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Sample records for kootenai river ecosystem

  1. Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, Norm

    2009-02-18

    The overarching goals of the 'Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation' Project (BPA Project No.2002-011-00) are to: (1) assess abiotic and biotic factors (i.e., geomorphologic, hydrological, aquatic and riparian/floodplain communities) in determining a definitive composition of ecological integrity, (2) develop strategies to assess and mitigate losses of ecosystem functions, and (3) produce a regional operational loss assessment framework. To produce a scientifically defensible, repeatable, and complete assessment tool, KTOI assembled a team of top scientists in the fields of hydrology, hydraulics, ornithology, entomology, statistics, and river ecology, among other expertise. This advisory team is known as the Research Design and Review Team (RDRT). The RDRT scientists drive the review, selection, and adaptive management of the research designs to evaluate the ecologic functions lost due to the operation of federal hydropower facilities. The unique nature of this project (scientific team, newest/best science, adaptive management, assessment of ecological functions, etc.) has been to work in a dynamic RDRT process. In addition to being multidisciplinary, this model KTOI project provides a stark contrast to the sometimes inflexible process (review, re-review, budgets, etc.) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project RDRT is assembled annually, with subgroups meeting as needed throughout the year to address project issues, analyses, review, and interpretation. Activities of RDRT coordinated and directed the selection of research and assessment methodologies appropriate for the Kootenai River Watershed and potential for regional application in the Columbia River Basin. The entire RDRT continues to meet annually to update and discuss project progress. RDRT Subcontractors work in smaller groups throughout the year to meet project objectives. Determining the extent to which ecological systems are experiencing anthropogenic disturbance and change in structure and function is critical for long term conservation of biotic diversity in the face of changing landscapes and land use. KTOI and the RDRT propose a concept based on incorporating hydrologic, aquatic, and terrestrial components into an operations-based assessment framework to assess ecological losses as shown in Figure E-1.

  2. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  3. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  4. Kootenai River Habitat Restoration Program BPA Project 2002-002-00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River floodplain ecosystem operational loss assessment 200201100 (KTOI) Provides data and information January 18, 2012 #12;#12;KRHRP · Ecosystem-based restoration program in 55- mile reach of Kootenai River redband trout, mountain whitefish and other native fish. #12;Changes to Ecosystem Beaver trapping Logging

  5. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki; Rogers, Rox

    2003-10-01

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  6. Characterization of the Kootenai River Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community before and after Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2003-2006. [Chapter 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Bonners

    2009-02-19

    The Kootenai River ecosystem has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam, completed in 1972 on the river near Libby Montana. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel, eliminating nutrient production and habitat diversity crucial to the functioning of a large river-floodplain ecosystem. Libby Dam continues to create large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows, and greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches. These changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to this artificial loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the Kootenay Lake's North Arm in 1992, the South Arm in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes the macroinvertebrate community in the Kootenai River and its response to experimental nutrient addition during 2005 and 2006. This report also provides an initial evaluation of cascading trophic interactions in response to nutrient addition. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 12 sites along a 325 km section of the Kootenai River, representing an upriver unimpounded reference reach, treatment and control canyon reach sites, and braided and meandering reach sites, all downstream from Libby Dam. Principle component analysis revealed that richness explained the greatest amount of variability in response to nutrient addition as did taxa from Acari, Coleoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. Analysis of variance revealed that nutrient addition had a significant effect (p<0.0001) on invertebrate abundance, biomass, and richness at sites KR-9 and KR-9.1 combined (the zone of maximum biological response). Richness, a valuable ecological metric, increased more than abundance and biomass, which were subject to greater sampling bias. Cascading trophic interactions were observed as increased algal accrual, increased in-river invertebrate abundance, and increased invertebrate counts in mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsonii) guts samples, but were not quantitatively tested. Sampling and analyses across trophic levels are currently ongoing and are expected to better characterize ecological responses to experimental nutrient addition in the Kootenai River.

  7. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach, and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of biological and ecological metrics were used with PCA for diatoms and algae. Algal metrics included

  8. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations: Salmonid Studies Project Progress Report, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Walters, Jody; Maiolie, Melo [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-04-09

    This research report addresses bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and Redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss redd surveys, population monitoring, trout distribution, and abundance surveys in the Kootenai River drainage of Idaho. The bull trout is one of several sport fish native to the Kootenai River, Idaho that no longer supports a fishery. Because bull trout are listed under the Endangered Species Act, population data will be vital to monitoring status relative to recovery goals. Thirty-three bull trout redds were found in North and South Callahan creeks and Boulder Creek in 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 and 2005 and less than the high count in 2003. However, because redd numbers have only been monitored since 2002, the data series is too short to determine bull trout population trends based on redd counts. Redband trout still provide an important Kootenai River sport fishery, but densities are low, at least partly due to limited recruitment. The redband trout proportional stock density (PSD) in 2007 increased from 2006 for a second year after a two-year decline in 2004 and 2005. This may indicate increased recruitment to or survival in the 201-305 mm length group due to the minimum 406 mm (16 inches) length limit initiated in 2002. We conducted 13 redd surveys and counted 44 redband trout redds from May 7 to June 3, 2007 in a 3.8 km survey reach on Twentymile Creek. We surveyed streams in the Kootenai River valley to look for barriers to trout migration. Man-made barriers, for at least part of the year, were found on Caboose, Debt, Fisher, and Twenty Mile creeks. Removing these barriers would increase spawning and rearing habitat for trout and help to restore trout fisheries in the Kootenai River.

  9. Kootenai River EcosystemKootenai River Ecosystem Operational LossOperational Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Inc. · Mike Burke - Inter-fluve · Dr. Gregory Egger - Umweltbüro Klagenfurt #12;1st Order 2nd Order 3 Impacts #12;1 wet year pair - depth 2 wet year pair - stage fluctuation 3 wet year pair - velocity 4 wet year pair - bed shear stress 5 wet year pair - stream power 6 avg year pair - depth 7 avg year pair

  10. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  11. Kootenai River Nutrient Dosing System and N-P Consumption: Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-19

    In early 2006 we designed and built low energy consumption, pump-operated system, for dosing of the liquid nutrient in the summer 2006 season. This operated successfully, and the system was used again during the 2007 and 2008 seasons for dosing. During the early winter period, 2008, laboratory tests were made of the liquid nutrient pump system, and it was noted that small amounts of air were being entrained on the suction side of the pump, during conditions when the inlet pressure was low. It was believed that this was the cause of diurnal fluctuations in the flow supplied, characteristic of the 2007 year flow data. Replacement of '0' rings on the inlet side of the pumps was the solution to this problem, and when tested in the field during the summer season, the flow supplied was found to be stable. A decision was made by the IKERT committee at the meeting of 20th to 21st May 2008 (held in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho) to use an injection flow rate of liquid fertilizer (polyammonium phosphate 10-34-0) to achieve a target phosphorus concentration of 3.0 {micro}g/L, after complete mixing in the river. This target concentration was the same as that used in 2006 and 2007. The proposed starting date was as early as possible in June 2008. Plans were made to measure the dosing flow in three ways. Two of the three methods of flow measurement (1 and 2 below) are inter-dependent. These were: (1) Direct measurement of flow rate by diverting dosing flow into a 1000 mL volume standard flask. The flow rate was computed by dividing the flask volume by the time required to fill the flask. This was done a few times only during the summer period. (2) Adjusting the flow rate reading of the Gamma dosing pump using the 'calibration' function to achieve agreement with the flow rate computed by method 1 above. (3) Direct measurement by electrical signal from conductive fluid passing through a magnetic field (Seametrics meter, as used in previous years). Values were recorded every 4 minutes by a data-logger. This instrument has been shown to be reliable, and in agreement with method 1 to within the expected uncertainty (within 2%). Liquid nutrients were delivered to the site in late May, and system testing was done the same day. High concentrations of suspended sediment in the water column, as indicated by shallow Secchi depth readings, were present in the river in the last part of May, into June. A plan was made to delay the start up of nutrient addition to a date later than 1st June, because the aquatic productivity was almost certainly to be compromised by insufficient light availability. Daily monitoring of Secchi depths was done, showing declining turbidity in early June. A decision was made to start the system on 15th June, by which time conditions were good.

  12. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01

    to the evaluation of ecosystem services, re - habilitation, and fair asset trading (mitigation and offsets) because (a) appropriate river classification systems were unavailable or inadequately exploited, (b) techniques for evaluating services were underdeveloped... basements or loss of land or house. Asset trading (mitigation and offsets) Environmental mitigation involves minimization of dam- age to sensitive areas and improvement in the quality of other sites through environmental offsets—an approach not yet...

  13. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume III (Overview and Tools).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  14. Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project 5 October 2012 ABSTRACT: The study area encompasses the Neuse River Basin, the third-largest river basin in North Carolina. The Basin, upstream of the city of New Bern, North Carolina. At New Bern the river broadens dramatically and changes

  15. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  16. A River Runs/Ran Through It: The interplay between fluvial geomorphology, stream ecosystems and people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    A River Runs/Ran Through It: The interplay between fluvial geomorphology, stream ecosystems and people Course Mission: · We spend most of our time studying and teaching about rivers in their most physical or biological processes, it does not address the current state of most rivers within our nation

  17. RESERVATION OF RIGHTS A number of governments and agencies participated in the development of this Kootenai Subbasin Plan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this Kootenai Subbasin Plan, Part I (Assessment Volume), Part II (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management that respond to impacts from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan or the participation in its development is intended to, and shall

  18. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  19. Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental health and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iii Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM Executive Summary The purpose in the Fraser Basin's aquatic ecosystem. The program was led by Environment Canada and conducted by scientists, was also used. The synthesis of information provided by these indicators records the status of the basin

  20. Paper in Proc. 9th AVIRIS Earth Science and Applications Workshop, February 23-25, 2000, Pasadena, CA. STUDYING THE POTENTIAL FOR MONITORING COLORADO RIVER ECOSYSTEM RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merényi, Erzsébet

    of the ecosystem between Lakes Powell and Mead, while providing stakeholders with information for decision making, CA. STUDYING THE POTENTIAL FOR MONITORING COLORADO RIVER ECOSYSTEM RESOURCES BELOW GLEN CANYON DAM resources of the Colorado River ecosystem have been the subject of intense study and discussions among

  1. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  2. The effects of PAT on the Savannah River ecosystem, particularly fisheries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the pre-startup activities at K-Reactor, i.e., Power Ascension Testing (PAT), have caused damage because of temperature rises in the Savannah River. Therefore, the biological studies were mainly aimed at providing information as to changes that might cause the damage of the fish population, and to other important organisms in the ecosystem. To determine if deleterious effects had occurred, one had to review the past studies to determine the condition and diversity of aquatic life before these PAT studies started. Therefore old reports were reviewed and a current study made in 1992.

  3. Document Citation: KTOI (Kootenai Tribe of Idaho) 2010. Kootenai River Native Fish Aquaculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents Contents .............................................................................................. 27 3.1.4 Water Quality ................................

  4. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15

    The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  5. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  6. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  7. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will assess the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing tribally owned buildings.

  8. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will assess the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing tribally owned buildings.

  9. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  10. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8:Final EnvironmentalFinal Environmental3:

  11. Thinking outside the channel: Modeling nitrogen cycling in networked river ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Ashley; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Meyer, Judy; Wollheim, Wilfred; Peterson, Bruce; Mulholland, Patrick J; Bernhardt, Emily; Stanford, Jack; Arango, Clay; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dodds, Walter; Gregory, Stanley; Hall, Robert; Hamilton, Stephen; Johnson, Sherri; McDowell, William; Potter, Jody; Tank, Jennifer; Thomas, Suzanne; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Zeglin, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban development alters nitrogen and other biogeochemical cycles in rivers worldwide. Because such biogeochemical processes cannot be measured empirically across whole river networks, simulation models are critical tools for understanding river-network biogeochemistry. However, limitations inherent in current models restrict our ability to simulate biogeochemical dynamics among diverse river networks. We illustrate these limitations using a river-network model to scale up in situ measures of nitrogen cycling in eight catchments spanning various geophysical and land-use conditions. Our model results provide evidence that catchment characteristics typically excluded from models may control river-network biogeochemistry. Based on our findings, we identify important components of a revised strategy for simulating biogeochemical dynamics in river networks, including approaches to modeling terrestrial-aquatic linkages, hydrologic exchanges between the channel, floodplain/riparian complex, and subsurface waters, and interactions between coupled biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    initial results from the Sacramento River Project. Rest Ecolrestoration [Internet]. Sacramento (CA): CALFED Bay Deltasoil survey of the Sacramento Valley, California. U.S.

