Cons of Digital RT-LAMP for HIV1 Viral Load Quantification on a Microfluidic Device and Improved Efficiency via a Two-Step Digital Protocol Bing Sun, Feng Shen, Stephanie E

  14. The implementation of non pharmaceutical interventions(NPIs) in smaller to large communities and its relation to RO and R(t) during HIN1 pandemic 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashmi, Sahar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the use of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) during the time of the 2009 HINI pandemic and its possible relation to RO and R(t). RO is defined as the mean number of people that a newly infected ...

  15. Metallicity Distribution in the Milky Way Disk Dana S. Balser, R.T. Rood, T.M. Bania, L.D. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    al. (2006) Sun GC #12;Electron Temperature Radial Gradient K200)(T R)49257()4986406(T e galeMetallicity Distribution in the Milky Way Disk Dana S. Balser, R.T. Rood, T.M. Bania, L.D. Anderson Photo: Harry Morton #12;HII Region Electron Temperature and Metallicity Shaver et al. (1983) 1.15 e C L

  16. K I N D E R G A RT E N T H R O U G H G R A D E 3 AChild Becomes a Reader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    G A RT E N T H R O U G H G R A D E 3 Produced by RMC Research Corporation, Portsmouth, New Hampshire by the National Institute for Literacy of any product, commodity, service, or enterprise in this publication Becomes a Reader Proven Ideas From Research for Parents Kindergarten through Grade 3 This publication

  17. arXiv:1105.4207v1[math.RT]21May2011 Affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras: The center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Arun

    arXiv:1105.4207v1[math.RT]21May2011 Affine and degenerate affine BMW algebras: The center Zajj and affine BMW algebras arise naturally in the context of Schur- Weyl duality for orthogonal and symplectic Lie algebras and quantum groups, respectively. Cyclotomic BMW algebras, affine Hecke algebras

  18. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    version electronically. (b) Training Requirements. Any Contractor personnel who will enter a government site to perform work shall have completed all of the ES&H training...

  19. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDN forAA7/31/136432-NIPO

  20. SF 6432-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDN forAA7/31/136432-NIPORT Title:

  1. Austin(2)-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis, 2014 SEAB MeetingSample

  2. COMPUTATIONAL IMAGING Berthold K.P. Horn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    Ziock, and Lorenzo Fabris. #12;Coded Aperture Imaging · Can't refract or reflect gamma rays · Pinhole Principle #12;Decoding Method Rationale #12;Coded Aperture Imaging · Can't refract or reflect gamma rays Squares Match in FT #12;Polystyrene Micro Beads (1µm) #12;#12;(2) CODED APERTURE IMAGING · Can't refract

  3. KP Renewables Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation,andEnergija JumpK CKP

  4. United States Department of t he Int erior J.A Krug Se creta rJ Fish and -lildlife Service, Albe rt {,1. Da~, Dir~Gtor Yi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ~uick freez ing and cold storaGe of- fish . 7 pp ., 1 cha rt , Decembe r 1946 ~ !I One of a s eries Get'man fishing industry . y Rep c'rt I - Fish process ing machinery .. u nte rview with He rr Baade ri7 7 pp ., De cembe r 1946 . Certa in a spects of t he GE rman fishing industry. 1/ Report II

  5. Local mechanical properties of Alloy 82/182 dissimilar weld joint between SA508 Gr.1a and F316 SS at RT and 320C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Kim, Jin Weon [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the variations of local mechanical and microstructural properties in dissimilar metal weld joints consisting of the SA508 Gr.1a ferritic steel, Alloy 82/182 filler metal, and F316 austenitic stainless steel. Flat or round tensile specimens and transmission electron microscopy disks were taken from the base metals, welds, and heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the joints and tested at room temperature (RT) and/or at 320 C. The tensile test results indicated that the mechanical property was relatively uniform within each material zone, but varied considerably between different zones. Further, significant variations were observed both in the austenitic HAZ of F316 SS and in the ferritic HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a. The yield stress (YS) of the weld metal was under-matched with respect to the HAZs of SA508 Gr.1a and F316 SS by 0.78 to 0.92, although the YS was over-matched with respect to both base metals. The minimum ductility occurred in the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1 at both test temperatures. The plastic instability stress also varied considerably in the weld joints, with minimum values occurring in the SA508 Gr.1a base metal at RT and in the HAZ of F316 SS at 320 C, suggesting that the probability of ductile failure caused by a unstable deformation at the Alloy 82/182 buttering layer is low. Within the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a, the gradient of the YS and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was significant, primarily because of the different microstructures produced by the phase transformation during the welding process. The increment of YS was unexpectedly high in the HAZ of F316 SS, which was explained by the strain hardening induced by a strain mismatch between the weldment and the base metal. This was confirmed by the transmission electron micrographs showing high dislocation density in the HAZ.

  6. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

  7. Electron contamination modeling and skin dose in 6 MV longitudinal field MRIgRT: Impact of the MRI and MRI fringe field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Keall, P. J. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In recent times, longitudinal field MRI-linac systems have been proposed for 6 MV MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT). The magnetic field is parallel with the beam axis and so will alter the transport properties of any electron contamination particles. The purpose of this work is to provide a first investigation into the potential effects of the MR and fringe magnetic fields on the electron contamination as it is transported toward a phantom, in turn, providing an estimate of the expected patient skin dose changes in such a modality. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam were performed. Longitudinal magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T were applied to a 30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3} phantom. Surrounding the phantom there is a region where the magnetic field is at full MRI strength, consistent with clinical MRI systems. Beyond this the fringe magnetic field entering the collimation system is also modeled. The MRI-coil thickness, fringe field properties, and isocentric distance are varied and investigated. Beam field sizes of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15 and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were simulated. Central axis dose, 2D virtual entry skin dose films, and 70 {mu}m skin depth doses were calculated using high resolution scoring voxels. Results: In the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field, electron contamination from the linear accelerator is encouraged to travel almost directly toward the patient surface with minimal lateral spread. This results in a concentration of electron contamination within the x-ray beam outline. This concentration is particularly encouraged if the fringe field encompasses the collimation system. Skin dose increases of up to 1000% were observed for certain configurations and increases above Dmax were common. In nonmagnetically shielded cases, electron contamination generated from the jaw faces and air column is trapped and propagated almost directly to the phantom entry region, giving rise to intense dose hot spots inside the x-ray treatment field. These range up to 1000% or more of Dmax at the CAX, depending on field size, isocenter, and coil thickness. In the case of a fully magnetically shielded collimation system and the lowest MRI field of 0.25 T, the entry skin dose is expected to increase to at least 40%, 50%, 65%, and 80% of Dmax for 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15, and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Conclusions: Electron contamination from the linac head and air column may cause considerable skin dose increases or hot spots at the beam central axis on the entry side of a phantom or patient in longitudinal field 6 MV MRIgRT. This depends heavily on the properties of the magnetic fringe field entering the linac beam collimation system. The skin dose increase is also related to the MRI-coil thickness, the fringe field, and the isocenter distance of the linac. The results of this work indicate that the properties of the MRI fringe field, electron contamination production, and transport must be considered carefully during the design stage of a longitudinal MRI-linac system.

  8. Frequency and longitudinal trends of household care product use Rebecca E. Moran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    SUPERB Indoor environment d-limonene a b s t r a c t The use of household cleaning products and air, frequencies of use of eight types of household cleaning products and air fresheners and the performance. Introduction Household care products, such as cleaning products and air fresheners, are frequently used

  9. Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Planned Transmission Outages Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant...

  10. Influence of the Moran Effect on Spatiotemporal Synchrony in Common Carp Recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Bjornstad et al. 1999; Ranta et al. 1999; Lobo´n-Cervia´ 2004; Lobo´n-Cervia´ and Rinco´n 2004; Ruetz et al

  11. Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4CenterPointChristinaClayCoalof

  12. Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit ReportNextConditional LoanEnergy Reply to Congressman

  13. An Optimally Fair Coin Toss Tal Moran # Moni Naor #+ Gil Segev #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the foundational problems in cryptography: the bias of coin­flipping pro­ tocols. Coin­flipping protocols allow only if the malicious party does not abort prematurely (note that the malicious party can decide to abort after learning the result of the coin flip). This satisfies a rather weak notion of fairness

  14. Moran & Shapiro, 5th Edition Oct. 27 to Nov. 3, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and adiabatic calculation s1 = 1.9263 BTU/lbm-o R from Table A-4E s2s = s1 = 1.9263 BTU/lbm-o R Interpolating

  15. JV between KP Renewables and Living Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen Energy2005) |JMalucelli Energia Place:Living Buildings Jump

  16. Tennessee Business and economic RepoRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    . This public document was promulgated at a cost of $4.50 per copy. Center for Business and Economic Research........................................................................................................................1 Figure 1. Inflation-Adjusted GDP Indexed to End of Recession: Current Expansion Yields Slower ............................... 5 Figure 5. Consumer Price Index Volatility Affected by Food and Energy Prices

  17. enway(Rt.1N) assachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    Harvard Street North Dana-Farber MBTA Stations Longwood Ave. Longwood Green Line Coolidge Corner Fenway Parking MBTA Subway MBTA Bus MapandDirections 44 Binney Street Boston, Massachusetts 02115 617-632-3000 Boston Metro Area Dana-Farber Area #12;MapandDirections By Subway: MBTA Green line Riverside (D line) Get

  18. Mapeando CSP em UML-RT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manoel Messias da Silva Menezes Junior

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A integrao de mtodos formais com notaes semi-formais visuais uma tendncia em engenharia de software. Mtodos formais apresentam uma semntica precisa e permitem verificao (more)

  19. Oceanography Vol.22, No.264 By E r i c P. c h a s s i g N E t, h a r l E y E . h u r l B u rt, E . J o s E Ph M E t zg E r ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanography Vol.22, No.264 By E r i c P. c h a s s i g N E t, h a r l E y E . h u r l B u rt, E . J o s E Ph M E t zg E r , o l E M a rt i N s M E d sta d, J a M E s a . c u M M i N g s , g E o r g E r . h a l l i w E l l , r a i N E r B l E c k , r E My B a r a i l l E , a l a N J . wa l lc r a f

  20. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT McMoran - FE DKT. NO. 13-26-LNG - ORDER

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan FundsDepartment ofNO. 3600 (FTA)LLC -3290 |

  1. Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

  2. 6, 1270112728, 2006 3-D polarised RT and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . of Atmosphere and oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, USA 3 Department of Space Science, Lulea Technical

  3. C tr ti N R rt Construction News Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Set interior tunnel lid and completed waterproofing. · Backfilled at interior tunnel. · Poured underground sanitary. · Received inspection on underground sanitary and storm and completed backfill framing at soffits and clouds on floors 4, 3 and 2. and completed backfill. · Completed gas line boring

  4. C tr ti N R rt Construction News Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MEP coordination. · Continued submittal process. · Completed backfill at exterior tunnel and dock. · Completed setting precast interior tunnel lids. · Completed north stair walls. · Completed north stair tower submittal process. · Completed supports in the new tunnel. · Completed steam condensate and chilled water

  5. AnnuAl RepoRt of ReseARch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    and develop new, and renewable, sources of energy. Compounding the problem is the growing need to avert in this total was $375 million in funding from federal agencies, up from $372 million a year ago. Funding from greenhouse gas concentrations in the global atmosphere, thus slowing the rate of climate change. Energy

  6. College of Engineering ReseaRch RepoRt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    expenditures have more than doubled to $50.4M in 2008 (an average growth of 8% per year). Just as important, such as developing alternative energy sources (pages 6 and 9) and detecting Improvised Explosive Devices (page 8 recognized Technology Commercialization Office helps move early stage research results into the marketplace

  7. s.s. PACIFIC EXPLORER ~RT III -BELOW DECK ARRANGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the operational f~atures of the refrigeration system. The factors considered in the conversion of the ship. At the cessation of hostilities the conversion of the ship was not com- pleted but various governmental agencies the conversion and to detennine the feasibility of mother ships t o expand the scope of the American fishing

  8. Rt Hon Danny Alexander MP Chief Secretary to the Treasury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It is perfectly legitimate to expect energy suppliers and users to bear these costs. Proper scrutiny

  9. Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood,GeorgeKlimaschutzKosmo Solar

  10. PROG RESS REPO RT FOR AEC CONT RACT AT(1

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of amphibi ans in temporar y ponds. Ph.D. thesis Recent Colloqu im Present ations: i . Smith Colleg e, Northa mpton, Mass. - Connecticut College, New London, Conn. Univ. of Rhode...

  11. F'rt -COPY" NBSIR 81-2372 N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    heater and hook-up to the water heating heat pump, the general applicability of the results is limited. #12;NBSIR 81-2372 DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENERGY TEST METHOD FOR A DEDICATED WATER-HEATING HEAT PUMP 4 C of this report is to present a test method for the water heating heat pump coupled with a 50-gallon electric

  12. Use of high-resolution ichnological and stable isotope data for assessing completeness of a KP boundary section, Agost, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    ­P boundary section, Agost, Spain Francisco J. Rodri´guez-Tovar a,*, Francisca Marti´nez-Ruiz b , Stefano M. Bernasconi c a Departamento de Estratigrafi´a y Paleontologi´a, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain b Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra CSIC-Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain c

  13. Observations of PKiKP///PcP amplitude ratios and implications for Earth structure at the boundaries of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koper, Keith D.

    reached that the solid inner core must contain a significant fraction of light element as well [Jephcoat Monitoring System has resulted in hundreds of new observations of precritical reflections from Earth's inner about 0.45 g/cm3 . These values can be reconciled with the higher estimates from normal mode constraints

  14. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 7: Appendices K--P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

  15. This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Patty

    ://www.biomedcentral.com/info/authors/ BMC Medical Research Methodology © 2013 Moran and Solomon This is an open access article distributed generating process BMC Medical Research Methodology 2013, 13:66 doi:10.1186/1471-2288-13-66 John L Moran (john.moran@adelaide.edu.au) Patricia J Solomon (patty.solomon@adelaide.edu.au) ISSN 1471-2288 Article

  16. a. Lngsamt & adiabatiskt reversibel, dvs en isentropisk process V1 = nRT1 / p1 = (m/M) RT1/p1 , massa m = 1 kg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Svar 1303: a. Långsamt & adiabatiskt reversibel, dvs en isentropisk process V1 = n·R·T1 / p1 = (m/M) ·R·T1/p1 , massa m = 1 kg H2 : M = 0.002 kg/mol; CO : M = 0.028 kg/mol; CO2 : M = 0.044 kg/mol p1 = z bar V1 = (R/M) · (300 + 50·a) / z m3 . t.ex. 30066 : p = 3 bar, gas = CO, T1 = 450 K V1 = 0.445 m3

  17. RTE.ie News Sport Business Entertainment Television Radio RT Aertel Performing Groups RT Guide About Mobile Edition Fashion Food Motors Jobs Travel Property Shop Weather Live TV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    About Mobile Edition Fashion Food Motors Jobs Travel Property Shop Weather Live TV Search Search Web of the Middle East, particularly the likes of Saudi Arabia, the picture we get in our heads is one

  18. 2013AnnuAl RepoRt Office of the Vice President for Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Vice President for Research 3 Introduction 4 Statistics 5 Economic Impact 7 Annual Institutional Annual Research Award and Expenditures by Sponsor Type 12 Institutional Federal R&D Funding Activity 13 for number of awards received. · We now have four National Academy members who are all focused on energy

  19. LAL/RT 02-01 TESLA Report 2003-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shows that after such a thermal treatment residual gases spectra and surfaces outgassing rates coming from bare stainless steel are acceptable, copper coating deposition procedure could have introduced UHV requirements, residual gas spectra and surfaces outgassing rates have been measured on copper

  20. Article no. bjoc.1999.0887 Correlation of positive RT-PCR for tyrosinase in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tm Proebstle; W Jiang; J Hgel; U Keilholz; L Weber; C Voit

    peripheral blood of malignant melanoma patients with clinical stage, survival and other risk factors

  1. Preliminary ILAW Formulation Algorithm Description, 24590 LAW RPT-RT-04-0003, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), has contracted with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to design, construct, and commission the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site (DOE 2000). This plant is designed to operate for 40 years and treat roughly 50 million gallons of mixed hazardous high-level waste (HLW) stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The process involves separating the hight-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions through filtration, leaching, Cs ion exchange, and precipitation. Each fraction will be separately vitrified into borosilicate waste glass. This report documents the initial algorithm for use by Hanford WTP in batching LAW and glass-forming chemicals (GFCs) in the LAW melter feed preparation vessel (MFPV). Algorithm inputs include the chemical analyses of the pretreated LAW in the concentrate receipt vessel (CRV), the volume of the MFPV heel, and the compositions of individual GFCs. In addition to these inputs, uncertainties in the LAW composition and processing parameters are included in the algorithm.

  2. FY 2014 AgencY FinAnciAl RepoRt www.nasa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    test of the Orion spacecraft will launch aboard a Delta IV Heavy launch vehicle in early FY 2015 are flying regular contracted re- supply missions, delivering cargo and science experiments from a U the "habitable zone" of a distant star, the zone around a star where water remains liquid on the surface

  3. Modeling and Solving Location Routing and Scheduling Problems R.T. Berger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralphs, Ted

    potentially overestimate the number of vehicles required and the associated distribution cost. In many cases, construct a set of delivery routes, and assign routes to vehicles in such a way as to minimize total cost-objective LRSP in which they seek to balance total cost, total vehicle time, and total vehicle load. They test

  4. '>' Ith the notat ion " Rep ( 1949)" On the current editio n of this cha rt (no'>'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a nd eodetlc Sune) hart o. 9302 . Benng ea. Eastern Part ( 17th ed .. re\\ 1956) al 0 ~ho~ these two o

  5. LIVE CARS FOR USE IN CATFISH INDUSTRY Donald C. ,r nland, Rob rt L. ..rill,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to deep water, or set adjacent to a well head for holding fish. Haul trucks can be scheduled more easily to loading sit s or shift d to saf areas for holding. When us d along Ith a haul Sf ine, pulling accurately because fish in properly staked live cars do not escape and can be harvested before truck arrives

  6. Modeling benzene plume elongation mechanisms exerted by ethanol using RT3D with a general

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    E10 gasoline (i.e., a blend with 10% vol/vol ethanol/ gasoline) showed that mean benzene plume of E10 gasoline (10% vol/vol ethanol), which compares favorably to field observations. For low benzene Act requirements. The widespread use of ethanol in gasoline has led to an increase in its potential

  7. TheJournalofGeneralPhysiology A RT I C L E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendell

    ) and calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI). The CaV /CaV 1-I-II loop and Ca2+ /calmodulin (CaM)/CaV 1­C-gated calcium channels (CaVs) serve as a major source of calcium influx in excitable cells (Hille, 2001). Calcium ions have a unique biological role in that they act as both charge carriers and as chemical

  8. Seattle Regulatory Pathways to Net Zero Water Phase 1 status RePoRt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that re- quire low impact development techniques, provides permitting guidance for rainwater harvesting-site water collection, use, reuse, storage, on-site treatment and release, and identify regulatory authority

  9. Te (R,t) Measurements using Electron Bernstein Wave Thermal Emission on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diem, S J; Efthimion, P C; LeBlanc, B P; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Wilgen, J B; Harvey, R W; Preinhaelter, J; Urban, J

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) routinely studies overdense plasmas with ne of (15) X 1019 m-3 and total magnetic field of <0.6 T, so that the first several electron cyclotron harmonics are overdense. The electrostatic electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in overdense plasmas, exhibits strong absorption, and is thermally emitted at electron cyclotron harmonics. These properties allow thermal EBW emission to be used for local Te measurement. A significant upgrade to the previous NSTX EBW emission diagnostic to measure thermal EBW emission via the oblique B-X-O mode conversion process has been completed. The new EBW diagnostic consists of two remotely steerable, quad-ridged horn antennas, each of which is coupled to a dual channel radiometer. Fundamental (818 GHz) and second and third harmonic (1840 GHz) thermal EBW emission and polarization measurements can be obtained simultaneously.

  10. ISSN0249-0803ISRNINRIA/RT--443--FR+ENG December 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    testbed dedicated to the security analysis of process control networks (SCADA) employed in industrial systems. The testbed is built on real hardware controllers and simulated physical processes which makes processes, we elaborated a methodology to infer a discrete model of the running controlled system through

  11. 554 VOLUME 14 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2013 nature immunology A rt i c l e s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    . 6Core Technology and Research Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan-affinity IgE receptor FcRI on mast cells with IgE and antigen initiates signals leading to the release and circulatory systems, often leading to life-threatening episodes. Environmentally induced alterations

  12. amplification rt-lamp system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    receiver side over an AWGN channel with an energy Ulukus, Sennur 215 Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin: Numerical BEM simulations vs experimental evidences...

  13. Tako imenovani Na?rt za pridigo iz rokopisne dobe sloven?ine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhailov, Nikolai

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?mlicherweise ist aber die Akkusa- tivrektion gebraucht (wahrscheinlich als Analogie: Ia + Acc. 'f?r'). naIega Pron. poss. 1. P. PI. m. Gen. Sg. in -ega. goIpudy Subst. m. des i-Stammes (wie im CRR, SR, KR, SGR) pr?sentiert hier den U-Reflex des ursl. o, was ein... Zeichen der no- tranjgina oder der dolenjSCina sein kann. tu Adv. loc. mod. slow. tu 'hier' oder Pron. dem. N. Sg. n. mod. slow. to mit dem U-Ref lex. Iy k?nnte das Reflexivpronomen si sein. Semantisch m??te es aber als ie 'noch' in- terpretiert...

