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1

Kootenai River Ecosystem Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kootenai River Ecosystem Kootenai River Ecosystem Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) June 2005 1 Department of Energy BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION Kootenai River Ecosystem Project Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Kootenai River Ecosystem Project. With this funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho (KTOI) and Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) would add liquid nitrogen and phosphorus to the Kootenai River from late June through September for up to five years to replace nutrients lost to the hydrosystem. The goal of this project is to help enhance native fish populations and river health. The nutrients are expected to stimulate production in the Kootenai River's

2

DOE/EA-1518: Kootenai River Ecosystems Environmental Assessment (June 2005)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kootenai River Ecosystem Kootenai River Ecosystem Final Environmental Assessment Bonneville Power Administration June 2005 Kootenai River Ecosystem Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Kootenai Tribe of Idaho (KTOI) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Name of Proposed Project: Kootenai River Ecosystem. State Involved: Idaho. Abstract: The Kootenai River is currently nutrient poor and has been so for about 25 years. Low nutrient levels are partly responsible for the low productivity found in the river and part of the reason that important fish populations are not doing well. BPA proposes to fund KTOI and IDFG to add liquid nitrogen and phosphorus to the Kootenai River in Idaho from late June through September for up to five

3

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho's construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort. Website for the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Native Fish Aquaculture Program: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Kootenai_Aquaculture_Program/

4

Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Characterization of the Kootenai River Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community before and after Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2003-2006. [Chapter 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River ecosystem has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam, completed in 1972 on the river near Libby Montana. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel, eliminating nutrient production and habitat diversity crucial to the functioning of a large river-floodplain ecosystem. Libby Dam continues to create large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows, and greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches. These changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to this artificial loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the Kootenay Lake's North Arm in 1992, the South Arm in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes the macroinvertebrate community in the Kootenai River and its response to experimental nutrient addition during 2005 and 2006. This report also provides an initial evaluation of cascading trophic interactions in response to nutrient addition. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 12 sites along a 325 km section of the Kootenai River, representing an upriver unimpounded reference reach, treatment and control canyon reach sites, and braided and meandering reach sites, all downstream from Libby Dam. Principle component analysis revealed that richness explained the greatest amount of variability in response to nutrient addition as did taxa from Acari, Coleoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. Analysis of variance revealed that nutrient addition had a significant effect (p<0.0001) on invertebrate abundance, biomass, and richness at sites KR-9 and KR-9.1 combined (the zone of maximum biological response). Richness, a valuable ecological metric, increased more than abundance and biomass, which were subject to greater sampling bias. Cascading trophic interactions were observed as increased algal accrual, increased in-river invertebrate abundance, and increased invertebrate counts in mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsonii) guts samples, but were not quantitatively tested. Sampling and analyses across trophic levels are currently ongoing and are expected to better characterize ecological responses to experimental nutrient addition in the Kootenai River.

Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Bonners

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to restore portions of the Kootenai River near the town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed project involves installing structures on the river banks, excavating areas in the river to create deeper pools, and developing and enhancing islands that would be planted with native vegetation.

9

Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Implementation Plan and Schedule; 2005-2010, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kootenai River white sturgeon have been declining for at least 50 years and extinction of the wild population is now imminent (Paragamian et al. 2005). Only 630 adults were estimated to remain in 2002 from a population ten times that size just 20 years ago. Significant recruitment of young sturgeon has not been observed since the early 1970s and consistent annual recruitment has not been seen since the 1950s. The remaining wild population consists of a cohort of large, old fish that is declining by about 9% per year as fish die naturally and are not replaced. At this rate, the wild population will disappear around the year 2040. Numbers have already reached critical low levels where genetic and demographic risks are acute. The Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Team was convened in 1994, provided a draft Recovery Plan in 1996 and the first complete Recovery Plan for Kootenai River white sturgeon in 1999 (USFWS 1996, 1999). The Plan outlined a four part strategy for recovery, including: (1) measures to restore natural recruitment, (2) use of conservation aquaculture to prevent extinction, (3) monitoring survival and recovery, and (4) updating and revising recovery plan criteria and objectives as new information becomes available. Sturgeon recovery efforts are occurring against a backdrop of a broader ecosystem protection and restoration program for the Kootenai River ecosystem. With abundance halving time of approximately 8 years, the Kootenai River white sturgeon population is rapidly dwindling, leaving managers little time to act. Decades of study consistently indicate that recruitment failure occurs between embryo and larval stages. This assertion is based on four key observations. First, almost no recruitment has occurred during the last 30 years. Second, thousands of naturally produced white sturgeon embryos, most viable, have been collected over the past decade, resulting from an estimated 9 to 20 spawning events each year. Third, Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning has been documented during most years from 1990 through 2005. Finally, no larvae and very few wild juveniles have been collected during recent decades despite years of intensive sampling. Concurrently, post-release hatchery reared juveniles (as young as 9 months of age at release) consistently exhibit successful growth and survival (Ireland et al. 2002). Recruitment has failed, in part because fish are currently spawning at sites where or when conditions appear unsuitable for successful incubation and early rearing. Research to date suggests that recruitment failure is caused by egg or larval suffocation, predation and/or other mortality factors associated with these early life stages. A variety of interrelated factors have clearly contributed to the decline of Kootenai white sturgeon; various hypotheses for recruitment failure are not mutually exclusive. Anders et al. (2002) suggested that Kootenai River white sturgeon recruitment failure is likely the result of additive mortality from: (1) increased predation efficiencies due to low turbidity, velocity, and an relative increase in predatory fishes, (2) a reduced number of eggs produced by a dwindling spawning population, and (3) spawning in habitat lacking interstitial space (embryo suffocation). Quite simply, the combined egg and embryo mortality from all biotic and abiotic factors kills more eggs and embryos than the dwindling wild population is currently capable of producing. Thus, natural recruitment failure appears to be caused by some combination of habitat and stock limitation, by the mechanisms mentioned above. Although past research has helped narrow the range of possible causes of natural recruitment failure, the relative significance of each potential impact remains uncertain because multiple ecological, biological, and physical habitat changes occurred simultaneously. This makes it difficult to choose among competing hypotheses and difficult to know where exactly to focus recovery efforts for maximum benefit. In an ideal world, specific recovery measures would be identified and imple

Anders, Paul

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Microsoft Word - Final Kootenai EA FONSI_May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project Finding of No Significant Impact Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is announcing its environmental findings regarding the Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project (Proposed Action). BPA is proposing to fund the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho (Tribe) to improve their Kootenai River Native Fish Conservation Aquaculture Program (aquaculture program) which BPA has funded since 1991. The aquaculture program currently propagates Kootenai River white sturgeon, which are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Tribe's aquaculture program currently provides the only significant source of recruitment of juvenile white sturgeon in the Kootenai River. The Tribe proposes to improve the program by upgrading its existing Tribal

11

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fi h d Wildlif PFish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Burbot) Kootenai River Operation Mitigation & Evaluation Building on Success 路 All Tribal projects objectives, and to guide and refine future project design and implementation Monitoring Corrective Evaluation Meets objectives Does not meet objectives Corrective action #12;4/11/2013 5 Integrated Ecosystem Based

12

Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, because of a developing trend in environmental sciences to emphasize the benefits and services provided by aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., Postel and Carpenter 1997, Loomis et al. 2000, Nelson et al. 2009). This trend in- cludes... (Ricciardi and Rasmussen 1999). A focus on ecosystem ser- vices may also promote alternative river management options, including river rehabilitation. The USACE抯 objective in this area is related to mandates for national ecosystem restoration through...

Thorp, James H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 growing seasons, showing higher river flow during the 2001 irrigation season compared to 2002 or 2003. 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Water Level (ft.) B4r 2001 B4r 2002 B4r 2003 JuneMayApril July August September October November 159... it to dS/m. The number is then multiplied by 640 making the number equivalent to ppm. A control using reagent-water was also performed here. Additionally, electrical conductivity measurements were made at two sites near Mentone, Texas...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Sierra National Forest, Fresno County, California, with fieldwork beginning in 1994 (Verner and Figure 1--The Kings River administrative study area in the Sierra National Forest in central California includesFisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Current Results

Standiford, Richard B.

15

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

16

Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

颅 Understand processes and develop tools (models and ocean indices) for forecasting salmonid survival and returns #12;EggEgg--smolt Potentialsmolt Potential-- Snake RiverSnake River Spring ChinookSpring Chinook 0 Recent `good' ocean 100 yr ave ocean `Poor' ocean #12;CHART OF SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE 路 Note: warm water

17

Microsoft Word - Final Kootenai EA FONSI_May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project (Department of Energy Environmental Assessment-1901). This MAP includes all of the mitigation measures recommended in the Final Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate adverse environmental impacts. It includes some measures that are essential to render the impacts of the Proposed Action not significant and other measures that will decrease impacts that did not reach a level to be considered significant. Mitigation has and will occur throughout the entire timeframe of the project. Mitigation has occurred

18

UPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risk to residential and commercial structures and restore impaired aquatic ecosystems in the watershedUPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION / National Ecosystem Restoration (NED/NER) Plan. The Recommended Plan includes five structural flood risk

US Army Corps of Engineers

19

Kootenai Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kootenai Electric Cooperative Kootenai Electric Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Kootenai Electric Cooperative Place Idaho Service Territory Idaho Website www.kec.com Green Button Committed Yes Utility Id 10454 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial Irrigation Service Commercial Large Commercial Service Commercial Large Commercial Service* Commercial Large Commercial Service-Primary Voltage* Commercial Net Metering Residential Service Residential Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 400 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPSSL 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPSSL 100 W Fiber . Pole Lighting

20

Kootenai River Native Fish Conservation Aquaculture Master  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 路 Continue small scale extensive rearing experiments in local ponds 路 Monitor experimental releases imprinting with upstream rearing site 颅 spread the risk 路 Implement critical upgrades to existing facility

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Kootenai River Habitat Restoration Project 200200200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.98 maf 600 MW Capacity (5 units) Max powerhouse discharge 25 kcfs Ave annual discharge 11.3 kcfs 238 MWa

22

Kootenai Electric Cooperative (Washington) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Washington) Cooperative (Washington) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kootenai Electric Cooperative Place Washington Utility Id 10454 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Kootenai Electric Cooperative (Washington). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

23

Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental health and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM Executive Summary The purpose in the Fraser Basin's aquatic ecosystem. The program was led by Environment Canada and conducted by scientists's aquatic-based ecosystem between 1992 and 1997. The research program was focused on the main stem Fraser

24

CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into four subregions connected by water flow to discretize the gradient of ecosystem properties as river with mid-salinity waters (15-29 psu), surrounded by a larger region of net heterotrophic waters where- salinity regions of the plume, with strongest sedimentation from the productive mid- salinity regions

Breed, Greg A.

25

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (20042010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The effects of PAT on the Savannah River ecosystem, particularly fisheries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the pre-startup activities at K-Reactor, i.e., Power Ascension Testing (PAT), have caused damage because of temperature rises in the Savannah River. Therefore, the biological studies were mainly aimed at providing information as to changes that might cause the damage of the fish population, and to other important organisms in the ecosystem. To determine if deleterious effects had occurred, one had to review the past studies to determine the condition and diversity of aquatic life before these PAT studies started. Therefore old reports were reviewed and a current study made in 1992.

Patrick, R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fish and Wildlife Dept.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by defining the problem, understanding ecological functions and processes, identifying restoration processes that were historically supported by nutrients supplied by the natural flood pulse of the Kootenai), and evaluation of new opportunities and incentives to create long-term, sustainable floodplain restoration

28

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Kootenai County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kootenai County, Idaho: Energy Resources Kootenai County, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.7568407掳, -116.6222056掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.7568407,"lon":-116.6222056,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. River restoration and flood protection: controversy orflows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river.status of terrestrial and flood- plain resources (including

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Analysis of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River from an Ecosystem Perspective. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology was applied to the analysis of chinook salmon in the mid-Columbia subbasins which flow through the steppe and steppe-shrub vegetation zones. The EDT examines historical changes in life history diversity related to changes in habitat. The emphasis on life history, habitat and historical context is consistent with and ecosystem perspective. This study is based on the working hypothesis that the decline in chinook salmon was at least in part due to a loss of biodiversity defined as the intrapopulation life history diversity. The mid Columbia subbasins included in the study are the Deschutes, John Day, Umatilla, Tucannon and Yakima.

Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EA-2003: Sandy River Delta Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE抯 Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assessed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed removal of a dam from the east channel of the Sandy River. The proposal would help fulfill a portion of the 2010-2013 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan to improve estuary habitat for salmon and steelhead species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

34

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic ecosystem sustainability?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic and Environmental Science (BRGM), Orl茅ans, France ; 2 National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water systems. Since degradation rates in conventional sewage treatment plants (STP) are rather low, ECs enter

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

35

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Negotiating river ecosystems: Impact assessment and conflict mediation in the cases of hydro-power construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss how the legitimacy of the impact assessment process is a key issue in conflict mediation in environmental impact assessment. We contrast two EIA cases in hydro-power generation plans made for the Ii River, Finland in different decades, and evaluate how impact assessment in these cases has contributed to the creation, mediation and resolution of conflicts. We focus on the elements of distributional and procedural justice that made the former EIA process more legitimate and consensual and the latter more conflictual. The results indicate that it is crucial for conflict mediation to include all the values and interests of the parties in the goal-setting process and in the definition and assessment of alternatives. The analysis also indicates that procedural justice is the most important to help the people and groups involved to accept the legitimacy of the impact assessment process: how different parties and their values and interests are recognized, and how participation and distribution of power are organized in an impact assessment process. It is confirmed in this article that SIA may act as a mediator or a forum providing a process through which competing knowledge claims, various values and interests can be discussed and linked to the proposed alternatives and interventions.

Karjalainen, Timo P., E-mail: timopauli.karjalainen@oulu.f [Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 7300, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Jaervikoski, Timo, E-mail: timo.jarvikoski@oulu.f [Unit of Sociology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 2000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as 搒almon) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of ecosystem indicators for the Suwannee River estuary: Oyster reef habitat quality along a salinity gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Suwannee River watershed is one of the least developed in the eastern United States, but with increasing urbanization it is facing potential long-term alterations in freshwater flow to its estuary in the Gulf...

Derk C. Bergquist; Jason A. Hale; Patrick Baker; Shirley M. Baker

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency and duration of Yolo Bypass flooding to at leastRiver to pass through the Yolo Bypass. The increase inthe proposed action. For the Yolo Bypass example, three

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Upper Jocko River Property funding Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Township 16 North, Range 19 West, Section 10, Lake County, MT Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Salish and Kootenai Tribes for the purchase of 5 acres of property, referred to as the Upper Jocko River Land Acqusition in Lake County, MT. The Salish and Kootenai Tribes will own and manage the Upper Jocko River property for fish and wildlife conservation purposes and BPA will receive a conservation

42

Restoration potential of the aquatic ecosystems of the Colorado River Delta, Mexico: Introduction to special issue on 揥etlands of the Colorado River Delta  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The delta of the Colorado River in Mexico supports about a million hectares of riparian, marsh and estuarine habitats of international importance. Some of these habitats depend on flows of fresh and brackish water from the U.S. and Mexico. Up to now, these flows were the incidental result of water management actions taken to provide water for agriculture and municipal use, protect against flooding, and dispose of saline agricultural return flows. This paper briefly describes the wetlands and documents recent bi-national efforts to provide environmental flows to the delta, codified in Minutes 306, 316 and 319 of the water treaty between the U.S. and Mexico for the utilization of Colorado River water. Providing water for environmental uses in this watershed will be a daunting task given the many competing uses for water and expected diminished flows due to climate change. The paper serves as an introduction to a special issue of Ecological Engineering, Wetlands of the Colorado River Delta, which contributes 17 new research articles to the science based on these diverse aquatic habitats. We hope these studies will be useful to those developing management strategies to preserve and enhance these habitats for the future.