  13. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    We ranked trend information for each ecosystem component—asecosystem dynamics. The synthesis of indicator informationecosystem, and showing where restoration has been successful and where it has not, our indicator assessment provides vital information

  14. EA-2003: Sandy River Delta Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assessed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed removal of a dam from the east channel of the Sandy River. The proposal would help fulfill a portion of the 2010-2013 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan to improve estuary habitat for salmon and steelhead species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  15. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  16. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    opment, or information on aspects of the ecosystem notfrom other ecosystems. Further information on these criteriainformation from the con- ceptual models into evaluations of worth, risk, reversibility, and opportunity for learning of proposed ecosystem

  17. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  18. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration, April 29-30, 2008, Astoria, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Sutherland, G. Bruce [Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (retired)

    2008-09-29

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C. A compact disk, attached to the back cover, contains material in hypertext-markup-language from the conference website (http://cerc.labworks.org/) and the individual presentations.

  19. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2012 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will determine technical and economic feasibility of a woody-biomass-fueled co-generation plant that would utilize fuels generated by tribal forest management activities to provide electricity and heat to tribal buildings at the tribal headquarters in Pablo, Montana, and/or generate electricity for the wholesale market.

  20. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This project is aimed at supporting one key component of a major multi-step undertaking on the part of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT): the acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric project and its subsequent operation as a wholesale power generation facility.

  1. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will determine technical and economic feasibility of a woody-biomass-fueled co-generation plant that would utilize fuels generated by tribal forest management activities to provide electricity and heat to tribal buildings at the tribal headquarters in Pablo, Montana, and/or generate electricity for the wholesale market.

  2. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This project is aimed at supporting one key component of a major multi-step undertaking on the part of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT): the acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric project and its subsequent operation as a wholesale power generation facility.

  3. Negotiating river ecosystems: Impact assessment and conflict mediation in the cases of hydro-power construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karjalainen, Timo P., E-mail: timopauli.karjalainen@oulu.f [Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 7300, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Jaervikoski, Timo, E-mail: timo.jarvikoski@oulu.f [Unit of Sociology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 2000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2010-09-15

    In this paper we discuss how the legitimacy of the impact assessment process is a key issue in conflict mediation in environmental impact assessment. We contrast two EIA cases in hydro-power generation plans made for the Ii River, Finland in different decades, and evaluate how impact assessment in these cases has contributed to the creation, mediation and resolution of conflicts. We focus on the elements of distributional and procedural justice that made the former EIA process more legitimate and consensual and the latter more conflictual. The results indicate that it is crucial for conflict mediation to include all the values and interests of the parties in the goal-setting process and in the definition and assessment of alternatives. The analysis also indicates that procedural justice is the most important to help the people and groups involved to accept the legitimacy of the impact assessment process: how different parties and their values and interests are recognized, and how participation and distribution of power are organized in an impact assessment process. It is confirmed in this article that SIA may act as a mediator or a forum providing a process through which competing knowledge claims, various values and interests can be discussed and linked to the proposed alternatives and interventions.

  4. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    the California Delta. Sacramento (CA): State of Californiap. Kratville D. 2009. Sacramento splitail conceptual model.Sacramento (CA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration

  5. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  6. INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

    2012-03-30

    Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

  7. Flessa, K.W., 2004. Ecosystem services and the value of water in the Colorado River delta and Estuary, USA and Mexico: Guidelines for mitigation and restoration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    in the northern Gulf of California (Figure 1). Since the completion of upstream dams, irrigation projects or indirectly, from ecosystem functions. Table 1 lists some of the services and goods provided to human society

  8. VOLUNTEER-BASED SALMON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute Environment Canada VOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHICVOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHIC INDICATORS TO ASSESS INDICATORS TO ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM HEALTH #12;Volunteer-Based Monitoring Program for the Salmon River

  9. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

  10. FONSI signed 5/14/2015

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to benefit Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed Kootenai White Sturgeon and other native fish, would complement other restoration on the Kootenai River, and would help mitigate for...

  11. Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Smith, Brennan T

    2008-02-01

    Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

  12. Woody Debris as a Resource for Aquatic Macroinvertebrates in Stream and River Habitats of the Southeastern United States: A Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, Daniel; Batzer, Darold

    2010-02-07

    Woody debris is a valuable resource to most stream and river ecosystems, especially for the resident aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna.

  13. Closing the Loop on Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions, River Hydrodynamics, and Metabolism on the San Joaquin River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of the rate of change of NEP ? Pressure, temperature, andstation. Calculation of NEP from the SJR-Merced RiverNet Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) using dissolved oxygen (DO)

  14. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Lopez

    1998-07-03

    Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ¾ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30? X 60? geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau?s Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

  15. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  16. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    2004-01-01

    to 1.0 cm of water per day and from 1.2 m to 3.1 m (3.9 to 10.2 ft.) of water per year (Davenport et. al., 1982), and 2.1 cubic meters/square meter (Carmen and Brotherson 1982). Monotypic stands of saltcedar have a negative impact on wildlife...

  17. Large River Food Webs: Influence of Nutrients, Turbidity, and Flow, and Implications for Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Katherine

    2012-10-19

    Humans impact rivers in many ways that modify ecological processes yielding ecosystem services. In order to mitigate anthropogenic impacts, scientists are challenged to understand interactions among physicochemical factors ...

  18. Urban hydrological modeling of the Malden River using the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Sara (Sara Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    The portion of the Malden River in Malden, Massachusetts, has a long history of industrial activity and urbanization, which has degraded the water quality and ecosystem of the River. Following years of water quality testing, ...

  19. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food ...

  20. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  1. Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ideas that address today's most urgent energy challenges. For More Information For more information about the Innovation Ecosystem Initiative, please visit eere.energy.gov...

  2. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics. 11(So. Cal's flat-tailed horned lizard) 12 Grasslands #12;4 13 Grasslands · Communities Freshwater Ecosystems · Include standing waters of ponds and lakes, and flowing waters of rivers and streams · Vertical stratification is an important aspect of oceans and many ponds/lakes (especially if large and

  3. Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Heather

    ; however, the contribution of alternative fuel sources to overall energy is still small. In the United are under development in the Northeast, includ- ing Roosevelt Island in New York City's East RiverP A P E R Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem Services Perspective A U

  4. SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT ACCUMULATION WITHIN LOWLAND BOTTOMLAND ECOSYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT ACCUMULATION WITHIN LOWLAND BOTTOMLAND ECOSYSTEMS: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE ATCHAFALAYA RIVER BASIN, LOUISIANA C.R. Hupp1 and G.B. Noe1 ABSTRACT Sediment and nutrient deposition, storage and interpretation of sedimentation/nutrient processes remain incomplete. Our studies located in the Coastal Plain

  5. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  6. Significant development pressure currently affects the flows of the Verde River. In order to protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    - informed water management. To understand conse- quences to the ecosystem of various water use scenari- os surface water flows required to support the Verde River ecosystem. The Ecosystem Flows ap- proach used the information needed to define rela- tionships between water supply conditions and the biological system

  7. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

  8. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  9. Ecosystem services in tropical agriculture: evaluating biodiversity and ecosystem function Understanding the relationship between biodiversity, ecosystem function, and service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    1 Ecosystem services in tropical agriculture: evaluating biodiversity and ecosystem function Overview: Understanding the relationship between biodiversity, ecosystem function, and service provision a pressing concern: ecological degradation is leading to permanent reduction or loss of critical ecosystem

  10. LIFE CYCLE AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF CADDISFLIES (INSECTA: TRICHOPTERA) IN THE NAVASOTA RIVER, TEXAS. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruski, Sarah

    2014-05-16

    of freshwater resources. Aquatic invertebrate communities and their ecological functions to the Navasota River and similar ecosystems are poorly studied. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the life cycle and community structure...

  11. Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

    2007-04-25

    Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional ...

  12. Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    ecosystems. Drainage from mines and mine tailings often leach acid waters, heavy metals, and dissolved drainage of Michel Creek, a tributary of the Elk River. Michel Creek receives various forms of runoff from the Coal Mountain Mine in the Elk River Basin. Compared to Flathead drainage streams, Michel Creek biomass

  13. Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM Acknowledgements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -France Gravel, Andrew Green, Kirk Johnstone, Kay Kim, Jean MacRae, Eric McGreer, Dan Millar, Mike Nassichuk, Bev, Kirk Johnstone, it would not have been completed amidst other high-priority concerns. Kirk not only

  14. The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Inception, Objectives,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , especially with controversies over the effects of even-aged timber harvest on old-growth forests, with minimal "zonation" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational use by the public. Inception of the Project

  15. RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT by LARRY DENNIS STURM WOLFE Bachelor of Science OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in the School of Resource and Environmental Management of Philosophy Title of Dissertation: Resolving Equivocality in Ecosystem Management Examining Committee: Chair

  16. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 8 Artificial Production304304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 8 Artificial Production304304 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 8. ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION AND THE EFFECTS OF FISH CULTURE ON NATIVE SALMONIDS largely on hatchery production, with no overt and large scale ecosystem-level recovery program is doomed

  17. Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

    1995-01-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

  18. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    ?What is the marine ecosystem? · Food webFood web · Focus onFocus on phytoplanktonphytoplankton Bacteria, archaea #12 species or functional types ofe.g. why do particular species or functional types of phytoplankton occupy

  19. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  20. UNEP Policy Series ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 UNEP Policy Series ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT Sustaining Forests: Sustaining forests: Investing in our ...........................................................................6 II. Threats to the world's forests: a complex policy problem ............................7 A. Market failures, financial mechanisms and costs of business ..................8 III. Innovative policy

  1. Data Compendium for the Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Huesties, L.R.; Maughan, A.D.; Miley, T.B.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-04-01

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). The CRCIA is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the CRCIA is to evaluate the current human and ecological risk from the Columbia River attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. Human risk will be addressed for radioactive and hazardous materials over a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The initial effort for the CRCIA is the development of a compendium of existing data on Columbia River contamination. This document provides the data compendium. It also includes a discussion of data sources, descriptions of the physical format of the data, and descriptions of the search process used to identify data.

  2. Microsoft Word - BNRS_FERRY_3D_DEA_DRAFT_EA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    protecting spawning. Kootenai River Habitat Restoration at Bonners Ferry Project Draft Environmental Assessment 10 * Suggestion to create community support through a public...

  3. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  4. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  5. 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals or desired future conditions for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals for this Management Plan is 10-15 years. The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model was used in the Hood River sediment load. The model also found fish passage, juvenile entrainment and flow effects at Powerdale Dam

  6. PERSPECTIVE www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Effects of solar UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    species and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, marshes, oceans). Solar UV radiation penetrates and high to mid latitudes have aroused concern about the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation of low temperatures.7 Exposure to solar UV radiation can reduce productivity, affect reproduction

  7. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  8. Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch 2202 Main Mall University of British Columbia Vancouver aware of and which would definitely provide information applicable throughout the basin, is a study being proposed by Dr. Molly Webb. The last three years of this study will provide information

  9. SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    be converted to monetary value What are Ecosystem Services from Rangelands #12;Types of EGS Biological;Biological EGS Domestic livestock Wildlife Forage for livestock Forage for wildlife Food for humans;Hydrological/Atmospheric EGS Drinking water Floods for channel and riparian area rejuvenation Water

  10. Distribution and fate of technical chlordane and mirex residues in a central Texas aquatic ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Harold Erle

    1976-01-01

    the environment ( 16, 30, 31) . The model ecosystem behavior of heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide was reported by Lu et al. (22). This article also reported the behavior of chlordene, the six-chlorine TABLE 2 . Pesticide and PCB Residues Reported in 12 Bald.... . Page V1 1X General Descri tion of Chlorinated Methanoindenes . 10 ~hx hi O Nonachlors. H~et hi ~ohotochemixtr . Mirex. . River Basin Monitorin EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Introduction. . Ph sical Descri tion of Stud Area. . Pesticide Sam lin...