  14. a rt i c l e s nature medicine VOLUME 19 | NUMBER 4 | APRIL 2013 465

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that limit their clinical efficacy. IFA-based vaccines are water-in-oil emulsions of antigen in mineral oil with cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov). Here we used a preclinical model to better understand melanoma-specific CD8

  15. 612 VOLUME 13 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2012 nature immunology A rt i c l e s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Meram Medical Faculty, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey. 12Department

  16. RAPID COMMUNICATION CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wave thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback diode laser will be described. The CW TEC DFB- moelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy

  17. ISSN0249-0803ISRNINRIA/RT--7612--FR+ENG Vision, Perception and Multimedia Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    by reconstructing simultaneously buildings, trees and topographically complex grounds. A major contribution of our work is the original way of modeling buildings which guarantees a high generalization level while vision, 3D-geometry, shape representation, urban scenes, point data, energy minimization, Markov Random

  18. ISSN0249-0803ISRNINRIA/RT--0387--FR+ENG Programs, Verification and Proofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    NATIONAL DE RECHERCHE EN INFORMATIQUE ET EN AUTOMATIQUE Integration of XML streams in information flow,version1-23Aug2010 #12;Centre de recherche INRIA Lille ­ Nord Europe Parc Scientifique de la Haute Borne 78 50 Integration of XML streams in information flow analysis for Java Arnaud Fontaine Theme

  19. RT-PCR Hiroki Kuroda/Hojoon Lee Most Common Technique for detecting molecular markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    extraction with RNA-STAT 1. Lyse six embryos by pipetting with 800 µl of RNA-Stat60. Note: Amount of total Cerberus Xnr1 Xnr2 Xnr5 Xnr6 Sox17 Mix1 Milk Mixer BMP target Vent1 Vent2 Msx1 Msx2 ID BCNE center Chordin

  20. 2012 EmploymEnt REpoRt RICE MBA Full TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior Consultant Deutsche Bank Ryan Stohl Investment Banking Associate Energy Market Exchange Melanie Walker Investment Banking Associate Kalypso Mallory Engler Senior Consultant Sunny Sun Senior Consultant Magalhaes Global Accounts Manager Lloyd's Jeffrey Freedman Associate Marathon Oil Corporation Jesse Filipi

  1. SM@RT: Applying Architecture-based Runtime Management into Internetware Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China huanggang@sei.pku.edu.cn, songhui the RAI implementation code without any modification on the source code of the target system on Eclipse GUI and Android, C2 arc- hitectural models on JOnAS, Rainbow C/S style on PLASTIC and UML models

  2. Department of recreational SportS AnnuAl RepoRt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    of students and campus alike. oSU recreational Sports is recognized as a leader and source of best practices center. The study was originated in response to increasing concerns by the campus community related to overcrowding. Substantial and sustained growth has created a demand that currently exceeds our capacity

  3. AnnuAl RepoRt Spend one year in our department of chemical engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    unmistakingly familiar with its confluence of energy and passion, the measureable and immeasureable ways are highly empowered to provide cutting-edge resources and access to world-renowned faculty who haveRing sAt scoRes Fall 2013 (Avg.) enteRing gRe scoRes fAll 2013 (Avg.) enRollment stAtistics Note: 1 Total

  4. Complete genome sequence of Syntrophobotulus glycolicus type strain (FlGlyRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mwirichia, Romano [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Syntrophobotulus glycolicus Friedrich et al. 1996 is currently the only member of the genus Syntrophobotulus within the family Peptococcaceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the genome-sequenced fraction of tree of life. When grown in pure culture with glyoxylate as carbon source the organism utilizes glyoxylate through fermentative oxidation, whereas, when grown in syntrophic co-culture with homoacetogenic or methanogenic bacteria, it is able to oxidize glycolate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. No other organic or inorganic carbon source is utilized by S. glycolicus. The subdivision of the family Peptococcaceae into genera does not reflect the natural relationships, particularly re- garding the genera most closely related to Syntrophobotulus. Both Desulfotomaculum and Pelotomaculum are paraphyletic assemblages, and the taxonomic classification is in signifi- cant conflict with the 16S rRNA data. S. glycolicus is already the ninth member of the family Peptococcaceae with a completely sequenced and publicly available genome. The 3,406,739 bp long genome with its 3,370 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartmentScripting AttacksThere isAttacksService on

  6. APLUW 2009 BienniAL RePoRt 1 tABLe of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    and medical acoustics, and other areas of applied physics continues to be active and productive. At and development programs, improved research integration, and upgraded infrastructure--have been realized. We-sea experimentation remains in high demand, and invention is thriving: APL-UW has spun off eight companies in nearly

  7. A Search For Charmless Dihadron Decays of Neutral b-Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misawa, Shigeki

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plots for the Kir, Kp, and pir mass assignments. Plots a, c,the A mass for the Kp and pir combinations. Plots a, c, andused for the Kir, Kp, and pir final state. The use of two

  8. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse Report No. 11. Appendices K-P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  9. Interrelation of structural and electronic properties in InxGa1-xN/GaN quantum dots using an eight-band kp model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is crucial for improving the performance of optical and optoelectronic devices.1­6 In this regard, AR the performance of optical and optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic systems and light-emitting diodes

  10. Nuclear and Plasma Physics Heriot-Watt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    and nano-diamond for fusion reactors" Romanian J Physics, 56 Supplement, 15-22, 2011 5. D. A. J. Moran, D

  11. TEM studies of laterally overgrown GaN layers grown on non-polar substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Ni, X.; Morkoc, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73, 1691 (1998). 11. H. Marchand, J.P. Ibbetson, P.T. Fini,1999). 17. P. Fini, H. Marchand, J.P. Ibbetson, B. Moran, L.

  12. Universittsmedizin Gttingen Publikationen und Hochschulschriften 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollisch, Tim

    -transduced, encephalitogenic T cells. J AUTOIMMUN, 35(2): 135-44. Buchbeiträge 1. Flügel A, Moran LB, Graeber M, Scheithauer BW

  13. Ecological Restoration for Community Benefit: People and Landscapes in Northern California, 1840-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Lucy Ontario

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Stream Restoration. Restoration Ecology 3,Robertson. Privatizing stream restoration in the US. Moran, Sharon. Stream Restoration Projects: A Critical

  14. Weakcontrast R/T coefficients in weakly anisotropic media: Pwave 9iFODY#9DYU\\XN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    of transversely isotropic halfspaces. Zillmer, Gajewski & Kashtan (1998) derived PP reflection coefficient

  15. Magnetic properties of RT2Zn20; R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co, Ru, Os and Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Shuang

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that rare earth intermetallic compounds have versatile, magnetic properties associated with the 4f electrons: a local moment associated with the Hund's rule ground state is formed in general, but a strongly correlated, hybridized state may also appear for specific 4f electronic configuration (eg. for rare earth elements such as Ce or Yb). On the other hand, the conduction electrons in rare earth intermetallic compounds, certainly ones associated with non hybridizing rare earths, usually manifest non-magnetic behavior and can be treated as a normal, non-interacted Fermi liquid, except for some 3d-transition metal rich binary or ternary systems which often manifest strong, itinerant, d electron dominant magnetic behavior. Of particular interest are examples in which the band filling of the conduction electrons puts the system in the vicinity of a Stoner transition: such systems, characterized as nearly or weakly ferromagnet, manifest strongly correlated electronic properties [Moriya, 1985]. For rare earth intermetallic compounds, such systems provide an additional versatility and allow for the study of the behaviors of local moments and hybridized moments which are associated with 4f electron in a correlated conduction electron background.

  16. 2012 RepoRt IllInoIs natuRal hIstoRy suRvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    research institute From the Executive Director 3 Financial Overview 5 Issues 6 Advancing Clean Energy as an example for the nation and the world. Editors: Susan Braxton, Libby Johnston, Lisa Sheppard, Steve Wald around the world. Among a myriad of other research and ser- vice projects, we provide data and expertise

  17. ISSN0249-0803ISRNINRIA/RT--0335--FR+ENG INSTITUT NATIONAL DE RECHERCHE EN INFORMATIQUE ET EN AUTOMATIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ´esum´e : Les projets comme SETI@home et Folding@home ont popularis´e le calcul de grille de PCs sur Internet@home and Folding@home have popularized Internet Desktop Grid (IDG) computing. The first generation of IDG projects

  18. 944 VOLUME 20 NUMBER 8 AUGUST 2013 nature structural & molecular biology a rt i c l e s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    division cycle1,2. The yeast origin recognition complex (ORC), which comprises Orc proteins 1 with the ORC to load hexameric MCM2-7, which comprises minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) proteins 2-resolution EM structures of ORC from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScORC) and Drosophila melanogaster (DmORC) have

  19. 1068 VOLUME 42 | NUMBER 12 | DECEMBER 2010 Nature GeNetics A rt i c l e s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Bakker, Paul

    14, Jacqueline C M Witteman18,52, Heyo K Kroemer60, W H Linda Kao33, Susan R Heckbert2,47,49, Thomas Meitinger29,30, Albert Hofman18,52, Harry Campbell40, Aaron R Folsom19, Dirk J van Veldhuisen14, Christine,4,52,78, Stephan B Felix9,78, Glenn I Fishman26,78, Yalda Jamshidi54,74,78, Bruno H Ch Stricker18

  20. nature structural & molecular biology VOLUME 20 NUMBER 3 MARCH 2013 347 a rt i c l e s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnat, Ray

    , Italy. 5Institute for Molecular Systems Biology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. 6Competence Center for Systems Physiology and Metabolic Diseases, ETH Zurich, Zurich of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. 3Structural Biology Laboratory

  1. DOE/SC-ARM-10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of

  2. DOE/SC-ARM-12-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of4 The2-023 ARM

  3. COBIOT-854; NO. OF PAGES 8 Please cite this article in press as: Lovley DR, Nevin KP. A shift in the current: New applications and concepts for microbe-electrode electron exchange, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2011), doi:10.1016/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    - trical power with microbial fuel cells over the last decade, some of the early optimism for power in aquatic sediments with benthic microbial fuel cells continues to be a promising application [5­8]. However, after some of the rather obvious design flaws in early microbial fuel cells were rectified, there has

  4. I.V. Ptashnik and K.P. Shine Vol. 16, No. 3 /March 2003/ Atmos. Oceanic Opt. 251 0235-6880/03/03 251-05 $02.00 2003 Institute of Atmospheric Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Academy of Science, Russia Received January 13, 2003 Line-by-line calculations in the spectral region 2 remains an important concern for global climate modeling. It was shown more then 10 years ago in Ref. 1 in the different models. This factor has become more important recently as significant changes have taken place

  5. Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik Version: August 2012 Name Matr.-Nr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Intelligente eingebettete Systeme BS Bildgebende Systeme Modul-Nr. Modulname KP LZF Note LM 1 LM 2 LM 3 LM 4 Modul-Nr. Modulname KP LZF Note LM 1 LM 2 LM 3 LM 4 LM 5 LM 6 LM 7 LM 8 Summe KP 3. Wahlpflichtmodul im Bereich Fachübergreifende Kompetenzen Modul-Nr. Modulname KP LM 1 4. Zusätzliche LM, die im Diploma Suppl

  6. Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use additional performance indicators (e.g. , consumption ofto calculate the key performance indicators (KP|s). This

  7. SEMESTER REPORT SUMMARY PROGRAM REVIEW COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    ; John Wang, ENGR; Georg Mauer, ENGR; Margot Mink Colbert, FA; Dana Moran Williams, FA; Daniel Ortega, FA; Jeanne Brown, LIB; Jennifer Fabbi, LIB; Caroline Smith, LIB; Rod Metcalf , SCI; Ganqing Jiang , SCI; Jeff

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - andersons imants ziemelis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Anderson Dr. Clive Fox Dr. Todd W. Anderson Dr. James S. Franks Dr. Michael P. Armstrong... . Michael L. Domeier Dr. Beatrice Morales-Nin Dr. David Donald Dr. Paul Moran Dr....

  9. Harem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Silke

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American Research Center in Egypt 11, pp. 98 - 101. Moran,El-Bahari. Vol. 2. Memoir of the Egypt Exploration Fund 30.London: The Egypt Exploration Fund. Nord, Del 1981 The Term

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE Magma at depth: a retrospective analysis of the 1975 unrest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the following three decades. The area of snow-free ground in the active crater has not returned to pre, USA. In: Moran SC, Newhall CG, Roman DC (eds) Failed eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

  11. Study of pollution in the El Jadida-Safi Atlantic coastal zone (Morocco) by using PIXE and SSNTD methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    region (Morocco). In addition, uranium (238 U) and thorium (232 Th) contents were evaluated in the same enterprise in the world, very little after American IMC Agrico Co. (Group Freeport McMoran). Mining

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - approach improves icu Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 36 Moran et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2010, 10:32 http:www.biomedcentral.com1471-22881032 Summary: an improved...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - adult icu population Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Mental Health Collection: Biology and Medicine 25 Moran et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2010, 10:32 http:www.biomedcentral.com1471-22881032 Summary: -of-care:...

  14. Temporal variation of residential pesticide use and comparison of two survey platforms: a longitudinal study among households with young children in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiangmei (May); Bennett, Deborah H; Ritz, Beate; Tancredi, Daniel J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005, 113:123136. Vogt R, Bennett D, Cassady D, Frost J,Health 2012, 11:83. Wu XM, Bennett DH, Ritz B, Cassady DL,48:31093119. Moran RE, Bennett DH, Tancredi D, Wu XM, Ritz

  15. air resources board: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute, Vanessa Escobar of the Texas Water Development Board, and Ernest Moran of the San Antonio River Author- ity calculate load duration curves... Jensen, Ric 2008-01-01 133...

  16. 304 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 4, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 1991 A Process Control Methodology Applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jess A.

    304 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 4, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 1991 A Process.Moran was with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cam- bridge, MA 02139. He is now with McKinsey and Company, Inc., San

  17. Fractal Strings and Multifractal Zeta Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapidus, Michel L.; Lvy-Vhel, Jacques; Rock, John A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decompositions of Moran fractals. Adv. Math. 92, 196236 (Probab. 12, 8. Falconer, K. : Fractal GeometryMathematicalB.M. , Lapidus, M.L. : Random fractal strings: their zeta

  18. Field results of the polymer flooding pilot project in eastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCauley, R.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Moran field in Allen County, Kans., has been producing since the early 1900s. Flooding became the principal means of production in this pool in 1957. Inexco purchased the Moran field in 1968. In June of 1975, Inexco Oil Co. initiated a Polymer Pilot Project on the Kreiger Lease in the Moran field. In March of 1977, this project was expanded from it's original 20 acres to a 126-acre project. This case history addresses the financial and technical success of this project and is considered significant in terms of the future of enhanced recovery projects in this type of reservoir. Inexco has demonstrated the feasibility and successful recovery of additional oil from the Moran Pool by means of the addition of polymer to the existing waterflood. This work describes the operations and interpretation of the results.

  19. What are matching gifts? Many corporations match their employees' charitable contributions. Your support for The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    Mobil FAMM LLC Firestone/Bridgestone Tire First Data Corporation FMC Foundation Freeport McMoran, Inc Co. Georgia Gulf Corporation Goodyear Corp. Graybar Electric Co. Great Lakes Carbon Corp. Grinnell

  20. Generalized Cauchy matrix approach for non-autonomous discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Songlin Zhao; Wei Feng; Shoufeng Shen; Jun Zhang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the non-autonomous discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) system in terms of generalized Cauchy matrix approach. These equations include non-autonomous bilinear lattice KP equation, non-autonomous lattice potential KP equation, non-autonomous lattice potential modified KP equation, non-autonomous asymmetric lattice potential modified KP equation, non-autonomous lattice Schwarzian KP equation and non-autonomous lattice KP-type Nijhoff-Quispel-Capel equation. By introducing point transformations, all the equations are described as simplified forms, where the lattice parameters are absorbed. Several kinds of solutions more than multi-soliton solutions to these equations are derived by solving determining equation set. Lax representations for these equations are also discussed.

  1. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Linking to the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) RT3D and MT3DMS Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Linkages to the Groundwater Modeling System have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to more realistically assess the risk to the public of radioactive contaminants at NRC-licensed sites. Common software tools presently in use are limited in that they cannot assess contaminant migration through complex natural environments. The purpose of this initiative is to provide NRC with a licensing safety-analysis tool with sufficient power, flexibility, and utility that it can serve as the primary software platform for analyzing the hazards associated with licensing actions at those complex sites at which the traditional tools are inappropriate. As a tool designed to realistically approximate prospective doses to the public, this initiative addresses NRCs safety-performance goal by confirming that licensing actions do not result in undue risk to the public.

  2. 2010-2011 ANNUAl REPoRt O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    , Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. ·Each year, Einstein faculty members and some 50 medical experienced acute lung problems after exposure to World trade Center dust have not yet recovered. ­ Found, Einstein's Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus pulses with energy. Our research centers are where our world

  3. RT in situ PCR detection of MART-1 and TRP-2 mRNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of melanoma and nevi.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itakura, Eijun; Huang, Rong-Rong; Wen, Duan-Ren; Paul, Eberhard; Wnsch, Peter H; Cochran, Alistair J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochran AJ. Detection of tyrosinase mRNA in formalin-fixed,PM, Hearing VJ. A second tyrosinase- related protein, TRP-2,mRNA isoforms of the tyrosinase-related protein-2/DOPAchrome

  4. J. Electrochem. Soc., Vol. 142, No. 11, November 1995 9 The Electrochemical Society, Inc. 3815 Q = In [c~a+ ~ ~ ~ -in io -RT ~ [5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    . Kucera, Progress in Batteries and Solar Cells, 6, 159 (1987). 4. W. M. Vogel and C. D. Iacovangelo measure- ments (usually 15 min). The activation polarization curve for the high-Btu gas is shown in Fig. 3 and the second wave is related to oxidation of Fe2§to Fe3§in the structure; (iv) the exchange current density

  5. T e c h n i ca l R e p o RT s naTuRe medicine VOLUME 20 | NUMBER 7 | JULY 2014 785

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    noise detectors with thermoelectric cooling and from the application of sophisticated software precompensation, adaptive optics modulating the excitation light and a fluorescence detector in a nondescanned

  6. Don't break the pipeline: Ensuring a workforce for the burning plasma era G.M. Olynyk, Z.S. Hartwig, and R.T. Mumgaard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don't break the pipeline: Ensuring a workforce for the burning plasma era G.M. Olynyk, Z.S. Hartwig, creating and sustaining a workforce requires a robust "pipeline" of people--from undergraduates to Ph.D stu uninterrupted and the decades of accumulated expertise are not lost due to a discontinuity in the pipeline. An e

  7. 1.1 Basic ideas r(t) is the position of a particle; r = |r| is the distance to the origin.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucklidge, Alastair

    speed of the particle is v = R. (11) #12;Chapter 2 Dynamics: Newton's laws of motion and gravitation 2 interacting though equal and opposite forces is constant. 3 #12;4 2.2 Newton's Law of Gravitation 2.2 Newton's Law of Gravitation Two particles of masses M and m a distance r apart exert a mutually attractive

  8. Analysis of genes regulated by the peroxide response regulator PerR in Borrelia burgdorferi using real-time RT-PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swingle, Kristen Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    encodes a peroxide response regulator (PerR) which regulates gene expression in response to oxidative stress in other organisms. Several borrelial genes with homology to known oxidative stress genes, and the pathogenesis-associated gene dbpA, contain...

  9. arXiv:math/0401317v2[math.RT]11Feb2004 Affine braids, Markov traces and the category O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Arun

    alge- bras, cyclotomic Hecke algebras, affine BMW algebras, cyclotomic BMW algebras, Markov traces) We define the affine BMW algebra (Birman-Murakami-Wenzl) and show that it has a representation theory

  10. Hans Muster Zrich, den XX.9.2013 Wehntalerstrasse 600

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Infrastruktursysteme Pflichtfcher HS LE-Nr. Titel SWS KP 1.Sem. 101-0467-01L Verkehrssysteme 4 6 103-0347-00L LE-Nr. Titel SWS KP 1.Semester 103-0377-00L Introduction to the Data Analysis Software R 1 1 103 MSc RE&IS FS LE-Nr. Titel SWS KP 2.Semester 751-2700-00L Bodenmarkt und Bodenpolitik 2 2 101-0428-00L

  11. androgen deprivation effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Early Monocular Deprivation on Visual Input to Cat Superior Colliculus K-P. HOFFMANN deprived (MD), and binocularly deprived (BD) cats have dem- onstrated that cells of...

  12. Texas camelid health and management survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacklitsch, Brenda Louise

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1 Camelid Background Llamas and alpacas have gained much popularity in recent years. This may be occurring as more people from urban areas decide to move to rural areas for the purpose of having a more laid back lifestyle. Approximately 100... to lack power, so the use of multiple tests was needed to look for patterns of clustering. ArcGIS Spatial Tools4 was used to run the spatial analysis tests. Moran?s autocorrelation was used to measure spatial dependence of disease prevalence. Getis...