Edward P. Glenn; Karl W. Flessa; Jennifer Pitt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

River restoration Ellen Wohl,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, massive expenditures, and the burgeoning industry of aquatic and riparian restoration, river ecosystems. Introduction: Problem Statement [2] Continuing degradation of river ecosystems and loss of aquatic biodiversityRiver restoration Ellen Wohl,1 Paul L. Angermeier,2 Brian Bledsoe,3 G. Mathias Kondolf,4 Larry Mac

Poff, N. LeRoy

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems endocrine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 3 Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental...

45

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

RIVER RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS River Res. Applic. 21: 849864 (2005)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assimilate wastewater treatment plant effluent. Our study illustrates the types of changes that river of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily

Poff, N. LeRoy

48

Valey-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30? X 60? geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for the Billings and Bridger Quadrangles; and are underway for the Hardin and Lodge Grass Quadrangles. Field investigations were completed during the last quarter. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

David A. Lopez

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30? X 60? geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau?s Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

David A. Lopez

1998-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

VALLEY-FILL SANDSTONE IN THE KOOTENAI FORMATION ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface database has been completed for the project. An ACCESS database converted to PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from all of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base, except for some wells that have no available logs or other information. All of the four 30 x 60 feet geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quandrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. All four quadrangles are in the Bureau's Publications Department being prepared for submittal to a printer. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has been traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel was submitted and the paper was presented at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998. A follow on proposal to conduct a soil gas geochemical survey of the reservation was approved and the contract was received in late August. The sampling will be conducted next summer and will involve Crow students.

David A. Lopez

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

52

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Multiple states in river and lake ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...maintained by high nutrient recycling). We are particularly interested...biomass of phytoplankton and low recycling rates of nutrients from sediment...forming noxious blooms, and recycling of nutrients from sediment...anthropogenic dis- charge of wastewater or by non-point pollution...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is an introduced phreatophyte in western North America. The plant was estimated to occupy well over 600,000 ha of riparian acres in 1965 (Robinson 1965). In the early 1900's, government agencies and private landowners began...

Hart, C.

55

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

56

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River Thames River Thames Du Cane Road Wood Lane Wood Lane North Pole Road Barlby Road Highlever Street Acton Market Place Acton Horn Lane Wood Lane Du Cane Road Wood Lane South Africa Road White City for BBC Television Centre Wood Lane Ariel Way Wood Lane Shepherd's Bush Green Shepherd's Bush Green

57

Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humans impact rivers in many ways that modify ecological processes yielding ecosystem services. In order to mitigate anthropogenic impacts, scientists are challenged to understand interactions among physicochemical factors affecting large river food...

Roach, Katherine

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

The IC Brazil ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brazilian Government has done a strong effort to develop the Microelectronics area in Brazil. An ecosystem of communities interested to rethink the insertion of Brazil in the important market of semiconductors. Important questions should be considered ... Keywords: IC projects, IT ecosystems and e-government, collaborative ecosystems, education, semiconductors

Oscar S. Silva Filho

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Leads Nancy J. Hess...

60

EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Influence of Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption of NO...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of an intensive management effort, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Northwest have not recovered and are currently listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. In addition to the loss of diversity from stocks that have already gone extinct, decreased genetic diversity resulting from genetic drift and inbreeding is a major concern. Reduced population and genetic variability diminishes the environmental adaptability of individual species and entire ecological communities. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), in cooperation with Washington State University and the University of Idaho, established a germplasm repository in 1992 in order to preserve the remaining salmonid diversity in the region. The germplasm repository provides long-term storage for cryopreserved gametes. Although only male gametes can be cryopreserved, conserving the male component of genetic diversity will maintain future management options for species recovery. NPT efforts have focused on preserving salmon and steelhead gametes from the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin. However, the repository is available for all management agencies to contribute gamete samples from other regions and species. In 2002 a total of 570 viable semen samples were added to the germplasm repository. This included the gametes of 287 chinook salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River (Lookingglass Hatchery), Lake Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery), and upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Hatchery) and the gametes of 280 steelhead from the North Fork Clearwater River (Dworshak Hatchery), Fish Creek, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery) and Snake River (Oxbow Hatchery). In addition, gametes from 60 Yakima River spring chinook and 34 Wenatchee River coho salmon were added to the repository by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, respectively. To date, a total of 3,928 Columbia River salmon and steelhead gamete samples and three Kootenai River white sturgeon are preserved in the repository. Samples are stored in independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU).

Young, William; Kucera, Paul

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Chapter 6 - Ecosystem Services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Forested ecosystems have always provided a large suite of services that benefit human civilizations, animals, plants, and other organisms living within the Earth抯 biosphere. As suggested in earlier chapters, forested ecosystems generate numerous provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural services. These services provide the basic building blocks of life on Earth and for human civilizations. Unfortunately, at times humans neither understand nor appreciate the regulating or supporting functions provided by ecosystems. Maintaining the health and well-being of our forested ecosystems can improve human health concerns and protect our homes from unexpected events such as floods and wildfires. Many also argue that healthy ecosystems are the foundation upon which we can build a secure future for our children and grandchildren. Managers of forests and natural resources will undoubtedly face trade-offs among ecosystem services when considering their actions. Even deciding to do nothing at all will involve the analysis of trade-offs, since some of the services provided by ecosystems include the food, shelter, and materials we may use in our normal, daily lives.

Donald L. Grebner; Pete Bettinger; Jacek P. Siry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. long-term trends could affect hydropower, ecosystems and aquatic species...). 1917 2005 Athabasca; #12;4 Reduced Water Supply from Reservoirs Climate Change Issues in the US 1. Rainfall vs Snowmelt; 21 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept

Julien, Pierre Y.

64

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Utah Technology Commercialization Office Location: Salt Lake City, UT Project Title Energy Innovation Commercialization Center Proposed Action or Project Description The project proposes to create an Energy Innovation Commercialization Center at the University of Utah. The scope of work for this project is in two phases: tasks necessary to create the Center and actual commercialization and outreach to other institutions. Specific activities for Phase I for the Center startup include 1) negotiating contract, prepare correspondence, establishing website, meetings, scheduling activities, developing metrics, and designing and creating a database. Phase 2 activities for Center

65

Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

Walton, D.W.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the gas balance at night (when GPP is zero) and then GPP is calculated from Eq. 2. This gas COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

Berkowitz, Alan R.

67

Two Ecosystem Demography Models Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecosystem Demography Models Released Ecosystem Demography Models Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of two Ecosystem Demography Models: Ecosystem Demography Model: U.S. Ecosystem Carbon Stocks and Fluxes, 1700-1990 . Data set prepared by G. Hurtt, S.W. Pacala, P.R. Moorcroft, J. Caspersen, E. Shevliakova, R.A. Houghton, B. Moore III, and J. Fisk. This model product contains the source code for the Ecosystem Demography Model (ED version 1.0) as well as model input and output data files for the conterminous United States. The ED is a mechanistic ecosystem model built around established sub-models of leaf level physiology, organic matter decomposition, hydrology, and functional biodiversity. It was used herein to estimate ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes in the conterminous U.S. at

68

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems Location: Cambridge, MA Project Title TechBridge Energy Innovation Acceleration Program

69

Simulation Modeling of Estuarine Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation model has been developed of Galveston Bay, Texas ecosystem. Secondary productivity measured by harvestable species...

Robert W. Johnson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Parallel ecological networks in ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interactions|ecosystem engineers|ecological stoichiometry...organisms with their environment (Haeckel 1869...concept of ecosystems engineers (Jones et al...strong species-environment feedbacks in almost...including species-environment interactions...importance of ecosystem engineers has been recognized...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems ... A holding pond for coal ash collapsed, releasing billions of gallons of coal-ash sludge onto nearby farmland and into the waters of the Emory and Tennessee rivers. ... For decades, researchers, environmental advocates, local communities, and even the U.S. EPA have been concerned about the ongoing risks posed by the unregulated management of coal ash. ...

Rhitu Chatterjee

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Our River  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

74

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) The Regents of the University of California, UC San Diego Location: La Jolla, CA Project Title Regional Energy Innovation and Commercialization Proposed Action or Project Description The University of California San Diego and San Diego State University are partnering to address deficiencies in the process for translation of research discoveries to the private sector in the clean energy space in the greater San Diego region and accelerate the movement of clean energy innovation from the university laboratory into the marketplace. The Phase I objective for launching the Regional Energy Innovation Challenge includes tasks such as: 1) project management and planning (organizing advisory

75

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative Funding Opportunity Number DE-FOA-0000356 Applicant (Legal Name) University of Central Florida Location: Orlando, FL Project Title MegaWatt Ventures Proposed Action or Project Description The University of Central Florida is dedicated to creating innovative programs that accelerate the

76

Mass balance for wastewater nitrogen in the Central Arizona朠hoenix ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A complete nitrogen mass balance for all wastewater generated in the Central Arizona朠hoenix ecosystem was developed using data from the 18 largest wastewater treatment plants (99% of flow). Components included total N in raw wastewater, denitrification in wastewater treatment plants, biosolids production, and effluent (reuse, recharge, and discharge). Denitrification and biosolids production remove 81% of wastewater N. Nearly all biosolids are recycled to cotton fields within the ecosystem. Most effluent is recycled within the ecosystem. As the result of wastewater management practices developed to reuse wastewater, wastewater N is either deliberately volatilized or accumulates within the system; only 4% of the original wastewater N is exported via the Gila River.

Lisa Lauver; Lawrence A Baker

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Preserving the biodiversity and ecological services of rivers: new challenges and research opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an Ecosystems Function Model (HEC-EFM) for the Bill Williams River restoration programme in Arizona (U intensifies the urgency. Environmental flows help to preserve the innate resilience of aquatic ecosystems School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, University of Washington-355020, Seattle, WA, U.S.A. UNESCO

McClain, Michael

78

2 Hydroecology and river restoration: 3 Ripe for research and synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

some aquatic 13 ecosystems beyond ``restoration'' to boost their ability to perform functions of value and ecological processes. 25 Meeting human water needs and sustaining the services that 26 aquatic ecosystems2 Hydroecology and river restoration: 3 Ripe for research and synthesis 4 Margaret A. Palmer1

Palmer, Margaret A.

79

River Steamboats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

80

Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

Mobrand, Lars E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Contributed Paper Effects of River Impoundment on Ecosystem Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

麓ios Tropicales sobre los Servicios del Ecosistema: Energ麓ia Virtual y Valor de Mercado de las Pesquer麓ias requiere del entendimiento del efecto de los impactos ambientales sobre la ecolog麓ia de especies clave o ecosistema proporcionado por r麓ios tropicales (i.e., pesquer麓ias artesanales). La importancia social y econ

Hoeinghaus, David J.

82

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contains established stands of the nonnative, invasive, emergent plant (Phragmites australis). Two sites. australis would not be successful due to tidal restriction and reestablishing the full tidal range the homogeneous P. australis stands. #12;Submerged Aquatic Vegetation. Twelve sites have been selected in Broad

US Army Corps of Engineers

83

1. Puget Sound Rivers and Salmon Recovery David R. Montgomery, Derek B. Booth, and Susan Bolton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and streams and therefore aquatic ecosystems. Factors influencing salmon abundance are often general- ized A symposium on Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers at the spring 2000 meeting of the Society for Ecological Restoration's Northwest chapter pre- sented an opportunity to synthesize regional expertise on river

Montgomery, David R.

84

Microtopography Recreation Benefits Ecosystem Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microtopography Recreation Benefits Ecosystem Restoration ... First, recreated microtopography alters rainfall redistribution and surface runoff path by adding topographic variation at fine scales. ... In conclusion, although recreating microtopography benefits ecosystem restoration, problems and perplexities still remain, partly due to the complexity of microtopography and the absence of systematic observations. ...

Wei Wei; Liding Chen; Lei Yang; F. Fred Samadani; Ge Sun

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lessons from Long-Term Monitoring of Aquatic Ecosystems Gordon H. Reeves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons from Long-Term Monitoring of Aquatic Ecosystems Gordon H. Reeves Team Leader Aquatic restoration effort (Fish Creek), the annual variability in the distribution of fish and habitat (Elk River) the effects of restoration work may not necessarily be seen in an increase in the number of fish in or leaving

86

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations 路 Healthy and productive coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Original Paradigm #12;We had Consumers & Coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Control

87

Climate change, biotic interactions and ecosystem services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generalized in aquatic systems (Daufresne...let alone ecosystems, will be challenging...management and restoration in the face...terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to changes in...the small in aquatic ecosystems. Proc. Natl...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

89

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

90

Scenic Rivers Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Virginia Scenic Rivers Program抯 intent is to identify, designate and help protect rivers and streams that possess outstanding scenic, recreational, historic and natural characteristics of...

91

Platte River Cooperative Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platte River Cooperative Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY,...

92

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

93

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as 搊utstanding...

94

Aquatic ecosystem protection and restoration: advances in methods for assessment and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many methods and criteria are available to assess aquatic ecosystems, and this review focuses on a set that demonstrates advancements from community analyses to methods spanning large spatial and temporal scales. Basic methods have been extended by incorporating taxa sensitivity to different forms of stress, adding measures linked to system function, synthesizing multiple faunal groups, integrating biological and physical attributes, spanning large spatial scales, and enabling simulations through time. These tools can be customized to meet the needs of a particular assessment and ecosystem. Two case studies are presented to show how new methods were applied at the ecosystem scale for achieving practical management goals. One case used an assessment of biotic structure to demonstrate how enhanced river flows can improve habitat conditions and restore a diverse fish fauna reflective of a healthy riverine ecosystem. In the second case, multitaxonomic integrity indicators were successful in distinguishing lake ecosystems that were disturbed, healthy, and in the process of restoration. Most methods strive to address the concept of biological integrity and assessment effectiveness often can be impeded by the lack of more specific ecosystem management objectives. Scientific and policy explorations are needed to define new ways for designating a healthy system so as to allow specification of precise quality criteria that will promote further development of ecosystem analysis tools.

Mark B Bain; Amy L Harig; Daniel P Loucks; Reuben R Goforth; Katherine E Mills

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ecosystem Services and Trade-Offs Mediated by Urban Water Bodies for Homeless Popula@ons in Phoenix Wolf, A.1,2, M.M. Palta,2 N.B. Grimm,2 J. Gwiszcz,3 O. Schwake,4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Services and Trade-Offs Mediated by Urban Water Bodies for Homeless 路 Urban runoff entering stormwater ouPalls in Phoenix have created "accidental" wetlands in the otherwise dry Salt River bed 路 Urban wetland environments

Hall, Sharon J.

96

Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

Matthews, R. A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Project #31: Connecticut River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOMORPHIC SETTING: At the project location, the Connecticut River has an annual average discharge of...