  11. A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    . Ecosystem 9:463:473 #12;which TAC are evaluated, and hence require basic information, of lower precisionA Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management Ratana Chuenpagdee,1 * Lisa Liguori,2 Dave ABSTRACT Although ecosystem-based management can lead to sustainable resource use, its successful imple

  12. River Corridor Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor, shown here.

  13. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  14. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  15. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  16. Managing Earth's Ecosystems: An Interdisciplinary Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    Managing Earth's Ecosystems: An Interdisciplinary Challenge Gretchen C. Daily* and Paul R. Ehrlich sheltered from competitive market forces, such as universities. Channels developed to direct flows

  17. What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information exchange information and pool resources to advance the rapidly evolving arena of ecosystem services ecosystem services efforts? For more information visit www.ecosystemcommons.org (June 2011) Photos 1, 3

  18. PERSPECTIVES Meta-ecosystems: a theoretical framework for a spatial ecosystem ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Robert D.

    with limited overlap. One perspective comes from population and community ecology, with emphasis on population and metacommunity concepts. A meta-ecosystem is defined as a set of ecosystems connected by spatial flows of energy and indirect interactions at landscape or regional scales. The meta-ecosystem perspective thereby has

  19. Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach P. Marrow1 *, M. Koubarakis2 , R the concept of an information ecosystem. An information ecosystem is analo gous to a natural ecosystem individuals. This paper describes a multi-agent platform, DIET (Decentralised Information Ecosystem

  20. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2009 d river run by Eireann Aspell Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynch Matt Serron #12 lives. #12;BLANK Editors' Note There were portents hinting at the Onion River Review's future as early

  1. TVA's Integrated River System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and controlling floods. So far as may be consistent with such purposes, ...for the generation of electric energy... TVA Power Service Area TVA'S INTEGRATED RIVER SYSTEM | 3...

  2. Large River Floodplains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunne, T; Aalto, RE

    2013-01-01

    River, California. Sedimentology 57, 389–407. http://J. (Eds. ), Fluvial Sedimentology VI. Special PublicationsAnatomy of an avulsion. Sedimentology 36, 1–24. Stallard,

  3. Wellcome Trust The UK's innovation ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Wellcome Trust The UK's innovation ecosystem Summary of a review commissioned by the Wellcome Trust innovation ecosystem does not always support its effective uptake. Good intellectual property (IP) management commissioned the consultancy Bain & Company to undertake an analysis of UK innovation and external IP

  4. Information Needs in Software Ecosystems Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    Information Needs in Software Ecosystems Development A Contribution to Improve Tool Support Across-evolution of projects that depend and rely on each other, these software ecosystems have led to an increased importance an investigation into the nature of the information needs of software developers working on projects that are part

  5. Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Service Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    1 Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Service Assessments by Ian Bateman, Georgina Mace, Carlo Fezzi, Giles Atkinson and Kerry Turner CSERGE Working Paper EDM 10-10 #12;2 Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Turneri,2 i. Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE), School

  6. Scaling metabolism from organisms to ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enquist, Brian Joseph

    of ecosystem respiration based on the kinetics of meta- bolic reactions11­13 and the scaling of resource use constant for plants and microbes12,13 , the two groups that comprise most of the biomass in terrestrial rates, Bi, for all Box 1 A general model for scaling biochemical kinetics from organisms to ecosystems

  7. Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification Rebecca J. Allee Megan Dethier Dail Brown Administration National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-43 July 2000 #12;A copy-WestHighway Silver Spring, MD 20910 #12;Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification Rebecca J. Allee

  8. Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA #12;Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Materials

  9. ENVS 4000, Spring (Jan-Apr) 2006 Monitoring Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    systems depend on ecosystems for food, materials, energy, purification, enjoyment, a sense of place challenges. Adaptive ecosystem management depends on knowledge of system states and dynamics, and therefore and models for ecosystem monitoring and management, including Environmental Benefit Analysis, Environmental

  10. The sustainability of scientific software: ecosystem context and science policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    The sustainability of scientific software: ecosystem context and science, use friction and the software ecosystem context. In particular we highlight the impact of the complexity of ecosystem context, in terms of the diversity

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizae and terrestrial ecosystem Matthias C. Rillig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rilli, Matthias C.

    REVIEW Arbuscular mycorrhizae and terrestrial ecosystem processes Matthias C. Rillig Microbial in terrestrial ecosystems. Despite their acknowledged importance in ecology, most research on AMF has focused (interacting) routes via which AMF can influence ecosystem processes. These include indirect pathways (through

  12. Size structuring of planktonic communities : biological rates and ecosystem dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taniguchi, Darcy Anne Akiko

    2013-01-01

    taxonomic and ecosystem function information, they also haveinformation on the organisms’ adaptations to an ecosysteminformation on organism function to understand their role in the ecosystem.

  13. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  14. Onion River OnionRiverReview2011dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    2011 d river run by Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna McCarthy Philip Noonan Erica Sabelawski #12;TheOnion River Review OnionRiverReview2011dd 2011 Our Lives in Dance Alex Dugas We were born with bare. Then we tap-danced on our graves, and back through the womb again, shoeless. #12;d Onion River Review d

  15. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2013 d river run by Alex Dugas Sarah Fraser Bryan Hickey Nick Lemon Diana Marchessault Mickey O'Neill Amy Wilson #12;#12;Editors' Note For this edition of the Onion River Review, we are finally able to present to you this year's edition of the Onion River Review: our love child, our shining

  16. Kootenai Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectric Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  17. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  18. Models of marine microbes: molecules to ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    Models of marine microbes: molecules to ecosystems Mick Follows, MIT #12;Microbes in the ocean Image: Jed Fuhrman #12;Microbes in the ocean Image: Jed Fuhrman · Base of food chain/food web · Modulate

  19. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  20. Marine Ecosystems Acous&cs Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on marine sanctuaries · Mi@gate noise impacts from oil explora@on and renewable energy distances with lidle energy loss §Higher marine organismsMarine Ecosystems Acous&cs Program Bob Dziak Program PIs: Joseph

  1. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  2. Rules of the River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1980-01-01

    't overexert. Be careful of sunburn, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. ? Leave car keys hidden at launch point or take-out (with shuttle cars), or firmly attach them to an article of clothing on your person with a strong safety pin. Don't leave valuables... are organized into four parts: ? Planning Your River Trip ? Selecting Your Equipment ? Rules of Safety ? Rules of Conduct When put into practice, these "Rules of the River" may turn an uncomfortable river trip into a lasting and special experience. Read...

  3. Understanding emergent innovation ecosystems in health care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    ’ (Rikkiev & Mäkinen, 2013). Most prior research is in semiconductors, computing and communications technology, which saw waves of convergence in the 1990s and early 2000s (Fredrik Hacklin, 2005; Stieglitz, 2003). There are limited studies in automotive... ’ (EV). This concept can then be extended to explicitly link the key actors in the industrial or innovation ecosystem, as shown in Figure 3. Figure 3 –Linking Ecosystem, Business Model and Value Network This approach provides a mechanism to make...

  4. Predicting Fire Behavior in U.S. Mediterranean Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    behavior in Mediterranean ecosystems are reviewed. A computer-based system which uses rele- vant fuel

  5. Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tryfonopoulos, Christos

    Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach P. Marrow1 *, M. Koubarakis2 , R be through the concept of an information ecosystem. An information ecosystem is analogous to a natural ecosystem in which there are flows of materials and energy analogous to information flow between many

  6. Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Mikls Herdon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ecosystem - enterprise information systems - SME 1 Introduction The Digital Business Ecosystem (DBEDigital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Drivers Miklós Herdon1 , Mária Raffai2 , Ádám of the Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE) has been come life in order to build an Internet-based environment

  7. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  8. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  9. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  10. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste...

  11. Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Tamara Lee

    1995-01-01

    The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River...

  12. From Individuals to Ecosystem Function: Toward an Integration of Evolutionary and Ecosystem Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    From Individuals to Ecosystem Function: Toward an Integration of Evolutionary and Ecosystem Ecology in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support

  13. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore »clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  14. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  15. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2012 d river run by Alex Dugas Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna Mc jokes. Together these things helped shape the 2012 edition of the Onion River Review. A worthwhile departing on an adventure, you simply have no idea what will happen or who you will meet. You may run

  16. The geometry of coexistence in large ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Jacopo; Suweis, Samir; Barabás, György; Banavar, Jayanth R; Allesina, Stefano; Maritan, Amos

    2015-01-01

    The role of interactions in shaping the interplay between the stability of an ecosystem and its biodiversity is still not well understood. We introduce a geometrical approach, that lends itself to both analytic and numerical analyses, for studying the domain of interaction parameters that results in stable coexistence. We find the remarkable result that just a few attributes of the interactions are responsible for stable coexistence in large random ecosystems. We analyze more than 100 empirical networks and find that their architecture generally has a limited effect on in sustaining biodiversity.

  17. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  18. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  19. UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY Marine Biological Laborato«y L I B R. A. R "ST OCT 2 31950 significant changes in the environmental conditions which affect fisheries in Sacramento River have resulted number of sportsmen who are turning to the Upper Sacramento River is indicative of the magnitude

  20. Patterns of shrub expansion in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naito, Adam T; Cairns, David M

    2015-01-01

    of tall shrubs. Given current understanding of the local-scale implications for hydrol- ogy, surface energy balances, and carbon and nutrient cycling as a result of enhanced shrub cover, the comple- tion of this phase transition will alter tundra ecosystem... in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition Adam T. Naito & David M. Cairns Department of Geography, Texas A&M University, 810 Eller O&M Building, Mailstop 3147 TAMU, College Station, Texas 77843-3147 Keywords Alaska, Arctic, landscape analysis...

  1. Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    1 23 Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155 Urban Ecosyst DOI 10.1007/s11252-015-0460-x Urban heat island at link.springer.com". #12;Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping. Urban heat island (UHI) effects may further exacerbate the impacts of climate change on organisms

  2. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of plant, animal and micro-organism communities and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional unit." "Ecosystem services are the benefits people capture for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security

  3. The Nitrogen Paradox in Tropical Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , by an abundance of N-fixing plants, and by sustained export of bioavailable N at the ecosystem scale. However and biogeochemical cycles through their vast exchanges of energy, water, carbon, and nutrients with the global, recycle, and export (via leaching and denitrification) very large quantities of N (e.g., Davidson et al

  4. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Motivation · Juvenile & subadult bigeye aggregates

  5. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  6. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  7. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  8. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Characterization Research Program Réka Domokos #12;Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division -80 -77 -74 -71 -68 -65 -62 -59 -56 -53 -50 -47 -44 Sv

  9. Reverse Engineering Software Ecosystems Doctoral Dissertation submitted to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanza, Michele

    and the information in the versioning system repositories of the projects in an ecosystem and generating visual perspectives. Given the large amount of information in an ecosystem, we provide exploration mechanisms that allow one to navigate the wealth of information available about the ecosystem. We distinguish between

  10. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 is the successor to the Science Subgroup. 2 South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs

  11. Letter to the Editor Ecosystem services: Multiple classification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    population's information about the world, especially when it comes to ecosystem services, is extremelyLetter to the Editor Ecosystem services: Multiple classification systems are needed In a recent to enrich our thinking about ecosystem services rather than a problem to be defined away. Let us start

  12. Towards faster method search through static ecosystem analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    by augmenting the data available to the developer with information derived from the analysis of the ecosystemTowards faster method search through static ecosystem analysis Boris Spasojevi´c University of Bern from the same ecosystem ­ written in the same language and sharing dependencies. We implemented a proof

  13. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  14. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 07/19/07 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Hands-on ­ The Hello World! Program Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell/Quasar Ecosystem

  15. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 07/19/07 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Developing Code for Cell - SIMD Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions

  16. An Analysis of Texas Waterways: A Report on the Physical Characteristics of Rivers, Streams, and Bayous in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belisle, Harold J.; Josselet, Ron

    1977-01-01

    Cree k San Jacinto River, East Fork Spring Creek Taylor Bayou Turkey Creek V. CENTRAL TEXAS WATE RWAYS A. Major Waterways Blanco River Bosque River Brazos River Colorado River Concho River . Frio River Guadalupe River Lampasas River... MAJOR CENTRAL TEXAS WATERWAYS 13. Blanco River 14. Bosque River 15. Brazos River 16. Colorado River 17. Concho River 18. Frio River 19. Guadal upe River 20. Lampasas River 21. Lavaca River 22. Leon River 23. Little River 24. Llano River 25...