  13. ORNL/CDIAC-160 Climatological Distributions of pH, pCO2, Total CO2, Alkalinity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers, Boulder, CO 80309 Prepared by Alex Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National KP 12 04 01 0 and KP 12 02 03 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE

  14. ORNL/CDIAC-147 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004 The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UniversityNDP 001a ORNL/CDIAC-147 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp001.2004 Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

  15. ORNL/CDIAC-128 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr1 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center 1 Energy, Environment of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP#12;ORNL/CDIAC-128 NDP-075 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE R

  16. genomic DNA was isolated from these centrifuged cell pellets and used for am-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    genomic DNA was isolated from these centrifuged cell pellets and used for am- plification of either changes in ruminal bacterial popula- tions. J Wood1, KP Scott,1, G Avgutin2,J Wood1 KP Scott, G of this group from rumen- extracted DNA. Restriction enzyme cleav- age of the PCR product yields profiles

  17. The MUSE-4 Experiment: Prompt Reactivity and Delayed Neutron Measurements A.Billebaud, J.Vollaire, R.Brissot, D.Heuer, C.Le Brun, E.Liatard,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The MUSE-4 Experiment: Prompt Reactivity and Delayed Neutron Measurements A.Billebaud, J the prompt multiplication factor kp and the delayed neutron fraction eff . kp values are obtained from time to experimental rates, the determination of the prompt multiplication factor is done. The delayed neutron fraction

  18. 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Fig. 3 Variation of the ratio of O/U1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    thickness and volume are inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity k or to k/p {p is the density proportional to the 1/3 power of k or k/p. To illustrate our method we take, for comparison purposes to consult any graphs. In addition, the results presented in Fig. 3 can be used to estimate the fin's thermal

  19. Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Mai 2010 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Mai 2010 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik-Nr.^+ KP LZF Note PR Programmierung LM 1 VI Verteilte Informationssysteme LM 2 PV Parallele und Vert. Systemarchitekturen LM 3 OC Organic Computing LM 4 IE Intelligente eingebettete Systeme Summe KP SB Signal- und

  20. Respondent-driven sampling shows successful initiation of prevention services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    reported receiving targeted KP prevention services using RDS Analysis Tool (RDSAT), adjusted for non at risk for HIV in Zanzibar A. Ussi1, A. Khamis1, M. Kimwaga2, F. Khalid1, J. Ward3, J. Tiberio4, S utilization by KP is important in informing policy and program decisions. In 2008, the Zanzibar AIDS Control

  1. S:\\(S) SHARE\\_Project PCC\\Administration\\COMMITTEES\\Iowa RT2 Comm\\2011\\Ia Research & Tech Committee Mtg Mins 2-23-2011 Research and Technology Transfer Committee-Iowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone County Kevin Merryman Iowa DOT James King Fayette County Shashi Nambisan InTrans ­ Director Sandra Clendenen Holcim Mark Dunn Iowa DOT Bob Dawson Iowa DOT Jim Grove FHWA Jim George Dallas County Todd Hanson Iowa DOT Tom Green Allied Construction Co., Inc. Brian Keierleber Buchanan County Jon Hanson City

  2. 40 H A S T I N G S C E N T E R R E P O RT May-June 2008 resident Bush's compromise policy on human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Streiffer, Robert

    -human chimeras. These problems provide ethical reasons not to perform several kinds of important research stem cell lines reveals several problems, providing ethical as well as scientific reasons to overturn derived reveals a parallel ethical argument for expanding feder- al funding. In the course of establish

  3. copyrisht@ree2bythen-""i"",,R3il:'J[$H#"",i*tTy"t"*r1"'J?rt;""mission orthecopyrightowner. Toward Orthogonal Self-Assembly of Redox Active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Orthogonal Self-Assembly of Redox Active Molecules on Pt and Au: Selective Reaction of Disulfide with Au.; Uphaus,R. A. Microchem.J.1990,42, 44, and referencestherein on viologen monolayer electrochemistry. (5

  4. stat,,?-s D':O'~)a rt;n8nt of t h o --into-rio I' :-,y:-''A-: Krug~ Secretary Fish and ~ild li fe Service, Albert M. Day , Dirpctor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~l ej'T';e D ts i n a Dev,; way l e.tting 80",e of the el ev,ent s d')::;.i nat '" i r:. 0 alcohol to ootain a liqUi d ~eady for sAle. ~JO t 3 : Reproduced from the Octobe r 1947 i ss ue of DRUG

  5. Supplemental Data. Graeber et al. (2011). A Guideline to Family-wide Comparative State-of-the-art qRT-PCR Analysis Exemplified with a Brassicaceae Cross-species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leubner, Gerhard

    Supplemental Data. Graeber et al. (2011). A Guideline to Family-wide Comparative State-of-the-art q Methods #12;Supplemental Data. Graeber et al. Plant Cell. (2011): PLANTCELL/2011/084103 2 Supplemental. Graeber et al. Plant Cell. (2011): PLANTCELL/2011/084103 3 Supplemental Table 1. Sequence similarities

  6. A Novel Position Sensitive Detector for Photons and Electrons K. W. Brown*, Z. Q. Gosser, J. M. Krupa*, A. Liao*, J. P. Smith*, T. K. Steinbach, S. Hudan, R.T. de Souza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    The detection and identification of low energy heavy ions represent a special experimental chal- lenge dueV/c, which is typical of mo- mentum transfers in nuclear reactions, has an en- ergy of 5.5 MeV. Such an ion wishes to detect such particles with high efficiency and to measure their mass, nuclear charge and energy

  7. Quarter Color Section Experimental Treatment Genes Measured Observations Fall07 Green AA Heat Stress 2h 37C Hsp70-3, Derepression Hsp70-3 in hac1 at RT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    Quarter Color Section Experimental Treatment Genes Measured Observations Fall07 Green AA Heat Blue AA Cold Stress 3h 4C Fall07 Blue AB Heat Stress 1h, 2h 37C Fall07 Blue AC Cold Stress 20' 4C AA Light/Dark/Cold Cor 15a Not sufficient samples to determine Win08 Green AB Heat Stress 1h 37C Hsp

  8. T E C H N I C A L R E P O RT S I N C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E Technische Universitt Dortmund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morik, Katharina

    energy be saved by using an additional GPGPU-equipped graphics card to accelerate general purpose Reducing the Energy Consumption of Embedded Systems by Integrating General Purpose GPUs Constantin Timm Gelenberg, Peter Marwedel,Frank Weichert: Reducing the Energy Consumption of Embedded Systems by Integrating

  9. ENHANCEMENTS OF NONPOINT-SOURCE MONITORING PROGRAMS TO ASSESS VOLATILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER OF THE UNITED STATES Wayne W. Lapham, Michael J. Moran, and John S. Zogorski ABSTRACT The U compounds (VOCs) in ground water of the United States. The data are from Federal, State, and local nonpoint for VOC occurrence and nonoccurrence in ground water of the United States. INTRODUCTION Background In 1991

  10. Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

  11. eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavanaugh, Kyle

    Peer Reviewed Title: Synchrony in dynamics of giant kelp forests is driven by both local recruitment://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7vw6c5gg Keywords: giant kelp, Landsat, Macrocystis pyrifera, Moran effect, population dynamics kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) canopy biomass to examine population synchrony in southern California kelp

  12. I/I ratios and halogen concentrations in pore waters of the Hydrate Ridge: Relevance for the origin of gas hydrates in ODP Leg 204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    in fluids associated with hydrocarbons, such as oil field brines (Moran et al., 1995) or coal-bed methane association of iodine with methane allows the identification of the organic source material responsible for iodine and methane in gas hydrates. In all cores, iodine concentrations were found to increase strongly

  13. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a Legitimate Government 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S)Jarrod J. H. Gillam and James E. Moran 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943­5000 8. PERFORMING Arabia, the Southern secessionist movement, and the Arab Spring protesters delegitimized the regime

  14. Direct-drive cryogenic target implosion performance on OMEGAa... T. C. Sangster,b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the National Ignition Facility NIF 3 currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore Na- tional. Koch, R. A. Lerche, M. J. Moran, T. W. Phillips, and G. J. Schmid Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 Received 11 November 2002; accepted 10 February 2003 Layered

  15. Health Serv Outcomes Res Method (2004) 5: 207226 DOI 10.1007/s10742-006-6829-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Patty

    Health Serv Outcomes Res Method (2004) 5: 207­226 DOI 10.1007/s10742-006-6829-9 Methodology in meta-analysis: a study from Critical Care meta-analytic practice John L. Moran, MBBS, FRACP · Patricia J. Solomon, Ph Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006 Abstract Methodological aspects of meta-analytic practice

  16. Response to IRSP. Project ID 35027: Evaluation of Two Captive Rearing Methods for Assisting with Recovery of Naturally Spawning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    general procedures cited by Paul Moran and Robin Waples (P.I's.) under Project No. 198909600. The USFWSResponse to IRSP. Project ID 35027: Evaluation of Two Captive Rearing Methods for Assisting. We will store the fin clips at room temperature prior to DNA extraction. Procedures for DNA

  17. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions with Extended-Duration Pulses at the National Ignition Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Moran,1 E. I. Moses,1 A. Pak,1 T. Parham,1 H.-S. Park,1 P. K. Patel,1 R. Petrasso,4 J. E. Ralph,1 S. P, California 94550, USA 2 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA 3 Laboratory

  18. Measuring the absolute deuteriumtritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Le Pape,3 T. Ma,3 A. MacKinnon,3 M. A. Mckernan,3 M. Moran,3 E. Moses,3 H.-S. Park,3 J. Ralph,3 B, California 94550, USA 4 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 97545, USA 5 Sandia National

  19. 3207Research Article Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkegaard, Karla

    (Messerschmitt et al., 1997; Moran, 1993), protein secretion (Balch et al., 1994; Dascher et al., 1994; Kuge et and Ehrenfeld, 1977; Jen et al., 1978; Jen et al., 1980) and the inhibition of protein secretion (Doedens are produced in the cytoplasm and appear to lack lipid modification. It is thought that 2BC and 3A associate

  20. Postdoctoral position in microfluidics for life and medical sciences at Technion -Israel Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    Postdoctoral position in microfluidics for life and medical sciences at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology The Microfluidic Technologies Laboratory at Technion, led by Prof. Moran Bercovici, is seeking of novel bio-microfluidic tools and assays. The Microfluidic Technologies Laboratory (microfluidics

  1. Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakha, Hesham A.

    The transportation sector consumes approximately 30% of the total energy in the United States, which is mostlyVirginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing, Moran, Saerens, and Van den Bulck 2 ABSTRACT Existing fuel consumption and emission models suffer from

  2. National family allegory: Irish men and post-independence novels and film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trayers, Shane Nicole

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Death and Photography??????????????... 134 Doubling and the Cyclical Life???????????... 138 Juanita: The Center of the Circle???????????. 145 The Objects of Michael?s Photographs????????? 147 vii CHAPTER Page... Photographs as Evidence and Conor?s Oedipal Response?. . 158 Conclusion???????????????????... 163 V FAILING FATHERS AND COPY-CAT SONS: THE MYTHIC FICTIONS OF THE PATERNAL ROLE???.. 165 Michael Moran: A Legacy of Verbal...

  3. IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE SURVEYS By Michael J. Moran, Rick M. Clawges, and John S. Zogorski U.S. Geological Survey 1608 Mt. View Rapid City, SD 57702 Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly added to gasoline

  4. RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE By Michael J. Moran, Mike J. Halde, Rick M. Clawges and John S. Zogorski U in the United States as an octane enhancer and oxygenate in gasoline. Octane enhancement began in the late 1970's with the phase-out of tetraethyl lead from gasoline. The use of oxygenates was expanded

  5. Salle Tanna Shulich Hall 527, rue Sherbrooke ouest, Montral, QC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    / coordinator Quintette no1 / Quintet No.1 Victor Ewald I. Moderato II. Adagio, non troppo lento, Allegro vivace III. Allegro moderato (1860-1935) Chris Moran, David Fhima, trompettes / trumpet; Anna Pierson, cor Bach I. Andante con moto - Allegro con brio II. Andantino - Allegro molto Presto III. Molto Vivace

  6. Submitted by In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    THESIS Submitted by In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Colorado State the variogram and Moran's I analyses indicate that the first hypothesis may be supported. Variogram gamma values the winter season. iii #12;Results of the variogram analyses for the multiple scale snow depth datasets do

  7. Intrusion Detection in the Large: Distributed Detection of Distributed Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Communicate CMAD IV (Monterey, 1996) Coniidentiality/Sanitize Security Feedback to cracker Under Phased Response - Are there dependable cues n Distributed Attack in small Cluster of Computers - Limit components CMAD IV (Monterey, 1996) Doug Moran, SRI International n Single Platform Type #12;Scaling-Up 4

  8. A method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low levels of 14C-labeled methane and accelerator mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    36(2):237-246. Moran, J. J. , Beal, E. J. , Vrentas, J. M. ,10.1073/ pnas.0702643105]. Beal, E. J. , C. H. House, and V.instead of sulfate (e.g. , Beal et al. 2009; Caldwell et al.

  9. On compensation of systematic manufacturing variations in physical design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Puneet

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. P. Gupta, F. -L. Heng, M. Lavin, Merits of CellwiseManufacturing, 2004. F. -L. Heng, P. Gupta, R. L. Gordon, K.P. Gupta and F. -L. Heng, Toward a Systematic-Variation

  10. Ranks of Elliptic Curves via Class Groups of Number Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    state-of-the art methods to compute the rank assuming there is no rational point of order ... p /? S of K, we have valuation ordp : K ?? Kp ? Z ? {?}. If L is a...

  11. Max-min separability: incremental approach and application to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    [9] Bennet, K.P. and Mangasarian, O.L. (1993), Bilinear separation of two sets in n-space,. Computational Optimization and Applications, 2(3), pp. 207-227.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - antimon och ett Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    var ett folkmord, utan en sanitr insats mot mnsklig ohyra. HH fick nu ta hand om Vim och skrev ett... flesta artiklar kopplat sig till ett stort ml och varje kp blev en...

  13. TORCH: Time-of-flight detector for low-momentum PID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo Garca, L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is a proposed particle identification system to achieve positive ?/K/p separation at a ?3? level in the momentum range below 10 GeV/c

  14. A study of the Fnr-1 transcription regulator in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abate, Elisa Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.E. and K.P. Nevin, Microbial Fuel Cells, A Current Review.current production in microbial fuel cells. Biosensors andSchematic of a microbial fuel cell with an anode acting as

  15. the french LOFAR consortium M. Tagger, P. Zarka + 30 participants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    , but clear decision to go-ahead #12;science · very strong interest in most topics adressed by LOFAR: EOR collaboration: #12;EoR · agreement between the EoR KP and french Planck scientists for collaboration

  16. Algebraic K-Theory and Topological Spaces Michael Paluch (mike@math.ist.utl.pt)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -p-q(X) and Hp(X; Kp) CHp(X), where CHp(X) is the Chow group of codimension p-cycles on X. For p = 1 the sheaf K1

  17. assessment problem solving: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at most p, then there are nondeterministic BPs of size O(kp) solving the heigh... Wehr, Dustin 2010-01-01 319 Effects of age, instructions, and problem content on everyday...

  18. Synthesis of a proteasome inhibitor containing a [Gamma]- lactam-[Beta]-lactone fused ring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urbina, Armando

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cool to rt, diluted with MTBE (2.7 L, 15 vol. ), washed withwas cooled to rt, added MTBE (1.0 L, ~20 vol. ) and adjusted

  19. Expression of defense genes in sorghum grain mold and tagging and mapping a sorghum anthracnose resistance gene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katile, Seriba Ousmane

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    expression of ApopRT- rtF1 and ApopRT- rtR1 in sorghum gynoecia in greenhouse experiments 2007 ??????????? 66 Table 26. Relative expression of AFP-RT- rtF1 and AFP-RT-rtR1 in sorghum glumes in greenhouse experiments 2007 ???????????... 67.... K. Prom and Dr. T. Isakeit for their guidance, patience, comments, criticisms, availability and help during this program. I would like to thank here also Dr. R. Perumal and his wife for their help for success of this program and all the student...

  20. Shortcomings of the Cartagena Protocol: Resolving the Liability Loophole at an International Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohm, Katherine E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soybeans, and Monsanto RT-200 Canola seeds). 34. Bratspies,and Monsanto RT-200 Canola seeds). 36. Duall, supra note 4,

  1. Small sample size power for some tests of constant hazard function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fercho, Wayne Ward

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    1970 ABSTRACT Small Sample Size Power for Some Tests of Constant Hazard Function (December 1970) Wayne Ward Fercho, B. A. , North Dakota State University N. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Larry Ringer Four different tests of constant.... Moran [1951] showed that Bartlett's M test was an asymptotically most powerful test agai. nst the alternative of a gamma distribution with parameters beta and theta. Hartley [1950] stated that the loss in power of his test was negligible...

  2. Written in Black and White: Creating an Ideal America, 1919-1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gann, Dustin Malone

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy ___________________ Chairperson, Dr. Jeff Moran ___________________ Dr. Jonathan Earle ___________________ Dr. Kim Warren ___________________ Dr. Jacob Dorman ___________________ Dr. Brian... Gazette and later joined The Readers Digest, which had been founded in 1922 by DeWitt Wallace. The background of each author influenced his career trajectory and his ideological beliefs. The divergent experience of Haldeman-Julius, Franklin, and White...

  3. City of Moreno Valley,, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (UtilityHolyrood,Martinsville, VirginiaMiamiMinidoka,MonroeMoran,

  4. City of Morgan City, Utah (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (UtilityHolyrood,Martinsville, VirginiaMiamiMinidoka,MonroeMoran,City of

  5. City of Morganton, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (UtilityHolyrood,Martinsville, VirginiaMiamiMinidoka,MonroeMoran,City

  6. IInJrtlh,,!/oglll 2-'.1/ 244: <)5 -JO-l , 191)2 " , /lmllr;"" .( R I )om',f (r'd \\ ), '11/(' IJ rtJumic.\\' lind u.~(' flf I. ClI'/H/linc /:"(,, 11'1'.'"1('111 ,\\"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    freezing of a slush layer in the presence of snowfall to produce white ice. As the season progresses, snow into open and ice-covered freshwater lakes from surface characteristics; a high transmittance case study s: PAR transmittance. freshwater ice, lake energy budgets Ahstract A simple technique, based on several

  7. Dynamical mass generation in unquenched QED using the Dyson-Schwinger equations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kizilersu, Ayse; Sizer, Tom; Pennington, Michael R.; Williams, Anthony G.; Williams, Richard

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of dynamical mass generation for unquenched QED in four dimensions, in the absence of four-fermion interactions, using the Dyson-Schwinger approach. We begin with an overview of previous investigations of criticality in the quenched approximation. To this we add an analysis using a new fermion-antifermion-boson interaction ansatz, the Kizilersu-Pennington (KP) vertex, developed for an unquenched treatment. After surveying criticality in previous unquenched studies, we investigate the performance of the KP vertex in dynamical mass generation using a renormalized fully unquenched system of equations. This we compare with the results for two hybrid vertices incorporating the Curtis-Pennington vertex in the fermion equation. We conclude that the KP vertex is as yet incomplete, and its relative gauge-variance is due to its lack of massive transverse components in its design.

  8. El dramaturgo Eduardo Sarls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pignataro Calero, Jorge

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dir. y act. Marisa Montana (en Flannagan). Reposicin, 1988 en Alianza Ur.-EE.UU., dir. Elena Zuasti, act. Cristina Moran. Estrenada en Tarragona, Espaa en 1987. 1986. Delmira Agustini o La dama de Knossos. Dir. Elena Zuasti (en Alianza). Primer... el 28 de abril de 1938 en Budapest, lleg de su Hungra natal a Montevideo en 1948 junto a su madre y una ta, nicos sobrevivientes de una familia juda diezmada por el nazismo y sus campos de concentracin. La adaptacin y asimilacin del nio...

  9. arXiv:1104.0081v2[math.CO]4Apr2011 CAYLEY GRAPHS OF ORDER 16p ARE HAMILTONIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Joy

    is prime. We show that if S is any generating set of G, then there is a hamiltonian cycle.2(1) of [10]. Namely, several of the main results of that paper combine to show: Every connected Cayley graph on G has a hamiltonian cycle if |G| = kp, where p is prime, 1 k

  10. Annales Geophysicae (2004) 22: 41334142 SRef-ID: 1432-0576/ag/2004-22-4133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the Kp index, the AE index, the Akasofu epsilon parameter and the solar wind kinetic energy flux Research, Helsinki, Finland 3Alfv´en Laboratory, Royal Institute of Techology, Stockholm, Sweden Received months of Astrid-2/EMMA electric and magnetic field data during 1999 (solar maximum year

  11. ORNL/CDIAC-34 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4777's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER

  12. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental

  13. ORNL/CDIAC-64 Proceedings of RIHMI-WDC,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 05 00 00 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Compiled by Marvel D. Burtis Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Oak for the #12;Global Change Research Program Environmental Sciences Division Office of Health and Environmental

  14. DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp061 ORNL/CDIAC-107

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    89512 Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Office of Biological and Environmental Research Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

  15. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological

  16. Publications of Prof. ANURAG KUMAR 1. Anurag Kumar, D. Manjunath, and Joy Kuri, Communication Networking: An Analyti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    of Wireless Sensor Networks," submitted. 1 #12;2. Arpan Chattopadhyay, Abhishek Sinha, Marceaux Coupechoux Wireless Sensor Networks," submitted. 4. Abhishek Sinha, Arpan Chattopadhyay, K.P. Naveen, Prasenjit Mondal Altman, Anurag Kumar, and Rajesh Sundaresan, "Opti- mal Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks

  17. Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in December 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    FOR ELECTRICAL ENERGY STORAGE $200,000 RSD 57392 ACLAND, GREGORY M BAKER INST OPTIGEN GENETIC TEST FOR HERIDITARY SURVEILLANCE $57,500 KP 50076 AKEY, BRUCE POPULATION MED AGAVE ANTE-MORTEM TSE DIAGNOSIS BY ELECTRIC CELL COUNTRIES $99,997 CMA 53239 BARRETT, CHRISTOPHER CCSF CARE DEVELOPING A MARKET ANALYSIS AND DECISION TREE

  18. ARQ 510002: INSTRUMENTAO PARA A TESE Coordenadores da disciplina: Prof. Ayrton Portilho Bueno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    em Pesquisa Científica, Usuário & Ambiente, Paisagem & Sustentabilidade e Fronteiras da Inovação em://www.dropbox.com/sh/7ib3x2kh7ghpfrw/kpVvdze8ZF M?DULO 3 PAISAGEM & SUSTENTABILIDADE (15h) Prof. Roberto Verdum (http

  19. Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Oktober 2012 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübeck, Universität zu

    Formblatt LM Ma Informatik Version Oktober 2012 Zuordnung von Lehrmodulen im Masterstudium Komplexität Modul-Nr. Name (Kurzform) KP Note PR Programmierung LM 1 VI Verteilte Informationssysteme LM 2 PV Parallele und Vert. Systemarchitekturen LM 3 OC Organic Computing LM 4 IE Intelligente eingebettete Systeme

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplkment au no 10, Tome 32, Octobre 1971, page C4-214 ELECTRON INTERACTION IN X-RAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    relatives ont kt6 calculQs dans une approximation ((frozen-orbital )) pour la transition d'un Btat K normal subshells. Introduction. -The K p satellite is an X-ray satellite which appears on the low energy side, proposed that the KP' structure originates from the interaction between a hole and the incomplete 3 d shell

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy September 05 Enriched Background Isotope, BER (KP 12 02 02 0) EBIS takes advantage of a low-level1999 14C-release to the Oak Ridge Reservation agency and institution cooperation #12;Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy September

  2. 1 A selection of Technical Publications produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    woodland 3 Homegrown timber in use in the building industry 21 3 #12;57 Appendix 1 Forestry Commission. 37 Environmental monitoring in British forests, by D. Durrant. Inventory Reports National Inventory­1615. [Beckett, K.P.,] Freer-Smith, P.H. [and Taylor, G.] (2000) The capture of particulate pollution by trees

  3. [PRESENTATION TITLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Desai

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    0,00. 0,50. 1,00. 1,50. 2,00. 2,50. 0. 0,1. 0,2. 0,3. 0,4. 0,5. 0,6. 0,7. 0,8. Cap illary Pressu re (kP a). CO2 Saturation. Pce=1kPa...