Wendi Goldsmith; Donald Gray; John McCullah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

Peters, E.C. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Richmond, R.H. [Univ. of Guam, Mangilao (Guam). Marine Lab.; Power, E.A. [EVS Environment Consultants, Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Post-dam sediment dynamics and processes in the Colorado River estuary: Implications for habitat restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

River-sea connectivity is essential for restoring ecosystem services in the Colorado River delta. The mixing of river water and seawater sustains biodiversity and provides brackish-water nursery grounds for both commercially important and endangered marine species. The Colorado River no longer reaches the sea except during particularly high tides and anomalously wet years. The river's relict channel is now obstructed by an accumulation of sediments deposited during flood tides; ebb flows are not strong enough to keep the channel open. Landsat 5-TM and Landsat-7 scenes from the Colorado River delta and tide prediction tables were used to reconstruct river-sea connectivity and geomorphic processes after 50 years of extensive human manipulation of the Colorado River. Historical documentation, previous topographic surveys and sediment cores were used to estimate sedimentation rates in the lower river channel. Satellite images and tide charts show that currently the river reaches the sea or the sea reaches the river about 12 days per year, unlike 10 years ago when a year-round connection existed. Reduction in connectivity results from the evolution of a tidal sandbar located within the bedload convergence zone, about 35爇m upstream from the river's mouth. Historical documentation and sediment core analyses suggest sedimentation rates in the range of 1021燾m per year. With the current conditions prevailing, active management dredging is required and needs to occur once every 510 years to reconnect the remaining riparian wetlands in the Colorado River to the Gulf of California.

Hector A. Zamora; Steven M. Nelson; Karl W. Flessa; Ritsuo Nomura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

County, Idaho.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Idaho, with evidence of traditional use going back thousands of years. Kootenai River Valley conservation easement protects habitat June 2009 Acquiring these properties would...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EA-1901: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of No Significant Impact EA-1901: Finding of No Significant Impact Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Based on...

102

EA-1901: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Assessment EA-1901: Final Environmental Assessment Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This EA...

103

A: Coastal and Ocean Ecosystems Current Findings Linking Plume and Ocean Conditions to Salmon Growth and Survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A: Coastal and Ocean Ecosystems 颅 Current Findings Linking Plume and Ocean Conditions to Salmon/860-3313 edmundo.casillas@noaa.gov It is now recognized that throughout most of the 1980's and 1990's, ocean conditions in the Pacific Northwest region were poor, and ocean survival of Columbia River salmon

104

Ecosystem Task Force Meeting Minutes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in violation of the clean water act 2. Long term tracking can identify problems and remediation techniques. 3. A focus on planning helps ground the Task Force because of the complexity of ecosystems. UNH targets for future reductions? 3.1. No. We could work on those with the Task Force. Water Quality

New Hampshire, University of

105

Lynx Conservation in an Ecosystem Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation could be approached within the context of ecosystem management. The Concept of Ecosystem-scale analysis, on science-based man- agement, on adaptive management, on interagency cooperation419 Chapter 15 Lynx Conservation in an Ecosystem Management Context Kevin S. McKelvey, USDA Forest

106

PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and so it is obscuring the fact that restoration projects, par- ticularly those in aquatic ecosystemsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

Palmer, Margaret A.

107

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

109

Sustainable Reservoir Operation: Can we Generate Hydropower and Preserve Ecosystem Values?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generations while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modeling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Turbulent Rivers Bjorn Birnir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) function gives rise to Hack's law [16]; stating that the length of the main river, in mature river basins, scales with the area of the basin l Ah, h = 0.568 being Hack's exponent. 1 Introduction The flow]. One of the best known scaling laws of river basins is Hack's law [16] that states that the area

Birnir, Bj枚rn

111

A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 28-15, 28-53, 28-67 Appomattox River, VA (NAO) 5-3, 5-20 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration BaltimoreI-1 A A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25 A.W. Kerr Scott Dam) 3-25 Savannah District (SAS) 8-8 Aquatic Plant Control Galveston District (SWG) 40-3, 46-28, 40

US Army Corps of Engineers

112

Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon and Washington: behavior in near-field and far-field plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon) and particulate (leachable and total) aluminum was examined in the Columbia River and estuary, in near Influence on Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) cruise of May/June 2006. Dissolved and particulate aluminum (Al

Hickey, Barbara

113

More than two-thirds of the Earth's surface is covered with water, so it is not surprising that the planet's oceans, lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands are considered valuable natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the planet's oceans, lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands are considered valuable natural resources and/stream ecology, wetland science, aquatic- conservation biology and Great Lakes ecosystems. Because of the breadth

Edwards, Paul N.

114

The Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Reuse Wastewater Seepage Management Surface Water Storage Reservoir Removing Barriers to SheetflowThe Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative Frank J. Mazzotti University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

Mazzotti, Frank

115

Fire-Return Intervals in Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Kings River Sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire-Return Intervals in Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems,070-ha study area in the Dinkey Creek watershed. Stumps in mixed-conifer forest were examined for fire a similar period in mixed-conifer forests at Redwood Mountain and Bearskin Creek, 40-50 km south of Dinkey

Standiford, Richard B.

116

FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are now increasingly managed to support aquatic ecosystems and fisheries, in addition to traditional humanFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

Pasternack, Gregory B.

117

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

118

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

119

Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

120

Rehabilitating Aquatic Ecosystems in Developed Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to restore watershed and aquatic ecosystem processes in urban areas are constrained by...rehabilitation and enhancement are preferred over restoration when referring to improving environmental conditions ...

Kathleen G. Maas-Hebner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Book review: Welch, Harold. Freshwater ecosystems: Revitalizing ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

of freshwater aquatic ecosystems to global ecological welfare, deal professionally ... cation of limnology in the protection, management and restoration of aquatic...

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Savannah River Site - Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

123

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

124

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

125

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of lab building SREL Home Faculty and Scientists Research Technical Reports Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites...

126

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

127

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

128

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Savannah River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

129

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van. Most ecosystems will change in the future. 2. Loss of species and biodiversity will continue to happen Energy Demand Urbanisation Climate Change Water Availability Infectious Diseases Biodiversity Loss #12

130

Treating business dimension in software ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Software Ecosystems (SECOs) have emerged as an approach to improve Software Engineering (SE) in industry considering relations among companies and stakeholders. Companies have opened up their platforms and artifacts to others, including partners and ... Keywords: component-based software engineering, software ecosystems, software reuse, value-based software engineering

Rodrigo Pereira dos Santos; Cl醬dia Werner

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Habitat structure mediates biodiversity effects on ecosystem properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between the environment, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in the marine benthos [3,36...and M. Solan 2010 Marine biodiversity-ecosystem functions...idiosyncratic effects of biodiversity in marine ecosystems. Nature...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Stream hydrology limits recovery of riparian ecosystems after wolf reintroduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...condition for ecosystem restoration. 2. Material...and function of ecosystems has been clearly demonstrated for aquatic and terrestrial...large-scale, natural ecosystems occurred following...Landscape-level restoration of riparian zones...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Impacts of marine-derived nutrients on stream ecosystem functioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...productivity of these aquatic ecosystems and decrease further...standing MDN effects on ecosystem functioning in terms...of salmon-related aquatic and riparian ecosystems, in terms of salmon habitat protection and restoration, and fisheries exploitation...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The ecosystem-service chain and the biological diversity crisis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...optimize the delivery of ecosystem services rather than to restoration. Further, there are discussions...functional diversity effects in ecosystem service assessments. Proc...Biodiversity effects on aquatic ecosystem functioning-maturation...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Community and ecosystem responses to recent climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...community and ecosystem effects and to...2002). For aquatic systems, Winder...A. 2009 Novel ecosystems: implications for conservation and restoration. Trends Ecol...interactions in an aquatic ecosystem. Ecology 85...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Loss of functionally unique species may gradually undermine ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as hysteresis [43]. This will make restoration of ecosystem services, whether for economic or aesthetic...interactions in a Caribbean coral reef ecosystem. In Trophic models of aquatic ecosystems. ICLARM Conference Proceedings 26, Metro...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Marine regime shifts: drivers and impacts on ecosystems services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...function of marine ecosystems [1,2]. A regime...of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, including lakes...on European marine ecosystems: observations, expectations...Threshold models in restoration and conservation...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

139

The Nation's Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...task of water quality assessment." Such interpretation...environment demands continuing assessment and interpretation...pro-cesses active in river systems and hence such measures...character of many river systems. To date, observations...money, observational tools must be designed to...

M. Gordon Wolman

1971-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Predicting the river抯 blue line for fish conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Basin (VRB), a tributary to the lower Colorado River that has been the poster child...rivers like the San Pedro River (also a Colorado River tributary in Arizona), citizen...reaches with zero flows (i.e., during floods) and hence colonize parts of the distant...

John L. Sabo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Offshore Texas and Louisiana marine ecosystems data synthesis. Volume 2: Synthesis report. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provided a synthesis of available environmental information for the continental shelf from the shallow sublittoral to a depth of 500 m for the area between Corpus Christi Bay, Texas and the Mississippi River Delta. The Synthesis Report consists of separate chapters devoted to marine geology, physical oceanography and meteorology, marine chemistry, marine biology, socioeconomics, and conceptual modeling of the area's major ecosystems with emphasis on the environmental effects of oil and gas operations. There is a summary of data gaps and information needs and suggestions for future field studies.

Phillips, N.W.; James, B.M.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Savannah River National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

144

Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem Name Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem Address 31 Theobals Road Place London, United Kingdom Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 2008 Phone number +447796276923 Website http://www.skipso.com Coordinates 51.5203543掳, -0.117755掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.5203543,"lon":-0.117755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pollination Cultural: Aesthetic, spiritual, educational, recreational Security: personal safety, secureEcosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith, happiness, social/community acceptance, recognition, etc) #12;Some problems: 路 ***What is `culture

146

NASA's Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plans for NASA抯 Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission is described. Recommended by Earth Science Decadal Survey in 2007, ACE is nominally planned for a 2021 launch. ACE is...

Starr, David O'C

147

Warming alters the metabolic balance of ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particular, it is unclear how global warming will affect the metabolic balance...change on key ecosystem services. global warming|carbon sequestration|carbon...for the ecological impacts of global warming on individual taxa is now unequivocal...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Digital Ecosystems: Evolving Service-Orientated Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel optimisation technique inspired by natural ecosystems is presented, where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of services which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network, operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on evolutionary computing that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions to satisfy locally relevant constraints. Through this twofold process, the local search is accelerated and will yield better local optima, because the distributed optimisation already provides a good sampling of the search space by making use of computations already performed in other peers with similar constraints. We call this new distributed optimisation architecture a Digital Ecosystem, an Ecosystem Orientated Architecture (EOA) created by extending a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) with Distributed Evolutionary Computing (DEC). The Digital Ecosystem will allow services to recombine and evolve over time, ...

Briscoe, G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Contaminated Aquatic Ecosystems Restoration: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use Decision Analysis methods to rank intervention strategies after contamination by radionuclides of an aquatic ecosystem. We assume certainty since the validation of models used to quantify impacts of cou...

E. Gallego; S. R韔s-Insua; A. Mateos; D. R韔s Insua

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Air pollutants effects on forest ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the effects of acid rain on forests. The conference was sponsored by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Topics considered at the conference included the status of US research on acid deposition and its effects contributing factors to the decline of forests, evidence for effects on ecosystems, the effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems in North America and Europe, forest management, and future scientific research programs and management approaches.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Integrated environmental monitoring at remote ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first annual report reviews progress to date on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory(INEL) research project, Integrated Ecosystem and Pollutant Monitoring at Remote Wilderness Study Sites.'' The two primary objectives of this study are to apply, field test, and conceptually evaluate the US Forest Service guidelines for remote ecosystem monitoring and to provide an ongoing database on selected high-elevation ecosystem attributes, including physical, chemical, and biological parameters. The basic criteria for evaluation of the guidelines are usability, cost-effectiveness, data variability, alternative approaches, ecosystem conceptual approach, and quality assurance. The goal of the project is to identify a list of pollutant measurements and ecological attributes that will provide good, quality-assured data about a particular ecosystem. The present report covers each of the major components of the Forest Service guidelines except for regulatory and management constraints and visibility, which are not part of this project. Therefore, progress to date is provided as separate sections of the report for each of the following components: atomspheric environment, soils, aquatic chemistry, aquatic biology, salmonid fish, and plants (including forest ecosystem). 24 refs., 66 figs., 28 tabs.

Bruns, D.A.; O'Rourke, T.P.; Staley, C.S.; White, G.J.; Wiersma, G.B. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA). Center for Environmental Monitoring and Assessment); Baker, G.A.; Harmon, M.E.; Smith, B.G. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Forest Science); Clayton, J.L. (Forest Service, Boise, ID (USA). Intermountain Research Station); Greene, S.E. (Forest Service, Corvallis, OR (USA

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place: Hudson, South Dakota Zip: 57034 Product: Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol...

153

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - April...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Company - July 21, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - March 29, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000...

154

SOURCES OF FINE-GRAINED SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN MILL STREAM BRANCH WATERSHED, CORSICA RIVER BASIN, A TRIBUTARY TO THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem (Phillips, 2002). In order to reduce sediment and nutrients Corsica River Basin from the State's impaired water bodies (303D) list (http://www.dnr.state.md.us watershed, the largest estuary in the United States, was listed as an "impaired water body" in 2000 under

155

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

156

River Protection.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

157

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

158

Ecosystem Management Team | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ecosystem Management Team Ecosystem Management Team Ecosystem Management Team Objectives The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating methods of reducing the long-term costs and risks associated with operating, monitoring, and managing its legacy sites. For example, vegetation management is a significant and growing component of annual maintenance costs at legacy sites. Long-term surveillance plans often require suppression of plant growth on rock-covered disposal cells because scientists have concerns that (1) plants' roots may increase water percolation through compacted soil layers into buried contaminated material (and hence, increase the potential for spreading contamination), or (2) roots may take up and disperse buried contaminants (e.g., wind may spread contaminated plant materials or

159

Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

Bassil, Youssef

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites Data Research Facilities Low Dose Irradiation Facility Tritium Irrigation Facility Microsatellite Development Education...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microbial ecosystems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic Summary: COMMENTARY Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid...

162

A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-14, 28-36, 28-46, 28-61 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Baltimore District (NAB) 4-23 Galveston DistrictA A.R. River Environmental Restoration Project (SWL) 37-18, 37-25 Aberdeen and Vicinity, SD (NWO-9 Aquatic Plant Control Charleston District (SAC) 7-2, 7-9, 7-12, Galveston District (SWG) 40-3, 40-25, 40

US Army Corps of Engineers

163

Chao Phraya River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the river flow during low flow in January and 4% during high flow conditions in July 2004. The unit shoreline ...... since the water first became enriched in radium isotopes assuming no ... uranium-series isotopes (223Ra and 226Ra), estimating radium ages .... inventory into concentration by dividing by the water depth, which

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Condamine River Meteor Zamia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONNORS Cape Townshend Townshend Island Island Long Broad Sound Condamine River Maran oa Comet Isaac Daws Roper Nogoa Ca llide Bungeworgorai North Balmy L ogan Denison L o t us Buck land Con ciliation Humb oldt Elphinstone Dam Eungella Dam R Ck Nebo RomaAmby Wowan Warra Miles Moura Dingo Comet Alpha Banana Rannes Marmor

Greenslade, Diana

165

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Nation's Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...soil erosion and the need for soil conserva-tion were first clearly...residuals accumu-lated in soils, vegetation, and other organisms...from the Potomac River near Washing-ton, D.C., and doubtless...Ruhe and R. B. Daniels, J. Soil Water Conserv. 20, 52 (1965...