  17. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01

    gaps for current ecosystem information. Insufficient fundingAlthough new information about the ecosystem may have become

  18. CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN HABITATS--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN, Defenders of Wildlife, Sacramento, California. Abstract: The Sacramento River's historic riparian habi- tats on this conference's plenary session panel, I will provide a conservationist perspective on Sacramento River riparian

  19. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  20. A model of global net ecosystem production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.S.; Matson, P.A. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Field, C.B.; Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We present an ecosystem modeling approach to resolve global climate and edaphic controls on seasonal NEP patterns. Global remote sensing, climate and land surface data sets are used as inputs to drive a terrestrial carbon cycle model at 1[degrees]lat/lon resolution. monthly net primary productivity (NPP) is calculated using surface radiation and NDVI to determine photosynthesis, which is subsequently adjusted by temperature, water and nitrogen stress factors. Total nitrogen availability is coupled to net mineralization rates from litter soil carbon pools. Soil respiration and NPP balance one another globally at around 60 Gt C yr[sup [minus]1]. The seasonal amplitude of global NEP is 1.2 Gt C. Although substantial month-to-month variation is observed for tropical forest areas, seasonal amplitude is driven globally by boreal and temperate forest ecosystems between 650 and 30[degrees] N latitude.

  1. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  2. d Onion River Review d OnionRiverReview2010dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    ://www.smcvt.edu/onionriver/. #12;d Onion River Review d 2010 d river run by Eireann Aspell Lauren Fish Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynchd Onion River Review d 2010 d OnionRiverReview2010dd #12;The Onion River Review is the literary Matt Serron #12;BLANK Editors' Note The only certainty of the Onion River Review is the editors' un

  3. Carbon flow and ecosystem dynamics in the Mississippi River plume described by inverse analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg Allen

    2002-01-01

    excess organic carbon from autotrophic regions to heterotrophic regions. In contrast, the winter result indicated a plume that was net-heterotrophic in all 4 subregions with high aerobic bacterial respiration and relatively low primary production...

  4. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    physical properties alter water and energy fluxes of an oak-The model simulates the energy, water, carbon, and momentumSeasonal variation of energy and water vapor exchange rates

  5. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    urban areas or dense residential settle- ments. Surrounding agriculture primarily consists of orchards, and

  6. 6th Annual Sustainable Raritan River Conference and Awards Ceremony Valuing Natural Capital and Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    is in the process of applying for LEED Gold certification for the building. Key innovations include: a rainwater harvesting system that provides water for 18 toilets in six bathrooms, as well as for "living wall

  7. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    were no flows > 55,000 cfs. • Average Number of Days perdecade, with flows > 55,000 cfs. • Average Number of Yearsthere were no flows > 70,000 cfs. Associated Ecological

  8. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2009-12-17

    Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

  9. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    of shoot water potential and vapor pressure difference, Treeterm average. [ 24 ] The vapor pressure deficit (VPD) wasb) precipitation, (c) vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and (d)

  10. Hydraulic controls on river biota and the consequence for ecosystem processes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limm, Michael Peter

    2009-01-01

    periphyton biomass on hydraulic characteristics and nutrientheterogeneity. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 110:1568-morphology. Journal Of Hydraulic Engineering 129:885- Power,

  11. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    woody stems such as willows (Salix spp. ), blue elderberry (Goodding’s black willow (Salix gooddingii)]. • Percent of

  12. UPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -structural FRM measures for 400 structures, to include flood-proofing, structure elevation, or buyout and removal

  13. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Lands Commission. 334 p. Garrison BA. 1999. Bank Swallow (for their breeding colonies (Garrison 1999). Major factors

  14. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    and K. Tan (2005), Precipitation patterns alter growth ofobserved global land precipitation variations during 1900 –and changes in global precipitation patterns: What do we

  15. RiverHeath Appleton, WI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to produce a closed loop neighborhood-wide geothermal exchange system using the river as the source of heat exchange.

  16. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  17. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  19. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  20. Spatial design principles for sustainable hydropower development in river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    : Freshwater reserve design Hydroelectric power Network theory Optimization Regulated rivers River portfolio

  1. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 6, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Procurement Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site. On March 6,...

  2. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA 98-09 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA 98-09 September 21, 1998 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Westinghouse Savannah River...

  3. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic...

  4. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication February 6,...

  5. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

  6. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wisconsin (NewPage Corporation in Wisconsin Rapids and Flambeau River Papers, LLC in Park Falls). NewPage and Flambeau River have demonstrated successful collaboration on...

  7. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigningResourcesfeed-image Digg:RisingRiver

  8. GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Fraser Pollution Abatement Office Fraser River Action Plan Environment Canada North Vancouver, B judgement in light of the knowledge and information available to UMA at the time of preparation. UMA denies by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through the Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. The views

  9. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Table 4. Out-of-subbasin production for three Hood River steelhead populations. Table 5. Life cycle river mile 6 13 Dee ID seepage 13 cold springs 2 city of HR overflow? riverside drive reservoir? 2 stone springs 4 city of HR riverside drive reservoir? 4 middle fork coe branch 15 MFID 15 clear branch 19 MFID

  10. Shrubs as ecosystem engineers in a coastal dune: influences on plant populations, communities and ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman, J. Hall

    Shrubs as ecosystem engineers in a coastal dune: influences on plant populations, communities the landscape? Location: Coastal hind-dune system, Bodega Head, northern California. Methods: In each of 4 years dune. At landscape level, the two shrubs ­ and their distinctive vegetation and soils ­ frequently had

  11. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  12. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  13. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    S, Thomas RQ. 2011. How do we improve Earth system models?Integrating Earth system models, ecosystem models,scales and ultimately earth system models (ESMs; Table 2).

  14. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  15. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking" Telescopes: An...

  16. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Integrating Earth system models, ecosystem models,S, Thomas RQ. 2011. How do we improve Earth system models?scales and ultimately earth system models (ESMs; Table 2).

  17. The ecosystem study on Rongelap Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, R.B.; Gessel, S.P.; Held, E.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Laboratory of Radiation Biology at the University of Washington carried out an intensive study of this Atoll, which was contaminated with radioactive fallout from the {open_quotes}Bravo shot{close_quotes} in 1954. This study involved many aspects of the environment and the plant and animal life: soils, land plants, marine life, birds, geology and hydrology, and human diets as well. In much of the research, the fortuitiously present radioactive isotopes, especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, were tracers. Although the term {open_quotes}ecosystem study{close_quotes} was not in vogue at that time, it is clear that this was an early use of the ecosystem approach. Soil types and their development, the distribution of mineral elements in plants and soils, including predominant radionuclides, distribution and growth of native terrestrial plants in relation to topography and salinity, some aspects of the human diets, micronutrient nutrition of the coconut palm, island and islet development and stability, were given attention in the studies. Some of the findings in the various areas of study will be presented and discussed. 32 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Savannah River Site Environmental Data for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs.

  19. Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

  20. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan

    2009-04-16

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  1. EA-2006: Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing a programmatic EA for actions recommended by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. Activities under this program could include full reconnection of tidal influence through breaching dikes and levees; partial reconnection of tidal influence through culverts, bridges, and tidegates; enhancement of the quantity and quality of tidal channels; removal of invasive species; and restoration of riparian habitat conditions, such as planting native vegetation.

  2. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

  3. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  4. Food web complexity and higher-level ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    LETTER Food web complexity and higher-level ecosystem services Jose´ M. Montoya1,2 *, Miguel A of herbivores in 19 plant-herbivore-parasitoid food webs influence the service supplied by natural enemies producers have shown that species richness provides and promotes fundamental ecosystem services. However, we

  5. Gulf CoastGulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf CoastGulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit The Gulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystem of Ocean Energy Management · National Aeronautics and Space Administration · National Oceanic 27 University of New Orleans 28 University of Texas at Brownsville 29 The University of West Florida

  6. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  7. Nitrogen Fluxes and Retention in Urban Watershed Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21227, USA; 4 US Geological Survey, Baltimore, Maryland 21237, USA, forested, and agricultural watersheds. The work is a product of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a long- term of these areas (Pickett and others 2001). Two urban ecosystem research sites (Baltimore and Central Ar- izona

  8. Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    the information needs of domain scientists, software component producers, infrastructure providers, and ecosystemUnderstanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact: current and future measures James,909 (10,153 excluding table text) *Corresponding Author Address: Information School University of Texas

  9. A Quantitative Analysis of Developer Information Needs in Software Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    A Quantitative Analysis of Developer Information Needs in Software Ecosystems Nicole Haenni, Mircea popular tools developers use to satisfy their ecosystem-related information needs. Categories and Subject present the results of an investigation into the nature of information needs of software developers who

  10. Building an Information Ecosystem for Public Transport in Rural Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Pete

    Building an Information Ecosystem for Public Transport in Rural Areas Peter Edwards, David Corsar, to con- struct an information ecosystem upon which a range of ap- plications and services can be built.beecroft,jeff.z.pan,yaji.sripada}@abdn.ac.uk ABSTRACT Passenger information systems (PISs) providing real-time information are valuable tools for public

  11. Ecosystem services provided by palms in SE Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    important in forest ecosystems and include some 600 species in SEA. Rural communities depend on palms provided by ecosystems and research into the value of these resources should: - Include rural communities of rural communities' harvest of palm products - Evaluate the potential of developing new palm products

  12. Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Locatelli Carbon sequestration is recognised as a global ecosystem service (see box on next page such as the global climate (through carbon sequestration), the quantity and quality of water and the force of windsS Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store carbon, forests contribute

  13. The Impact of Imported Water on Hardwoods Range Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    introduction of contaminants into water-ways. Although counter-intuitive, water itself has become a pollutant549 The Impact of Imported Water on Hardwoods Range Ecosystems1 Thomas Scott2 Abstract Water Pollution is defined as the corruption of ecosystems, human health, and local economies by the inappropriate

  14. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 3/2/2008 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Hands-on - DMA Transfer Using get and put Buffer Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell

  15. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 3/2/2008 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Hands-on - DMA Transfer Using Control Block Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell

  16. NREL Today: Symposium and Distinguished Ecosystem Ecologist Lecture and Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    NREL Today: Symposium and Distinguished Ecosystem Ecologist Lecture and Awards Thursday, November Student Center For more information about the event, visit http://www.nrel.colostate.edu/ecosystem-award.html or email Laurie.Richards@colostate.edu. NREL Today: Symposium Program 1:00-1:05 Introduction from Director

  17. Exploration of a Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystem in Lake Huron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploration of a Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystem in Lake Huron Bopaiah A. Biddanda,1 * Dwight F in the bedrock (sinkholes), through which groundwater emerges onto the lake floor. During September 2003, we explored a recently discovered submerged sinkhole ecosystem (55 m · 40 m · 1 m) located at a depth of 93 m