  4. A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, K. G.; Wright, J. D.; Katz, M. E.; Browning, J. V.; Cramer, B. S.; Wade, Bridget S.; Mizintseva, S. F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.3133/of2007-1047.kp06 A View of Antarctic Ice-Sheet Evolution from Sea-Level and Deep-Sea Isotope Changes During the Late...

  5. Structure of yeast Argonaute with guide RNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakanishi, Kotaro; Weinberg, David E.; Bartel, David P.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (Whitehead); (MSKCC)

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The RNA-induced silencing complex, comprising Argonaute and guide RNA, mediates RNA interference. Here we report the 3.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of Kluyveromyces polysporus Argonaute (KpAGO) fortuitously complexed with guide RNA originating from small-RNA duplexes autonomously loaded and processed by recombinant KpAGO. Despite their diverse sequences, guide-RNA nucleotides 1-8 are positioned similarly, with sequence-independent contacts to bases, phosphates and 2{prime}-hydroxyl groups pre-organizing the backbone of nucleotides 2-8 in a near-A-form conformation. Compared with prokaryotic Argonautes, KpAGO has numerous surface-exposed insertion segments, with a cluster of conserved insertions repositioning the N domain to enable full propagation of guide-target pairing. Compared with Argonautes in inactive conformations, KpAGO has a hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes an expanded and repositioned loop, which inserts an invariant glutamate into the catalytic pocket. Mutation analyses and analogies to ribonuclease H indicate that insertion of this glutamate finger completes a universally conserved catalytic tetrad, thereby activating Argonaute for RNA cleavage.

  6. Specification of >2 MeV geosynchronous electrons based on solar wind measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    affected by the solar wind. Statistical asynchronous regression (SAR), a statistical method recently use measurements directly from the solar wind, instead of the Kp index, and the SAR method when they pass through these local times. We cross calibrate the electron measurements from the five

  7. Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    -S TEXAS MILK MRKT MILK TESTING METHODOLOGY IMPROVEMENT & STANDARDIZATION $161,548 MBF 15366 BIRMAN FUNCTION $61,928 KP 47556 COOL, TERRILL A AEP DOE (DOE GERMANTOWN) FLAME-SAMPLING PHOTOIONIZATION MASS Department Sponsor Project Title Amount GCO OSP Number COOL, TERRILL A AEP DOD (ARMY-ARO) QUANTITATIVE STUDY

  8. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Asit, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index ? on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  9. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holley, H.O. Back, T.J. Bowles, L.J. Broussard, R. Carr, S. Clayton, S. Currie, B.W. Filippone, A. Garcia, P. Geltenbort, K.P. Hickerson, J. Hoagland, G.E. Hogan, B. Hona, T.M....

  10. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boissevain, T.J. Bowles, L.J. Broussard, R. Carr, D.J. Clark, S. Currie, S. Du, B.W. Filippone, P. Geltenbort, A. Garca, A. Hawari, K.P. Hickerson,5 R. Hill, M. Hino, S.A....

  11. Notes 10. The dynamic vibration absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ] Luis San Andres (c) 2008 MEEN 363 - 617 THE VIBRATION ABSORBER Preamble - A NEED arises: Consider the periodic forced response of a primary system (Kp-Mp) defined by X p (t) K p F(t) M P M p 10 3 lb?:= K p 110 5 ? lbf in ?:= Its natural frequency is...

  12. Donggao Zhao REFEREED PAPERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    iron fragment with human living material and its effect on human health. Earth Science Frontier, vol and fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling in China. Applied and Environmental Microbiology-ceramic nuclear waste form for weapon plutonium. Eds. K.P. Hart and G.R. Lumpkin, Proceedings of the Materials

  13. Extremal Graph Problems, Degenerate Extremal Problems,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonovits, Miklós

    Extremal Graph Problems, Degenerate Extremal Problems, and Supersaturated Graphs Mikl´os Simonovits´an-type extremal problem. The graphs attaining the maximum will be called extremal and their family will be denoted and multi- ple edges. In 1940, P. Tur´an posed and solved the extremal problem of Kp+1, the complete graph

  14. 9 Modelling the CoCoME with the JAVA/A Component Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Stephen

    checking tools HUGO/RT and LTSA to verify that components comply to their ports and that connected ports the absence of deadlocks in composed be- haviours. Since HUGO/RT and LTSA are general model checking tools we

  15. Uncertainty of microwave radiative transfer computations in rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Sung Wook

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    retrieval using new thermodynamic observations; and 3) to investigate the characteristics of four different RT codes. Firstly, a plane-parallel RT Model (RTM) of n layers in light rainfall was used for the analytical and computational derivation...

  16. Time and Encoding Effects in the Concealed Knowledge Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seymour, Travis L.; Fraynt, Becky R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    items). This weapon-focus effect has been demonstrated ina weapon) seem Table 2 Mean concealed knowledge effect on RT

  17. 1. Introduction 2. Design of the acceleration law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to h Time before impact: z(t) \\Gamma x(t) ?? x(t) Ratio of this time by the desired time headway: r(t) = z(t) \\Gamma x(t) h ?? x(t) r(t) measures the correct positioning of the following vehicle w.r.t. the leading vehicle We want to maintain r(t) = 1 å Output y(t) = r(t) with 1 as our set point Some assumptions

  18. Time Series Models for Measuring Market Risk Time Series Models for Measuring Market Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernndez Lobato, Jos Miguel

    and collaborative mixtures of experts 3 GARCH processes with non-parametric innovations 4 Conclusions and future Competitive and collaborative mixtures of experts 3 GARCH processes with non-parametric innovations 4 Volatility models: GARCH processes We say {rt}T t=1 follows a GARCH(1,1) process if: rt = tt (4) 2 t = + |rt

  19. Thermodynamics and Enzymatic Polymerization of Artificial Metallo-Nucleic Acids AND Investigation of Duplex Formation between GAN and RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eun Kyong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C rt (92%). (c) DMTrCl, pyridine, rt (69%). (d) (iPr) 2 NP(Cl)OEtCN, (iPr) 2 NEt, CH 2 Cl 2 , rt (71%). Scheme 1. 7N,N-diisopropylehylamine ((iPr) 2 NEt) and 2-cyanoehtyl-N,N-

  20. A CSP View on UMLRT structure diagrams Clemens Fischer, ErnstRudiger Olderog and Heike Wehrheim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    A CSP View on UML­RT structure diagrams Clemens Fischer, Ernst­R¨udiger Olderog and Heike Wehrheim UML­RT structure diagrams together with the formal method CSP­OZ combining CSP and Object­Z. While CSP­OZ is used for specifying the system components themselves (by CSP­OZ classes), UML­RT diagrams provide

  1. a difference Please help us plant trees!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .m.-1:00 p.m. Berry Brook Restoration Site Why? The trees will enhance the wildlife habitat along the newly created wetland and stream channel and help to filter pollutants and make the stream bank more to the Berry Brook Restoration Site: From Rt. 16 ­Take Exit 9 toward Rt-9/Dover/Rt 108/Somersworth. Take

  2. RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION DEVICES: EFFECTIVENESS IN IMPROVING SAFEGUARDS AT GAS-CENTRIFUGE URANIUM-ENRICHMENT PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOE,J.

    2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) have engendered a growing interest among international safeguards experts. Potentially, RFIDs could reduce inspection work, viz. the number of inspections, number of samples, and duration of the visits, and thus improve the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards. This study systematically examined the applications of RFIDs for IAEA safeguards at large gas-centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). These analyses are expected to help identify the requirements and desirable properties for RFIDs, to provide insights into which vulnerabilities matter most, and help formulate the required assurance tests. This work, specifically assesses the application of RFIDs for the ''Option 4'' safeguards approach, proposed by Bruce Moran, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for large gas-centrifuge uranium-enrichment plants. The features of ''Option 4'' safeguards include placing RFIDs on all feed, product and tails (F/P/T) cylinders, along with WID readers in all FP/T stations and accountability scales. Other features of Moran's ''Option 4'' are Mailbox declarations, monitoring of load-cell-based weighing systems at the F/P/T stations and accountability scales, and continuous enrichment monitors. Relevant diversion paths were explored to evaluate how RFIDs improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards. Additionally, the analysis addresses the use of RFIDs in conjunction with video monitoring and neutron detectors in a perimeter-monitoring approach to show that RFIDs can help to detect unidentified cylinders.

  3. Stat 39100/FinMath 34600 Lecture 6 AMERICAN OPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mykland, Per A.

    ]t = vL (St)dSt - dDt where, since dSt = d[e-rt St] = -re-rt Stdt + e-rt dSt: dDt = e-rt rvL (St)dt - rv 0 rvL (x) - rxvL (x) - 1 2 2 x2 vL (x) = 0 if x > L rK if x dDt = e-rt rvL (St) - rvL (St

  4. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ?P [ max s E [S (s, ?) ? p ? D (s, ?) | ? ? P ] ] ? C(P) } . (7) This utility is maximized when the consumer is confronted with the wholesale prices: p? ? = p ? . Proposition 4 With real-time meters and imperfectly reactive, but rational consumers: (i... purchase cost corresponds to: 1 entire consumption profile (RT meter) yes customers RT profile 2 entire consumption profile (RT meter) no / partial customers RT profile 3 aggregate consumption only (traditional meter) no customers RT profile 4 aggregate...

  5. An overview of craniospinal axis fields and field matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Robin L., E-mail: robinscott631@gmail.com

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods are implemented for craniospinal axis (CSA) radiation treatment (RT). This papers goal is to define correctly matched CSA RT fields. Overlap or a space between matched RT fields can create variances of dose and the possibility of negative side effects or disease recurrence, respectively. An accurate CSA RT match procedure is created with localization markers, immobilization devices, equations, feathered matches, safety gap, and portal imaging. A CS match angle is predetermined to optimize patient position before immobilization device fabrication. Various central axis (CA) placements within the brain and spine fields that effect gantry, table, and collimator rotation are described. An overview of the methods used to create CSA RT fields and matches is presented for optimal CSA RT implementation. In addition, to the authors knowledge, this is the first time that a prone CSA RT with anesthesia has been described.

  6. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noal, Sabine [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Levy, Christelle [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Hardouin, Agnes [Department of Medical Biology, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Rieux, Chantal [Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Heutte, Natacha [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie GRECAN, Caen (France); Segura, Carine [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Collet, Fabienne [Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Henry-Amar, Michel [Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Joly, Florence, E-mail: f.joly@baclesse.fr [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); CHU, Cote de Nacre, Caen (France)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  7. A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg [Medicsight PLC, Kensington Centre, 66 Hammersmith Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

  8. Improved Posttreatment Functional Outcome is Associated with Better Survival in Patients Irradiated for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hoskin, Peter J. [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential prognostic impact of the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on motor function and of the post-RT ambulatory status on survival in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients. Methods and Materials: Of 1,852 patients irradiated for MSCC, 778 patients (42%) received short-course RT and 1,074 (58%) received long-course RT. The effect of RT on motor function (improvement vs. no change vs. deterioration) and the ambulatory status after RT (ambulatory vs. nonambulatory) were evaluated with respect to survival. Results: The actuarial survival rate of the entire cohort was 56% at 6 months, 43% at 12 months, and 32% at 24 months. The patients in whom motor function improved after RT had a significantly better 1-year survival rate than those who had no change or deterioration of motor function (75% vs. 40% and 3%, p < 0.001). The 1-year survival rate of the patients who were ambulatory after RT was significantly better than for those who were not ambulatory (63% vs. 4%, p < 0.001). The results were confirmed in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The response to RT and the post-RT ambulatory status are important predictors for survival in MSCC patients. This finding can be used by physicians to stratify future studies, plan further therapy, and improve follow-up strategy in these patients.

  9. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Carol L., E-mail: armstrongc@email.chop.edu [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neuro-Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shera, David M. [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lustig, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Phillips, Peter C. [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology and Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  10. On Primitivity and the Unital Full Free Product of Finite Dimensional C*-algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres Ayala, Francisco

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    = kp1 and k2 = kp2 Assume B is {isomorphic to Ll j=1Mnj . To prove the result it is enough to show there are positive integers (m(1); : : :m(l)) such that n1m(1) + + nlm(l) = k: Let (B1; B) = [m1(1); : : : ;m1(l)]; (B2; u Bu) = [m2...(1); : : : ;m2(l)]: Since (MN ; B1) (B1; B) = (MN ; B2) (B2; u Bu) we deduce thatm1m1(j) = m2m2(j) for all 1 j l. Multiplying by k and using N = m1k1 = m2k2 we conclude N p1 m1(j) = km1m1(j) = km2m2(j) = N p2 m2(j); so p2m1(j) = p1m2(j). Since gcd...

  11. Salt index of potassium phosphate fertilizers and its relation to germination and early plant growth of field crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeouf, Jerry Allen

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), ammoniated potassium phosphate (AKP-1 and AKP-2) and potassium phosphate (KP). These vere typical samples prepared in a pilot plant. Scottish Industries was the source of potassium metaphosphate (KMP) and Tennessee Valley Authority for ammonium Table 2.... Fertilizer materials used in study. Fertilizer Potassium polyphosphate Desi nation Fertilizer Source Pennzoil United N-P205-K20 Anal sis %%d 0-50-40 Polyphosphate S ecies Yes Ammoniated potassium phosphate AKP-1 Ammoniated potassium phosphate...

  12. Mammalian community structure in lowland, tropical Peru, as determined by removal trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodman, Neal; Slade, Norman A.; Timm, Robert M.; Schmidt, Cheryl A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : 1 19. Duellman WE, Koechlin JE. 1991. The Reserva Cuzco Amazonico, Peru: Biological investigations, conservation, and ecotourism. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural History, Hie University of Kansas 142: 1 38...-271. White GC, Anderson DR, Burnham KP, Otis DL. 1982. Capture-recapture and removal methods for sampling closed populations. Los Alamos, New Mexico: Los Alamos National Laboratory, 235 pp. Wilson EO (ed.). 1988. Biodiversity. Washington, DC: National...

  13. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37 (2004) R86R108 PII: S0022-3727(04)61469-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    conductivity of the particle (W m-1 K-1 ) p thermal diffusivity of particle (p = Kp/(p · c p p)) (m2 s-1 April 2004 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/37/R86 DOI: 10.1088/0022-3727/37/9/R02 Abstract This article of plasma sprayed finely structured coatings. (Some figures in this article are in colour only

  14. A Comparison of Least-Squares Finite Element Models with the Conventional Finite Element Models of Problems in Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nellie Rajarova,

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    disadvantage of classical variational methods is the difficulty in constructing the approximate functions for arbitrary domains. 1.4. Review of Weighted-Residual Methods Weighted-residual methods are those in which we seek approximate solutions using a... functions. The pth order interpolation function is given by )48.2( 1 2 1 1 2 1 221 2 21 T pp npp p kp g g g f f f...

  15. 1989 1:100,000 1992 1:100,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen-Shan

    Taiwan, based on smaller Foraminifera: II. Northern Part. Proc. Geol. Soc. China 11, p.19-33. Chen, W.S, eastern Taiwan. Proc. Geol. Soc. China, no.34, p.43-56. Chen, W.S., Yen, I.C., Fengler, K.P., Rubin, C., Huang, M.T. and Liu, T.k. (1991) Neotectonic significance of the Chimei fault in the coastal range

  16. Slum upgrading in India and Kenya: investigating the sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Victoria Louise Molly

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I Government of India HUDCO Housing and Urban Development Corporation Limited IoG Institute of Governance JNNURM Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission KP Kamgar Putla LDCs Least Developed Countries MASHAL Maharashtra Area Social... -up approaches. The case studies are of varying ages and were implemented via partnerships with differing agents including government, NGO, CBO, private developer and donors. The influence and design of the delivery model upon the upgrading sustainability...

  17. Evaluation of Fatigue Resistance in Alaskan Sled Dogs Through Exercise Induced Myocyte Gene Expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Natacha Maria

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects Agency, who made this project possible through their funding (Award# W911NF0710552). vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT ???????????????????????????. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ????????????????????? v...., Inactivation of fatty acid transport protein 1 prevents fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. J Clin Invest, 113(5): p. 756-763, 2004. 18. Porubsky, P.R., K.P. Battaile, and E.E. Scott , Human cytochrome P450 2E1 structures with fatty acid...

  18. Advanced structure-borne sound Wave mobilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    ^p e j(v -p ) · Wave mobilities © Prof. B.A.T. Petersson Advanced structure-borne sound · Decomposed1 Advanced structure-borne sound p(kx) v(kx) v = p Y = ^ve- jkx x ejv ^pe- jkx x e jp = ^v ^p = ^v;2 Advanced structure-borne sound · Interface mobilities s C kp = 2p C kq = 2q C ; p = 0 ±1 ±2 ±3... ; q = 0

  19. Analysis of Multi-Quantum Well Electroabsorption Joachim Piprek, Yi-Jen Chiu, and John E. Bowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    fabricated InGaAsP/InP multi-quantum well EAMs with a bandwidth of 25 GHz and a drive voltage of 1.2 V for 20 previously fabricated InGaAsP/InP MQW EAMs with a bandwidth of 25 GHz and a drive voltage of 1.2 V for 20d model to analyze our EAMs. The model self-consistently combines kp bandstructure and absorption

  20. Strangeness production in Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering EPS Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Tabasco CINVESTAV M´erida On behalf of H1 Collaboration · Introduction · Measurement of K0 s and · Measurement of K± · Summary Julia Ruiz Tabasco (DESY-CINVESTAV) Strangeness production EPS conference 1 / 15) e + (k') Q2 = -q2 = -(k - k )2, y = qP kP , xBj = Q2 2qP Julia Ruiz Tabasco (DESY

  1. Production of K+K? pairs in proton-proton collisions below the ? meson threshold

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Q. J.; Hartmann, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Gao, H.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Lorentz, B.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Merzliakov, S.; Mielke, M.; Mikirtytchiants, S.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Polyanskiy, A.; Serdyuk, V.; Stein, H. J.; Strher, H.; Trusov, S.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Wstner, P.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pp?ppK+K? reaction was measured below the ? threshold at a beam energy of 2.568 GeV using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. By assuming that the four-body phase space is distorted only by the product of two-body final-state interactions, fits to a variety of one-dimensional distributions permit the evaluation of differential and total cross sections. The shapes of the distributions in the Kp and Kpp invariant masses are reproduced only if the K?p interaction is even stronger than that found at higher energy. The cusp effect in the K+K? distribution at the K0K{bar}0 threshold is much more clear and some evidence is also found for coupling between the K?p and K?0n channels. However, the energy dependence of the total cross section cannot be reproduced by considering only a simple product of such pairwise final-state interactions.

  2. Historical Trends in the Use of Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Cancers: 1973-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jairam, Vikram [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Roberts, Kenneth B. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. Results: RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions: The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT.

  3. Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

  4. Association of Clinical Response and Long-term Outcome Among Patients With Biopsied Orbital Pseudotumor Receiving Modern Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhu, Roshan S., E-mail: rprabhu@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kandula, Shravan; Liebman, Lang [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wojno, Ted H.; Hayek, Brent [Division of Oculoplastics, Orbital and Cosmetic Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Division of Oculoplastics, Orbital and Cosmetic Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate institutional outcomes for patients treated with modern radiation therapy (RT) for biopsied orbital pseudotumor (OP). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients (26 affected orbits) with OP were treated with RT between January 2002 and December 2011. All patients underwent biopsy with histopathologic exclusion of other disease processes. Sixteen patients (80%) were treated with intensity modulated RT, 3 (15%) with opposed lateral beams, and 1 (5%) with electrons. Median RT dose was 27 Gy (range 25.2-30.6 Gy). Response to RT was evaluated at 4 months post-RT. Partial response (PR) was defined as improvement in orbital symptoms without an increase in steroid dose. Complete response (CR) 1 and CR 2 were defined as complete resolution of orbital symptoms with reduction in steroid dose (CR 1) or complete tapering of steroids (CR 2). The median follow-up period was 18.6 months (range 4-81.6 months). Results: Seventeen patients (85%) demonstrated response to RT, with 7 (35%), 1 (5%), and 9 (45%) achieving a PR, CR 1, and CR 2, respectively. Of the 17 patients who had ?PR at 4 months post-RT, 6 (35%) experienced recurrence of symptoms. Age (>46 years vs ?46 years, P=.04) and clinical response to RT (CR 2 vs CR 1/PR, P=.05) were significantly associated with pseudotumor recurrence. Long-term complications were seen in 7 patients (35%), including 4 with cataract formation, 1 with chronic dry eye, 1 with enophthalmos, and 1 with keratopathy. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment for improving symptoms and tapering steroids in patients with a biopsy supported diagnosis of OP. Older age and complete response to RT were associated with a significantly reduced probability of symptom recurrence. The observed late complications may be related to RT, chronic use of steroids/immunosuppressants, medical comorbidities, or combination of factors.

  5. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which could aid in individualizing therapy, particularly for patients at risk for liver injury after RT.