M. Gordon Wolman

1971-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

River meandering dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ikeda, Parker, and Sawai river meandering model is reexamined using a physical approach employing an explicit equation of motion. For periodic river shapes as seen from above, a cross-stream surface elevation gradient creates a velocity shear that is responsible for the decay of small-wavelength meander bends, whereas secondary currents in the plane perpendicular to the downstream direction are responsible for the growth of large-wavelength bends. A decay length D=H/2Cf involving the river depth H and the friction coefficient Cf sets the scale for meandering, giving the downstream distance required for the fluid velocity profile to recover from changes in the channel curvature. Using this length scale and a time scale T, we explicitly trace the observed length scale invariance to the equations of motion, and predict similar time and velocity scale invariances. A general time-dependent nonlinear modal analysis for periodic rivers reveals that modes higher than the third mode are needed to describe upstream migration of bend apexes just before oxbow cutoff, and are important to accurate calculations of the time and sinuosity at cutoff.

Boyd F. Edwards and Duane H. Smith

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Human Impact on Freshwater Ecosystem Services: A Global Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human environmental change influences freshwaters as well as the regulating, provisioning, and cultural services that ecosystems provide worldwide. Here, we assess the global human impact on the potential value of six freshwater ecosystem services (ES) ...

Walter K. Dodds; Joshuah S. Perkin; Joseph E. Gerken

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Marine biodiversityecosystem functions under uncertain environmental futures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Montoya and Dave Raffaelli Marine biodiversity-ecosystem functions under...dredging-implications for marine biodiversity. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst...in this Data Supplement: Marine biodiversity-ecosystem processes under...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters...natural and social science approaches to address coupled...ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters...natural and social science approaches to address coupled...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fisheries in the Southern Ocean: an ecosystem approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...approach to management. This approach has been extended...primarily with the science-related...ecosystem approach to the management of the living...primarily with the science-related...ecosystem approach to the management of the living...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ecology Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators David...determinants of ecosystem C sequestration. carbon|island ecology|rats...of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in European forests and forest...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

2 Valuing ecosystem services Benefits, values, space and time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of evidence suggests that in the twenty-first century we will face a number of pressing and interrelated considered an ecosystem service versus other con- cepts in the literature, such as ecosystem processes

Vermont, University of

175

UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

176

Eutrophication in coastal marine ecosystems (B. B. Jorgensen and K ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Margin Ecosystem Research program (of NSF), Coastal Ocean Pro- cesses program ... nutrient reductions will lead to restoration, but estimates here sug- gest that .... groups of organisms that are important to aquatic ecosystems; this capability...

177

JIANGXIAO QIU Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus: Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural landscape-Madison Project: NSF Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC)--Climate change, shifting land use, and urbanization Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Beijing China Thesis: Landscape pattern and urban morphology

Turner, Monica G.

178

Oil and Planktonic Ecosystems [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 June 1982 research-article Oil and Planktonic Ecosystems [and Discussion] J. Davenport M...Gray D. J. Crisp J. M. Davies Information about the effects of oil and oil products upon planktonic organisms is much sparser than for nekton...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Revisiting Odum (1956): A synthesis of aquatic ecosystem metabolism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Few syntheses of aquatic ecosystem metabolism have been completed since. ... Results will be valuable for management, restoration, and carbon budgets,...

180

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production, and Tradeoffs at Landscape Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production ECOSYSTEM SERVICES_ 4 o Modeling multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, commodity tradeoff between biodiversity conservation and J?l ecosystem services. Scenarios involving more development

Vermont, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Global change tipping points: above- and below-ground biotic interactions in a low diversity ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ground which, in turn, feedback to ecosystem recovery and restoration. In contrast to these more complex ecosystems of high diversity, the terrestrial...materials between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Ecosystems. 4, 421-429...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the species compo- sitions, biodiversity, and functioning of terrestrial and marine ecosystems worldwide (1, freshwater, and marine ecosystems (8颅15). This has raised concerns that contemporary biodiversity declinesNutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity Forest

Minnesota, University of

183

Impacts of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fisheries data to test how biodiversity loss affects marine ecosystem services across temporal and spatial the effects of changes in marine biodiversity on fundamental ecosystem services by combining available dataImpacts of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services Boris Worm,1 * Edward B. Barbier,2 Nicola

Stachowicz, Jay

184

"Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 1 16 .06.2008 Pastoral system and herders communities Professor D.Dorligsuren Programme Coordinator "Green Gold" Pasture Ecosystem Management Programme Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development, Mongolia "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management

185

White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective Yuan Luo, Lin Gao, and Jianwei Huang Abstract--The successful deployment of a TV white space network requires the coordination-users), which form the White Space Ecosystem. In this paper, we study the white space ecosystem from

Huang, Jianwei

186

RESEARCH ARTICLE Response of an aridland ecosystem to interannual climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on ecosystem structure and function. In the south- western US, interactions among regional climate drivers (e drivers strongly affect the distribution and composition of ecosystems worldwide. Indeed, potential to which increased climate variability will affect ecosystem processes requires long-term analysis

187

Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of U.S. and international coral reef ecosystems. The CRCA also required that the National OceanicStatus of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam By Val Porter, Trina Leberer, Mike Gawel, Jay Gutierrez Marine Laboratory Technical Report No. 113 October 2005 #12;Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam

Mcilwain, Jenny

188

Ecosystem development explained by competition within and between material cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...productivities, plant and decomposer biomasses, and ecosystem cycling e ciency...increasing ecosystem productivity, biomass and cycling e ciency, thus...loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation ecosystems: the rsttwenty...Biol. 136, 337^356. Wood, T., Bormann, F. H...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Toward an Integrated Classification of Ecosystems: Defining Opportunities for Managing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT / Many of the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest United States have been) a framework for experimentation and demonstration of commitment and untested restoration tech- niques. Aquatic. Changes in forest ecosystems of the region seem to mirror those of aquatic ecosystems. Many forests have

190

Prospects for monitoring freshwater ecosystems towards the 2010 targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...al. 2003), aquatic and floodplain...wetland restoration success (Shuman...of freshwater ecosystems and species...inland water ecosystems. In Technical...analysis of global ecosystems: freshwater...V.HUse of aquatic insects in biomonitoring...monitoring wetland restoration success. Restor...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Terrestrial Ecosystems extend from uplands to wetlands, which form the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field of study provides students with an understanding of ecological restoration, particularly as it relates to restoring and managing the kinds of ecosystems found, restoration, consulting and education pertaining to a wide range of forest ecosystems in the governmental

Edwards, Paul N.

193

Savannah River Site - Enforcement Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Savannah River Site Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Puncture Wound Injury resulting in a Radiological Uptake at the Savannah River Site, July 22, 2011 (NEA-2011-02) Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Amer Industrial Technologies, Inc. related to Weld Deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010

194

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

195

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

196

EcoSystem Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoSystem Corporation EcoSystem Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoSystem Corporation Place Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip 55415 Sector Carbon, Efficiency Product Minnesota-based OTC-listed company developing a technology to increase yields and efficiency, while also decreasing energy consumption and carbon intensity at conventional corn ethanol plants. Coordinates 44.979035掳, -93.264929掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.979035,"lon":-93.264929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Biofilm responses to multiple stressors associated to global change in river ecosystems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the effects of consequences of global change on fluvial biofilms. To achieve this objective a multi-marker (more)

Proia, Lorenzo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- November 14, 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Criticality Safety Violations at the Savannah River Site

199

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- April 19, 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Employee Reprisal at the Savannah River Site

200

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NERPs Definition | Savannah River National Environmental Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NERPS: Idaho, Hanford, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Fermilab, Nevada, and Savannah River. The Savannah River Site became the first NERP in 1972. Unlike National Parks, NERPs provide a...

202

Overview | Savannah River National Environmental Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology Laboratory (SREL), USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (USFS-SR), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As a research unit of UGA, SREL's primary function is...

203

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

204

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

205

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

206

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

207

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site, Summary Report - February 2004 February 2004 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site...

208

Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

perturbations to ecosystems (e.g., habitat fragmentation, urbanization, environmental contamination) on the movement behavior, population dynamics, and health of...

209

CX-007364: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007364: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to Purchase the Upper Twin Rivers Conservation Easement CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/17/2011 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of 87 acres in the Kootenai River watershed for wildlife habitat mitigation. The acquisition parcel was selected for protection in part due to the potential to restore altered riparian habitats for wildlife, resident fish species (i.e., rainbow trout, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee) and the Kootenai River White Sturgeon, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The Kootenai River watershed

210

factsheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 acres of land in northern Idaho along Smith Creek in the Kootenai River floodplain for wildlife habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Boundary County, the property is partly...

211

Removal of intensive agriculture from the landscape improves aquatic ecosystem health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The 20th century witnessed substantial increases in the intensity of agricultural land management. Increased agricultural intensity leads to degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Removal of intensive agriculture from the landscape is rare; however this occurred in the Ovens Valley, Victoria, Australia when its 150-year-old tobacco industry was closed in 2006. The present study examined stress in aquatic biota in the Ovens River and associated wetlands and dams before (198889) and after (2010) the tobacco closure. The endpoint observed was incidence of morphological deformities in chironomid (搉on-biting midge) larvae. A significant reduction in deformity incidence, particularly in the mentum (teeth), was observed in larvae collected from waters near or adjacent to tobacco cultivation, between 1988/89 and 2010. Similarly, there is a significant decline in the incidence of deformities in the pecten epipharyngis between 1988/89 and 2010. Ninety-six pesticides were also measured in sediments in 2010, of which only the persistent organochlorines DDT, DDE, DDD and dieldrin were detected. Some analysis of pesticides in sediments was conducted in 1988 but the results were inconclusive because the detection limits were inadequate and not all pesticides being used in tobacco cultivation at that time were analysed. The decline in morphological deformities correlates with the cessation of tobacco cultivation and indicates a recovery in ecosystem health.

Bryant Gagliardi; Vincent Pettigrove

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy, Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, December 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

c c Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force December 2011 G u l f C o a s t E c o s y s t e m R e s t o r a t i o n T a s k F o r c e Cover Photo Credits: Brown pelicans: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Volunteer planting marsh grass: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Steve Hillebrand Turtle: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Wetlands: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Boats: Mississippi Development Authority, Tourism Division Nothing in this document is intended to create private rights of action or other enforceable individual legal rights. 漏2011 Google Earth Map of Gulf of Mexico Coast US Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force December 2011 G u l f C o a s t E c o s y s t e m R e

213

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species interactions, (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Light and photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems (J. T. O. Kirk ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light and photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cam- bridge and New York. 401 p. $82.50. Although they 搒ymbiotically appear in...

216

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Market Takeaways: The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters,...

217

Submerged aquatic vegetation and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee as indicators of greater Everglades ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lake Okeechobee, Florida, located in the middle of the larger Kissimmee River-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades ecosystem in South Florida, serves a variety of ecosystem and water management functions including fish and wildlife habitat, flood control, water supply, and source water for environmental restoration. As a result, the ecological status of Lake Okeechobee plays a significant role in defining the overall success of the greater Everglades ecosystem restoration initiative. One of the major ecological indicators of Lake Okeechobee condition focuses on the near-shore and littoral zone regions as characterized by the distribution and abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and giant bulrush (Scirpus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Steud.). The objective of this study is to present a stoplight restoration report card communication system, common to all 11 indicators noted in this special journal issue, as a means to convey the status of SAV and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee. The report card could be used by managers, policy makers, scientists and the public to effectively evaluate and distill information about the ecological status in South Florida. Our assessment of the areal distribution of SAV in Lake Okeechobee is based on a combination of empirical SAV monitoring and output from a SAV habitat suitability model. Bulrush status in the lake is related to a suitability index linked to adult survival and seedling establishment metrics. Overall, presentation of these performance metrics in a stoplight format enables an evaluation of how the status of two major components of Lake Okeechobee relates to the South Florida restoration program, and how the status of the lake influences restoration efforts in South Florida.

Matthew C. Harwell; Bruce Sharfstein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Savannah River Site Homepage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7/2014 7/2014 SEARCH GO News Releases Video Releases Upcoming Events 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL NEWS RELEASES CLICK HERE for our email news service, govDELIVERY 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award - Click to play on YouTube 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award Finalist: SRS Recovery Act Project PLAY VIDEO CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL VIDEO RELEASES Enterprise.SRS - Safety and Security begin with me! SRS Status & Emergency Information * Cold War Patriot's Resource Fair - Aiken, SC (04.25.13) * 3rd Annual Small Modular Reactor Conference - Columbia, SC (04.16-17.13)

219

Adaptive management of coastal ecosystem restoration projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a clear need to apply better and more effective management schemes to coastal ecosystem restoration projects. It is very common for aquatic ecosystem restoration projects not to meet their goals. Poor performance has led to a high degree of uncertainty about the potential success of any restoration effort. Under adaptive management, the knowledge gained through monitoring of the project and social policies is translated into restoration policy and program redesign. Planners and managers can utilize the information from the monitoring programs in an effective way to assure that project goals are met or that informed and objective decisions are made to address both ecological and societal needs. The three main ingredients of an effective adaptive management plan in a restoration project are: (1) a clear goal statement; (2) a conceptual model; and (3) a decision framework. The goal 慸rives the design of the project and helps guide the development of performance criteria. The goal statement and performance criteria provide the means by which the system can be judged. With the conceptual model, the knowledge base from the field of ecological science plays an active and critical role in designing the project to meet the goal. A system-development matrix provides a simple decision framework to view the alternative states for the system during development, incorporate knowledge gained through the monitoring program, and formulate a decision on actions to take if the system is not meeting its goal.

Ronald M Thom

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

222

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Georgia, University of

223

Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rivers to the Golden Gate Bridge is termed the Northernconcentrations near the Golden Gate Bridge (Cutter and

Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Caney River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Caney River Facility Caney River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Enel Green Power North America Inc. Developer Tradewind Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Tennessee Valley Authority Location Elk County KS Coordinates 37.448424掳, -96.425027掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.448424,"lon":-96.425027,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Marble River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Marble River Facility Marble River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Churubusco NY Coordinates 44.9406848掳, -73.9303307掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9406848,"lon":-73.9303307,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Missouri River Institute Research Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Army Corps of Engineers) Corps of Engineers Outreach and Education Programs 11:00 Dan Catlin (Virginia and Pesticides on Amphibians Along the 59-Mile Reach of the Missouri River Posters from various individuals

Sweeney, Mark R.

228

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER management decisions? II--WATERWATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere,Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems resource issues. #12;I-WATER: Vision and Goals 陇 I-WATER will provide a new generation of Ph.D. students

230

Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

213 Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab- olism for Giltner in the estimation of ecosystem metabolism by open-channel methods (McCutchan et al. 2002; Hall and Tank 2005). To estimate metabolism in Giltner Spring Creek, Hall and Tank (2005) employ a mass-balance equation

Lewis Jr., William M.