  18. TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES& A&comprehensive&analysis&of®ulating& and&cultural&services&provided&by&Texas'&forests& & & & & & October&2013 June 2009 #12;#12;Texas&Statewide&Assessment&of&& Forest&Ecosystem&Services& A&comprehensive&analysis&of&the®ulating&and&& cultural&services&provided&by&Texas

  19. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  20. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  1. Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services and poverty and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework' Ecosystem Services, vol 7, pp. 34­45., 10.1016/j.ecoser.2013 services and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework$ Janet A. Fisher a,n , Genevieve Patenaude

  2. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  3. Species-specific phenological responses to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazer, SJ; Gerst, KL; Gerst, KL; Matthews, ER; Matthews, ER; Evenden, A

    2015-01-01

    and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem S USAN J. Mand precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem. Ecosphere 6(information is available from water-limited ecosystems. In

  4. Migration and Global Environmental DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    .....................................................................................................9 Cultural and information ecosystem services1 Migration and Global Environmental Change DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration .............................................................................................................................................5 Ecosystem services in low-lying coastal areas

  5. From population dynamics to ecoinformatics: Ecosystems as multilevel information processing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    From population dynamics to ecoinformatics: Ecosystems as multilevel information processing systems which lead to viewing ecosystems in terms of local multilevel information processing and evolution. We of information processing, and under which circumstances these modes may be favored. Ecosystem diversity

  6. The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    processes can contribute to reaching ecosystem goals. We draw primarily on information developed31 The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range Thomas A. Spies twelve major ecological themes (regional environment, ecosystem types and patterns, vegetation

  7. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  8. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mary FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood Warnings and Bulletins · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood RiskBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mary FLOOD

  9. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nerang FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Nerang River catchment is locatedBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nerang FLOOD

  10. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01

    in Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry Wang Liurong.YRCC’sin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry not just importantin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry emerging market

  11. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  12. Raft River Idaho Magnetotelluric Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gregory Nash

    2015-05-13

    Raw magnetotelluric (MT) data covering the geothermal system at Raft River, Idaho. The data was acquired by Quantec Geoscience. This is a zipped file containing .edi raw MT data files.

  13. Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations More Documents & Publications Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of...

  14. Sacramento River Steelhead: Hatchery vs. Natural Smolt Outmigration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandstrom, Phil

    2012-01-01

    DELTA SCIENCE PROGRAM Sacramento River Steelhead: HatcheryUC Davis BACKGROUND The Sacramento River steelhead trout (a tributary of the upper Sacramento River. Smolts are young,

  15. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  16. Rapid environmental degradation in a subarctic ecosystem influences resource use of a keystone avian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockwell, Robert F.

    Rapid environmental degradation in a subarctic ecosystem influences resource use of a keystone). Keystone herbivores in Arctic ecosystems are especially susceptible to the effects of environmental change

  17. Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

    1995-07-01

    The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

  18. Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (DOE/EA-2006)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Public Involvement Contact Link to BPA Home Page EFW - Salmon Swimming Upriver EFW - Forest, Evening Sky EFW - Deer in River Advanced Search About BPA Newsroom Integrated Fish...

  19. OPINION PAPER A community-based framework for aquatic ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Nielsen · Erik Jeppesen · J. Alex Elliott · Vardit Makler-Pick · Thomas Petzoldt · Karsten Rinke · Mogens. Jeppesen SINO-DANISH Research Centre, Beijing, China J. A. Elliott Algal Modelling Unit, Lake Ecosystem

  20. heavy-snowfall area. The annual NEP (net ecosystem productiv-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heavy-snowfall area. The annual NEP (net ecosystem productiv- ity) observed by eddy covariance and the duration of the growing season were important factors with regards to annual NEP. Additional detailed

  1. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  2. Evapotranspiration models compared on a Sierra Nevada forest ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    ranged from simple temperature and solar radiation-driven equations to physically-based combination that measure carbon, water, and energy fluxes into and out of the ecosystems. The evapotranspiration models

  3. Stakeholder value network analysis for the mobile services ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind, A. S. (Amarnath Sury)

    2009-01-01

    The mobile services ecosystem has evolved and continues to evolve at a rapid pace adjusting to the different players competing to be part of the value creation and capture. This thesis attempts to capture a holistic view ...

  4. Knowledge Management Capabilities of Lead Firms in Innovation Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    , and the symbiotic nature of relationships between the firm and its external stakeholders (Moore 2006) and the firm as resource integrator (Vargo and Lusch 2004). Firms such as Apple and Facebook have offered recent potent examples of innovation ecosystem...

  5. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  6. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Unplanned Exposures and Radioactive Material Intakes at the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) On July 18, 2000, the...

  7. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan, or the participation in its development, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan

  8. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan and exclusively resulting from, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower

  9. WAMweisman art museum 333 east river road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    WAMweisman art museum press release 333 east river road minneapolis, MN 55455 www government that allowed tax-supported institutions (like the University of Minnesota) to acquire these works: The Weisman is located at 333 E. River Road in

  10. INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili such a computing architecture can be implemented using current internet technologies. Based on the "intelligent a normal web browser. KEYWORDS River water quality, Environmental management, Internet computing, Systems

  11. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Barron FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Barron River has a catchmentBureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Barron FLOOD

  12. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  13. In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 -2009 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 - 2009: Master of Resource Management Title of Research Project: In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser managers I develop an in-river backwards run reconstruction to provide Conservation Unit (CU) specific

  14. Hydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction For centuries, man has modified running waters [51]. In alpine rivers, production of hydropower of power plants are commonly in use: (1) run-of-river power plants that continuously pro- cessHydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river M. Fette & C. Weber

  15. Sociological adaptation among bacterial populations in an activated sludge ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Robert George

    1970-01-01

    SOCIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AMONG BACTERIAL POPULATIONS IN AN ACT1VATED SLUDGE ECOSYSTEM A Thesis by Robert George Forrest Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARK University in partial flilfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1970 Major Subject& Microbiology SOCIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AMONG BACTERIAL POPULkTIONS IN AN ACTIVATE) SLUDGE ECOSYSTEM A Thesis by Robert George Forrest Approved as to style and content by& (Co-Chairman of Committee) (Co...

  16. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  17. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  18. Research Priorities forTropical Ecosystems Under Climate ChangeWorkshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    ecosystems in Earth system models (ESMs) and that demand immediate field investigations. The results

  19. Satellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries E. Chassot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of information for ecosystem modelling, a key tool for implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries managementSatellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries management E. Chassot1 *, S and it is a promising tool for conservation issues. In the context of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management

  20. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  1. Diets of the Arkansas River Shiner and Peppered Chub in the Canadian River, New Mexico and Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Gene

    Diets of the Arkansas River Shiner and Peppered Chub in the Canadian River, New Mexico and Texas)collectedfrom the Canadian River in New Mexico andTexasfrom September1996to August 1998. Both the Ark~n~~ River streamsand rivers of the Arkansas River drainage systemof Arkansas,Colorado, Kansas,New Mexico, Kansas

  2. Radon fluxes in tropical forest ecosystems of Brazilian Amazonia: night-time CO2 net ecosystem exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Radon fluxes in tropical forest ecosystems of Brazilian Amazonia: night-time CO2 net ecosystem exchange derived from radon and eddy covariance methods C H R I S T O P H E R S . M A R T E N S *, T H O M 97119.900, Brazil Abstract Radon-222 (Rn-222) is used as a transport tracer of forest canopy

  3. Many people and organizations are working together to ensure the Morro Bay ecosystem remains healthy: the San Luis Obispo Science and Ecosystem Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    healthy: the San Luis Obispo Science and Ecosystem Alliance (SLOSEA), the Morro Bay National Estuary were developed by members of the San Luis Obispo Science and Ecosystem Alliance, the Morro Bay National

  4. River System Hydrology in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    and databases maintained by the Texas Water Development Board and the U.S. Geological Survey. River basin volume budgets and trend and frequency metrics for simulated naturalized and regulated stream flows and reservoir storage are developed using the WAM System...

  5. Historical Shoreline Evolution as a Response to Dam Placement on the Elwha River, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagid, Bethany Marie

    2015-01-01

    of the Elwha River, Washington- Biological and physicalthe Elwha River, Washington, U.S. , Fisheries Management &on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and

  6. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

  7. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  8. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  9. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Savannah River Laboratory Decontamination Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has had a Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Technology program since 1981. The objective of this program is to provide state-of-the-art technology for use in D D operations that will enable our customers to minimize waste generated and personal exposure, increase productivity and safety, and to minimize the potential for release and uptake of radioactive material. The program identifies and evaluates existing technology, develops new technology, and provides technical assistance to implement its use onsite. This program has impacted not only the Savannah River Site (SRS), but the entire Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To document and communicate the technology generated by this program, 28 papers have been presented at National and International meetings in the United States and Foreign Countries.

  11. Savannah River Laboratory Decontamination Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has had a Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology program since 1981. The objective of this program is to provide state-of-the-art technology for use in D&D operations that will enable our customers to minimize waste generated and personal exposure, increase productivity and safety, and to minimize the potential for release and uptake of radioactive material. The program identifies and evaluates existing technology, develops new technology, and provides technical assistance to implement its use onsite. This program has impacted not only the Savannah River Site (SRS), but the entire Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To document and communicate the technology generated by this program, 28 papers have been presented at National and International meetings in the United States and Foreign Countries.

  12. Two-dimensional river modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, James Cameron

    1988-01-01

    heavily vegetated flood plain. It is found that the two-dimensional model can determine the flow more completely and more accurately than a corresponding one- dimensional model. Two-dimensional models are best applied where the flow conditions... committee, W. P. James, R. A. Wurbs, and R. 0. Reid, for their support and interest in this research. Dr. James, in particular, has shown great foresight in supporting broader use of two-dimensional river modeling. Dave Froehlich deserves much...

  13. Savannah River | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION JSTEM-ing theSummarySavannah River Site

  14. Navigating Fragmented Ocean Law in the California Current: Tools to Identify and Measure Gaps and Overlaps for Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekstrom, Julia A.

    2008-01-01

    combines ecosystem ecology with information retrievalboundaries of ecosystems based on whatever information isto analyze the information. EAM – see Ecosystem Approach to

  15. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  16. Kootenai County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrderInformationKizildereTexas: EnergyEnergyKooskia,

  17. Microsoft Word - Final Kootenai EA FONSI_May 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May2.docTechnicalBARACK OBAMA AND JOE BIDEN: This

  18. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  19. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  20. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

  1. North University Dr. Indian River Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Oge

    ) around campus and running path on Indian River Street. Participants MUST run WITH tra c on all roads 39 4 31B 31A 7636 8W 6 80 46 89 92 31E 31 31D 31C 81 49 North University Dr. Indian River Street B-04.LucieAve.South Indian River St. BrevardCt. BrevardCt. Lot 23 Lot 22 Lot 11 Lot 7 Lot 6 Lot 21 LakeFPL Substation Lot 9

  2. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  3. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  4. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  5. Microsoft Word - CROOKED RIVER VALLEY REHABILITATION PROJECT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Act). Among other things, this Act directs BPA to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the Federal Columbia River...

  6. River Falls Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Utility Administrator River Falls Municipal Utilities Website http:www.rfmu.orgindex.aspx?nid681 Funding Source Wisconsin Focus on Energy State Wisconsin Program Type...

  7. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  8. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 13, 2014 Evaluation to determine whether Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. Voluntary...

  9. Cuivre River Electric- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control & Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water...

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  11. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  12. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology...