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Range Fluctuations in Charged Particle Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Shinichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Wolfgang, John; Lu, H.-M.; Schneider, Robert; Choi, Noah C.; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Water equivalent path length (WEL) variations due to respiration can change the range of a charged particle beam and result in beam overshoot to critical organs or beam undershoot to tumor. We have studied range fluctuations by analyzing four-dimensional computed tomography data and quantitatively assessing potential beam overshoot. Methods and Materials: The maximal intensity volume is calculated by combining the gross tumor volume contours at each respiratory phase in the four-dimensional computed tomography study. The first target volume calculates the maximal intensity volume for the entire respiratory cycle (internal target volume [ITV]-radiotherapy [RT]), and the second target volume is the maximal intensity volume corresponding to gated RT (gated-RT, {approx}30% phase window around exhalation). A compensator at each respiratory phase is calculated. Two 'composite' compensators for ITV-RT and gated-RT are then designed by selecting the minimal compensator depth at the respective respiratory phase. These compensators are then applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data to estimate beam penetration. Analysis metrics include range fluctuation and overshoot volume, both as a function of gantry angle. We compared WEL fluctuations observed in treating the ITV-RT versus gated-RT in 11 lung patients. Results: The WEL fluctuations were <21.8 mm-WEL and 9.5 mm-WEL for ITV-RT and gated-RT, respectively for all patients. Gated-RT reduced the beam overshoot volume by approximately a factor of four compared with ITV-RT. Such range fluctuations can affect the efficacy of treatment and result in an excessive dose to a distal critical organ. Conclusion: Time varying range fluctuation analysis provides information useful for determining appropriate patient-specific treatment parameters in charged particle RT. This analysis can also be useful for optimizing planning and delivery.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adak, Ashish, E-mail: ashish-adak@yahoo.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ghosh, Samiran, E-mail: sran-g@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.chakrabarti@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an inhomogeneous pair-ion plasma has been analyzed. Considering two fluid model for two species of ions (positive and negative), we obtain the possibility of the existence of RT instability. The growth rate of the RT instability as usual depends on gravity and density gradient scale length. The results are discussed in context of pair-ion plasma experiments.

  8. Stabilization of biodiversity in the coevolutionary rock-paper-scissors game on complex networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schtt, Markus

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical mechanisms that can stabilize the coexistence of species (or strategies) are of substantial interest for the maintenance of biodiversity and in sociobehavioural dynamics. We investigate the mean extinction time in the coevolutionary dynamics of three cyclically invading strategies for different evolutionary processes on various classes of complex networks, including random graphs, scale-free and small world networks. We find that scale-free and random graphs lead to a strong stabilization of coexistence both for the Moran process and the Local Update process. The stabilization is of an order of magnitude stronger compared to a lattice topology, and is mainly caused by the degree heterogeneity of the graph. However, evolutionary processes on graphs can be defined in many variants, and we show that in a process using effective payoffs the effect of the network topology can be completely reversed. Thus, stabilization of coexistence depends on both network geometry and underlying evolutionary proces...

  9. Magnetic Activity in Stars, Discs and Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald Lynden-Bell

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Although magnetic fields in interstellar matter were postulated almost fifty years ago, magnetohydrodynamic theory was then much hampered by our inability to see what the magnetic field configurations were like and, after a decade of innovative development, cynics, not without some justification, began to claim that anything can happen when magnetism and an imaginative theorist get together. Thus cosmic lightning in particular received a bad press. More recently great advances in observational techniques that we shall hear of from Title, Beck, Moran and Mirabel have enabled us to see not only the sun's magnetic field with unprecedented clarity but the fields in galaxies, quasars and microquasars are now measured and not merely figments of fertile imaginations.

  10. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using ?-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated ?-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed ?-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  11. Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced performance around the world LANL statistical tools have helped create Reliability Technology (RT), which increases the overall fraction of productive manufacturing...

  12. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiologic Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hesheng, E-mail: hesheng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Frey, Kirk A. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF doseresponse functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. Results: The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=?0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). Conclusions: 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies to maximize tumor control and minimize the risk of liver damage.

  13. -TU3.fs S$Ee{rsrRY SBFaR?}dEtSr tne sfflclal" records af Tufte 6o1J.ege for the year 18bS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    &themtics and piiysieB" 'fbe recorda aleo ehow th*rt he held thie Bositlon until 186S wiren he was relreved of two c

  14. Annoncetillg frA AArhus universitet Kronprinsesse Mary kommer p besg. En

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kulminen I Arktis smelter sneen tidligere end for ti år siden. Det har medført, at planternes blomstring er

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - amplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nonintegrin; ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; FCS, foetal calf serum; GFP, green fluorescent protein... in alveolar Ms from all other individuals. Flow cytometry, RT-PCR,...

  16. Nanoscale optoentropic transduction mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Benjamin David

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of detection of tyrosinase and MART-1 transcripts in theused for lung cancer; tyrosinase expression for melanoma;W. Multiple RT-PCR tyrosinase testing reveals that melanoma

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysical observatory cambridge Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rt. Hon. John Denham MP Summary: physics University of Cambridge Particle physics phenomenology Royal Observatory Edinburgh Astrophysics... physics University of Cambridge High...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - atwood number rayleigh-taylor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    three dimensions using direct numerical simulations, where... . Introduction The phenomenology of mixing due to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, the instability Source:...

  19. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rtMartinPP-371Comments.pdf More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Pamela Martin...

  20. 248 K. Jareteg et al. / Annals of Nuclear Energy 68 (2014) 247256 Even though such approaches have been proven to give reason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazire, Christophe

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tron diffusion approximation (Bell and Glasstone, 1970): Z 1 rDr;ErUr;ERT r;EUr;E Rs0r;E0

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - analogue reverse transcriptase Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Summary: of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase by d4TTP: an Equivalent Incorporation... (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), there is little detailed...

  2. ancient geologic samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-temperature RT sample scanning superconduct- ing quantum interference device SQUID microscopy SSM is a very Weiss, Benjamin P....

  3. anomalous quantum interference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-temperature RT sample scanning superconduct- ing quantum interference device SQUID microscopy SSM is a very Weiss, Benjamin P....

  4. arrested development high-resolution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-temperature RT sample scanning superconduct- ing quantum interference device SQUID microscopy SSM is a very Weiss, Benjamin P....

  5. aerobic room temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-temperature RT sample scanning superconduct- ing quantum interference device SQUID microscopy SSM is a very Weiss, Benjamin P....

  6. POLTICAS PBLICAS E A DIFICULDADE DE EFETIVAR DIREITOS SOCIAIS NO BRASIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cangussu, Brbara Ferreira; Maringues de Aquino, Larissa Alvarenga

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paulo: Malheiros, 2011. BRASIL. CLT Saraiva & ConstituioSo Paulo: Saraiva, 2011. BRASIL. Cdigo penal, cdigo dee atual.. So Paulo: RT, 2008. BRASIL. Constituio (1891).

  7. Three Dact gene family members are expressed during embryonic development and in the adult brains of mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    v. 9.1 (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) AlignX software using anpolymerase (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). The RT reaction waspolymerase (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA). Purified PCR products

  8. Nr. 178 / 2013 // 28. Juni 2013 Einweihung des NW III am 4. Juli 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    verbessern", erklärt Dr. Markus Zanner, Kanzler der Universität Bayreuth. Das Gebäude weist 3.335 qm

  9. 66 PLANTmanagement (PC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos

    ), (image processing) (DSP). 8-bit, 32-bit, . , - PLC. , , , ( .. ladder PLC), . o, PLC - (.. ). , ( RT-Linux, QNX ..), . , . PLC . laptop 2 , . 2V

  10. Subclinical Cardiotoxicity Detected by Strain Rate Imaging up to 14 months After Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erven, Katrien, E-mail: katrien.erven@uzleuven.be [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Iridium Cancer Network, Antwerp (Belgium); Florian, Anca [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Image Computing (ESAT/PSI), University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium) [Medical Image Computing (ESAT/PSI), University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); IBBT-KU Leuven Future Health Department, Leuven (Belgium); Sweldens, Caroline [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Jurcut, Ruxandra [Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania)] [Institute of Emergency for Cardiovascular Diseases, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania); Wildiers, Hans [Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Voigt, Jens-Uwe [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Weltens, Caroline [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic modality that enables accurate measurement of regional myocardial function. We investigated the role of SRI and troponin I (TnI) in the detection of subclinical radiation therapy (RT)-induced cardiotoxicity in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This study prospectively included 75 women (51 left-sided and 24 right-sided) receiving adjuvant RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Sequential echocardiographs with SRI were obtained before RT, immediately after RT, and 8 and 14 months after RT. TnI levels were measured on the first and last day of RT. Results: Mean heart and left ventricle (LV) doses were both 9 4 Gy for the left-sided patients and 4 4 Gy and 1 0.4 Gy, respectively, for the right-sided patients. A decrease in strain was observed at all post-RT time points for left-sided patients (?17.5% 1.9% immediately after RT, ?16.6% 1.4% at 8 months, and ?17.7% 1.9% at 14 months vs ?19.4% 2.4% before RT, P<.01) but not for right-sided patients. When we considered left-sided patients only, the highest mean dose was given to the anterior left ventricular (LV) wall (25 14 Gy) and the lowest to the inferior LV wall (3 3 Gy). Strain of the anterior wall was reduced after RT (?16.6% 2.3% immediately after RT, ?16% 2.6% at 8 months, and ?16.8% 3% at 14 months vs ?19% 3.5% before RT, P<.05), whereas strain of the inferior wall showed no significant change. No changes were observed with conventional echocardiography. Furthermore, mean TnI levels for the left-sided patients were significantly elevated after RT compared with before RT, whereas TnI levels of the right-sided patients remained unaffected. Conclusions: In contrast to conventional echocardiography, SRI detected a regional, subclinical decline in cardiac function up to 14 months after breast RT. It remains to be determined whether these changes are related to clinical outcome. In the meantime, we encourage the use of radiation techniques that minimize the exposure of the anterior LV wall in left-sided patients.

  11. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  12. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Benjamin J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Engineering, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT 2605 (Australia); O'Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, P.O.Box 980058, Richmond, Virginia 23298-0058 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D CBCT in its current implementation.

  13. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, E. P. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Rosner, R., E-mail: eph2001@columbia.edu [Computation Institute, University of Chicago, 5735 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  14. MachineIndependent Virtual Memory Management for Paged Uniprocessor and Multiprocessor Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uniprocessors and multiprocessors including the VAX family of uniprocessors and multiprocessors, the IBM RT PC paging support. Versions of Berkeley UNIX on non­VAX hardware, such as SunOS on the SUN 3 and ACIS 4.2 on the IBM RT PC, actually simulate internally the VAX memory mapping architecture ­­ in effect treating

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - archaeal genus acidianus Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    >> 1 Eur. J. Biochem. 267, 112 (2000) q FEBS 2000 R E V I E W A RT I C L E Summary: Eur. J. Biochem. 267, 112 (2000) q FEBS 2000 R E V I E W A RT I C L E Archaeal protein......

  16. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallin, Asa R. [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Svanvik, Joar [Department of Surgery, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Adell, Gunnar [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Sun Xiaofeng [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  17. MINUTES OF UNIVERSITY COURT 25 June 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Innovation Centre bids (Industrial Biotechnology, Construction, Oil & Gas, Big Data) Engagement with UK Physical Laboratory; the Rt Hon. Vince Cable MP ­ Fraunhofer UK launch; House of Commons Business Innovation and Skills Committee visit to Strathclyde; the Rt Hon. Michael Moore MP ­ EU research spending

  18. Marine-derived heterocycles : structural, synthetic and biological investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skepper, Colin K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OMOM i) iPr 2 NP(OFm) 2 tetrazole MeCN/CH 2 Cl 2 , rt OBnO OAc i) iPr 2 NP(OFm) 2 tetrazole MeCN/CH 2 Cl 2 rt, 40 minmg, 0.0021 mmol) and tetrazole (4.34 mg, 0.0062 mmol, 183 L

  19. Calibration of Indoor UWB Sub-band Divided Ray Tracing Using Multiobjective Simulated Annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemen, Thomas

    , Sweden; 5 ICTEAM, Universit´e catholique de Louvain, Belgium Abstract--Sub-band divided ray tracing (RT) has been widely used to reproduce as reliably as possible the ultra-wideband (UWB) radio wave the accuracy of sub-band divided RT in terms of the power delay profile (PDP) and the root mean square (RMS

  20. Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia From Charleston Roanoke, VA: Via I-64 West, exit at White Sulphur Springs (Exit 181) and take Rt. 92 North to Green Bank, then take Rt. 92 South to Green Bank. From Washington DC: Via I-66 West to I-81 South. Option 1: Take I-81

  1. HGS Schedulers for Digital Audio Workstation like Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poduval, Karthik Venugopal

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    RT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.1.3 Libsynchro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.1.4 Synchro SDF version 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 3.2 JACK Integration... 4.1.4 Rt-app Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 v 4.2 JACK with SEQ SDF integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 4.2.1 No Load...

  2. Real-time magnetic resonance imagingguided radiofrequency atrial ablation and visualization of lesion formation at 3 Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    of lesion formation at 3 Tesla Gaston R. Vergara, MD,* Sathya Vijayakumar, MS,* Eugene G. Kholmovski, Ph. In this study, we report a novel 3-Tesla RT -RI based porcine RF ablation model and visuali- zation of lesion-Tesla RT MRI-based catheter ablation and lesion visualization system. METHODS RF energy was delivered

  3. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Autumn Semester 20089 Vectors and Motion 2 Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t = 0, the particle is at rest at the origin, and find the initial acceler- ation of the particle. (3)] = a ? b (2 marks) At time t, the position vector r(t) of a moving particle is given by r(t) = µ2 [µt

  4. Physics 112 Second Midterm Exam February 22, 2000 MIDTERM EXAM INSTRUCTIONS: You have 90 minutes to complete this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to the mixing process? (The gas constant R NAk, where NA is Avogadro's number.) (a) 0 (b) -5RT ln 2 (c) +5RT ln is observed at T = 10, 000 K. The heat capacities of the gas at constant pressure and constant volume decoupled? (It is enough to consider the relative volume occupied by the expanding photon gas.) (a) 103 (b

  5. alkaline gel electrophoresis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 1L Adjust pH to 8.3 with NaOH or acetic acid Store at RT TBE (5X) Tris 54g EDTA 4.65g Boric Acid 24g ddH2O up to 1L Adjust pH to 8.3 with boric acid Store at RT - Ethidium...

  6. agarose gel surrounding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 1L Adjust pH to 8.3 with NaOH or acetic acid Store at RT TBE (5X) Tris 54g EDTA 4.65g Boric Acid 24g ddH2O up to 1L Adjust pH to 8.3 with boric acid Store at RT - Ethidium...

  7. aminating reagents forthe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 1L Adjust pH to 8.3 with NaOH or acetic acid Store at RT TBE (5X) Tris 54g EDTA 4.65g Boric Acid 24g ddH2O up to 1L Adjust pH to 8.3 with boric acid Store at RT - Ethidium...

  8. SMART Camp 2013. Returning student application form Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    SMART Camp 2013. Returning student application form Instructions: Print out and complete clearly participated in since the previous SMaRT camp? What do you expect from spending another term in SMaRT camp students of your group master the material. You will need to prepare to this work in advance, recalling

  9. ZD6474, an inhibitor of VEGFR and EGFR tyrosine kinase activity in combination with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gustafson, Dan [Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bianco, Cataldo [Dipartimento di Oncologia, dei Trapianti e delle Nuove Technologie in Medicina, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Ciardiello, Fortunato [Department of Molecular and Clinical Endocrinology, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Dimery, Isaiah [AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation enhances both epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, which are a part of key pathways for tumor progression. Some tumors may not respond well to EGFR inhibitors alone or may develop resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Therefore, drug therapy targeted to VEGF receptors and EGFRs, when combined with radiotherapy (RT), may improve tumor control and provide wider applicability. This article focuses on ZD6474, an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGF receptor signaling in combination with RT. We discuss preclinical and clinical studies with RT and inhibitors of VEGF or EGFR signaling first. We then address issues associated with ZD6474 pharmacokinetic dosing, and scheduling when combined with RT. We also discuss ZD6474 in the context of anti-EGFR therapy resistance. Dual inhibition of EGFR and VEGF receptor signaling pathways shows promise in enhancing RT efficacy.

  10. Radiotherapy to Improve Local Control Regardless of Surgical Margin and Malignancy Grade in Extremity and Trunk Wall Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jebsen, Nina L. [Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen Faculty of Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)], E-mail: njeb@helse-bergen.no; Trovik, Clement S. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Orthopedics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bauer, Henrik C.F. [Department of Orthopedics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Rydholm, Anders [Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Monge, Odd R. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Hall, Kirsten Sundby [Cancer Clinic, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); Alvegard, Thor [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Cancer Clinic, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Faculty Group, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy has during the past decades become increasingly used in the treatment of localized soft tissue sarcoma. We evaluated the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on local recurrence rates (LRRs) in Scandinavia between 1986 and 2005. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,093 adult patients with extremity or trunk wall soft tissue sarcoma treated at four Scandinavian sarcoma centers were stratified according to the treatment period (1986-1991, 1992-1997, and 1998-2005). The use of adjuvant RT, quality of the surgical margin, interval between surgery and RT, and LRR were analyzed. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results: The use of RT (77% treated postoperatively) increased from 28% to 53%, and the 5-year LRR decreased from 27% to 15%. The rate of wide surgical margins did not increase. The risk factors for local recurrence were histologic high-grade malignancy (hazard ratio [HR], 5), an intralesional (HR, 6) or marginal (HR, 3) surgical margin, and no RT (HR, 3). The effect of RT on the LRR was also significant after a wide margin resection and in low-grade malignant tumors. The LRR was the same after preoperative and postoperative RT. The median interval from surgery to the start of RT was 7 weeks, and 98% started RT within 4 months. The LRR was the same in patients who started treatment before and after 7 weeks. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that adjuvant RT effectively prevents local recurrence in soft tissue sarcoma, irrespective of the tumor depth, malignancy grade, and surgical margin status. The effect was most pronounced in deep-seated, high-grade tumors, even when removed with a wide surgical margin.

  11. A Score Predicting Posttreatment Ambulatory Status in Patients Irradiated for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg, Eppendorf (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood (United Kingdom); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To create a scoring system to predict ambulatory status after radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Methods and Materials: On the basis of a multivariate analysis of 2096 MSCC patients, a scoring system was developed. This included the five prognostic factors significantly associated with post-RT ambulatory status: primary tumor type, interval between tumor diagnosis and MSCC, visceral metastases, motor function before RT, and time developing motor deficits before RT. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the post-RT ambulatory rate (as a percentage) by 10. Total scores represented the sum of the scores for each factor and ranged between 21 and 44 points. Patients were divided into five groups according to this score. Results: The post-RT ambulatory rates were 6% (24 of 389) for patients with scores of {<=}28 points, 44% (121 of 278) for those with 29-31 points, 70% (212 of 303) for those with 32-34 points, 86% (315 of 266) for those with 35-37 points, and 99% (750 of 760) for those with {>=}38 points. The 3-month survival rates were 29%, 62%, 77%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The 6-months survival rates were 6%, 31%, 42%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Conclusions: Because patients with scores of {<=}28 points had poor functional outcome after RT and extraordinarily poor survival rates, short-course RT to decrease pain or best supportive care may be considered. Patients with scores of 29-37 points should be considered surgical candidates, because RT-alone results were not optimal. Patients with scores of {>=}38 points seem to have excellent results with RT alone.

  12. Short-course radiotherapy is not optimal for spinal cord compression due to myeloma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School, Hannover (Germany)]. E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Hoskin, Peter J. [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schulte, Rainer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Lubeck (Germany); Poortmans, Philip [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Dahm-Daphi, Jochen [Institute of Radiobiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Obralic, Nermina [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Wildfang, Ingeborg [Department of Radiotherapy, Siloah Hospital, Hannover (Germany); Bahrehmand, Roja [Department of Radiotherapy, St. Georg Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); Engenhart-Cabilic, Rita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Philipps-University, Marburg (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the suitability of short-course radiotherapy (RT) for spinal cord compression (SCC) in myeloma patients. Methods and Materials: Data for 172 myeloma patients irradiated between January 1994 and December 2004 for SCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course RT (1 x 8 Gy, 5 x 4 Gy, n = 61) and long-course RT (10 x 3 Gy, 15 x 2.5 Gy, 20 x 2 Gy, n = 111) were compared for functional outcome up to 24 months after RT. In addition, 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 90 patients (52%). Forty-seven percent of nonambulatory patients regained the ability to walk. Functional outcome was significantly influenced by the time of developing motor deficits before RT. Improvement of motor function was more frequent after long-course RT than after short-course RT: 59% vs. 39% (p = 0.10) at 1 month, 67% vs. 43% (p 0.043) at 6 months, 76% vs. 40% (p = 0.003) at 12 months, 78% vs. 43% (p 0.07) at 18 months, and 83% v 54% (p = 0.33) at 24 months. A subgroup analysis of the long-course RT group demonstrated a similar functional outcome for 10 x 3 Gy when compared with 15 x 2.5 Gy and 20 x 2 Gy. Conclusions: Long-course RT is preferable for SCC in myeloma patients because it resulted in better functional outcome than short-course RT. Treatment with 10 x 3 Gy can be considered appropriate.

  13. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Saito, Naoko [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Qureshi, Muhammad M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ozonoff, Al [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Romesser, Paul B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  14. Favorable Prognosis in Patients With High-Grade Glioma With Radiation Necrosis: The University of Colorado Reoperation Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Olsen, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Franklin, Wilbur; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Lillehei, Kevin; Waziri, Allen [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise M. [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen, Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the pathology, outcomes, and prognostic factors in patients with high-grade glioma undergoing reoperation after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with World Health Organization Grade 3-4 glioma underwent reoperation after prior RT. The median dose of prior RT was 60 Gy, and 84% received chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. Estimation of the percentage of necrosis and recurrent tumor in each reoperation specimen was performed. Pathology was classified as RT necrosis if {>=}80% of the specimen was necrotic and as tumor recurrence if {>=}20% was tumor. Predictors of survival were analyzed using log-rank comparisons and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: The median interval between the completion of RT and reoperation was 6.7 months (range, 1-59 months). Pathologic analysis showed RT necrosis in 27% and recurrence in 73% of cases. Thirteen patients required a reoperation for uncontrolled symptoms. Among them, 1 patient (8%) had pathology showing RT necrosis, and 12 (92%) had tumor recurrence. Median survival after reoperation was longer for patients with RT necrosis (21.8 months vs. 7.0 months, p = 0.047). In 7 patients with Grade 4 tumors treated with temozolomide-based chemoradiation with RT necrosis, median survival from diagnosis and reoperation were 30.2 months and 21.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with RT necrosis at reoperation have improved survival compared with patients with tumor recurrence. Future efforts to intensify local therapy and increase local tumor control in patients with high-grade glioma seem warranted.