231

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research 路 Glacier Research 路 Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

232

Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems Sanja Selakovic 1 Peter...Netherlands Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with...interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The 4C framework: principles of interaction in digital ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent years have seen an increased research interest in multi-device interactions and digital ecosystems. This research addresses new opportunities and challenges when users are not simply interacting with one system or device at a time, but orchestrate ... Keywords: digital ecosystems, framework, multi-artifact, multi-user, relationships, structures

Henrik S鴕ensen, Dimitrios Raptis, Jesper Kjeldskov, Mikael B. Skov

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

PERSPECTIVES Biodiversity loss, trophic skew and ecosystem functioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDEAS AND PERSPECTIVES Biodiversity loss, trophic skew and ecosystem functioning J. Emmett Duffy School of Marine Science & Virginia Institute of Marine Science, The College of William and Mary biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning have been criticized on the basis that their random

Duffy, J. Emmett

235

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

Johnson, Pieter

236

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations R E B E C C body of research linking bioenergy cultivation to changing patterns of biodiversity, there has been remarkably little interest in how bioenergy plantations affect key ecosystem processes underpinning impor

237

Aquatic Microbiology for Ecosystem Scientists: New and Recycled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to pelagic ecosystems: the problem of bacterial cell dormancy; the effect of solar radiation on organic some allochthonous organic input, the secondary production of plank- tonic bacteria can be co ABSTRACT In all ecosystems, bacteria are the most numerous organisms and through them flows a large

238

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field Deborah S. Kelley,1 * Jeffrey A. Baross,1 Roger E. Summons,7 Sean P. Sylva4 The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately

Gilli, Adrian

239

Assessment of ecosystem biodiversity by acoustic diversity indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of ecosystem biodiversity by measurement of acoustic diversity was explored [B. L. Krause Explorers J. Winter 156160 (1993)]. Specific acoustic indices (e.g. based on frequency spectrum) were developed and correlated with standard diversity indices (e.g. standard species abundance indices). Necessary technological infrastructures and analytic processes to measure acoustic dynamics of ecological biodiversity were explored. An automated web?based infrastructure capable of capturing processing and relaying real?time field measurements from multiple ecosystems to desktop and home computers was developed tested and implemented. Key infrastructure components were remote field instrumentation remote computer processing wireless digital relay instrumentation Internet server and automation relational database and website software. A dynamic digital library of ecological acoustic samples correlated ecosystem attributes and acoustic analysis methodologies was established. Library resources including digital sound files captured from ecosystems were made available to researchers and the public over the Internet [N. Metzger and M. Blumenthal Realizing Info. Future NAP 113119 (1994)]. Indices of acoustic ecosystem diversity were refined through application on existing digital ecosystem sound recordings and digital sounds captured from multiple ecosystems. The performance of these indices was compared to standard biodiversity indices applied to the same ecosystems.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Carbon Sequestration May Have Negative Impacts on Ecosystem Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration May Have Negative Impacts on Ecosystem Health ... Yin, R.; Sedjo, R.; Liu, P.The potential and challenges of sequestering carbon and generating other services in China抯 forest ecosystems Environ. ... A discussion of whether climate change in China can be mitigated by expanding its forest area by 40 million ha to sequester C (CO2 emissions). ...

Yafeng Wang; Shixiong Cao

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

242

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

243

CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan Envision a Dynamic Community of Wellbeing for innovation that can be exported outside of its boundaries. Umore Park: Ecosystems of Infrastructure it every day in the form of roads, buildings, power lines, stoplights, energy plants, water pipes, when

Netoff, Theoden

244

Spreading Dead Zones and Consequences for Marine Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...factor affecting ecosystem energy flows. Within most systems...on the upward flow of energy in the food chain...fisheries and affecting energy flows in the same way...countries is highly likely if wind patterns shift and cause...times, most coastal and offshore ecosystems never became...

Robert J. Diaz; Rutger Rosenberg

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Two-dimensional river modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow conditions. This thesis investigates the application of a recently developed two- dimensional river model system. The microcomputer version of FESWMS-2DH was developed for the Federal Highway Administration by the U. S. Geological Survey. Four... simulations are used to examine the performance of the two- dimensional river modeling system: flow in a simple channel, flow in a strongly curved channel bend, flow in a meandering creek, and flow in Buckhorn Creek, a single opening bridge crossing of a...

Thompson, James Cameron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Anthropogenic impacts on tropical forest biodiversity: a network structure and ecosystem functioning perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes...longer performs the ecosystem functions and services...primary forest in terms of ecosystem functions and services...themselves can recover, the restoration of interactions and...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

AQUATIC CONSERVATION: MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst. 19: 274284 (2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Ecohydrologists and stream ecologists frequently focus aquatic ecosystem management and restoration effortsAQUATIC CONSERVATION: MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst. 19 frequently alter aquatic ecosystems. Manipulations caused by large centralized water projects have been well

Merenlender, Adina

248

Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan The natural resources of the Gulf's ecosystem are vital to many of the region's industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood production and sales, energy production and navigation and commerce. Among the key priorities of the strategy are: 1) Stopping the Loss of Critical Wetlands, Sand Barriers and Beaches The strategy recommends placing ecosystem restoration on an equal footing with historic uses such as navigation and flood damage reduction by approaching water resource management decisions in a far more comprehensive manner that will bypass harm to wetlands, barrier islands and beaches. The

249

Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Japan Co Ltd Japan Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd Place Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip 160-0002 Sector Solar Product Japan-based installer of solar panels. Coordinates 35.670479掳, 139.740921掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.670479,"lon":139.740921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Tourism destinations as digital business ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism has been experiencing very relevant changes since when Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), in all their forms, have started to pervade the industry and the market. In the last decade, a new concept gained the attention of both researchers and practitioners, that of Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE). It can be considered as a technological infrastructure aimed at creating a digital environment to support and enhance networking between enterprises and stakeholders operating within a sector. Aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which the technological connection has affected the structural configuration of the tourism system and, specifically, of tourism destinations. The present study argues that two components can be considered when assessing the relationships among stakeholders within a tourism destination: a real and a virtual one. Further it shows how these two components are structurally strongly coupled and co-evolve forming a single system.

Baggio, Rodolfo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by...

252

Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback with a Revised Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ITP LEADER Case Study: Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback With a Revised Energy Strategy Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery FlambeauRiverBiofuels.pdf...

253

ITP LEADER Case Study: Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Documents & Publications Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback with a Revised Energy Strategy Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery FlambeauRiverBiofuels.pdf...

254

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

255

Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ecosystem into a terrestrial one when... times dry. Ecosystems are not always self-sustaining. For example, fish and other ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems review Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ecosystem into a terrestrial one when... times dry. Ecosystems are not always self-sustaining. For example, fish and other ... Source: Liskiewicz, Maciej - Institut fr...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECOSYSTEMS JOINT MODULE WITH UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA Summary: environments Fresh Water Ecosystems Aquatic policies Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Terrestrial... and...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal ecosystem engineers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the approach with regards to ecosystem engineering... in an engineered ecosystem (e.g., water purification, biomass production, etc.). In the short term, the objective......

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Starch Glucose Complex anaerobic... 12;Microbial Systems as Model Ecosystems P C R Energy Heat ... Source: Vallino, Joseph J. - Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Grays River Watershed Restoration Status Report 2007, May 1, 2007 - October 30, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-013-00, 'Grays River Watershed Restoration', began in FY04 and continues into FY09. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during the period 1 May 2007 through 30 October 2008. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with the Columbia River Estuary Task Force (CREST) on implementation of the Grays River Restoration Project. The Grays River is vitally important to the recovery of Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon because it currently has the most viable population remaining in the LCR region. The Grays River watershed is also important to the recovery of salmon and steelhead in the LCR ecosystem. Today, numbers of naturally spawning salmon and steelhead have declined to levels far below historical numbers because of habitat limiting factors that include but are not limited to the lack of habitat connectivity, diversity, channel stability, riparian function and altered stream flow conditions. The objective of this project is to restore habitat-forming processes to enhance salmon and steelhead populations in the Grays River, following recommendations developed during the FY04-06 BPA-sponsored Grays River Watershed Assessment (BPA Project No. 2003-013-00). Specifically, this project will be the first step in restoring channel structure and function that will increase instream habitat diversity, channel stability, and riparian integrity in the critical response reach upstream and adjacent to critical salmon spawning areas of the Grays River. The major component of this strategy is the planning, design, installation, and monitoring of engineered logjams (ELJ) that will rejuvenate historic channel and floodplain processes. Additional restoration measures include reforesting the riparian corridor to enhance future large woody debris recruitment and investigation of conservation activities within ecologically critical areas. These activities include land acquisition and levee removal to protect critical areas and reconnect floodplain areas. Finally, monitoring integrated with restoration activities is proposed to evaluate restoration effectiveness and allow for adaptive management of future restoration treatments in the project area as well as other degraded watersheds in the Lower Columbia River.

Hanrahan, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Canadian River Compact Commission The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by

263

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of tritium resources; by contributing to the stockpile surveillance program; and by assisting in the development of alternatives for large-scale pit disassembly/conversion capability. SRS also manages excess nuclear materials and supports nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. Environmental stewardship activities include the management, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. Enforcement April 13, 2010 Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -

264

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

265

Organisms as cooperative ecosystem engineers in intertidal flats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The importance of facilitative interactions and organismal ecosystem engineering for establishing the structure of communities is increasingly being recognised for many different ecosystems. For example, soft-bottom tidal flats host a wide range of ecosystem engineers, probably because the harsh physico-chemical environmental conditions render these species of particular importance for community structure and function. These environments are therefore interesting when focusing on how ecosystem engineers interact and the consequences of these interactions on community dynamics. In this review, we initially detail the influence on benthic systems of two kinds of ecosystem engineers that are particularly common in tidal flats. Firstly, we examine species providing biogenic structures, which are often the only source of habitat complexity in these environments. Secondly, we focus on species whose activities alter sediment stability, which is a crucial feature structuring the dynamics of communities in tidal flats. The impacts of these engineers on both environment and communities were assessed but in addition the interaction between ecosystem engineers was examined. Habitat cascades occur when one engineer favours the development of another, which in turn creates or modifies and improves habitat for other species. Non-hierarchical interactions have often been shown to display non-additive effects, so that the effects of the association cannot be predicted from the effects of individual organisms. Here we propose the term of 揷ooperative ecosystem engineering when two species interact in a way which enhances habitat suitability as a result of a combined engineering effect. Finally, we conclude by describing the potential threats for ecosystem engineers in intertidal areas, potential effects on their interactions and their influence on communities and ecosystem function.

Claire Passarelli; Fr閐閞ic Olivier; David M. Paterson; Tarik Meziane; C閐ric Hubas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Savannah River National Laboratory - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art Top Menu Bar SRNL Update: Embassy Fellows Report A report co-authored by Savannah River National Laboratory Senior Advisory Engineer, Dr. Robert Sindelar, has been released. The report to the Government of Japan - Ministry of the Environment provides observations and recommendations on decontamination work and progress... >>MORE Portable Power Research at SRNL Hadron Technologies, Inc., a microwave technology and systems development and manufacturing company with offices in Tennessee and Colorado, has signed a license for a Hybrid Microwave and Off-Gas Treatment System developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's applied science laboratory located at the Savannah River Site. >>MORE

267

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny 搂3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

268

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

269

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory- June 7, 2000  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site

270

Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flambeau River Biofuels Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Flambeau River Biofuels Place Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector Biomass Product A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC that plans to develop a Fischer Tropsch diesel project in Park Falls, Wisconsin that will process residual wood biomass from forest and agricultural sources. References Flambeau River Biofuels[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flambeau River Biofuels is a company located in Park Falls, Wisconsin . References 鈫 "Flambeau River Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flambeau_River_Biofuels&oldid=345407" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

271

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

272

Salinity Gradient Energy at River Mouths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity Gradient Energy at River Mouths ... River mouths are potentially abundant locations for the exploitation of the clean and renewable salinity gradient energy (SGE) as here perpetually fresh water mixes with saline seawater. ...

Oscar Alvarez-Silva; Christian Winter; Andres F. Osorio

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Critical wavelength for river meandering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully nonlinear modal analysis identifies a critical centerline wave number qc for river meandering that separates long-wavelength bends, which grow to cutoff, from short-wavelength bends, which decay. Exact, numerical, and approximate analytical results for qc rely on the Ikeda, Parker, and Sawai [J. Fluid Mech. 112, 363 (1981)] model, supplemented by dynamical equations that govern the river migration and length. Predictions also include upvalley bend migration at long times and a peak in lateral migration rates at intermediate times. Experimental tests are suggested.

Boyd F. Edwards and Duane H. Smith

2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

United States Entity Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that reflects the actual value of coordinated power operations with Canada, maintains an acceptable level of flood risk and supports a resilient and healthy ecosystem-based...

275

Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

276

Warming alters community size structure and ecosystem functioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...37-49, 08003 Barcelona, Spain Global warming can affect all levels of biological...structure|ecosystem functioning|global warming|body mass|size spectrum...The ecological implications of global warming have been documented across many...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ecosystem Approaches to the Management and Allocation of Critical Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chapter identifies concepts, approaches, and frontiers that can increase the understanding of the linkages between ecology, society, and the economy for improved ecosystem management. The first part focuse...

Carl Folke

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

GHG Emissions from Boreal Reservoirs and Natural Aquatic Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) gross fluxes were measured at the air-water interface of 205 aquatic ecosystems in the Canadian boreal region from 1993 to 2003. Fluxes were obtained wi...

Alain Tremblay; Jean Therrien; Bill Hamlin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Timothy Gordon Whitby Research Intern, Ecosystem & Landscape Ecology Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of long-term plots in lodgepole pine stands following 1988 Yellowstone wildfires to understand long-supported remote sensing of ecosystem structure and function project in Colorado and Utah. 2004- 2009 Apprentice

Turner, Monica G.

280

A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With biology becoming quantitative, systems-level studies can now be performed at spatial scales ranging from molecules to ecosystems. Biological data generated consistently across scales can be integrated with physico-chemical ...

Follows, Michael J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An urban ecosystem as a superposition of interrelated active media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A space-time model that treats the urban ecosystem as a superposition of active media is expanded to take the heterogeneity of anthropogenic and natural factors into account. The approach is based on represent...

A. E. Sidorova; Yu. V. Mukhartova; L. V. Yakovenko

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from爏tates, tribes, federal...

283

Stream hydrology limits recovery of riparian ecosystems after wolf reintroduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Natural Resource and Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, , Fort Collins, CO...Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, Colorado State University, , Fort Collins, CO...downcutting channels and disconnecting flood plains from their adjacent streams [18...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hygienic rating of hydrocarbons in bottom deposits of water ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors of this article draw the reader抯 attention to the topical problem of the contamination of bottom deposits of water ecosystems by hydrocarbons, such as oil and gas condensate,...

Rauf Valievich Galiulin

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ecosystem health through ecological restoration: barriers and opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is quite possible that no ecosystem on the planet is totally free of anthropogenic effects. Changes in the ozone layer, airborne transport of contaminants, and the persistence of pesticides and other chemic...

John Cairns Jr

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Hap Dunning and Richard Frank, UC Davis School of Law Feb. 24 Farms, floods, fowl and fish on the Yolo, Yolo County; others TBA Mar. 10 Science and ecosystem reconciliation for the Delta. Peter Goodwin

Ferrara, Katherine W.