  13. Gila River Indian Community- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) will conduct feasibility studies of potential renewable energy projects on its lands in south central Arizona.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  15. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  16. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  17. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  18. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Kolan FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Kolan River catchment is located in south east Queensland and coversBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Kolan FLOOD

  4. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bulloo FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Bulloo River catchment is located in southBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bulloo FLOOD

  5. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Noosa FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Noosa River has a catchment areaBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Noosa FLOOD

  6. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Burrum and Cherwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    River at Howard Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Other Links Flood Risk The Burrum River catchment covers an area of about 935 square kilometres which and Cherwell FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURRUM AND CHERWELL RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  7. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Leichhardt River catchment FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LEICHHARDT RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  8. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Paroo FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Paroo River catchment is located in south west Queensland and coversBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Paroo FLOOD

  9. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Lower FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Brisbane River ALERT Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Brisbane River catchment covers an area of approximately 15 Brisbane FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure

  10. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Moonie FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Moonie River basin is located in southwest Queensland and drainsBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Moonie FLOOD

  11. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Daintree FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Post Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Daintree River FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DAINTREE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  12. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Gilbert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Gilbert River catchment is located in northBureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Gilbert FLOOD

  13. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Haughton FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Haughton River FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  14. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bremer FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The BremerBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bremer FLOOD

  15. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Pine and FLOOD SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and Caboolture FLOOD SYSTEM for the PINE & CABOOLTURE RIVERS This brochure describes the flood system operated information which will be useful for understanding River Height Bulletins issued by the Bureau's Flood Warning Centre during periods of high rainfall and flooding. Pine River at Murrumba Downs Contained

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

  17. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development, oil/gas exploration, and food production1,3 . This is a primary reason for the higher per capita ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic half of the world's population lives near coasts that benefit human society with access to trade, land

  18. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis design. This paper explores how to support energy as a first-class operating system resource. En- ergy the limited energy resource among competing tasks. 1. INTRODUCTION Traditionally, the operating system plays

  19. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    at the mean annual 1 College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Michele all'Adige, Italy. 12 Alterra, Earth System ScienceClimate Change, Wageningen University, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally

  20. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  1. 2 Valuing ecosystem services Benefits, values, space and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ); and global fisheries collapse (Myers and Worm, 2003). These problems are occurring on an unprecedented scale comprehension of the environmental infrastructure upon which human existence and welfare depends (Schroter et al, systematic approaches to measur- ing, modelling and mapping of ecosystem services, governance analysis

  2. Terrestrial Subsidies of Organic Carbon Support Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    filled, we monitored net ecosystem production (NEP) on a biweekly basis from 9 April to 27 May 2002. All ponds were consistently net heterotrophic; how- ever, NEP was significantly less negative in re- moval that the difference in NEP between treatments was driven by the change in R. Therefore, it appears that terrestrial

  3. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes influenced while the rest are considered uninfluenced by human impact. Impacts are mainly from machines used or successional shifts to other vegetation types are more evident in such habitats. The main threats

  4. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  5. Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to Curb Trade in Illegal forestry lacey act united states The Forest Legality Alliance was launched today to support private sector efforts and policies to reduce trade in illegally harvested wood. The Alliance is a global public

  6. Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report ARB Award No. 98 the automated in-situ gas chromatograph system for measuring volatile organic compound mixing ratios. Other and Outlook at the Beginning of This Study............... 4 2.0 Field Measurement Site........................................................

  7. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    generation mechanisms. Prior to harvest, K soil- water concentrations were relatively uniform with depthTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and after

  8. 1714(1) Winter 2006 Yellowstone Science NY ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    things (plants, animals, etc.)andnon-livingthings (rocks, soil, water, etc.) in a given geographic area at this time. Once photosynthesis converts light energy into biomass, many other organisms, including animals in any of these ecosystems. One of the most important of these exchanged materials is energy. When we

  9. Contrasting Ecosystem-Effects of Morphologically Similar Blake Matthews1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Christian

    ) and shape selection pressures on other organisms (niche construction). Very little is known about how unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source along food chains and the rate of nutrient recycling in the environment [2,8,9]. The ecosystem

  10. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest Holly A. Ewing,1 Biology, University of Connecticut, 75 N. Eagleville Road, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA ABSTRACT Fog and nitrogen (N) fluxes from hori- zontally moving fog and vertically delivered rain as well as redwood tree

  11. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  12. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  13. Nutrient export from freshwater ecosystems by anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient export from freshwater ecosystems by anadromous sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka that sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) imported and exported from four major systems in Bristol Bay, Alaska into fresh waters. The percentage of parental nutrients that smolts exported varied through time and among

  14. Plants reverse warming effect on ecosystem water balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    that global warming may increase aridity in water- limited ecosystems by accelerating evapotranspiration. We University, Stanford, CA, and approved June 16, 2003 (received for review April 7, 2003) Models predict for the unexpected rise in soil moisture. Our findings illustrate the potential for organism­environment interactions

  15. DECEMBER 2005|1738 Coupling between Land Ecosystems and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvak, Marcy

    Biogenic Aerosol Pathways BY MARY BARTH, JOSEPH P. MCFADDEN, JIELUN SUN, CHRISTINE WIEDINMYER, PATRICK to Earth, in turn, affects many of the key properties of the land surface. Terrestrial ecosystems also incorporated into quantitative numerical models describing the interac- tions between the terrestrial

  16. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Carla

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis attention to managing energy as a first-class system resource and explicitly allocating it among competing.duke.edu Abstract Energy consumption has recently been widely recognized as a ma- jor challenge of computer systems

  17. Towards a food web perspective on biodiversity and ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    CHAPTER 8 Towards a food web perspective on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning Bradley engineers would instead think of servers connected together in a world-wide web, synapses connecting neurons the number of species interacting within a food web influence the efficiency and reliability by which energy

  18. Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Supplanting ecosystem services provided by scavengers raises greenhouse gas emissions Zebensui to human-induced increments in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the most concentrations of some gases such as carbon dioxide, methane or nitrous oxide (globally called greenhouse gases

  19. Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    in nitrification, denitrification and trace nitrogen gas losses. Plant species also impact herbivore behaviourREVIEW Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling J. M. H. Knops,1 * K. L. Bradley1 and D. A. Wedin2 1 School of Biological Sciences, 2 School of Natural Resource Sciences

  20. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  1. SPECIAL FEATURE FORUM THE TREE OF LIFE IN ECOSYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    SPECIAL FEATURE ­ FORUM THE TREE OF LIFE IN ECOSYSTEMS The world-wide `fast­slow' plant economics, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia Summary 1. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) provides a useful framework described, involved only two key resources (carbon and nutrients) and one of three economically important

  2. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  3. Transient climate change and net ecosystem production of the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Wang, Chien.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

    The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM version 4.1) is applied to assess the sensitivity of net ecosystem production (NEP) of the terrestrial biosphere to transient changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate in the ...

  4. The Interactive Effects of Multifactor Global Change Were Evaluated for a Range of Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP) transpiration and runoff We examined those responses in sevenecosystem production (NEP), transpiration ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i

  5. SYNTHESIS The functional role of biodiversity in ecosystems: incorporating trophic complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, J. Emmett

    ? Will extinctions alter basic ecosystem processes, including those that produce food, purify air and water, and decompose harmful wastes? To address such questions, the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem

  6. Structuring institutional analysis for urban ecosystems: A key to sustainable urban forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    Structuring institutional analysis for urban ecosystems: A key to sustainable urban forest in urban settings with a specific focus on sustainable urban forest management. We conclude that urban management . Urban forest policy. Institutional analysis . Ecosystem services . Public goods . Sustainability

  7. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  8. Microbial risk assessment for recreational use of the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques, Margaret (Margaret Rose)

    2015-01-01

    The Malden River is located in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts. The River has a long history of abuse and neglect stemming from urbanization and industrial activity along the River and in the surrounding areas. ...

  9. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  10. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    ecosystem studies of the C consequences of these management options using eddy covariance will con- tinue to provide valuable information

  11. Patterns and Controls of Temporal Variation in CO2 Sequestration and Loss in Arctic Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter C.

    2002-03-21

    Determine seasonal and interannual patterns of net ecosystem CO2 flux from wet coastal and moist tussock tundra.

  12. Carbon fluxes in a young, naturally regenerating jack pine ecosystem Eugenie S. Euskirchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    , are measurements within young, recently disturbed ecosystems. [3] Generally, net ecosystem productivity (NEP, or equiv- alently, net ecosystem exchange of carbon, NEE = ­NEP; where a positive value of NEP indicates a C uptake, or equivalently, a C sink, and a negative value of NEP indicates a C loss, or equivalently

  13. Providing trusted scientific information to foster healthy marine ecosystems for current and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Providing trusted scientific information to foster healthy marine ecosystems for current and future generations Ecosystem Assessment Program (EAP) 7/10th of the planet is covered by water to elucidate the importance of the ma rine ecosystem on our economy, our environment, our culture, and our

  14. Extracting quality information from PL/1 legacy ecosystems Masterarbeit der Philosophisch-naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultat der

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    St1-PL/1 Extracting quality information from PL/1 legacy ecosystems Masterarbeit der Philosophisch presents a case study of analyzing a legacy PL/1 ecosystem that has grown for 40 years and runs on a modern several interviews to learn about legacy ecosystem analysis requirements. We briefly introduce the tool

  15. RAProp: Ranking Tweets by Exploiting the Tweet/User/Web Ecosystem Srijith Ravikumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    additional information from the Twit- ter ecosystem that consists of users, tweets, and the web pages that tweets link to. This information is obtained by modeling the Twitter ecosystem as a three-layer graphRAProp: Ranking Tweets by Exploiting the Tweet/User/Web Ecosystem by Srijith Ravikumar A Thesis

  16. 2006 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 83 Research Applications of Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , scientists and managers can benefit because they gain information about the geographic patterns in ecosystems Applications of Ecosystem Patterns Robert G. Bailey1 Abstract.--This article discusses the origins of natural ecosystem patterns from global to local scales. It describes how understanding these patterns can help

  17. A Landscape Ecology Approach to Informing the Ecology and Management of Coastal Marine Species and Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Mary Alida

    2014-01-01

    and ecosystem-based approaches, there is a growing need for spatially explicit, quantitative informationand ecosystem-based approaches, there is a growing need for spatially explicit, quantitative informationinformation on the distributions of species and the processes that maintain diversity, populations, species, and ecosystems (

  18. Above-and below-ground impacts of introduced predators in seabird-dominated island ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukami, Tadashi

    . Williamson1,7 Abstract Predators often exert multi-trophic cascading effects in terrestrial ecosystems via multiple pathways, and in doing so, act as major ecosystem drivers. Keywords Allochthonous input in terrestrial ecosystems (Hairston et al. 1960; Spiller & Schoener 1990; Pace et al. 1999; Schmitz et al. 2000

  19. Report of the 3rd National Ecosystem Modeling Workshop (NEMoW 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report of the 3rd National Ecosystem Modeling Workshop (NEMoW 3): Mingling Models for Marine Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-149 December 2014 #12;#12;Report of the 3rd National Ecosystem Modeling of the 3rd National Ecosystem Modeling Workshop (NEMoW 3): Mingling Models for Marine Resource Management

  20. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  1. Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25° C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

  2. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  3. Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning...

  4. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    state determination for entire site. Addthis Related Articles Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northeast Plume Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin...

  5. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northeast...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    state determination for entire site. Addthis Related Articles Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin...

  6. Columbia River Treaty Review #2 - April 2009.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Columbia River Treaty has provided signifi cant benefi ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard...

  7. Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Savannah River Site Saltstone...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Savannah River Site Saltstone and Tank Farm Performance Assessments Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Savannah River Site Saltstone and...

  8. Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1, November 12 to December 23, 2005, Summary Report Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1, November...

  9. Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations:...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: Supplement 4, January - March 2006 Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations: Supplement 4, January -...

  10. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix...

  11. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Savannah River Field Office Savannah River Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report...

  12. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    River Protection and Richland Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office The ongoing and projected...

  13. LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Presentation from the 35th Tritium...

  14. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS)...

  15. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

  16. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge...

  17. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...

  19. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building May 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on...

  20. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx,...

  1. UVA Hydraulic and Transport Engineering Lab for Sustainable River Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    #12;UVA Hydraulic and Transport Engineering Lab for Sustainable River Resources Some Applications: Small and Large Dam Removal River Restoration / Rehabilitation In Stream Flow Calculation Stormwater

  2. Employee of Savannah River Site Contractor Recognized as Exemplary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employee of Savannah River Site Contractor Recognized as Exemplary in Safety and Health Employee of Savannah River Site Contractor Recognized as Exemplary in Safety and Health...