  15. Whole-pelvis, 'mini-pelvis,' or prostate-only external beam radiotherapy after neoadjuvant and concurrent hormonal therapy in patients treated in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9413 trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: roach@radonc17.ucsf.edu; De Silvio, Michelle [RTOG Statistical Headquarters, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Valicenti, Richard [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Grignon, David [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Asbell, Sucha O. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland OR (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9413 trial demonstrated a better progression-free survival (PFS) with whole-pelvis (WP) radiotherapy (RT) compared with prostate-only (PO) RT. This secondary analysis was undertaken to determine whether 'mini-pelvis' (MP; defined as {>=}10 x 11 cm but <11 x 11 cm) RT resulted in progression-free survival (PFS) comparable to that of WP RT. To avoid a timing bias, this analysis was limited to patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent hormonal therapy (N and CHT) in Arms 1 and 2 of the study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had a risk of lymph node (LN) involvement >15%. Neoadjuvant and concurrent hormonal therapy (N and CHT) was administered 2 months before and during RT for 4 months. From April 1, 1995, to June 1, 1999, a group of 325 patients were randomized to WP RT + N and CHT and another group of 324 patients were randomized to receive PO RT + N and CHT. Patients randomized to PO RT were dichotomized by median field size (10 x 11 cm), with the larger field considered an 'MP' field and the smaller a PO field. Results: The median PFS was 5.2, 3.7, and 2.9 years for WP, MP, and PO fields, respectively (p = 0.02). The 7-year PFS was 40%, 35%, and 27% for patients treated to WP, MP, and PO fields, respectively. There was no association between field size and late Grade 3+ genitourinary toxicity but late Grade 3+ gastrointestinal RT complications correlated with increasing field size. Conclusions: This subset analysis demonstrates that RT field size has a major impact on PFS, and the findings support comprehensive nodal treatment in patients with a risk of LN involvement of >15%.

  16. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Steve R., E-mail: steve.martinez@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P. [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bold, Richard J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  17. An experimental measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of a porous solid-liquid system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, James Elliott

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to contain the sample for the flow rate measurement. 1. Air Supply 2 ~ Vacuun Line 3. Waste Line 4 ~ Surge Tank 5. Water Reservoir 6. Oil Reservoir Test Specinsn 8. Pressure Regulator Valve SATURATION APPARATUS FCR SATURATI?l SARDSTONR TXSP... the system can be described by' the one h dimensional form of Fouriers dT Equation: Q ~ -!:. A ? . ds The quantity of heat flowing through the oil and water in the pore dT space is OCk! ~ K A& ( ? ) + Kp AC (~)C ~ Based on the unidirectional W & d...

  18. Threshold voltage extraction circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoon, Siew Kuok

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    =Vos* (point of inflection in t/In-V&s), the drain current flowing in M2 and Ml would correspond to the square-law current equation of In; ? (kp/2);(W/L)i (Vcs; ? Vr) . (17) Thus, 4Im = Im and t/Inz/VIm ? 0. 5. By plotting the graph of ratio t... can also be expressed as VGS2 VGS/ slope = ~ (4) Let 4~ = I then t//t ? 2I, then by equating (3) and (4), Vr can be obtained with a simple expression as Vr = 2Vost ? Vcr. Linear Extrapolation Method This method is similar...

  19. Determination of the linkage relationships and the gene-centromere genetic distances for endopeptidase structural genes in hexaploid wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillin, David Edwin

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The linkage relationships for the (EP) structural gene are shown below. centromere 42. 17 ~E -Blv 13. 04 7AL ~E-Ale 6. 67 ~E-Al 3. 90 10. 67 ACKNOMLF. DGT'KNT S Sincere gratitude is extended to all members of my graduate committee for. their guidance..., or KP-BlZ and their chromosome constitut on Linkage relationships for three (EP) structural genes on 7AL Chi square test for independence of EP-Aj. y and ~E-Alx Chi square testing the hypothesis that two independently segregating genes in FI...

  20. Geodesic Distance in Planar Graphs: An Integrable Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Di Francesco

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the enumeration of planar graphs using bijections with suitably decorated trees, which allow for keeping track of the geodesic distances between faces of the graph. The corresponding generating functions obey non-linear recursion relations on the geodesic distance. These are solved by use of stationary multi-soliton tau-functions of suitable reductions of the KP hierarchy. We obtain a unified formulation of the (multi-) critical continuum limit describing large graphs with marked points at large geodesic distances, and obtain integrable differential equations for the corresponding scaling functions. This provides a continuum formulation of two-dimensional quantum gravity, in terms of the geodesic distance.

  1. Computer vision determination of the stem/root joint on processing carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, Matthew McMahon

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Emerson Electric Company, 1982). Camera, Lens, and Field of View The vision sensor used in this research was a non-interlaced, solid state. black and white television camera. This Hitachi CCTV - MOB Camera Model KP-1 20U had a resolution of 320 (H... in the camera's field of view (FOV) (Hitachi, 1985). A 12. 5-75 mm f1:1. 8 Computer TV zoom lens was selected for use with the television camera. The zoom feature of this lens and its short minimum focal length were appropriate for this application...

  2. Newsfront 10-16 September 2007, Issue 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Yubaraj

    and an active non-corporate media. (Saadi is a climate change expert.) actionFLOOD S h as h an k a S a ad i Floods in South Asian countries are a major setback for the regional and national economy. Directly and indirectly affected poor and middle income... a truly democratic set-up." He said Nepal's transition needs a safe landing which is possible only through unity and reconciliation. In a Gandhian spirit, he said, "politics of hatred and denial dictated by undemocratic desire of revenge KP...

  3. Modeling of temperature and excitation dependences of efficiency in an InGaN light-emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Weng W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The changes in excitation dependence of efficiency with temperature is modeled for a wurtzite InGaN light-emitting diode. The model incorporates bandstructure changes with carrier density arising from screening of quantum-confined Stark effect. Bandstructure is computed by solving Poisson and k.p equations in the envelop approximation. The information is used in a dynamical model for populations in momentum-resolved electron and hole states. Application of the approach shows the interplay of quantum-well and barrier emissions giving rise to shape changes in efficiency versus current density with changing temperature, as observed in some experiments.

  4. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun, E-mail: tongjun@pku.edu.cn; Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on kp approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  5. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1 APPENDIX

  6. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1

  7. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1

  8. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1

  9. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1T-1

  10. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1T-11

  11. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamasK-1 APPENDIX KP-1R-1T-111

  12. The evaluation and design of aeration systems for the storage of cottonseed in Muskogee type houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundt, Ronald James

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    minute at 12 inches negative pressure (water) to a mass of 4, 000 tons seed 60 to 70 feet deep (37). Most of the earlier seed cooling systems were designed with the floor laterals spaced on approximately 10 foot centers and in some cases with small.... It is convenient in this work to substitute a pseudo permeability, K, for the quantity k/p (16). Equation 2 becomes: vL = g -K dP A dL where vL feet/minute Q ~ cubic feet/minute A ~ square feet dp dL inches of water/foot (sq. ft. )/(min. ) (inches water...

  13. Determination of iridium in industrial concentrates by controlled-potential coulometry with a glassy-carbon electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stril'chenko, T.G.; Kabanova, O.L.; Danilova, F.I.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a coulometric method for determining iridium without separating nonferrous and noble metals using a glassy-carbon (GC) crucible instead of the expensive platinum electrode. The crucible also serves as the electrochemical cell for the coulometric determination and as a vessel in which an aliquot weight of the analyzed solution is taken. The KP-3 concentrate contains several metals that accompany iridium. The main metals which interfere in the electrochemical determination of iridium with the use of a platinum electrode are iron and ruthenium. This paper describes the authors' proposed procedure for determining iridium in hydrochloric acid solutions with the GC crucible-electrode.

  14. Estimation of the spontaneous mutation rate in Heliconius melpomene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keightley, Peter D.; Pinharanda, Ana; Ness, Rob W.; Simpson, Fraser; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Mallet, James; Davey, John W.; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    be produced for most species. Sequencing parents and their offspring and searching for de novo mutations in the offspring is more generally applicable, but to date experiments have only been carried out in humans (Roach et al. 2010; Conrad et al. 2011... 1454. Roach JC, Glusman G, Smit AFA, Huff CD, Hubley R, Shannon PT, Rowen L, Pant KP, Goodman N, Bamshad M. 2010. Analysis of genetic inheritance in a family quartet by whole-genome sequencing. Science 328: 636-639. Schrider, DR, Houle D, Lynch M, Hahn MW...

  15. Effective model for in-medium $\\bar{K}N$ interactions including the $L=1$ partial wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciepl, Ale

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled channels model of meson-baryon interactions based on the effective chiral Lagrangian is extended to account explicitly for the $\\Sigma(1385)$ resonance that dominates the $P$-wave $\\bar{K}N$ and $\\pi\\Sigma$ interactions at energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. The presented model aims at a uniform treatment of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ and $\\Sigma(1385)$ dynamics in the nuclear medium. We demonstrate the applicability of the model by confronting its predictions with the vacuum scattering data, then we follow with discussing the impact of nuclear matter on the $\\pi\\Sigma$ mass spectrum and on the energy dependence of the $K^{-}p$ branching ratios.

  16. Effective model for in-medium $\\bar{K}N$ interactions including the $L=1$ partial wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ale Ciepl; Vojt?ch Krej?i?k

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled channels model of meson-baryon interactions based on the effective chiral Lagrangian is extended to account explicitly for the $\\Sigma(1385)$ resonance that dominates the $P$-wave $\\bar{K}N$ and $\\pi\\Sigma$ interactions at energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. The presented model aims at a uniform treatment of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ and $\\Sigma(1385)$ dynamics in the nuclear medium. We demonstrate the applicability of the model by confronting its predictions with the vacuum scattering data, then we follow with discussing the impact of nuclear matter on the $\\pi\\Sigma$ mass spectrum and on the energy dependence of the $K^{-}p$ branching ratios.

  17. Microsoft Word - KCP SEC J_Appendix P - Special Financial Agreement

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of the Yucca0 National Nuclear Security2 Issue 1920K,P,

  18. Postoperative Radiation Therapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Node-Positive Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Liu, Jian, E-mail: liujianfj@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Li, Jiancheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Zhu, Kunshou [Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, Xiongwei [Department of Pathology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Pathology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Mingqiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Ming [School of Graduate, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou (China)] [School of Graduate, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou (China); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy plus RT (CRT) for the postoperative treatment of node-positive thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and to determine the incidence and severity of toxic reactions. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 304 patients who had undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymph node dissection for TESCC and were determined by postoperative pathology to have lymph node metastasis without distant hematogenous metastasis. Of these patients, 164 underwent postoperative chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2}, average days 1-3, plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1; 21-day cycle) plus RT (50 Gy), and 140 underwent postoperative RT alone. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for the CRT and RT groups were 47.4% and 38.6%, respectively (P=.030). The distant metastasis rate, the mixed (regional lymph node and distant) metastasis rate, and the overall recurrence rate were significantly lower in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). However, mild and severe early toxic reactions, including neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and gastrointestinal reaction, were significantly more common in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). No significant differences in incidence of late toxic reactions were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our results show that in node-positive TESCC patients, postoperative CRT is significantly more effective than RT alone at increasing the overall survival and decreasing the rates of distant metastasis, mixed metastasis, and overall recurrence. Severe early toxic reactions were more common with CRT than with RT alone, but patients could tolerate CRT.

  19. Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kron, Tomas, E-mail: Tomas.Kron@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Willis, David; Link, Emma [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lehman, Margot [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Campbell, Gillian [Auckland City Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland (New Zealand); O'Brien, Peter [Newcastle Calvary Mater Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Chua, Boon [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dosevolume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dosevolume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Christopher H., E-mail: chchap@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sundgren, Pia C. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Buchtel, Henry [Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junck, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  1. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ying-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chi-Shiun, E-mail: cschiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong, E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor.

  2. Valproic Acid Use During Radiation Therapy for Glioblastoma Associated With Improved Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Christopher A., E-mail: barkerc@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bishop, Andrew J.; Chang, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Chan, Timothy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VA) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor taken by patients with glioblastoma (GB) to manage seizures, and it can modulate the biologic effects of radiation therapy (RT). We investigated whether VA use during RT for GB was associated with overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 544 adults with GB were retrospectively reviewed. Analyses were performed to determine the association of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG RPA) class, seizure history, and concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and AED use during RT with OS. Results: Seizures before the end of RT were noted in 217 (40%) patients, and 403 (74%) were taking an AED during RT; 29 (7%) were taking VA. Median OS in patients taking VA was 16.9 months (vs 13.6 months taking another AED, P=.16). Among patients taking an AED during RT, OS was associated with VA (P=.047; hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-1.07), and RTOG RPA class (P<.0001; HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.37-1.61). Of the 5 most common AEDs, only VA was associated with OS. Median OS of patients receiving VA and TMZ during RT was 23.9 months (vs 15.2 months for patients taking another AED, P=.26). When the analysis was restricted to patients who received concurrent TMZ, VA use was marginally associated with OS (P=.057; HR, 0.54; 95% CI, ?0.09 to 1.17), independently of RTOG RPA class and seizure history. Conclusions: VA use during RT for GB was associated with improved OS, independently of RTOG RPA, seizure history, and concurrent TMZ use. Further studies of treatment that combines HDAC inhibitors and RT are warranted.

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Immune Responses in Cattle Experimentally Infested with Amblyomma americanum ticks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brannan, Jaime Lynette

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . .................... 93 3.3 Relative gene expression by qRT-PCR for (A) TLR4, (B) CD14, and (C) NLRP3 in bovine tick bite-site biopsies (Skin) and blood leukocytes (Blood...)... ..................................................................................................... 95 3.4 Relative gene expression by qRT-PCR for (A) IFN? and (B) TLR5 in bovine tick bite-site biopsies (Skin) and blood leukocytes (Blood). .......... 96 3.5 Relative gene expression by qRT-PCR for (A) IL6, (B) IL8, (C) IL1RN...

  4. Radiotherapy for Liver Metastases: A Review of Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, Morten, E-mail: hoyer@aarhus.rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Swaminath, Anand [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bydder, Sean [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Lock, Michael [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Mendez Romero, Alejandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, there has been an increasing use of radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of liver metastases. Most often, ablative doses are delivered to focal liver metastases with the goal of local control and ultimately improving survival. In contrast, low-dose whole-liver RT may be used for the palliation of symptomatic diffuse metastases. This review examines the available clinical data for both approaches. The review found that RT is effective both for local ablation of focal liver metastases and for palliation of patients with symptomatic liver metastases. However, there is a lack of a high level of evidence from randomized clinical trials.

  5. Some perturbation methods for the study of unstable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nash, James Mosely

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    201 I~l ~ N DG 200 J=lpN Blip-J)=0. 0 B(lpl)=1o0 DG 501 I=lpN A(N+lpI)~I 00 502 K=lpH KP1=K+1 KNICK-I IF (K-N) 525p 516 ~ 516 DO 503 I=KpH A(I NP2) ABSF(A(I K)) DG 504 J=KPlpN IF (A( lpN+2) ABSF(A( lp J) ) ) 505p504p 504 At I p M+2)p... SEARCH COLUHN A(lpN+3) I='lpH ? SHIFT HOLD COLUNN 8(lpJ) Ip J=lpN SITE FGR CONSTRUCTIOH GF INVERSE DIHENSION A()03pl04) p 8(101p IO?3 CGHHGN ApBpNpOETNTpALEHpBUHPpFKRp IPASpNPASpHGDE DETNT=I+0 NPI=H+I NP2=N+2 NP3=N+3 A(NP2 ~ NP3)~0 NH1 = N-1 DO...

  6. Theoretical studies of optical gain tuning by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to describe theoretically the tuning of the optical gain by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), the optical gain calculations within kp approach were developed and applied for N-containing and N-free QWs. The electronic band structure and the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW were calculated within the 10-band kp model which takes into account the interaction of electron levels in the QW with the nitrogen resonant level in GaInNAs. It has been shown that this interaction increases with the hydrostatic pressure and as a result the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW decreases by about 40% and 80% for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes, respectively, for the hydrostatic pressure change from 0 to 40 kilobars. Such an effect is not observed for N-free QWs where the dispersion of electron and hole energies remains unchanged with the hydrostatic pressure. This is due to the fact that the conduction and valence band potentials in GaInAs/GaAs QW scale linearly with the hydrostatic pressure.

  7. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden 1 , J. B.involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of ?generated by RT in type Ia supernovae should obey Bolgiano-

  8. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PV REC RPS RT SAM T&D TES WECC WREZ WWSIS VG VOLL AncillaryCoordinating Council (WECC). http://www.wecc.biz/committees/Coordinating Council (WECC). TEPPC TAS 2020 Dataset

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous plasma loaded Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ex Vivo-Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Infusion in HIV-Infected Patients Summary: DNA) assay and by quantitative RT-PCR assay in the...

  10. AME 101, Fall 2013 Midterm exam #2 review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    really means when the Mach number (M) is not sound speed = (RT)1/2 o Isentropic. Problem #1 (scrutiny) (30 points total) I calculated the power required to pump liquid through a new type

  11. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- - , 1 .3 t fLU4 ' I 04 - -t - rt . .5 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing soil pollution Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along an urban-rural gradient in southeastern New York, USA. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 57-58, 797... Jartun M, Ottesen RT, Steinnes E (2003): Urban soil ... Source:...

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  14. Ris-R-706p*f Hydrogen Problems Relatedto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is dedicated to the presentation of the experimental research completed at AECL-Research, Whiteshell Laboratory til beskrivelsen af eksperimenter udført i AECL-Researcn, White- shell Laboratory, hvor effekterne

  15. IEOR 3106, Fall 2011, Professor Whitt Introduction to Renewal Theory: Tuesday, November 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    states that lim t R(t) t = E[R1] E[X1] . 3. Long-haul Truck Driver: Driving Back and Forth A truck driver

  16. PHOTOVOLTAIC PROPERTIES OF METAL-MEROCYANINE-TiO2 SANDWICH CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje Asbjorn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in making the photovoltaic cells. Figure 3. Diagram ofused in making the photovoltaic cells. HO HO ,5 di -t rt.organic compounds in photovoltaic cells. It lies more in the

  17. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation for the near-ocean-surface high-resolution downwelling irradiance statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zao

    We present a numerical study of the near-surface underwater solar light statistics using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Advanced variance-reduction ...

  18. A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels. Citation: Marchand RT, JM Haynes, GG Mace, TP Ackerman, and GL Stephens.2009."A Comparison of Simulated...

  19. PHOTOVOLTAIC PROPERTIES OF METAL-MEROCYANINE-TiO2 SANDWICH CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje Asbjorn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    67 3.6 Photovoltaic Action Spectrum . . . . 3.7dye used in making the photovoltaic cells. Figure 3. Diagramused in making the photovoltaic cells. HO HO ,5 di -t rt.

  20. Kim & Shahidi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1r; = Ad(1r) be the Gelha-rtJacquet lift {(33} of 7L This is a cuspidal repre-. Sentation of .... corresponds t0 {9011)} C ['62, if m, corresponds to {tv} C LGL...

  1. Coherence of resonant-tunneling transport in terahertz quantum-cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sushil

    We develop simple density-matrix models to describe the role of coherence in resonant-tunneling (RT) transport of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs). Specifically, we investigate the effects of coherent coupling between the ...

  2. The Role of O-mannosyl Glycans in Drosophila Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyalin, Dmitry

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . The co-expression of RT and TW is required to generate high-molecular-mass bands of DG. The lectin staining revealed differences in glycan compositions of DG purified from different genetic backgrounds. Overall, this research work established...

  3. Electronic behavior of three oxygen non-stoichiometric Fe4+/Fe3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    r(T), thermoelectric power a(T), and magnetic susceptibility w(T). Oxidation of Ca 2 Fe 2 O 5 by annealing in ozone progresses by oxygen insertion to give conductive CaFeO...

  4. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    , O3 lidar) R.B. Pierce NOAA/NESDIS Co-I AQ modeling, data assimilation R. Spurr RT Solutions, Inc. Co geostationary communications satellite with expected ~2019 launch Provides hourly daylight observations

  5. A Semi-Empirical Growth Estimation Method for Matrix Models of Endangered Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P.L. , Taniguchi, I.K. , Rogers-Bennett, L. , 2000. Serial71, 12671274. Rogers-Bennett, L. , Leaf, R.T. Elasticity16, in press. Rogers-Bennett, L. , Haaker, P.A. , Huff,

  6. Using Matrix Models to Evaluate Abalone Conservation and Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and conservation. Authors: Rogers-Bennett, L. and R.T. Leaf.data. Authors: Rogers-Bennett, L. and D.W. Rogers Date: 2006Analysis Laura Rogers-Bennett University of California,

  7. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11 Karen Kluger px6667 Dec. 8, 2009-Dec. 7, 2012 Rt 269 & Road 53 or 61, Walker County, AL Site Characterization for CO2 Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black...

  8. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11 Karen Kluger, px6667 Dec. 8, 2009-Dec. 7, 2012 Rt 269 or Goodsprings Rd & Rd 53 or 61 AL Site Characterization for CO2 Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black...

  9. ARPA-E Celebrates Five Years of Changing What's Possible | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    front). Image: Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. AutoGrid 2 of 5 AutoGrid Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), AutoGrid's...

  10. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - - 6 2 10 ( ) s as as w s T M - + Khler Equation Surface Tension Slide 35 of 46 * 4 0.85 exp ( (85) * ) w as w w p M RT G D ...

  11. Durability of Diesel Engine Particulate Filters

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AT data is FY10 work 11 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy K IC fracture surface displays nodules in SiC- based material that are silicon rich RT and 500C...

  12. How the augmented Lagrangian algorithm can deal with an ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 23, 2014 ... Fis. Mat. e Nat. Accad. Naz. Lincei Ser. VIII, LXIII, Fasc. 5. 3, 22, 31. [45] R.T. Rockafellar (1970). Convex Analysis. Princeton Mathematics Ser.

  13. Error Bounds and Hlder Metric Subregularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    imal decreasing curve. Atti Accad. Naz. Lincei Rend. Cl. Sci. Fis. Mat. Natur. (8) 68(3),. 180187 (1980). In Italian. 9. Dontchev, A.L., Rockafellar, R.T.: Regularity

  14. IT Services Organisation Structure 21 June 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Manager: Adam Ford Head: Sandy Radford Head: Mike Luscombe Greg Austin Email and RT Millard Trainers (p/t) *1 ~0.1 FTE Kyle Fieldus Jeffrey Relf Research Support Kes

  15. U.S. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To:806 477 6256 o FEB 2 3 2010 c0 rt U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor 1200 New Jersey Ave .* S.E. Carrier Safety Washington, DC 20590 Administration...