287

STUART E.G. FINDLAY Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and K.A. Kuehn. 2002. Microbial growth and nitrogen retention in litter of Phragmites australis.M. Groffman and S. Dye. 2003. Trade-offs among ecosystem functions during restoration: Phragmites removal from

288

Wild and Scenic Rivers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildandScenicRivers&oldid612228" Category: NEPA Resources...

289

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Canal Sacramento Valley ? Yolo Bypass (drains, west-sideSe effluents* North Bay streams Inflow (import) YoloBypass Yolo Bypass Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta Los

Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

292

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape The Cleantech Group www.cleantech.com Principal Authors Greg Neichin David Cheng Contributing Authors Sheeraz Haji Josh Gould Debjit Mukerji David Hague 2 Table of Contents Page I. Introduction .............................................................................. 3 In-Depth Market Analysis II. Advanced Metering .......................................................... 19 III. Demand Response ............................................................ 39 IV. Distribution Grid Management ...................................... 57

293

SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

Georgia, University of

294

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

295

The ecological value of stream restoration measures: An evaluation on ecosystem and target species scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Stream restoration is widely applied for conservation of freshwater ecosystems, but systematic comparisons on the effects of different techniques are rare. In this study, we systematically evaluated two types of gravel introduction, substratum raking and the placement of boulders in six streams. We compared indicator-based and multi-scale approaches that simultaneously assess effects on target species, different taxonomic groups and on ecosystem scale. Gravel introduction had by far the strongest effects on macroinvertebrates (increase of species density and numbers of individuals), periphyton (increase of cell numbers) and macrophytes (decrease of coverage, species numbers and biomass), followed by substratum raking. The placement of boulders had no significant long-term effects on aquatic communities. Over all investigated restoration treatments, fish community composition only changed significantly in 50% of the study rivers depending on the occurrence of species sensitive to the structures introduced by the restoration treatments. These were lithophilic, rheophilic and invertivorous fishes, comprising several species listed in the Red List of endangered species, which used the added 1632爉m gravel as juvenile habitat. Areas with introduced gravel were also most frequently used by spawning Salmo trutta, Thymallus thymallus and Phoxinus phoxinus. In contrast, active bioindication using Salmo trutta eggs indicated that none of the restoration treatments was sufficient to enhance habitat conditions in deeper substratum layers throughout the egg incubation period. Our results suggest that instream restoration measures can contribute to freshwater biodiversity conservation, but reproductive success of species depending on long-term improvement of interstitial water quality cannot be achieved without considering catchment effects and natural substratum dynamics.

Melanie Mueller; Joachim Pander; Juergen Geist

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Spreading Dead Zones and Consequences for Marine Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a single hypoxic event in the New York Bight that covered about 1000 km 2 caused mass...Adriatic, Pomeranian Bay, and the German Bight. Paleo-indicators and models from the...climate predictions for the Mississippi River basin indicate a 20% increase in river discharge...

Robert J. Diaz; Rutger Rosenberg

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Resilience of river flow regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Junk WJ Bayley PB Sparks RE ( 1989 ) The flood pulse concept in river-floodplain systems...F Ward JV ( 2000 ) An extension of the flood pulse concept...ZZQQhy2011 Bisbee (AZ) Bisbee (AZ) Summer Boulder Creek Arizona (United States) 98 1984...

Gianluca Botter; Stefano Basso; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe; Andrea Rinaldo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Resilience of river flow regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Junk WJ Bayley PB Sparks RE ( 1989 ) The flood pulse concept in river-floodplain systems...F Ward JV ( 2000 ) An extension of the flood pulse concept...summer, autumn, winter Vallecito Creek Colorado (United States) 188 1963 ZZQQhy1997...

Gianluca Botter; Stefano Basso; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe; Andrea Rinaldo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microsoft Word - Kootenai Prelim Draft EA_February 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program Preliminary Environmental Assessment February 2013 DOE/EA-1901 This page left intentionally blank Bonneville Power Administration i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Purpose of and Need for Action .......................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 Need for Action ........................................................................................................................ 1-1 1.3 Purposes ................................................................................................................................... 1-2 1.4 Background Information ......................................................................................................... 1-2

300

Microsoft Word - Final Kootenai EA_May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Project Final Environmental Assessment and Response to Public Comments May 2013 DOE/EA-1901 This page left intentionally blank Bonneville Power Administration i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Purpose of and Need for Action .......................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 Need for Action ........................................................................................................................ 1-1 1.3 Purposes ................................................................................................................................... 1-2 1.4 Background Information ......................................................................................................... 1-2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Washington River Protection Solutions Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 September 2010 Participation in the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the review of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review for 2010. The review was conducted during the period of August 23 to September 2, 2010, and focused on six functional areas: corrective action management, work planning and control, radiological protection, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, and

302

Mercury speciation in floodplain soils and sediments along a contaminated river transect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel mercury-specific sequential extraction procedure (SEP) for the assessment of mercury (Hg) speciation in soils and sediments, with emphasis on studying the interaction between Hg and organic matter (OM), was developed and tested. It was applied to determine Hg speciation in floodplain topsoils and surface sediments along the Hg-contaminated part of the river Elbe, and to simultaneously derive some information on the (re)mobilization potentials for Hg from these matrices. The majority of the total Hg in the ecosystem today is bound in the floodplains, which also still geographically reflect the historic emission record. Most of the Hg in both matrices is bound strongly to OM, suggesting low availability. However, distinct differences between Hg speciation in the floodplain soils and sediments were also discovered. Mercury deposited in the floodplains shows speciation patterns that indicate stronger fixation compared with Hg in the sediments. This difference is attributed to the association of Hg with larger quantities of OM, which presumably also has higher molecular weight (MW). By comparison, Hg in the sediments was distributed among weaker binding forms, which are more likely to liberate Hg. Particularly, sediments showed a total lack of sulfidic binding forms for Hg. Pronounced geographical trends were detected in the Hg speciation along the river transect, with a general downstream shift from weaker to stronger binding forms, probably due to increased association with OM. These studies indicate that Hg speciation in riverine ecosystems is dynamic and reflects the chemical mechanisms underlying (bio) geochemical processes like distribution and transport.

Wallschlaeger, D.; Desai, M.V.M.; Spengler, M. [GKSS Forschungszentrum GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik; Wilken, R.D. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new

305

G. A. Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W S R C: M S- 9 5 -0 0 0 8 W S R C: M S- 9 5 -0 0 0 8 Analytical Considerations in the Code Qualification of Piping Systems (U) by G. A. Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, South Carolina 29808 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respnsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

306

Influence of river discharge and ocean currents on coastal optical properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The variability in the optical properties of a coastal region influenced by river runoff and multiple ocean currents in a southern hemisphere setting has been studied. The study area, Tasmanian coastal waters, is influenced by subtropical currents such as the East Australian Current (EAC) and the Zeehan Current (ZC) mix with cooler sub-Antarctic water (SAW). Freshwater discharges from rivers around the island and their mixing with the ocean currents also influence Tasmanian coastal waters. This study was performed to understand the influence of hydrodynamic processes on coastal optical properties and underwater light propagation. Physical, biogeochemical and optical properties were measured in Tasmanian coastal water during the austral autumn of 2007. In this study we found that physical properties have a good correlation with optical properties indicating the role played by hydrodynamic processes in distribution of optically active substances, optical properties of the water mass and underwater light propagation. Analysis of in situ salinity and temperature confirmed the presence of relatively cooler ZC in the South-West region, a cooler mixture of the ZC and SAW in the South-East, warm and saline EAC waters along the East coast and relatively cooler and fresh Bass straight waters along the North coast. In Tasmanian coastal waters light absorption in the water column is controlled by Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) with regionally varying contributions from Non-Algal Particulate (NAP) matter and phytoplankton. Absorption due to CDOM and NAP show a conservative mixing behaviour indicating that these biogeochemical components were delivered by the river and diluted in the coastal water. Suspended particulate matter in Tasmanian coastal water are highly scattering in nature and the beam attenuation is mainly due to light scattering. Variability in probability of light backscattering was mainly due to varying availability of non-algal particulate matter in the surface waters, which is controlled by river discharges in the region. Beam attenuation was high in coastal waters that are influenced by river runoff and increasing beam attenuation had constrained the underwater light propagation in these coastal waters. In the absence of major rivers along the East coast, optical properties were mainly influenced by the EAC water mass. Optical properties of the East coast were clearly different from the rest of the Tasmanian regions. In other regions the influence of ocean currents is subtle due to strong mixing between river discharges and ocean water mass. Overall, analysis of bio-optical properties shows that optical properties are constrained by regional hydrodynamic processes. Results presented highlight importance of using hydrodynamic process specific bio-optical properties and parameterisation in modelling light propagation in coastal ecosystems that are influenced by multiple ocean currents and river discharges.

Nagur Cherukuru; Vittorio E. Brando; Thomas Schroeder; Lesley A. Clementson; Arnold G. Dekker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Offshore Texas and Louisiana marine ecosystems data synthesis. Volume 1: Executive Summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provided a synthesis of available environmental information for the continental shelf from the shallow sublittoral to a depth of 500 m for the area between Corpus Christi Bay, Texas and the Mississippi River Delta. Results of the study are given in three volumes: Executive Summary (Volume I), Synthesis Report (Volume II), and Annotated Bibliography (Volume III). The Synthesis Report consists of separate chapters devoted to marine geology, physical oceanography and meteorology, marine chemistry, marine biology, socioeconomics, and conceptual modeling of the area's major ecosystems with emphasis on the environmental effects of oil and gas operations. There is a summary of data gaps and information needs and suggestions for future field studies. The annotated bibliography, which contains 1,535 references, was compiled through a combination of computer searches, telephone contacts, library visits, and submissions from chapter authors. The bibliographic data set is presented in hard copy and on IBM-compatible floppy disks that have been indexed with a computer program (FYI 3000 Plus) to allow searching by author, date, topic and geographic keywords, or words in the title, source, or annotation.

Phillips, N.W.; James, B.M.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Impacts of Climate Change on Photosynthetic Microbes in Arid Ecosystems |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Impacts of Climate Change on Photosynthetic Microbes in Arid Ecosystems Impacts of Climate Change on Photosynthetic Microbes in Arid Ecosystems Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information 禄 October 2012 Impacts of Climate Change on Photosynthetic Microbes in Arid Ecosystems Researchers find that ten years of controlled CO2 elevation on desert microbes had deleterious effects.

309

Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs September 14, 2011 - 4:22pm Addthis Rich Earley, CEO of Clean Urban Energy presents at Clean Energy Trust's Clean Energy Challenge in March 2011 | Courtesy of Clean Energy Trust Rich Earley, CEO of Clean Urban Energy presents at Clean Energy Trust's Clean Energy Challenge in March 2011 | Courtesy of Clean Energy Trust Sarah Jane Maxted Special Assistant, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this project do? Smart grid start-up company Clean Urban Energy secured $75,000 for its energy storage and smart grid performance optimization technology. Their system harnesses a building's inherent thermal mass to drive

310

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Operation - June 2010 Savannah River Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) self-assessment of the Technical Qualification Program (TQP). Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Savannah River

311

Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Operations Savannah River Operations Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Savannah River Operations Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 10, 2013 CX-010669: Categorical Exclusion Determination 484-17D Coal Yard Remediation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 1, 2013 CX-010837: Categorical Exclusion Determination Disassembly, Relocation, and Reassembly of a Metal-framed Quonset Hut CX(s) Applied: B1.22 Date: 08/01/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 1, 2013 CX-010836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subcontractor Roof Repair at 717-12S CX(s) Applied: B1.3

313

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Wing River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wing River Wind Farm Facility Wing River Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wing River Wind Farm Developer Wing River Wind Farm Location Hewitt MN Coordinates 46.3254掳, -95.0864掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3254,"lon":-95.0864,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 September 6, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Aiken, SC -- The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office today exercised its option to extend the current Savannah River Site Management and Operating contract with Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) for an additional 38 months, from August 1, 2013 to September 2016. The SRNS contract was competatviely awareded January 10, 2008. The total value of the SRNS contract with the extension is approximately $8 billion. The current contract provides for management and operations of Savannah

316

13 Emergence of a science policy-based approach to ecosystem-oriented management of large marine ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article addresses interdisciplinary sustainable aspects of fisheries as linkages for the adaptive management of large marine ecosystems (LMEs). Natural and human-induced impacts on living marine resources are considered. Management and the ecological aspects of fish stock populations in the United States Northeast Continental Shelf ecosystem are examined for prospective and emerging 揵est practices from a synthesis of the scientific literature. With the passage of the Oceans Act of 2000 (Public Law 106256; e.g. Watkins 2002) in the United States, this article seeks to enhance the fostering of sustainability through natural and social science by forging linkages between the best available science practice and the 損recautionary approach that includes ecosystem considerations of fish stocks as component parts of a representative model LME.

F.J. Gable

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

US Army Corps of Engineers

318

River Corridor Closure Project Partnering Performance Agreement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- March 2009 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, River Corridor Closure Project - June 2012 Indoctrinating Subcontractors into the DOE Safety Culture and Expectations...

319

Savannah River National Laboratory Technologies Available for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Available for Licensing The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) "Puts Science to Work" to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost effective technology solutions. In...

320

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Home | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmental Outreach...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the public about the diverse ecological research conducted by scientists at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Today, the Outreach Program continues to provide a great variety...

322

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

323

Kimberly Andrews | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Andrews with kingsnake Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Kimberly Andrews Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803)...

324

Kurt Buhlmann | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buhlmann Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Kurt A. Buhlmann Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5293 office...

325

J. Whitfield Gibbons | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gibbons Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology J. Whitfield Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5852 ...

326

Justin D. Congdon | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Congdon Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Justin D. Congdon Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5341 office...

327

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest梖rom fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region抯 electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Salt River Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The mission of Salt River Project's (SRP) Electric Vehicle Initiative is to encourage greater use of clean energy transportation. Under this program, SRP's headquarters received two Level 2...

329

Conference Center | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference Center front view UGA-SREL Conference Center large conference room Large conference room small conference room Small conference room The Savannah River Ecology...

330

Savannah River Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and concerns for the site. Savannah River Needs Assessment More Documents & Publications Oak Ridge Reservation Needs Assessment Oak Ridge Y-12 and ORNL Needs Assessment Former...

331

For the Federal Columbia River Power System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

its products and services . BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal nuclear plant and several small...

332

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

335

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS)...

338

The Columbia River System: Inside Story  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Falls Little Wood Reservoir Idaho Falls (City Plant) Idaho Falls (Lower Plant) Idaho Falls (Upper Plant) Ponds Lodge Ashton St. Anthony Felt Gem State Portneuf River Billingsley...

339

Root River Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: Root River Energy LLC Place: Minnesota Zip: 55961 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: Minesota-based wind development company tasked with developing...

340

Sandia National Laboratories: river current energy converters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a partnered effort to develop marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Informing the design and governance of a pro-poor payment for ecosystem services program in Western Panama.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Human society depends on healthy ecosystems. Payments for ecosystem services (PES) have emerged as an incentive-based tool to protect and restore ecosystem-service flows, which are (more)

Duke, Esther Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Back杢o杢he杅uture: a fresh policy initiative for fisheries and a restoration ecology for ocean ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...developments in ecosystem modelling, and...science-based restoration ecology aimed...fisheries and aquatic ecosystems (Pitcher et al...process for the restoration of fisheries and aquatic ecosystems. (Modified from...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The sharing of water between society and ecosystems: from conflict to catchment朾ased co杕anagement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variations of aquatic ecosystem requirements, not least...the best match between ecosystem and human requirements...different parts of the aquatic ecosystem and society. The critical...poverty of these people. Restoration of the Diawling Park...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

346

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rivers Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Wild and Scenic Rivers ActLegal Abstract This Act classifies rivers as...