  3. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  4. Savannah River Site dose control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.S.

    1992-06-01

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits.

  5. FLOOD RESPONSE PLAN River Flood Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    1 FLOOD RESPONSE PLAN River Flood Guide Effective Date: January 2013 Updated: February 2014 #12 Thames River basin have the potential to cause flooding on Western properties. PURPOSE To establish areas) closing of parking lots and clearing of parked vehicles and other Western property in flood

  6. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The State of the Columbia River Basin Draft Fiscal Year 2009 ANNUAL REPORT To Congress and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Basin, and a synopsis of the major activities of the Council during the fiscal year ending September 30

  7. BLUE RIVER BASIN (Dodson Industrial District)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    BLUE RIVER BASIN (Dodson Industrial District) Kansas City, Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST capability to support this request. PROJECT PURPOSE Dodson Industrial District is located along the Blue of a 6,800 foot long levee- floodwall along the north bank of the Blue River from the Bannister Road

  8. 2010 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tables 27 Table 1A: Total Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions 29 Table 1B: Cumulative Expenditures 1978 and habitat, of the Columbia River Basin that have been affected by hydroelectric development. This program fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin. The Power Act requires

  9. Fast Facts About the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost and availability, and the effect of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife. columbia River, and fish and wildlife affected by, the columbia River Basin hydropower dams. the council is a unique of the Council under the Act are to: 1. Develop a regional power plan to assure the Northwest an adequate

  10. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  11. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

  12. Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations Final Report #12;Published by financing of a sample of African, Asian and European River Basin Organizations (RBOs). Its focus contributions to cov- er their regular run-ning costs. To a degree, the financial challenges some African RBOs

  13. WAMweisman art museum 333 east river road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    WAMweisman art museum press release 333 east river road minneapolis, MN 55455 www per person (current Individual and Dual level members) FREE for members at the Sustainer level: The Weisman is located at 333 E. River Road in Minneapolis. There is no admission fee to the Weisman

  14. Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    satellite track runs along the river. As T/P cross track (orthe T/P tracks run parallel to the river. In these cases,

  15. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W.; Hayes, Daniel J; Mcclelland, James W; Peterson, Bruce; Mcguire, David; Melillo, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  16. River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    ............................................................ 29 14 Alluvial fans along the Guadalupe Mountains in Big Dog Canyon........ 31 15 Alluvial fans along the Brokeoff Mountains in Big Dog Canyon........... 35 16 View of alluvial fans from their drainage basins.................................. 75 27 Salt Basin-Brokeoff Mountains alluvial fan group ................................. 76 28 Big Dog Canyon-Brokeoff Mountains alluvial fan group....................... 77 29 Big Dog Canyon-Guadalupe Mountains alluvial fan group...

  17. Response of South American ecosystems to precipitation variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Bras, Rafael L [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    The Ecosystem Demography Model 2 is a dynamic ecosystem model and land surface energy balance model. ED2 discretizes landscapes of particular terrain and meteorology into fractional areas of unique disturbance history. Each fraction, defined by a shared vertical soil column and canopy air space, contains a stratum of plant groups unique in functional type, size and number density. The result is a vertically distributed representation of energy transfer and plant dynamics (mortality, productivity, recruitment, disturbance, resource competition, etc) that successfully approximates the behaviour of individual-based vegetation models. In previous exercises simulating Amazonian land surface dynamics with ED2, it was observed that when using grid averaged precipitation as an external forcing the resulting water balance typically over-estimated leaf interception and leaf evaporation while under estimating through-fall and transpiration. To investigate this result, two scenario were conducted in which land surface biophysics and ecosystem demography over the Northern portion of South America are simulated over {approx}200 years: (1) ED2 is forced with grid averaged values taken from the ERA40 reanalysis meteorological dataset; (2) ED2 is forced with ERA40 reanalysis, but with its precipitation re-sampled to reflect statistical qualities of point precipitation found at rain gauge stations in the region. The findings in this study suggest that the equilibrium moisture states and vegetation demography are co-dependent and show sensitivity to temporal variability in precipitation. These sensitivities will need to be accounted for in future projections of coupled climate-ecosystem changes in South America.

  18. Willamette River Transit Bridge PSU CTS Seminar January 16, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Willamette River Transit Bridge PSU CTS Seminar January 16, 2009 Dave Unsworth, TriMet Guenevere River Transit Bridge · Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Project · Plans for a new Willamette River Bridge · Public Process Today's Agenda #12;Willamette River Transit BridgePortland-Milwaukie Light Rail Project

  19. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site- December 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Inspection of Reinforced Concrete Construction at the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

  20. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

  1. River Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2006-08-01

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

  2. Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise businesses that interacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

    ecosystem is the human user of these appliances. The whole interactions of the information appliances, humanAbstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise ecosystems. We introduce the idea of creating an eco- system from a number of smart devices. This ecosystem

  3. An evaluation of models for partitioning eddy covariance-measured net ecosystem exchange into photosynthesis and respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rights reserved. Keywords: Eddy covariance; Information theory; Net ecosystem exchange; Gross ecosystemAn evaluation of models for partitioning eddy covariance-measured net ecosystem exchange Abstract We measured net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) using the eddy covariance (EC) technique for 4 years

  4. rizona's grassland ecosystems are an integral part of the regional ecology, and they provide important social and economic values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    losses from conservation may work against it. Ecosystem services valuation can provide information about page 3 for information. #12;Grassland Ecosystem Services Arizona's grassland ecosystems provide manyA rizona's grassland ecosystems are an integral part of the regional ecology, and they provide

  5. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  6. Modeling the influence of river rehabilitation scenarios on bed material sediment flux in a large river over decadal timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    Modeling the influence of river rehabilitation scenarios on bed material sediment flux in a large and calibrated sediment transport formulae were used to assess the decadal impact of major river rehabilitation the implementation of three major river rehabilitation strategies being considered in the Sacramento River Valley

  7. The influence of sediment cover variability on longterm river incision rates: An example from the Peikang River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Karl

    The influence of sediment cover variability on longterm river incision rates: An example from reach of the Peikang River. Sediment from these landslides produced widespread aggradation the spatial and temporal variability of sediment cover for the Peikang River. Because the river is undergoing

  8. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  9. Metagenomic analysis of planktonic microbial consortia from a non-tidal urban-impacted segment of James River

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Bonnie L.; LePrell, Rebecca V.; Franklin, Rima B.; Rivera, Maria C.; Cabral, Francine M.; Eaves, Hugh L.; Gardiakos, Vicki; Keegan, Kevin P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-09-19

    Knowledge of the diversity and ecological function of the microbial consortia of James River in Virginia, USA, is essential to developing a more complete understanding of the ecology of this model river system. Metagenomic analysis of James River's planktonic microbial community was performed for the first time using an unamplified genomic library and a 16S rDNA amplicon library prepared and sequenced by Ion PGM and MiSeq, respectively. From the 0.46-Gb WGS library (GenBank:SRR1146621; MG-RAST:4532156.3), 4 x 106 reads revealed >3 x 106 genes, 240 families of prokaryotes, and 155 families of eukaryotes. From the 0.68-Gb 16S library (GenBank:SRR2124995; MG-RAST:4631271.3; EMB:2184),more »4 x 106 reads revealed 259 families of eubacteria. Results of the WGS and 16S analyses were highly consistent and indicated that more than half of the bacterial sequences were Proteobacteria, predominantly Comamonadaceae. The most numerous genera in this group were Acidovorax (including iron oxidizers, nitrotolulene degraders, and plant pathogens), which accounted for 10 % of assigned bacterial reads. Polaromonas were another 6 % of all bacterial reads, with many assignments to groups capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Albidiferax (iron reducers) and Variovorax (biodegraders of a variety of natural biogenic compounds as well as anthropogenic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and endocrine disruptors) each accounted for an additional 3% of bacterial reads. Comparison of these data to other publically-available aquatic metagenomes revealed that this stretch of James River is highly similar to the upper Mississippi River, and that these river systems are more similar to aquaculture and sludge ecosystems than they are to lakes or to a pristine section of the upper Amazon River. Altogether, these analyses exposed previously unknown aspects of microbial biodiversity, documented the ecological responses of microbes to urban effects, and revealed the noteworthy presence of 22 human-pathogenic bacterial genera (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae, pathogenic Pseudomonadaceae, and ‘Vibrionales') and 6 pathogenic eukaryotic genera (e.g., Trypanosomatidae and Vahlkampfiidae). This information about pathogen diversity may be used to promote human epidemiological studies, enhance existing water quality monitoring efforts, and increase awareness of the possible health risks associated with recreational use of James River.« less

  10. Metagenomic analysis of planktonic microbial consortia from a non-tidal urban-impacted segment of James River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Bonnie L.; LePrell, Rebecca V.; Franklin, Rima B.; Rivera, Maria C.; Cabral, Francine M.; Eaves, Hugh L.; Gardiakos, Vicki; Keegan, Kevin P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-09-19

    Knowledge of the diversity and ecological function of the microbial consortia of James River in Virginia, USA, is essential to developing a more complete understanding of the ecology of this model river system. Metagenomic analysis of James River's planktonic microbial community was performed for the first time using an unamplified genomic library and a 16S rDNA amplicon library prepared and sequenced by Ion PGM and MiSeq, respectively. From the 0.46-Gb WGS library (GenBank:SRR1146621; MG-RAST:4532156.3), 4 x 106 reads revealed >3 x 106 genes, 240 families of prokaryotes, and 155 families of eukaryotes. From the 0.68-Gb 16S library (GenBank:SRR2124995; MG-RAST:4631271.3; EMB:2184), 4 x 106 reads revealed 259 families of eubacteria. Results of the WGS and 16S analyses were highly consistent and indicated that more than half of the bacterial sequences were Proteobacteria, predominantly Comamonadaceae. The most numerous genera in this group were Acidovorax (including iron oxidizers, nitrotolulene degraders, and plant pathogens), which accounted for 10 % of assigned bacterial reads. Polaromonas were another 6 % of all bacterial reads, with many assignments to groups capable of degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Albidiferax (iron reducers) and Variovorax (biodegraders of a variety of natural biogenic compounds as well as anthropogenic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and endocrine disruptors) each accounted for an additional 3% of bacterial reads. Comparison of these data to other publically-available aquatic metagenomes revealed that this stretch of James River is highly similar to the upper Mississippi River, and that these river systems are more similar to aquaculture and sludge ecosystems than they are to lakes or to a pristine section of the upper Amazon River. Altogether, these analyses exposed previously unknown aspects of microbial biodiversity, documented the ecological responses of microbes to urban effects, and revealed the noteworthy presence of 22 human-pathogenic bacterial genera (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae, pathogenic Pseudomonadaceae, and ‘Vibrionales') and 6 pathogenic eukaryotic genera (e.g., Trypanosomatidae and Vahlkampfiidae). This information about pathogen diversity may be used to promote human epidemiological studies, enhance existing water quality monitoring efforts, and increase awareness of the possible health risks associated with recreational use of James River.

  11. River Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2004-08-01

    Beginning in fiscal year 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River.

  12. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN ASSESSMENT FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that respond to impacts from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan or the participation in its development is intended to, and shall

  13. Think water : reconditioning the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

  14. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help residential members increase the energy efficiency of homes. Loans up to $17,000 are available for the...

  15. BPA research aids Columbia River white sturgeon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research aids Columbia River white sturgeon 8142015 12:00 AM Tweet Page Content BPA fish biologist Scott Bettin (left) and Brad Cady of the Washington Dept. of Fish and...

  16. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R.

    1998-08-01

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  17. Savannah River Site Achieves Waste Transfer First

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The EM program and its liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) made history recently by safely transferring radioactive liquid waste from F Tank Farm to H Tank Farm using a central control room.