  16. EINLADUNG INFOTAG 2001 Eine Forschungsanstalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    durch den Benzinzusatz MTBE. Methyl-tert-butylether gehört weltweit zu den meistproduzierten orga- nischen Chemikalien. Weil MTBE im Grundwasser auftritt, soll es in den USA als Benzinzusatz verboten

  17. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CO2 Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin ofAL Conduct seismic survey along Rt.269 corridor, Walker County, Alabama. 11 9 2009 Karen Cohen Digitally...

  18. Mapping molecular flexibility of spin labeled proteins on the nanosecond and longer time scales via CW lineshape analysis and osmolyte-perturbation EPR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lpez, Carlos Javier

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the nanometer range by pulse EPR. Chem. Phys. Chem. 3:927-Augusto, O. and Vaz, S.M 2007. EPR spin-trapping of proteinWeber, R.T. 2010. Quantitative EPR. Springer- Verlag/Wien.

  19. The dual-task methodology and assessing the attentional demands of ambulation with walkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowley, Tammara Kemp

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subjects. uninformed as to the correct use of the walkers were used. Each subject completed three phases of the experiment: (1) performing the reaction time (RT) task only; (2) performing each of the walking tasks alone; and (3) performing each...

  20. forest Ecology Forest Ecology and ~1anagement 112 (1998) 41-47

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reserved. Pit, 50378-1 t27(98)n03 17-X #12;LM, I'WI Zy/ el a/.IFVrt'.H Eco/0K.v and MarlaRt'mem 1/2 (/998

  1. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~~eam) . . . . . . 2. Diffuse Conversion Factor {Rt 1 e u~l~3. Reflection Conversion Factor (R c). F. EstimateExhibit 9. Direct Beam Conversion Factor from Horizontal to

  2. Delicatessen fish products by Norman D. Jarvis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TERI R, tewa rt L. dalJ , ecretary FISII A:-iD WILDlIFE SE R\\,I ut~ke. Camm/ufo"er Bl RHl ' OF C0'1'1f

  3. Start of Semester Meeting Fall 2013 Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    ://www.cs.stonybrook.edu · Under "Facilities Start of Semester Information" link. 2. What is RT? · Request Tracker system. More. · Quota > 1GB. · Separate Windows and Unix accounts (email sent when activated to your SOLAR registered

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute pelvic inflammatory Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RT be- cause of acute... of an association between the volume of pelvic BM receiving low-dose radiation (V10, V20) and acute HT in patients... doi:10.1016j.ijrobp.2006.03.018...

  5. Proteasome Inhibitors Block DNA Repair and Radiosensitize Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cron, Kyle R.

    Despite optimal radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy and/or surgery, a majority of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) fail treatment. To identify novel gene targets for improved tumor control, ...

  6. Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of snow in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musselman, Keith Newton

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and McMillen, R.T. , 1984. Solar radiation within an oak--J.P. et al. , 2004. Solar radiation transmission through1992. Analysis of solar radiation data for Port Harcourt,

  7. Communicating Evolution as Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thanukos, Anastasia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thuringiensis toxins. Science. 1992;258(5087):14515. MillerRT, Ruse M. But is it science? Amherst, NY: Prometheusto the philosophy of science: theory and reality. Chicago:

  8. COO-3095-11

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    best available original document. -1- ANNU AL PROG RESS REPO RT, 1973 - '. U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISS ION CONIR ACT AT (11-1) 3095 Project Abstract This invest igatio n deals...

  9. The characterization, functional expression, and localization of the first arthropod myokinin receptor from the southern cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (Acari: ixodidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Steven P.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the southern cattle tick, Boophilus microplus. The deduced amino acid sequence was 40 % identical to the lymnokinin receptor. The receptor transcript is present in all tick life stages as determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR. When expressed in mammalian CHO...

  10. NV: ELTE AZONOST: Mat. BSc. Algebra2: 4. vizsga (keresztflv)/1 2010. jan. 26.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, Emil

    . Számítsuk ki a kvaterniócsoportban (kjk)2009 k-2 értékét. (kjk)2009 k-2 = -j 17. Legyen A1 a síkon az

  11. LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Smith, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIGRATION PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS Alan Jaymay vary even though replacement fi~~d the pa~ameter value PIe N - P ;, RT I r:. fILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS. I.lan ~1ar

  12. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  13. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jebsen, Nina L., E-mail: nina.louise.jebsen@helse-bergen.no [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Engstrm, Katarina [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bauer, Henrik C. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Monge, Odd R. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Muren, Ludvig P. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Eide, Geir E. [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement S. [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, yvind S. [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant doseresponse effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  14. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Williams, Melanie [Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas (United States)] [Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niu, Jiangong [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad [Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J. [New York State Cancer Registry, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York (United States)] [New York State Cancer Registry, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ?66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, ?, and ?{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEERMedicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEERMedicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  15. Electronic Supplemental Information (ESI) Quantifying mRNA Levels Across a Histological Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Electronic Supplemental Information (ESI) for Quantifying mRNA Levels Across a Histological Section washes were performed using 20 µL of wash #13 and 12.5 µL of wash #14 buffers. AgPath-ID one-step RT was inverted, incubated, centrifuged, and washed as described. AgPath-ID one-step RT-PCR mix was prepared

  16. Development and validation of transgene constructs in order to generate bi-transgenic mice models for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Lakshmy

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    -polyA signal ....................... 36 Figure 14: CNPase-rtTA pUC57 confirmation digest ...................................................... 37 Figure 15: pTRE-Tight-Bi-AcGFP1-DN-ErbB4 cloning ................................................ 38 Figure 16...: GFP expression by the DN-ErbB4 construct .................................................. 39 Figure 17: Dn-ErbB4 immunoblot analysis ...................................................................... 41 Figure 18: CNPase-rtTA digestion...

  17. Dynamic workload characterization for energy efficient computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhiman, Gaurav

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    f u ke im art plu mc mc 2ar ppl qua a-2sw 2-2ap ip2-2 c-2 -2e r 2pe m swi rl-2 2pe u ppl -2a esa 2m rt -2a esa 2m f cf2 p 2ap f t u ake wim Avg mc ppl rt-2ar equ im-2s cf-2 2a m

  18. Algebra Lineal (Honores) Tarea 2 Septiembre 5 de 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardona, Alexander

    Algebra Lineal (Honores) Tarea 2 Septiembre 5 de 2014 I. Responda falso o verdadero(R) Mn(R), definida por T(A) = AT A, es una transformacion lineal. ii. Existe una transformacion lineal transformacion lineal, dim NT = dim (V/RT ). iv. Si T : V V es una transformacion lineal tal que V = NT RT

  19. The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthiesen, Chance, E-mail: chance-matthiesen@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, J. Spencer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, David [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron [Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an apparent risk of increased morbidity.

  20. Litt om evolusjonr spillteori. 1. ESS: Evolusjonrt Stabile Strategier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    Litt om evolusjonær spillteori. 1. ESS: Evolusjonært Stabile Strategier I klassisk spillteori har konstant i tid. Spørsm°alet er om man kan si noe om denne (stabile) strategifordelingen. 1.1. ESS. La være av befolk- ningen. Vi sier at p er en Evolusjonært Stabil Strategi (ESS) hvis p ikke kan bli invadert

  1. Survival Effect of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy Before Esophagectomy for Patients With Esophageal Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwer, Amanda L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)], E-mail: amanda.schwer@uchsc.edu; Ballonoff, Ari; McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); D'Agostino, Ralph B. [Department of Biostatistical Science, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) before definitive surgery for esophageal cancer remains controversial. This study used a large population-based database to assess the effect of NeoRT on survival for patients treated with definitive surgery. Methods and Materials: The overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival for patients with Stage T2-T4, any N, M0 (cT2-T4M0) esophageal cancer who had undergone definitive surgery between 1998 and 2004 were analyzed by querying the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results database. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and univariate comparisons were made using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards survival regression multivariate analysis was performed with NeoRT, T stage (T2 vs. T3-T4), pathologic nodal status (pN0 vs. pN1), number of nodes dissected (>10 vs. {<=}10), histologic type (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), age (<65 vs. {>=}65 years), and gender as covariates. Results: A total of 1,033 patients were identified. Of these, 441 patients received NeoRT and 592 underwent esophagectomy alone; 77% were men, 67% had adenocarcinoma, and 72% had Stage T3-T4 disease. The median OS and cause-specific survival were both significantly greater for patients who received NeoRT compared with esophagectomy alone (27 vs. 18 months and 35 vs. 21 months, respectively, p <0.0001). The 3-year OS rate was also significantly greater in the NeoRT group (43% vs. 30%). On multivariate analysis, NeoRT, age <65 years, adenocarcinoma histologic type, female gender, pN0 status, >10 nodes dissected, and Stage T2 disease were all independently correlated with increased OS. Conclusion: These results support the use of NeoRT for patients with esophageal cancer. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

  2. Outcomes and Effect of Radiotherapy in Patients With Stage I or II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballonoff, Ari [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: ari.ballonoff@uchsc.edu; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Schwer, Amanda; McCammon, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Bassetti, Michael; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and the effect of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients and Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all patients diagnosed with Stage I, IE, II, or IIE DLBCL between 1988 and 2004. The analyzable data included gender, age, race, stage, presence of extranodal disease, and RT administration. Patients who had died or were lost to follow-up within 6 months of diagnosis were excluded. Results: A total of 13,420 patients met the search criteria. Of these, 5,547 (41%) had received RT and 7,873 (59%) had not. RT was associated with a significant DSS (hazard ratio, 0.82, p <0.0001) and OS benefit that persisted during the 15 years of follow-up. Elderly patients, defined either as those >60 or >70 years old, had significantly improved DSS and OS associated with RT. On multivariate analysis, RT was significantly associated with increased DSS and OS. The 5-year DSS outcomes were highly variable among patient subsets, defined by age, stage, and extranodal disease (range for RT-treated patients, 70% for Stage II, age >60 years to 87% for Stage I, age {<=}60 years). Conclusion: This analysis presents the largest detailed data set of Stage I-II DLBCL patients. The results of our study have demonstrated that RT is associated with a survival advantage in patients with localized DLBCL, a benefit that extends to elderly patients. Outcomes for discrete patient subsets varied greatly. The development of tailored therapy according to the relapse risk is warranted, rather than uniform treatment of all early-stage DLBCL.

  3. Radiation-Associated Liver Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Charlie C., E-mail: cpan@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Das, Shiva K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

  4. Compact, Convex Upper Bound Iteration for Approximate POMDP Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tao

    uncertainty How to act based on past experience Maximize long term reward Wide range of applications Robotics and autonomous agent design Helicopter control, Robot navigation and mapping Nursing , Elderly assistance Others #12;POMDP model s0 s0 a1 a1 o1 o1 s1 s1 s2 s2 a2 a2 o2 o2 st st at at ot ot r0 r0 r1 r1 r2 r2 rt rt

  5. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  6. Supporting Information Supplemental Table 1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Se-C Forms A. Canola One multi scan 3.60E-04 ND ND 99 B. Indian mustard Two multi scans 4.02E-04 4.28E-04 ND Seeds RT Min. (Canola) % Soluble Selenium (Canola) Selenium Compounds (Canola) 2.54 ± 0.02 14.11 ± 2Cysteine 11.49 ± 1.03 19.64 ± 4.11% Selenate Seed Meals RT Min. (Canola) % Soluble Selenium (Canola) Selenium

  7. High-Temperature Steam-Treatment of PBI, PEEK, and PEKK Polymers with H2O and D2O: A Solid-State NMR Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluemel, Janet

    1 High-Temperature Steam-Treatment of PBI, PEEK, and PEKK Polymers with H2O and D2O: A Solid Supplementary Information Figure S1. TGA of melt-molded PBI after stirring in H2O at RT and steam-treatment with H2O at 150 °C and 315 °C. Figure S2. TGA of melt-molded PEEK after stirring in D2O at RT and steam

  8. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  9. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270?C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2}?+?Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270?C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2}?+?Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270?C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270?C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270?C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  10. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauspy, Jan [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Hamilton Health Sciences Centre and McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Beiner, Mario E. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Sheba Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Harley, Ian [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chapman, William [Department of Pathology, St. Joseph's Health Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fyles, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Levin, Wilfred, E-mail: wilfred.levin@rmp.uhn.on.c [Department of Pathology, St. Joseph's Health Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. Results: A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p = .02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p = .004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs.

  11. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jebsen, Nina L. [Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen Faculty of Medicine, Bergen, Norway and Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo Faculty Division, Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Turesson, Ingela [Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Folin, Annika [Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Trovik, Clement S. [Departments of Oncology and of Orthopedics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Hall, Kirsten Sundby [Cancer Clinic, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  12. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, Sean E., E-mail: semcguir@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cerne, Jasmina Z. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  13. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Ansa Maer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Scherwath, Angela [Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ernst, Gundula [Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Institute for Neuroradiology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Steinmann, Diana, E-mail: steinmann.diana@mh-hannover.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in patients with brain metastases after RT to the brain, whereas it remained relatively stable in breast cancer patients.

  14. Cognitive Function Before and After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, Kuan-Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Shyh-An, E-mail: yehsa@hotmail.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiung-Chih [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy (RT) on neurocognitive function in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with NPC treated with intensity-modulated RT were included. Dose-volume histograms of the temporal lobes were obtained in every patient. Neurocognitive tests were administered individually to each patient 1 day before initiation of RT and at least 12 months after completion of RT. Cognitive functioning status was evaluated as change in scores over time. Results: Among the total of 30 patients, 23 patients (76.7%) had significantly lower post-RT cognitive functioning scores compared with their pre-RT scores (p = 0.033). The cognitive functioning scores had significantly declined in the domains of short-term memory, language abilities, and list-generating fluency (p = 0.020, 0.023, and 0.001, respectively). Compared with patients with a mean dose to the temporal lobes of 36 Gy or less, patients with a mean dose of greater than 36 Gy had a significantly greater reduction in cognitive functioning scores (p = 0.017). Patients in whom V60 of the temporal lobes (i.e., the percentage of the temporal lobe volume that had received >60 Gy) was greater than 10% also had a greater reduction in cognitive functioning scores than those in whom V60 was 10% or less (p = 0.039). Conclusions: The results of our study indicated that RT could have deleterious effects on cognitive function in patients with NPC. Efforts should be made to reduce the radiation dose and irradiated volume of temporal lobes without compromising the coverage of target volume.

  15. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2?10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 61000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.0610 T) could result in a factor of 2500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  16. Cardiac Mortality in Patients With Stage I and II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With and Without Radiation: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, Thomas J., E-mail: thomas.pugh@ucdenver.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Ballonoff, Ari; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; McCammon, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Standard therapy for stage I and II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma consists of combined modality therapy with anthracycline-based chemotherapy, anti-CD20 antibody, and radiation therapy (RT). Curative approaches without RT typically utilize more intensive and/or protracted chemotherapy schedules. Anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimens are associated with a dose-dependent risk of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. We hypothesize that patients treated without RT, i.e., those who are treated with greater total chemotherapy cycles and hence cumulative anthracycline exposure, are at increased risk of cardiac mortality. Methods and Materials: The rate of cardiac-specific mortality (CSM) was analyzed in patients with stage I and II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma diagnosed between 1988 and 2004 by querying the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results database. Analyzable data included gender, age, race, stage, presence of extranodal disease, and RT administration. Results: A total of 15,454 patients met selection criteria; 6,021 (39%) patients received RT. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-180 months). The median age was 64 years. The actuarial incidence rates of CSM at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.3%, 9.0%, and 13.8%, respectively, in patients treated with RT vs. 5.9%, 10.8% and 16.1%, respectively, in patients treated without RT (p < 0.0001; hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-1.56). The increase in cardiac deaths for patients treated without RT persisted throughout the follow-up period. On multivariate analysis, treatment without RT remained independently associated with an increased risk of CSM (Cox hazard ratio, 1.32; 95% CI: 1.13-1.54; p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Increased anthracycline exposure in patients treated only with chemotherapy regimens may result in an increase in cardiac deaths, detectable only through analysis of large sample sizes. Confirmatory evaluation through meta-analysis of randomized data and design of large prospective trials is warranted.

  17. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickie, Colleen I., E-mail: Colleen.dickie@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Griffin, Anthony M. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Parent, Amy L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Svensson, Jon [AngliaRuskin University, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced technology and image guidance.

  18. Determination of {sup 13}C NMR isotropic Knight shift and deviation from BCS relation in {ital A}{sub 3}C{sub 60} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniwa, Y.; Sugiura, D.; Kume, K. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-osawa, Hachi-oji, Tokyo 192-03 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-osawa, Hachi-oji, Tokyo 192-03 (Japan); Kikuchi, K.; Suzuki, S.; Achiba, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-osawa, Hachi-oji, Tokyo 192-03 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-osawa, Hachi-oji, Tokyo 192-03 (Japan); Hirosawa, I.; Tanigaki, K. [NEC Corporation, 34 miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305 (Japan)] [NEC Corporation, 34 miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305 (Japan); Shimoda, H.; Iwasa, Y. [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Tatsunokuchi, Ishikawa 923-12 (Japan)] [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Tatsunokuchi, Ishikawa 923-12 (Japan)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the isotropic {sup 13}C NMR hyperfine coupling constant as {ital a}{sub iso}/2{pi}=0.69{plus_minus}0.06 MHz for the C{sub 60}{sup 3{minus}} ion near room temperature (RT). On this basis, the spin susceptibility at RT, {chi}{sub {ital s}}(RT), was estimated in various alkali-metal doped C{sub 60} compounds {ital A}{sub 3}C{sub 60}, which is approximately proportional to the lattice constant {ital a}{sub 0}; we found {ital d}{chi}{sub {ital s}}/{ital da}{sub 0}=(0.61{plus_minus}0.06){times}10{sup {minus}3} (emu/moleC{sub 60})/A . The correlation between the superconducting transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} and {chi}{sub {ital s}}(RT) was determined. It was found that {ital T}{sub {ital c}} of Na{sub 2}RbC{sub 60}, Na{sub 2}KC{sub 60}, Li{sub 2}CsC{sub 60}, and ammoniated {ital A}{sub 3}C{sub 60} is significantly lower than that expected from the BCS relation based on {chi}{sub {ital s}}(RT). {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. The role of helium implantation induced vacancy defect on hardening of tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ou, Xin, E-mail: x.ou@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); State Key Laboratory of Functional Material for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200250 (China); Anwand, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.anwand@hzdr.de; Kgler, Reinhard, E-mail: r.koegler@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Zhou, Hong-Bo [Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Richter, Asta, E-mail: asta.richter@th-wildau.de [Technische Hochschule Wildau, Hochschulring1, 15745 Wildau (Germany)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacancy-type defects created by helium implantation in tungsten and their impact on the nano-hardness characteristics were investigated by correlating the results from the positron annihilation spectroscopy and the nano-indentation technique. Helium implantation was performed at room temperature (RT) and at an elevated temperate of 600?C. Also, the effect of post-annealing of the RT implanted sample was studied. The S parameter characterizing the open volume in the material was found to increase after helium irradiation and is significantly enhanced for the samples thermally treated at 600?C either by irradiation at high temperature or by post-annealing. Two types of helium-vacancy defects were detected after helium irradiation; small defects with high helium-to-vacancy ratio (low S parameter) for RT irradiation and large defects with low helium-to-vacancy ratio (high S parameter) for thermally treated tungsten. The hardness of the heat treated tungsten coincides with the S parameter, and hence is controlled by the large helium-vacancy defects. The hardness of tungsten irradiated at RT without thermal treatment is dominated by manufacturing related defects such as dislocation loops and impurity clusters and additionally by trapped He atoms from irradiation effects, which enhance hardness. He-stabilized dislocation loops mainly cause the very high hardness values in RT irradiated samples without post-annealing.

  20. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: richard.lawrence@jefferson.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hahn, Carol A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have reviewed the published data regarding radiotherapy (RT)-induced brain injury. Radiation necrosis appears a median of 1-2 years after RT; however, cognitive decline develops over many years. The incidence and severity is dose and volume dependent and can also be increased by chemotherapy, age, diabetes, and spatial factors. For fractionated RT with a fraction size of <2.5 Gy, an incidence of radiation necrosis of 5% and 10% is predicted to occur at a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy (range, 100-140) and 150 Gy (range, 140-170), respectively. For twice-daily fractionation, a steep increase in toxicity appears to occur when the biologically effective dose is >80 Gy. For large fraction sizes (>=2.5 Gy), the incidence and severity of toxicity is unpredictable. For single fraction radiosurgery, a clear correlation has been demonstrated between the target size and the risk of adverse events. Substantial variation among different centers' reported outcomes have prevented us from making toxicity-risk predictions. Cognitive dysfunction in children is largely seen for whole brain doses of >=18 Gy. No substantial evidence has shown that RT induces irreversible cognitive decline in adults within 4 years of RT.

  1. Cognitive function after radiotherapy for supratentorial low-grade glioma: A North Central Cancer Treatment Group prospective study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laack, Nadia N. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Ivnik, Robert J. [Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Furth, Alfred F. M.S. [Cancer Center Statistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ballman, Karla V. [Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Hammack, Julie E. [Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Arusell, Robert M. [Roger Maris Cancer Center, Fargo, ND (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Buckner, Jan C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of cranial radiotherapy (RT) on cognitive function in patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Twenty adult patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma were treated with 50.4 Gy (10 patients) or 64.8 Gy (10 patients) localized RT. The patients then were evaluated with an extensive battery of psychometric tests at baseline (before RT) and at approximately 18-month intervals for as long as 5 years after completing RT. To allow patients to serve as their own controls, cognitive performance was evaluated as change in scores over time. All patients underwent at least two evaluations. Results: Baseline test scores were below average compared with age-specific norms. At the second evaluation, the groups' mean test scores were higher than their initial performances on all psychometric measures, although the improvement was not statistically significant. No changes in cognitive performance were seen during the evaluation period when test scores were analyzed by age, treatment, tumor location, tumor type, or extent of resection. Conclusions: Cognitive function was stable after RT in these patients evaluated prospectively during 3 years of follow-up. Slight improvements in some cognitive areas are consistent with practice effects attributable to increased familiarity with test procedures and content.