347

New perspectives in ecosystem services science as instruments to understand environmental securities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...New perspectives in ecosystem services science as instruments to understand environmental...IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, , 48008 Bilbao, Spain 2 Gund Institute...life-sustaining resources grows, the science of ecosystem services (ES) is seen as...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Bimodality in a Monostable ClimateEcosystem: The Role of Climate Variability and Soil Moisture Memory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The probabilistic modal response of vegetation to stochastic precipitation variability is studied in a conceptual climateecosystem model. It is found that vegetation can exhibit bimodality in a monostable climateecosystem under strong rainfall ...

Zhengyu Liu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fire and Thinning Effects on Mixed-Conifer Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for low-intensity underburns but is now estimated to be over 600 years. 路 Tree density has dramatically out of a key question raised in the Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project: Critical Findings Section, 1996. 路 Old-growth has fairly stable carbon and nutrient pools. 路 Old forest conditions are often what

North, Malcolm

350

Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance A. Mansour*1 of the most up-to-date innovations in sensor technology and sensor networks, our current project should as well as the second phase of the project which consists in analyzing living underwater micro

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

351

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S, 2007) Declines in biodiversity have prompted concern over the conse- quences of species loss the functional consequences of realistic, nonrandom changes in biodiversity. Instead, most designs have used

Brody, James P.

352

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, Jos茅 Mar铆a

353

Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enjoying traction in places where ethical argu- ments for biodiversity conservation are given short shriftEditorial Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation Conservation biology began life as a crisis discipline, its central tenet to understand and help reverse losses of biodiversity

Vermont, University of

354

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

White, Luther

355

Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem...are linked to changes in the chlorophyll biomass. The model can be treated analytically...Mathematical bounds are found for the autotrophic biomass and the residual nitrate in terms of the...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Integrating ecosystem-service tradeoffs into land-use decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...InVEST software tool to evaluate the...existed between carbon storage and water quality...improved carbon storage (0.5% increase...food, water, and energy security and in climate...explicit modeling tool, Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services...

Joshua H. Goldstein; Giorgio Caldarone; Thomas Kaeo Duarte; Driss Ennaanay; Neil Hannahs; Guillermo Mendoza; Stephen Polasky; Stacie Wolny; Gretchen C. Daily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 路 Failing or nearby septic tank systems 路 Exfiltration from sanitary sewers in poor repair 路 Leaking underground storage tanks and pipes 路 Landfill seepage or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil

Pitt, Robert E.

358

1714(1) Winter 2006 Yellowstone Science NY ECOSYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Yellowstone Science 14(1) 路 Winter 200618 photosynthetic members supplying energy to others. However, while in any of these ecosystems. One of the most important of these exchanged materials is energy. When we walk around the GYE, the energy source for the richness of life we can see is appar- ent

359

ASSESSING MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS: ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING MACROINVERTEBRATE BIODIVERSITY IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS: ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN DNA.suzanne@epamail.epa.gov David P. Larsen Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Corvallis, Oregon 97333 USA e-mail: larsen, biodiversity, freshwater, next-generation sequencing abstract Assessing the biodiversity of macroinvertebrate

Pfrender, Michael

360

Valuing ecosystem services: A shadow price for net primary production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States c Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston 2007 We analyze the contribution of ecosystem services to GDP and use this contribution to calculate production per unit output. The rate of technical substitution indicates that the quantity of capital needed

Myneni, Ranga B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

362

Bioturbators enhance ecosystem function through complex biogeochemical interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... benthos could have global consequences, the significance of species loss to bentho-pelagic rates and processes remains poorly understood. Benthic sediments are replete with complex biogeochemical interactions, and ecosystem performance ... the net effects of their activities are difficult to predict because of the number of interrelated ...

Andrew M. Lohrer; Simon F. Thrush; Max M. Gibbs

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

364

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems CNRS Institut ?cologie et scales. This book provides an overview of current sensors for ecology and makes a strong case of practical ecological applications, this text is meant to be an invaluable resource for students, researchers

van Tiggelen, Bart

365

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and afterTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute Sciences/US Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; 4 USDA

Vermont, University of

367

Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET that produce considerable variation in the hydrologic cycle, affecting nutrient delivery, ecosystem primary

368

Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to Curb Trade in Illegal forestry lacey act united states The Forest Legality Alliance was launched today to support private sector efforts and policies to reduce trade in illegally harvested wood. The Alliance is a global public

369

Payments for Ecosystems Services Findings and Perceptions from the USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Payments for Ecosystems Services Findings and Perceptions from the USA Policy Summary Jenna Coull market mechanisms. The use of these schemes has become more widespread particularly in the USA and some and conservation protection in the USA, large mitigation banks have emerged which provide credits for an area

370

Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity Thorsten B. H. Reusch with such climatic extremes is a question central to contem- porary ecology and biodiversity conservation. Previous, and it may buffer against extreme climatic events. In a manipulative field experiment, increasing

Myers, Ransom A.

371

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS 颅 A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source methane from wetlands will respond to future climatic change. Dr. Paul Bodelier (Netherlands Institute

M眉hlemann, Oliver

372

Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

373

Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater beneath much of Hanford's 100 Areas is contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) as a consequence of treating reactor cooling water to prevent corrosion. Several treatment systems are in place to remove Cr{sup +6} from the groundwater; however, these systems currently do not reduce Cr{sup +6} to concentrations below aquatic standards. Of concern is the transport of Cr{sup +6} to areas within the channel of the river, as sensitive species inhabit the river and its associated transition zone. The aquatic standard for Cr{sup +6} is currently 11 ug/l under the Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Action and Department of Energy (DOE) currently plans to pursue remediation of the groundwater to achieve the 11 ug/l standard. Because the compliance wells used to monitor the current remediation systems are located some distance from the river, they may not provide an accurate indication of Cr{sup +6} concentrations in the water that reaches the riverbed. In addition, because salmon spawning areas are considered a high priority for protection from Hanford contaminants, it would be advantageous to understand (1) to what extent Cr{sup +6} discharged to the near-shore or river ecosystems is diluted or attenuated and (2) mechanisms that could mitigate the exposure of the river ecosystems to the discharging Cr{sup +6}. The current concentration target for Cr{sup +6} at near-river groundwater monitoring locations is 20 {micro}g/L; it is assumed that this groundwater mixes with river water that contains virtually no chromium to meet Washington Department of Ecology's (Ecology) water quality standard of 10 {micro}g/L in the river environment. This dynamic mixing process is believed to be driven by daily and seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater remediation system operations, and has been validated using analytical data from numerous groundwater samples obtained adjacent to and within the banks of the river. Although the mean mixing factor of river water and site groundwater in this zone has been estimated to be equal parts of groundwater and river water, a wide range of mixing ratios likely occurs at various times of the day and year. The degree of mixing and dilution appears to be greatly influenced by the river stage and other groundwater/surface water interaction. The extent of mixing, thus, has implications for the design and operation of the groundwater remediation systems. Improved understanding of this 'dilution' mechanism is needed to design an optimum 'systems approach' to accelerate remediation of the near-shore contaminant plumes. More information on the pathway from near-river mapped plumes to riverbed receptor locations is also needed to develop a defensible proposed plan for a future ROD for final remedial action of contaminated groundwater. In April 2008, an expert panel of scientists was convened to review existing information and provide observations and suggestions to improve the current understanding of groundwater surface water interactions in the 100 Areas (primarily focusing on 100-D Area), and to identify what additional analyses or approaches may provide critical information needed to design and implement remediation systems that will minimize impacts to river aquatic systems. Specific objectives provided to the panel included: (1) comment on approaches and methods to improve the current understanding of groundwater-surface water interactions, specifically how contaminated groundwater enters the riverbed and how this relates to remediation of chromate in the groundwater in the 100 Areas; (2) evaluate past and current data collection methods, data analysis techniques, assumptions, and groundwater transport and mixing mechanisms; (3) evaluate the current monitoring network (monitoring wells, aquifer tubes, and shoreline/river monitoring); (4) evaluate the role played by modeling; and (5) suggest additional research to fill data gaps and perform modeling.

PETERSEN SW

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

376

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 Oversight Scheduling an Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2013-03-25...

377

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 9, 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site Office - December 2009 Inspection of Nuclear Safety at the Savannah River Site Office and the Tritium Program...

378

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Flux Measurements Super Site at Savannah River National Laboratory The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Carbon Flux Super Site provides a unique resource for...

379

Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of...

380

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 May 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Walkthrough The U.S. Department...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Orientation Visit The U.S....

382

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 March 2013 Oversight Scheduling an Operational Awareness at the...

383

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern Lights Bonners Ferry East End Mutual Heyburn Burley United Electric Albion Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Declo...

384

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for Savannah River Operations Office 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office (SRS) 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Bonneville Power Administration...

385

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy In order to meet the...

386

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

387

Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies...

388

Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development...

389

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

390

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

391

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

392

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste...

393

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- June 4, 1996  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Potential Violations of the Quality Assurance and Occupational Radiation Protection Rules at the Savannah River Site

394

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

395

Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for Worker Safety and Health Violations October...

396

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Savannah River Swamp - SC...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Savannah River Swamp - SC 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Savannah River Swamp (SC.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

397

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011 July 2011 Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River...

398

Tapping the Power of Alaska's Rivers | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

a practical River In-Stream Energy Conversion (RISEC)-a device that can produce electricity from free-flowing rivers not suited to conventional hydroelectric generation, and...

399

EA-1671: Big River Substation to Poston Substation 69-Kilovolt...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

671: Big River Substation to Poston Substation 69-Kilovolt Transmission Line Project, Arizona and California EA-1671: Big River Substation to Poston Substation 69-Kilovolt...

400

City of Wood River, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Wood River, Nebraska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Wood River Place: Nebraska...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at the Raft River geothermal area by the USGS. References Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) (1 January 1981) Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal...

402

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

403

Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

Cai, Long

404

Accounting for Ecosystem Services in Life Cycle Assessment, Part II: Toward an Ecologically Based LCA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accounting for Ecosystem Services in Life Cycle Assessment, Part II: Toward an Ecologically Based LCA ... Accounting for the role of ecosystem services is essential for LCA to guide decisions toward sustainability; Eco-LCA is a step in this direction. ... This article presents a step toward including the direct and indirect role of ecosystems in LCA, and a hierarchical scheme to interpret their contribution. ...

Yi Zhang; Anil Baral; Bhavik R. Bakshi

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

Research, assessment and management on the Mascarene Plateau: a large marine ecosystem perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...different sciences, quan...reactive approach to ecosystem management needs to...assessment and management on the Mascarene...marine science, training...ecosystem approach to regional...of Marine Science. Salvat...ecosystem approach to global assessment and management of coastal...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25掳 C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

Standiford, Richard B.

407

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl 脕 Ecosystem functioning 脕 Fruits

Mousseau, Timothy A.

408

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl 脕 Ecosystem functioning 脕 Fruits

Mousseau, Timothy A.

409

Genetic variation changes the interactions between the parasitic plant-ecosystem engineer Rhinanthus and its hosts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variation|ecosystem engineer|Rhinanthus...genotype and genotype environment interactions in...well as micro-environment [9], and host...of an ecosystem engineer, the goldenrod...Plant genotype and environment interact to shape...of an ecosystem engineer. Ecology 88...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH their environmental impact, innovative practices must be developed that replace ecosystem services lost during systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

Rosemond, Amy Daum

411

Managing for Variability to Sustain Freshwater Ecosystems N. LeRoy Poff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

needs has come at a significant cost to the natural functioning of aquatic and riparian ecosystems provided to human society from maintaining healthy aquatic and riparian ecosystems, coupled with the high cost and difficulty of restoring degraded ecosystems Bernhardt et al. 2005 , have fueled the growing

Poff, N. LeRoy

412

ERDC/ELTR-13-9 Ecosystem Management and Restoration Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Native Plants for Vegetative Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems EnvironmentalLaboratory Gary O. Dick, R and Establishment of Native Plants for Vegetative Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems Gary O. Dick and R. MichaelERDC/ELTR-13-9 Ecosystem Management and Restoration Research Program Propagation and Establishment

US Army Corps of Engineers

413

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

Arnett, M.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geomorphic histories for river and catchment management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...area, changes in water temperature or pH, or disturbances to fish migration by the construction of weirs and dams. Therefore...river catchments of Asia by Clift [35]. Using high-quality seismic records for continental margins offshore from the large rivers...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

CedarCreekanticlineCedarCreekanticline Yellowstone River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins, United States and Canada #12;Cover. Conceptual block diagram of groundwater flow in the Williston structural basin. #12;Conceptual Model of the Uppermost Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

416

Wind River Conference on Prokaryotic Biology2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as propionate and acetate as carbon and energy sources. Sirtuin-deficient strains lack...of Wisconsin) (2). CONCLUSIONS The Wind River Conference on Prokaryotic Biology...directly to their own research. The 47th Wind River Conference will be 4 to 8 June 2003...

Kenneth W. Bayles; Neil E. Welker; Malcolm E. Winkler; Uldis N. Streips

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River 082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The high-activity fraction of the high-level waste (HLW) salt solution would then be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and stored until it could be disposed of as HLW in a geologic repository. The low activity fraction would be disposed of as low-level waste (saltstone)

418

Ecosystem metabolism in an effluent-derived, arid-land river estimated from diurnal dissolved-oxygen profiles Stevan Earl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the largest wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the region is located in the far West Valley along the Salt

Hall, Sharon J.

419

Macroinvertebrate response to land cover, habitat, and water chemistry in a mining-impacted river ecosystem: A GIS watershed analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study addressed potential land use impacts to macroinvertebrate communities and water quality from past coal mining activities in the watershed of the ... and southern New York). Landscape tools of GIS and r...

Dale A. Bruns

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nitrogen is a natural and necessary part of every healthy ecosystem, but too much nitrogen in our rivers,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), sewage treatment plants, and animal ma- nure. Once in water, nitrogen can change in chemical form

Torgersen, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The effects of agrochemicals on an aquatic ecosystem : A case study from the Krian River basin, Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contrary to belief, the concern over increased levels of nitrogenous fertilisers and pesticides concentrations used in the existing agricultural projects is unfounded. The agrochemicals contribute insignificant a...

Siaw-Yang Yap; Hean-Tatt Ong

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hydroecology and river restoration: Ripe for research and synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particularly the cumulative effects of many small projects; to restore ecosystem processes under highly constrained conditions such as below dams or in urban settings; to push some aquatic ecosystems beyond water needs and sustaining the services that aquatic ecosystems provide remain one of the greatest

Palmer, Margaret A.