  18. EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and...

  19. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  20. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  1. Addressing Stakeholder Concerns: Pests and Pest Control in the Sacramento River Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langridge, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    scale restoration on the Sacramento River. Chapter 17 inriverside forests along the Sacramento River, the source ofand levee construction. The Sacramento River CONTACT Suzanne

  2. Observations on the Review of Archaeological Investigations in the Sacramento River Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raven, Christopher

    1985-01-01

    decision to excavate the Sacramento River Canyon sites wasInvestigations in the Sacramento River Canyon, Vol. I:Investigations in the Sacramento River Canyon CHRISTOPHER

  3. Local diffusion networks act as pathways?to sustainable agriculture in the Sacramento River Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark; Fulton, Allan

    2007-01-01

    agriculture in the Sacramento River Valley by Mark Lubellquality management in the Sacramento River Valley. Data fromencourage growers in the Sacramento River Valley to

  4. Historic and Present Distribution of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead in the Calaveras River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Glenda

    2007-01-01

    2001). Presently, fall run Tuolumne River still occurs inof Calaveras River King Salmon run and proposed contingencyJune and Stanislaus Rivers Fall Run 8 June – December Late

  5. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  6. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

  7. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

  8. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore »plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  9. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  10. Effect of stand age on whole ecosystem CO2 exchange in the Canadian boreal forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    information on the fractional coverage of stands in different age classes and measurements of ecosystem gasEffect of stand age on whole ecosystem CO2 exchange in the Canadian boreal forest Marcy Litvak1 ), and moderate in the 70 and 130 year old stands (À6.3 and À7.1 mmol mÀ2 sÀ1 , respectively). Whole-ecosystem

  11. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Georgina and Eyre FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and Eyre FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the GEORGINA RIVER & EYRE CREEK This brochure describes the flood warning. It includes reference information which will be useful for understanding Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins issued by the Bureau's Flood Warning Centre during periods of high rainfall and flooding. Eyre

  12. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects). Stressors: Water quality and habitat conditions have changed food webs in specific locations in the upper

  13. Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs Robert J 31, 2012 (received for review August 6, 2012) Well-functioning food webs are fundamental emphasis on restoring habitat structure--without explicitly considering food webs--has been less successful

  14. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Norman FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Range) 200 kilometres southeast of Croydon and flows in a northwesterly direction. It is joined by its. #12;The record major flood of January 1974 and the floods of February 1991 and early February 2009 The Carpentaria Shire Council for the lower Norman River and the Croydon Shire Council for the upper Norman River

  15. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Proserpine River has a total catchment area FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the PROSERPINE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  16. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Warrego FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Warrego River catchment is located in south west Queensland and north FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the WARREGO RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  17. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Burnett FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Burnett River is located on the southern Queensland coast FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURNETT RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  18. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Tully and FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    at Kareeya Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk and Murray FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the TULLY-MURRAY RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system

  19. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Pioneer FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    at Mirani Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the PIONEER RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  20. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Don FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Don River drains occurs in the Queens Beach and Bowen delta areas and dwellings are at risk. Previous Flooding Since

  1. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nicholson FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Nicholson River catchment is located in north FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NICHOLSON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  2. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Herbert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood ALERT System · Flood Warnings Flood Risk The Ross, Bohle and Black River catchments covers an area of 750 square kilometres. Two main FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the ROSS, BOHLE & BLACK RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system

  3. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Logan and Albert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood Warnings Flood Risk The Logan River has a catchment area of about 3850 square kilometres and lies in the south and Albert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  4. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mooloolah FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Mooloolah River. Continuing increases in population have accentuated this potential flood risk to life and property. Previous

  5. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Flinders FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Flinders River catchment is located in north FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the FLINDERS RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  6. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Johnstone ALERT System · Flood · Other Links Flood Risk The North and South Johnstone Rivers rise in the tablelands of the north tropical FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  7. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Balonne and FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Pty Ltd Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · The Flood Risk Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links The Flood Risk and Maranoa FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BALONNE AND MARANOA RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  8. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mulgrave/Russell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning · Local Information · Mulgrave/Russell ALERT System Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Mulgrave and Russell Rivers drain the mountain country dominated/Russell FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the MULGRAVE AND RUSSELL RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  9. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The vast Diamantina River catchment is located FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DIAMANTINA RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  10. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Macintyre FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning · Local Information · Flood Warnings and Bulletins · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk and Weir FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the MACINTYRE AND WEIR RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  11. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Condamine to Warwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Warwick ALERT System · Flood · Other Links Flood Risk The Condamine River catchment to Warwick covers an area of approximately 1300 to Warwick FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the CONDAMINE RIVER TO WARWICK This brochure describes the flood warning

  12. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Condamine Warwick to Cotswold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Ltd Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · The Flood Risk Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links The Flood Risk Warwick to Cotswold FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the CONDAMINE RIVER WARWICK TO COTSWOLD This brochure

  13. THE MIDDLE SACRAMENTO RIVER: HUMAN IMPACTS ON PHYSICAL AND ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES ALONG A MEANDERING RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE MIDDLE SACRAMENTO RIVER: HUMAN IMPACTS ON PHYSICAL AND ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES ALONG A MEANDERING, California. Abstract: Native plant and wildlife communities along Northern California's middle Sacramento and eroding terraces. Human-induced changes to the Sacramento River, in- cluding bank protection, gravel

  14. Disturbance frequency and functional identity mediate ecosystem processes in prairie streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of stream ecosystem properties (algal form and biomass, invertebrate densities, metabolism and nutrient along a downstream gradient of increasing temperature and nutrient concentrations. Different results

  15. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massby direct effects of climate change including ocean warming,

  16. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in2007), Comparison of carbon dioxide fluxes over three borealharvest influence carbon dioxide fluxes of black spruce

  17. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  18. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  19. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    smart grid landscape The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters,...

  20. Observed and modeled ecosystem isoprene fluxes from an oak-dominated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    isoprene fluxes from an oak-dominated temperate forest and the influence of drought stress Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observed and modeled ecosystem isoprene...

  1. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    access at Springerlink.com Fog Water and Ecosystem Function:The contribution of fog to the water relations of Sequoiaelectrical conductivity, water content, and surface conduc-

  2. Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Oran R

    2009-01-01

    ENV-02 Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate theof Ecosystem-Based Management Preparer Information: Juliaof Environmental Science & Management young@bren.ucsb.edu

  3. An Evaluation of the Collaboration Towards Ecosystem Objectives and a Watershed Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;An Evaluation of the Collaboration Towards Ecosystem Objectives and a Watershed Vision ....................................................................................................7 3.1 Social and Economic Profile ...........................................................8 4.0 Case Study Evaluation

  4. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  5. Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca Garrett

    2005-04-29

    This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

  6. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  7. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Mayes, Melanie; Gu, Lianhong; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2014-01-01

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  8. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  9. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B.; Miller, Karl V.; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  10. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  11. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    2013-11-15

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  12. Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rear, M.G. ); Steele, J.L.; Kitchen, B.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The environmental surveillance activities at and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) (formerly the Savannah River Plant (SRP)) comprise one of the most comprehensive and extensive environmental monitoring programs in the United States. This overview contains monitoring data from routine and nonroutine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities, summaries of environmental protection programs in progress, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities, and a listing of environmental permits (Appendix A) issued by regulatory agencies. This overview provides information about the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. The SRS occupies a large area of approximately 300 square miles along the Savannah River, principally in Aiken and Barnwell counties of South Carolina. SRS's primary function is the production of tritium, plutonium, and other special nuclear materials for national defense, for other governmental uses, and for some civilian purposes. From August 1950 to March 31, 1989, SRS was operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. On April 1, 1989 the Westinghouse Savannah River Company assumed responsibility as the prime contractor for the Savannah River Site.

  13. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  14. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality Characterization Using Rapidly Deployable Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS RD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas C. Harmon; Richard F. Ambrose; Robert M. Gilbert; Jason C. Fisher; Michael Stealey; William J. Kaiser

    2006-01-01

    High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality1594. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Qualityobserving spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties

  15. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2008-02-20

    The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures for the estuary are monitored indicators that reflect the status of habitat conditions and fish performance, e.g., habitat connectivity, survival, and life history diversity. Performance measures also pertain to implementation and compliance. Such measures are part of the monitoring, research, and action plans in this estuary RME document. Performance targets specific to the estuary were not included in the 2007 draft Biological Opinion.

  16. T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems | Savannah

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With LivermoreSustainable Landmimic keySystemssystemso be p rRiver

  17. Snake River Steelhead Straying Risk To Oregon Mid-C Steelhead Populations and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). · Snake River hatchery strays are considered a primary threat to Deschutes River and John Day River Migration In-River Transport Year # Adults Failed # Adults Failed 1999 51 25% 46 43% 2000 1098-River 22% Migration In-River Transport Year # Adults Failed # Adults Failed 1999 188 27% 187 38% 2000 426

  18. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  19. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 UNCW. These rivers are classified as blackwater systems because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear

  20. Environmental Assessment of the Lower Cape Fear River System, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    along Cape Fear Estuary Persistent blue-green Microcystis algal bloom in Cape Fear River, fall 2009 UNCW because of their tea colored water. The Northeast Cape Fear River often seems to be more oxygen stressed

  1. ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and hydroelectricity since the 19th century. A restoration program of the river started officially in 1998. It has, the Rhône River has been regulated for navigation, irrigation and hydroelectricity since the 19th century

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2004-07-29

    2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  3. RETURN OF THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 5 Freshwater Habitats131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rivers of the world and also one of the most developed with ten major hydroelectric dams on the main the major hydroelectric projects and the owner-operator of each project. #12;RETURN OF THE RIVER - 2000

  4. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN PLAN FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan and exclusively resulting from, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower

  5. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste Processing Facility on October 6, 2009 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the...

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  7. Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy, Case...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2005 ("DOE Potomac River Order") Pepco hereby files this revised notice of the planned outage of the 230 kV circuits serving the Potomac River Substation, and through that station,...

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    2005-01-01

    modeling systems that simulate the storage, flow, and diversion of water in a system of reservoirs and river reaches. Generalized means that a computer modeling system is designed for application to a range of concerns dealing with river basin systems...

  9. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Savannah River Remediation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the evaluation of Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina during the period of November 4-13, 2014, and provides the Associate Under...

  10. Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    College intern Spencer Isom recently began her second summer with Savannah River Remediation (SRR), and her fourth year at Savannah River Site (SRS), where she continues a 31-year family legacy on site.

  11. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2006-10-23

    FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2005-07-19

    2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Nitric Acid Spill Event and an Electrical Arc Flash Injury Event at the Savannah River Site On October 7, 2010, the U.S....

  14. Supplemental Recovery Plan Module for Snake River Salmon and Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River Hydropower Projects June 2014 Prepared by the: National Marine Fisheries Service West Coast Region............................................................................................................................... 3 2. Hydropower System Overview Hydropower Projects (Hydro Module, dated September 24, 2008) for Snake River anadromous fish species listed

  15. Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999 -2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999 - 2008 Peter Hassemer Idaho Department of Fish Upper Columbia Summer Chinook Salmon Coho Salmon Shad Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Returns 1999

  16. New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead May 24, 2010 - 1:23pm Addthis Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles...

  17. Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Monthly Model Evaluation Study Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 2006 Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Monthly Model Evaluation Study Report, December 2006 Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-07-02: As you are aware, Mirant Potomac River,...

  18. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  19. DEEP-SEA COR AL ECOSYSTEMS OF THE UNITED STATES FEATURE ARTICLE 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    77 DEEP-SEA COR AL ECOSYSTEMS OF THE UNITED STATES FEATURE ARTICLE 3 INTRODUCTION Coral reefs- ties are structured by deep-sea corals, also referred to as cold-water corals, and are distributed the last decade has revolution- ized our understanding of these deep-sea coral ecosystems and spurred calls

  20. Trade and the governance of ecosystem services Richard B. Norgaard, Ling Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in production, or production externalities generally, because trade separates consumption from production with an industrial good and a rural good. Industrial good production results in pollution that affects the provision of ecosystem services and thereby the production of the rural good. The assignment of ecosystem rights