  2. From nothing to something: discrete integrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S Y Lou; Yu-qi Li; Xiao-yan Tang

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese ancient sage Laozi said that everything comes from `nothing'. Einstein believes the principle of nature is simple. Quantum physics proves that the world is discrete. And computer science takes continuous systems as discrete ones. This report is devoted to deriving a number of discrete models, including well-known integrable systems such as the KdV, KP, Toda, BKP, CKP, and special Viallet equations, from `nothing' via simple principles. It is conjectured that the discrete models generated from nothing may be integrable because they are identities of simple algebra, model-independent nonlinear superpositions of a trivial integrable system (Riccati equation), index homogeneous decompositions of the simplest geometric theorem (the angle bisector theorem), as well as the M\\"obious transformation invariants.

  3. Two-dimensional cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary and rogue waves in ultrarelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ata-ur-Rahman [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan) [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Mushtaq, A. [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200 (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary and rogue waves is investigated in a two-dimensional ultrarelativistic degenerate warm dense plasma. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the cylindrical KadomtsevPetviashvili (KP) equation is derived, which can be further transformed into a Kortewegde Vries (KdV) equation. The latter admits a solitary wave solution. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, the KdV equation can be transferred to a nonlinear Schrdinger equation to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified IA wavepackets. The propagation characteristics of the IA solitary and rogue waves are strongly influenced by the variation of different plasma parameters in an ultrarelativistic degenerate dense plasma. The present results might be helpful to understand the nonlinear electrostatic excitations in astrophysical degenerate dense plasmas.

  4. Kaon Absorption from Kaonic Atoms and Formation Spectra of Kaonic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junko Yamagata; Satoru Hirenzaki

    2006-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We considered the kaon absorption from atomic states into nucleus. We found that the nuclear density probed by the atomic kaon significantly depends on the kaon orbit. Then, we reexamined the meanings of the observed strengths of one-body and two-body kaon absorption, and investigated the effects to the formation spectra of kaon bound states by in-flight ($K^-,p$) reactions. As a natural consequence, if the atomic kaon probes the smaller nuclear density, the ratio of the two-body absorption at nuclear center is larger than the observed value, and the depth of the imaginary potential is deeper even at smaller kaon energies as in kaonic nuclear states because of the large phase space for the two-body processes.

  5. Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cieply

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

  6. The structure of countable primary abelian groups and primary abelian groups without elements of infinite height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heatherly, Henry Edward

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    octet'-C- ? '=k-'p=- w = 'able Thon 4 C A3 . N 3, ;, -;. 'an4;@web 4 . ' $s . e'sebgtbep af Ci, (1) '- -(2) ":='. :- '' ' ' . - (n)- . ?oaeye-. eaob'. ieiA. :. ;-. hie='ot6eb 3eee 5bau ot- ejbe3. 'bs y bp . (eS-'. -";. =: "-': - - ' . . -:-: -. :. ri...-': . -':, . - . . : - -". c: , anoh that p g S ZZ, Let $' e 8 (g ) We mJ, Sh. 'tc Shoe that this snZz. ie direct. , Assume the contrary, Thea iZ~ np . s e x mhers nip. 'g. o ?Racb into jer ni may 'he represented in' the foxm. ni. m qiy z mhez e 0 & q . w y 'and' 0' 4 ri m...

  7. ISO-SWS calibration and the accurate modelling of cool-star atmospheres - II. General results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Decin; B. Vandenbussche; C. Waelkens; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; B. Plez; A. J. Sauval; K. Hinkle

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fine calibration of the ISO-SWS detectors (Infrared Space Observatory - Short Wavelength Spectrometer) has proven to be a delicate problem. We therefore present a detailed spectroscopic study in the 2.38 -- 12 micron wavelength range of a sample of 16 A0 -- M2 stars used for the calibration of ISO-SWS. By investigating the discrepancies between the ISO-SWS data of these sources, the theoretical predictions of their spectra, the high-resolution FTS-KP (Kitt Peak) spectrum of Alpha Boo and the solar FTS-ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) spectrum, both calibration problems and problems in computing the theoretical models and the synthetic spectra are revealed. The underlying reasons for these problems are sought for and the impact on the further calibration of ISO-SWS and on the theoretical modelling is discussed extensively.

  8. Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, Hiroaki, E-mail: hiroaki@ee.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tabata, Hitoshi [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi [Department of Electronics and Information Science, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing kp perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

  9. Training Hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy System to Infer Permeability in Wells on Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurtado, Nuri; Torres, Julio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high accuracy on inferrring of rocks properties, such as permeability ($k$), is a very useful study in the analysis of wells. This has led to development and use of empirical equations like Tixier, Timur, among others. In order to improve the inference of permeability we used a hybrid Neuro-Fuzzy System (NFS). The NFS allowed us to infer permeability of well, from data of porosity ($\\phi$) and water saturation ($Sw$). The work was performed with data from wells VCL-1021 (P21) and VCL-950 (P50), Block III, Maracaibo Lake, Venezuela. We evaluated the NFS equations ($k_{P50,i}(\\phi_i,Sw_i)$) with neighboring well data ($P21$), in order to verify the validity of the equations in the area. We have used ANFIS in MatLab.

  10. Regions of influence for two iterative methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifeste, Arlee Ross

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and 0 & 9 & 1. Now combine (3) and (4) to obtain (k+1) 1 y f (k) P (k) ) p (k) 1 1 d (J k ) '=1 ' ? 2 r J il 15 Because a determinant with two identical columns is zero, we have (k+1) 1 V R (k)p (k) det(J The above relation is as yet only formally... true. Now proceed inductively; assume the truth of (2) (it is obviously true for k = 0). Since then ~x. ? y. ~ & 9/u, the point (x (k) (k) i i ll x , ''', x ) is in R . Also ~x + S, (V x ) y. l (k) (k) i (k) r (k) I 2 n 2 'l j 1 ? 6. )~x. ? y...

  11. An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .050 0.100 0.150 0.200 0.250 0.300 0.350 0.400 0.450 0.500 650 700 750 800 850KPH M M BT U / KP H 0% Worst Performance 25% 50% Average 75% 100% Best Performance EM R S R e duc e s V a r i a b ilit y Im pr ov e U n it E f f i cen cy Reduce Steam Usage... Survey - Characterized by Single Loop Analog Instrument System, relay or individual PLC?s and tenor drum programmers. Determine the number of controllers not in automatic control. Review of recorder charts for effectiveness of control - any...

  12. Resonant formation of Lambda(1405) by stopped-K- absorption in deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Esmaili; Y. Akaishi; T. Yamazaki

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To solve the current debate on the position of the quasi-bound K^-p state, namely, "Lambda(1405) or Lambda*(1420)", we propose to measure the T_{21} = T_{Sigma-pi \\leftarrow Kbar-N} Sigma-pi invariant-mass spectrum in stopped-K- absorption in deuteron, since the spectrum, reflecting the soft and hard deuteron momentum distribution, is expected to have a narrow quasi-free component with an upper edge of M = 1430 MeV/c^2, followed by a significant "high-momentum" tail toward the lower mass region, where a resonant formation of Lambda(1405) of any mass and width in a wide range is revealed. We introduce a "deviation" spectrum as defined by DEV = OBS (observed or calculated) / QF (non-resonant quasi-free), in which the resonant component can be seen as an isolated peak free from the QF shape.

  13. Nonlinear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Fogaa; F. S. Navarra; L. G. Ferreira Filho

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decades the study of strongly interacting fluids experienced a tremendous progress. In the relativistic heavy ion accelerators, specially the RHIC and LHC colliders, it became possible to study not only fluids made of hadronic matter but also fluids of quarks and gluons. Part of the physics program of these machines is the observation of waves in this strongly interacting medium. From the theoretical point of view, these waves are often treated with li-nearized hydrodynamics. In this text we review the attempts to go beyond linearization. We show how to use the Reductive Perturbation Method to expand the equations of (ideal and viscous) relativistic hydrodynamics to obtain nonlinear wave equations. These nonlinear wave equations govern the evolution of energy density perturbations (in hot quark gluon plasma) or baryon density perturbations (in cold quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter). Different nonlinear wave equations, such as the breaking wave, Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers equations, are obtained from different equations of state (EOS). In nuclear matter, the Walecka EOS may lead to a KdV equation. We explore equations of state such as those extracted from the MIT Bag Model and from QCD in the mean field theory approach. Some of these equations are integrable and have analytical solitonic solutions. We derive these equations also in spherical and cylindrical coordinates. We extend the analysis to two and three dimensions to obtain the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, which is the generalization of the KdV. The KP is also integrable and presents analytical solitonic solutions. In viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we have second order patial derivatives which physically represent dissipation terms. We present numerical solutions and their corresponding algorithms for the cases where the equations are not integrable.

  14. Final Report - ILAW PCT, VHT, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity Model Development, VSL-07R1230-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Cooley, S. K.; Joseph, I.; Pegg, I. L.; Piepel, G. F.; Gan, H.; Muller, I.

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of work and testing specified by the Test Specifications (24590-LAW-TSP-RT-01-013 Rev.1 and 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-02-001 Rev.0), Test Plans (VSL-02T4800-1 Rev.1 & TP-RPP-WTP-179 Rev.1), and Text Exception (24590-WTP-TEF-RT-03-040). The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

  15. Study of RayleighTaylor growth in laser irradiated planar SiO{sub 2} targets at ignition-relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, J. D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    RayleighTaylor (RT) growth experiments were performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar SiO{sub 2} targets seeded with a single mode 60-?m wavelength perturbation driven at peak laser intensities up to 9 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. These are the first RT measurements in SiO{sub 2} at conditions relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion ignition. The measured average modulation growth rates agree with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO, providing an important step in the development of target ablators that are robust to RT growth and hot- electron preheat considerations when driven at the intensities required to achieve thermonuclear ignition.

  16. Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R. [North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

  17. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  18. Pulsed Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy in Combination With Temozolomide in a Murine Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, David Y.; Chunta, John L.; Park, Sean S.; Huang, Jiayi; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.; Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed low-dose radiation therapy (PLRT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) as a novel treatment approach for radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a murine model. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87MG hGBM tumors were established in Nu-Foxn1{sup nu} mice and imaged weekly using a small-animal micropositron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system. Tumor volume was determined from contrast-enhanced microCT images and tumor metabolic activity (SUVmax) from the F18-FDG microPET scan. Tumors were irradiated 7 to 10 days after implantation with a total dose of 14 Gy in 7 consecutive days. The daily treatment was given as a single continuous 2-Gy dose (RT) or 10 pulses of 0.2 Gy using an interpulse interval of 3 minutes (PLRT). TMZ (10 mg/kg) was given daily by oral gavage 1 hour before RT. Tumor vascularity and normal brain damage were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Radiation therapy with TMZ resulted in a significant 3- to 4-week tumor growth delay compared with controls, with PLRT+TMZ the most effective. PLRT+TMZ resulted in a larger decline in SUVmax than RT+TMZ. Significant differences in survival were evident. Treatment after PLRT+TMZ was associated with increased vascularization compared with RT+TMZ. Significantly fewer degenerating neurons were seen in normal brain after PLRT+TMZ compared with RT+TMZ. Conclusions: PLRT+TMZ produced superior tumor growth delay and less normal brain damage when compared with RT+TMZ. The differential effect of PLRT on vascularization may confirm new treatment avenues for GBM.

  19. Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: grit.welzel@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Fleckenstein, Katharina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p < 0.001) and to a lesser extent by WBRT. Acute (T1) radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

  20. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  1. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  2. Strong stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by material strength at Mbar pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H S; Lorenz, K T; Cavallo, R M; Pollaine, S M; Prisbrey, S T; Rudd, R E; Becker, R C; Bernier, J V; Remington, B A

    2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results showing significant reductions from classical in the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate due to high pressure effective lattice viscosity are presented. Using a laser created ramped drive, vanadium samples are compressed and accelerated quasi-isentropically at {approx}1 Mbar pressures, while maintaining the sample in the solid-state. Comparisons with simulations and theory indicate that the high pressure, high strain rate conditions trigger a phonon drag mechanism, resulting in the observed high effective lattice viscosity and strong stabilization of the RT instability.

  3. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Sarah N., E-mail: shamilton7@bccancer.bc.ca [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Tan, King [Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Gascoyne, Randy D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Connors, Joseph M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group, RT was associated with 98% local control. DLBCL-leg is a more aggressive disease; the excellent results in the rituximab group suggest it has an important role in management.

  4. Nonlinear adaptive control using radial basis function approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Jerry Lee

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for answering my constant barrage of questions, as well as Ayman Farahat and Bryan Milligan for their knowledge of mathematics and computer systems, respectively. Finally, I am eternally grateful to my parents for teaching the value of a good education... Response for rt = 54 Figure 9: Tracking Control Response for q = 54. 2 Figure 10: Tracking Control Response for rt = 54. 4 Figure 11: Tracking Control Response for q = 56 29 30 30 31 Figure 12: Trajectory History and Constant Center Grid 1 Figure...

  5. Is the term "type-1.5 superconductivity" warranted by Ginzburg-Landau theory?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V.G.; Schmalian, J.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that within the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) approximation the order parameters {Delta}{sub 1}(r,T) and {Delta}{sub 2}(r,T) in two-band superconductors vary on the same length scale, the difference in zero-T coherence lengths {zeta}{sub 0{nu}} {approx} {h_bar}{nu}{sub F}/{Delta}{sub {nu}}(0), {nu} = 1,2 notwithstanding. This amounts to a single physical GL parameter {kappa} and the classic GL dichotomy: {kappa} < 1/{radical}2 for type I and {kappa} > 1/{radical}2 for type II.

  6. Version 3.0 SOP 24 --fugacity October 12, 2007 fugacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- . B(T) . , ( ) ( )l m lm l m B T x x B T= (9) Blm = Bml. . ( )l m lm l m k k k k k, 2007 177 ( ) B B 2 ( ) 2 ( )l m lm m m l m m kk kk n n B T n B T RT V p nn = - + (11) B B[2 ( ) ( )]l m m lm l m RT V x x B T B T p p = + - (12) fugacity . ( ) B B 2 ( ) ( ) exp l m Bm lm l m x x B

  7. Instability localized at the inner surface of an imploding spherical shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, S.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that in an imploding spherical shell the surface instabilities are of two different types. The first, which occurs at the outer surfaces, is the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The second instability occurs at the inner surface. This latter instability is not as disruptive as R-T modes, but it has three basic properties which differ considerably from those of the R-T instability: (1) it is oscillatory at early times; (2) it grows faster in the long wavelength modes; (3) it depends on the equation of state. It is further shown that this new instability is driven by amplified sound waves in the shell.

  8. RAPID COMMUNICATION GABAA-Receptor-Mediated Rebound Burst Firing and Burst Shunting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huguenard, John R.

    , and 0.5 CaCl2 ,intra-nRt connectivity is to mediate lateral inhibition between nRt equilibrated with 95 MgCl2 , 2 CaCl2 , and 10I N T R O D U C T I O N glucose, equilibrated with 95% O2-5% CO2 for ¢1 h and in absence epilepsy (for review see nate, 11 KCl, 1 MgCl2 , 1 CaCl2 , 10 N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine- Steriade

  9. Validation of a Score Predicting Post-Treatment Ambulatory Status After Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.ne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Douglas, Sarah; Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Basic, Hiba [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Hoskin, Peter J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood (United Kingdom); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A score predicting post-radiotherapy (RT) ambulatory status was developed based on 2,096 retrospectively evaluated metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients. This study aimed to validate the score in a prospective series. Methods and Materials: The score included five factors associated with post-RT ambulatory status: tumor type, interval tumor diagnosis to MSCC, visceral metastases, pre-RT motor function, time developing motor deficits. Patients were divided into five groups: 21-28, 29-31, 32-34, 35-37, 38-44 points. In this study, 653 prospectively followed patients were divided into the same groups. Furthermore, the number of prognostic groups was reduced from five to three (21-28, 29-37, 38-44 points). Post-RT ambulatory rates from this series were compared with the retrospective series. Additionally, this series was compared with 104 patients receiving decompressive surgery plus RT (41 laminectomy, 63 laminectomy plus stabilization of vertebrae). Results: In this study, post-RT ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 43.5% (29-31 points), 71.0% (32-34 points), 89.5% (35-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points). Ambulatory rates from the retrospective study were 6.2%, 43.5%, 70.0%, 86.1%, and 98.7%. After regrouping, ambulatory rates were 10.6% (21-28 points), 70.9% (29-37 points), and 98.5% (38-44 points) in this series, and 6.2%, 68.4%, and 98.7% in the retrospective series. Ambulatory rates were 0%, 62.5%, and 90.9% in the laminectomy plus RT group, and 14.3%, 83.9%, and 100% in the laminectomy + stabilization plus RT group. Conclusions: Ambulatory rates in the different groups in this study were similar to those in the retrospective study demonstrating the validity of the score. Using only three groups is simplier for clinical routine.

  10. Linear study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a diffusive quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momeni, Mahdi [Faculty of Physics, Shahrood University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Faculty of Physics, Shahrood University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an incompressible quantum plasma is investigated on the basis of quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is shown that the occurrence of RT instability depends on density-temperature inhomogeneity (characteristic lengths) on one hand, and the system layer size on the other. It is also observed that the combined effects of external magnetic field, diffusivity, and quantum pressure significantly modify the dispersion properties of system in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. For any case, the imaginary and real parts of dispersion relation are presented and the possibility and conditions for the instability growth rate are discussed.

  11. Analysis, including estimation of water influx, and prediction of performance of volatile-oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridings, Robert Lewis

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    points of the reservoir production history. c. The determination of a water influx function to xnatch the performance history and the apparent reservoir volumes previously calculated ? d. The calculation uf a field relative permeability.... The proposed equation of state used to represent the pressure- volume - temperature-composition relations of gaseous and liquid mix- tures is: P (T, d) = RTd. + (B RT - A - C JT ) d + (bRT-a)d + astd + cd/T L(I+ yd)e . (9) In this equation, P...

  12. Intern experience at the Texas Transportation Institute: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Donald A.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    -Word Sequential Signs. Trthues osmmtis a gyOIEX ADEC CTfA EUxRT& yOIEX ADEC yOIEX ADEC CTfA EUxRT yaMavav yaMaMav yaMa&a& yaMava& yaMaMa& Ppqs v qFGFqsq 19 Ppqs 8 iFGsm 2js c:h1s" pn srupm:"sm "s(:F"sq 2p u"smsc2 2js sc2F"s hsmmtis) % CO RR EC T RE SP...

  13. On Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Dimitrijevic; Branko Dragovich; Jelena Grujic; Zoran Rakic

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider some aspects of nonlocal modified gravity, where nonlocality is of the type $R \\mathcal{F}(\\Box) R$. In particular, using ansatz of the form $\\Box R = c R^\\gamma,$ we find a few $R(t)$ solutions for the spatially flat FLRW metric. There are singular and nonsingular bounce solutions. For late cosmic time, scalar curvature R(t) is in low regime and scale factor a(t) is decelerated. R (t) = 0 satisfies all equations when k = -1.

  14. A survey of the customers of Fincastle Nursery and Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Damon Gregory

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dunlap, P. O. Box 4720 1, Dallas, TX 75247 83. Roxi Lorance, P. O. Box 1314, Athens, TX 75751 84. Nancy Miles, 2321 Sarasota, Tyler, TX 75701 85. Allie Bridger, Rt 2, Box 1412 H, Eustace, TX 75124 86. Grace Cook, Rt 2, Box 1412 G, Eustance TX 75124... 87. Calvin G. Lyons, Extension Horticulture-TAEX, College Station, TX 77840 88. Carolyn Collinsworth, 550 Huntington, Lewisville, TX 75067 89. Ruth Weatherly, 2511 Columbus, Ft. Worth, TX 76106 90. Roger W. Hyde, Jr. , 705 S Sutton, Mabank, TX...

  15. PTG exam 2322011 short answers 75. For this cyclic process: 0dUQW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    . 35 bar, 0 °C gas density = MCH4p/RT = 24,7 kg/m3 volume flow = 201,6 / 24,7 = 8,18 m3 /sPTG exam 2322011 ­ short answers 75. For this cyclic process: 0dUQW a. Q1 + W2 + Q2 = 10000 MJ/s 10000 MJ/s / 35,4 MJ/m3 n = 282,5 m3 n /s; ideal gas: n/V =p/RT 1 m3 n = 101300 / 8

  16. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-products (NAABB) Consortium KO Albrecht RT Hallen March 2011 #12;DISCLAIMER routes to producing diesel fuel from TAGs. First, the most common and commercially practiced method for producing diesel fuel from algae-derived lipids is through deoxygenation. TAGs can be directly deoxygenated

  17. Functional genomics analysis of the arabidopsis ABI5 bZIP transcription factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hur, Jung-Im

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    results correlated best with qRT-PCR validation data for selected genes. A small number of genes including AtCOR413 pm-1 showed a consistent expression pattern across the three platforms. A robust ABRE cis-regulatory element was identified in the promoter...

  18. Developed at the request of: Research conducted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the greatest threats to humanity. The Rt Hon. Chris Huhne MP, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change in response to human activities. Across the world, this is already being felt as changes to the local weather information, a great many uncertainties remain. That's why I have put in place a long-term strategy at the Met

  19. An Advanced Oxygen Trim Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, J. G.

    cell has fundamental design problems that can cause errors. First, the output of the cell is determined by the Nernst equation (B). (B) E RT 4r logn Pl P2 where E e.m.f. (potential) R Gas Co nstant T Absolute Temperature F Faraday Constant...

  20. Integrated Dynamic Simulation for Process Optimization and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    wherever possible ­ Radiative heat transfer ­ Mass balance ­ Boundary layer transport ­ Surface adsorption;Schematics of Polysilicon RT-CVD Reactor MFC gas cylinder heating lamps RTP reactor RTP pumps 1st stage 2nd-level description ­ Reduced-order models to represent high complexity (e.g., reactor fluid dynamics, heat transfer