424

Threats and human influence on coastal ecosystem of Southern India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Populations of the majority of fish species showed drastic reduction over the past five decades in west coast of India. We conducted an intensive study of Aghanashini estuary for water quality and fish diversity in west coast of India. Coastal ecosystems are impacted by many stressors and are continually subjected to threats from multiple stresses imposed mostly by human activities predominantly as a result of increased population growth in India. The most significant categories of threats derive from water pollution from numerous sources including thermal effluents, heavy metals, oil, sewage, pesticides, pulp mills, habitat loss and degradation, overexploitation, eutrophication and misguided human perceptions. Wide array of prohibited fishing methods are rampant by using of insecticides as poisons, destruction and modification of habitats, dynamiting, using chemical and herbal poisons. Due to deteriorated water, quality from anthropogenic activities fish diversity has drastically reduced. In complex coastal ecosystems, strategies for restoration can become equally complicated.

D. Sannadurgappa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

River Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ecosystem dynamics at six contrasting sites: a generic modelling study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pelagic marine ecosystem simulation model ERSEM-2004, developed from the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM II), is presented along with a parameter set applicable to six highly contrasting sites, ranging from a temperate mixed shelf station to a permanently stratified tropical deep-ocean station. The physical characteristics are simulated by direct coupling to a 1D vertically resolved turbulence model, parameterised for each site. A mathematical description of the pelagic ecosystem model is presented. Additions to ERSEM II's well resolved community and decoupling of gross production and ambient nutrient concentration include variable carbon to chlorophyll ratios, coupling of bacterial production to nutrient availability, improved resolution of the organic particulate and dissolved fractions and developments to the mesozooplankton description. Comparison of seasonally depth resolved and integrated properties illustrates that the model produces a wide range of community dynamics and structures that can be plausibly related to variations in mixing, temperature, irradiance and nutrient supply. The spatial杢emporal variability in key environmental indicators only partially correlates with the spatial杢emporal variability in community structure (?0.75) between spatial杢emporal variability in community structure (biomass) and function (production). ERSEM-2004 is shown to be a robust model that is capable of representing a range of systems commonly described in the marine system. Consequently, the model is proposed as a potential basis for an ecosystem-based management tool that may, with appropriate physical representation, be applied over large geographic and temporal scales with utility to both heuristic and predictive studies of the marine lower trophic levels.

J.C. Blackford; J.I. Allen; F.J. Gilbert

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assistive technologies and the visually impaired: a digital ecosystem perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assistive technology devices for the visually impaired form a small part of a much wider support infrastructure of people and systems that cluster about a particular disability. Various disabilities, in turn, form part of a greater ecosystem of sometimes ... Keywords: ambient sound cues, assistive technology, disabled, infrared, laser, long cane, obstacle warning displays, portable electronic device, sensory channels, sound interface displays, ultrasonic pulse-echo, visually impaired

David J. Calder

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Sorption of Phthalate Esters and PCBs in a Marine Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of Phthalate Esters and PCBs in a Marine Ecosystem C H E R Y L E . M A C K I N T O S H to particulate matter in aquatic environments. Sorption plays a key role in controlling the long-term fate of the sorption of many commercial DPEs do not exist. To characterize the sorptive nature of DPEs in a real

Gobas, Frank

429

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape The Cleantech Group www.cleantech.com Principal Authors Greg Neichin David Cheng Contributing Authors Sheeraz Haji Josh Gould Debjit Mukerji David Hague 2 Table of Contents Page I. Introduction .............................................................................. 3 In-Depth Market Analysis II. Advanced Metering .......................................................... 19 III. Demand Response ............................................................ 39

430

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

431

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site- December 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inspection of Reinforced Concrete Construction at the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

432

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- September 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities

433

Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association Eastern Oregon Irrigators Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to river flows, reservoir elevations and hydroelectric power production. Its results are currently being

434

Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that connects the pump, distribution tank and holding ponds. As of April 15, 2013, three of the ponds were completed and have been lined with a synthetic liner to prevent seepage and leakage as this was a major problem in early projects. Pecos River WPP...Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update Funding Provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a Clean Water Act 319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S Environmental Protection Agency TR-447 October 2013 Pecos River...

Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temporary storage of flood waters by wetlands, long-term storage of climate-altering greenhouse gases long-term stream of benefits to individual people and to society as a whole; the value of natural in forests, dilution and assimilation of wastes by rivers, and numerous others. All of these services provide

436

139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecosystem management? What is Ecosystem Management? Ecosystem management emphasizes an ecological approach to resource stewardship. It is a holistic approach to natural resource management that attempts to manage139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1

Standiford, Richard B.

437

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site September 4, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. August 5, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office July 25, 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013

438

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

439

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

440

EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Hood River Fisheries Program 1: Hood River Fisheries Program EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program SUMMARY This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and wildlife associated with the construction and operation of Federal hydro-power facilities in the Columbia River Basin. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 4, 2008 EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project May 16, 2005 EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project, Hood River County, Oregon Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

442

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Elk River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Elk River Wind Farm Facility Elk River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Empire District Electric Co. Location Butler County KS Coordinates 37.586575掳, -96.547093掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.586575,"lon":-96.547093,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Three Rivers Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rivers Electric Coop Rivers Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Three Rivers Electric Coop Place Missouri Utility Id 16751 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W w/Metal Pole Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0926/kWh Commercial: $0.0791/kWh Industrial: $0.0688/kWh References 鈫 "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Three_Rivers_Electric_Coop&oldid=411667"

445

North Sky River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.335578掳, -118.186347掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.335578,"lon":-118.186347,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

447

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 27, 2012 June 27, 2012 CX-008614: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Culvert on Road 3 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 27, 2012 CX-008613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Awning, Building 735-A CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 26, 2012 CX-008618: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Sorbent/Ion Exchangers for Radiochemical and Metal Separations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/26/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 26, 2012 CX-008617: Categorical Exclusion Determination Savannah River National Laboratory Building 735-13A Power Addition CX(s) Applied: B1.15

448

Linda Lee | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lee Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Linda Lee Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5883 office (803) 725-3309 fax lee(at)srel.uga.edu I have a...

449

Peter Stangel | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stangel Senior Vice President, U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities co Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (404)-915-2763 (803) 725-8158...

450

Farmington River Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Farmington River Power Company Place: Connecticut References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data...

451

Raft River geoscience case study: appendixes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included in these appendices: lithology, x-ray analysis, and cores; well construction data; borehole geophysical logs; chemical analyses from wells at the Raft River geothermal site; and bibliography. (MHR)

Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

James Beasley | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beasley Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home James Beasley Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5113 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

453

Robert A. Kennamer | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kennamer Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Robert A. Kennamer Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-0387 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

454

Gary Mills | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mills Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Gary Mills Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5368 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

455

Judith L. Greene | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Greene Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology Judith L. Greene Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-7637 office (803)...

456

Thomas G. Hinton | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hinton Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Thomas G. Hinton Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-7454 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

457

David E. Scott | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scott Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5747 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

458

Larry Bryan | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bryan Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Larry Bryan Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-2907 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

459

John Seaman | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seaman Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home John Seaman Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-0977 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

460

Domy C. Adriano | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adriano Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Domy C. Adriano Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5834 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Shem D. Unger | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Unger Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Shem D. Unger Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5324 office (765) 414-5435 cell...

462

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Savannah River Site Achieves Waste Transfer First  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. The EM program and its liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) made history recently by safely transferring radioactive liquid waste from F Tank Farm to H Tank Farm using a central control room.

464

Contractor Fee Payments- Office of River Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Office of River Protection on these charts.

465

Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site's H Canyon Work Ensures Future Missions for Facility Restoration of a 90-acre powerhouse ash basin at the Savannah River Site, pictured here, is under way as workers remove...

466

Contractor Fee Payments- Savannah River Site Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Savannah River Site Office on these charts.

467

Savannah River Site 1991 Road Erosion Inventory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 28 pp. Abstract - This paper explains the rationale and results of a 1991 road erosion inventory conducted by members of the USDA Forest Service Savannah River (FS-SR) and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The inventory provided information for the Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) to justify the need for developing an erosion and sediment control program with appropriate funding, personnel, and equipment. Federally managed since the early 1950抯, the SRS is located on 198,344 acres (80,301 hectares) in the South Carolina counties of Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale. Located along the eastern border of the Savannah River, the SRS is located within the Upper and Lower Coastal Plains of South Carolina.

Jones, Cliff.

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help its residential members increase the energy efficiency of their homes. Loans up to $10,000 are available for...

469

Think water : reconditioning the Malden River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Upcoming Seminars | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Upcoming Seminars Seminars will be held at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Bldg. 737-A, in the Cypress Room, at 3:30 PM. Snacks will be provided at 3:15. DATE SPEAKER TITLE...

471

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665掳, -118.25529掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

472

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 24, 2011 February 24, 2011 CX-005504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Methods for Radiochemical Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office February 24, 2011 CX-005503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Drain Line Replacement West of 735-A CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office February 24, 2011 CX-005502: Categorical Exclusion Determination Implement Savannah River National Laboratory Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 2004-2 Gap Closure Activity CX(s) Applied: B2.3 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

473

Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership. The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

located just downstream of Longview, Wash. Vegetation is typical for disturbed tidal wetlands along the Columbia River; on-site vegetation is a mix of native and non-native...

474

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

CERTA PJ

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network Topics: G  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

river formation green river kerogen green river lowland green river oil green river shale green river utah green roof benefits green roof ecosystem green roof grant green roof...

477

Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

L. C. Hulstrom

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

478

Raft River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Raft River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 DOE Involvement 4 Timeline 5 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 6 Future Plans 7 Raft River Unit II (26 MW) and Raft River Unit III (32 MW) 8 Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstration 9 Exploration History 10 Well Field Description 11 Technical Problems and Solutions 12 Geology of the Area 12.1 Regional Setting 12.2 Structure 12.3 Stratigraphy 12.3.1 Raft River Formation 12.3.2 Salt Lake Formation 12.3.3 Precambrian Rocks 13 Hydrothermal System 14 Heat Source 15 Geofluid Geochemistry 16 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 17 Exploration Activities (77) 18 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.10166667,"lon":-113.38,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

479

EA-1901: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Draft Environmental Assessment 1: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1901: Draft Environmental Assessment Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho's construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort. EA-1901-DEA-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1901: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1901: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan

480

Using knowledge in a complex decision-making process Evidence and principles from the Danish Houting project's ecosystem-based management approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In ecosystem-based management (EBM), the use of knowledge is considered an important means to reach sound decisions. However, EBM approaches typically entail complex decision-making processes, involving multiple actors and policy levels. Hence, it is questionable whether and how knowledge can be used as a means to reach sound decisions. This paper explores and evaluates the knowledge governance employed by decision-makers to successfully implement EBM in a complex setting. Conclusions are drawn from a case study based on 30 qualitative interviews, document analysis, and observational participation in Denmark's second largest river restoration project, the Houting project. Our findings suggest that disjointed knowledge governance, knowledge bases acknowledging different values and interests, and the use of experiments were crucial to the success, but at the same time partly restricted the quality, of decision-making in the project. Several suggestions are made on how to compensate for the shortcomings identified.

Diana Giebels; Arwin van Buuren; Jurian Edelenbos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kootenai river ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment columbia river Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: assessment columbia river Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 352000 Columbia river Basin Fish and Wildlife Program "...the Council is adopting Summary: 352000 Columbia river Basin...

482

Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

Rebecca Garrett

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

483

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

Not Available

1994-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Factors impacting contaminant body burdens and contaminant effects at different trophic levels in an estuarine ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Organic contaminants continue to enter coastal ecosystems, creating stress for animals that inhabit these areas. A variety of factors such as land use, climate, and (more)

Hopper, Tiffany L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems implications Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ap- proaches, nor address the complex dynamics of changing ecosystem... of the human-health implications of changing forest ... Source: Vermont, University of - Gund Institute...

486

Towards Enhancing Community Health in El-Fayoum, Egypt, Using Ecosystem Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ecosystem degradation caused by factors such as improper natural resources management and contamination with agricultural, industrial, and domestic wastes often results in the creation of an unhealthy ecosyste...

Fawzy M. Kishk; Hesham M. Gaber; Salwa M. Abd-Allah

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

488

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

smart grid landscape The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters,...

489

Litter-Carbon Dynamics: The Importance of Decomposition, Accretion, and Sequestration in Understanding Ecosystem Carbon Cycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing since the industrial revolution. A proposed mitigation strategy is sequestering carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, either in plant (more)

Kochsiek, Amy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic marine ecosystem Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: the Arctic (Figure 3). The loss of sea ice affects marine access, regional weather, ecosystem changes... to provide reliable predictions of the changes coming to...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to allow time... .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Agro-ecosystem; Bio-indicators; Farming systems; Micro... -arthropods; Nematodes; Tillage; Protozoa; Soil ecology;...

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ecosystems dominated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 Microbial ecosystem responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic Summary: COMMENTARY Microbial...

493

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Ecosystem Prediction- Aquatic... In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every ... Source: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA...

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic marine ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMINAR Diatom Based Quantitative Reconstructions of Summary: . The bay ecosystem is affected by changes in water quality and quantity in the adjacent marine... by estuaries...

495

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect ecosystem metabolism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America Summary: . Stoichiometry of the net ecosystem metabolism in a coastal inlet affected by upwelling. The Ria de Arousa (NW... act as resource subsidies to many...

496

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied ecosystem analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

life cycle assessment analysis (LCA), the article... of the problems with LCA. Linking industrial models with spatially explicit, dynamic and site-specific ecosystem......

497

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural landscapes ecosystem Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

level, natural vegetation dominated areas, agricultural... Land use functional types Patch Landscape Ecosystem Processes CAP... Wu, John David, Darrel Jenerette, Matt Luck, and...

498

MOIRA: A decision support system for decision making on aquatic ecosystems contaminated by radioactive fallout  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interventions to restore radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems may reduce individual and collective radiation doses, but may also result in detrimental ecological, social and economic effects. Decision ...

D. R韔s Insua; E. Gallego; A. Mateos; S. R韔s-Insua

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Carbon dioxide emissions and net primary production of Russian terrestrial ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Determination of the C balance is of considerable importance when forecasting climate and environmental changes. Soil respiration and biological productivity of ecosystems (net primary production; NPP) are th...

V. N. Kudeyarov; I. N. Kurganova

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project : Biennial Report 1996-97.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Red River has been straightened and the riparian vegetation corridor eliminated in several reaches within the watershed. The river responded by incision resulting in over-steepened banks, increased sedimentation, elevated water temperatures, depressed groundwater levels, reduced floodplain function, and degraded fish habitat. The Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project is a multi-phase ecosystem enhancement effort that restores natural physical and biological processes and functions to stabilize the stream channel and establish high quality habitats for fish and wildlife. A natural channel restoration philosophy guides the design and on the ground activities, allowing the channel to evolve into a state of dynamic equilibrium. Two years of planning, two years of restoration in Phases I and II, and one year post-restoration monitoring are complete. By excavating new bends and reconnecting historic meanders, Phase I and II channel realignment increased channel length by 3,060 feet, decreased channel gradient by 25 percent, and increased sinuosity from 1.7 to 2.3. Cross-sectional shapes and point bars were modified to maintain deep pool habitat at low flow and to reconnect the meadow floodplain. Improved soil moisture conditions will help sustain the 31,500 native riparian plantings reestablished within these two phases. Overall, short-term restoration performance was successful. Analyses of long-term parameters document either post-restoration baseline conditions or early stages of evolution toward desired conditions. An adaptive management strategy has helped to improve restoration designs, methods, and monitoring. Lessons learned are being transferred to a variety of audiences to advance the knowledge of ecological restoration and wise management of watersheds.

LRK Communications; Wildlife Habitat Institute; Pocket Water, Inc.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z