Sample records for kootenai river ecosystem

  1. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  2. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  3. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts...

  4. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  5. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kootenai River Network, (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network (KRN) was contracted by the Bonneville Power Administration; PPA Project Number 96087200 for the period June 1, 2003 to May 31, 2004 to provide Kootenai River basin watershed coordination services. The prime focus of the KRN is coordinating activities and disseminating information related to watershed improvement and education and outreach with other interest groups in the Kootenai River basin. To this end, the KRN primarily focuses on maintaining communication networks among private and public watershed improvement groups in the Columbia River Basin. The KRN willing shares its resources with these groups. The 2003-2004 BPA contract extended the original Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks contract, which was transferred to the Kootenai River Network through a Memorandum of Understanding in November 2001. The KRN objectives of this contract were carried out through Watershed Coordinator position. The highly successful Kootenai River Network Annual General Meeting in Bonners Ferry in May 2003 demonstrated the tremendous gains that the Kootenai River Network has made in trans-boundary networking of watershed issues and accomplishments. The Annual General Meeting included seventy five participants representing more than forty US and Canadian citizen groups, tribes, first nations, agencies, ministries, businesses and private land owners from Montana, British Columbia, Idaho and Alberta. The International Restoration Tour in July 2004 featured the Grave Creek and Therriault Wetlands restoration projects in Montana and the Sand Creek and Wolf Creek restoration projects in British Columbia. The tour was attended by more than thirty people representing US and Canadian Federal and State/Provincial agencies, schools, colleges, conservation groups, private land owners, consultants, tribes, first nations, and politicians. These exciting trans-boundary successes encouraged the KRN to establish half-time Watershed Coordinator positions in both the United States and Canada. In September 2004 Kim Laub was hired as US-Watershed Coordinator and Jim and Laura Duncan were hired as Canadian Watershed Coordinators. To rejuvenate and revitalize the KRN, the Board conducted a strategic thinking and planning meeting in November 2004. All Board, staff and Advisory members participated in a combined effort to clearly define the goals of the KRN and to design ways of achieving those goals. Affirming and integrating board policy was a primary focus and it included writing accurate job descriptions for all KRN positions. KRN committee goals, the BPA contract and the Statement of Work plan were reviewed to establish future directions for a complex organization.

  6. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  7. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

  8. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  9. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations: Salmonid Studies Project Progress Report, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Walters, Jody; Maiolie, Melo [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research report addresses bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and Redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss redd surveys, population monitoring, trout distribution, and abundance surveys in the Kootenai River drainage of Idaho. The bull trout is one of several sport fish native to the Kootenai River, Idaho that no longer supports a fishery. Because bull trout are listed under the Endangered Species Act, population data will be vital to monitoring status relative to recovery goals. Thirty-three bull trout redds were found in North and South Callahan creeks and Boulder Creek in 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 and 2005 and less than the high count in 2003. However, because redd numbers have only been monitored since 2002, the data series is too short to determine bull trout population trends based on redd counts. Redband trout still provide an important Kootenai River sport fishery, but densities are low, at least partly due to limited recruitment. The redband trout proportional stock density (PSD) in 2007 increased from 2006 for a second year after a two-year decline in 2004 and 2005. This may indicate increased recruitment to or survival in the 201-305 mm length group due to the minimum 406 mm (16 inches) length limit initiated in 2002. We conducted 13 redd surveys and counted 44 redband trout redds from May 7 to June 3, 2007 in a 3.8 km survey reach on Twentymile Creek. We surveyed streams in the Kootenai River valley to look for barriers to trout migration. Man-made barriers, for at least part of the year, were found on Caboose, Debt, Fisher, and Twenty Mile creeks. Removing these barriers would increase spawning and rearing habitat for trout and help to restore trout fisheries in the Kootenai River.

  10. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  11. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation[s]; Stock Status of Burbot, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Hoyle, Genevieve

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation Project planned to monitor burbot Lota lota movement in the winter of 2002-2003 and test a hypothesis regarding the relationship of winter flow to upstream spawning migration success. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration were unable to provide the consistent low winter flows needed to meet the experimental design criteria in that monitoring and evaluation plan (approximately 170 m{sup 3}/s from Libby Dam). Although conditions consistent with management for sustained minimum flows persisted throughout the winter, and stable low flows were maintained below Libby Dam from September 1 through November 24, 2002 (158 m{sup 3}/s average) and from January 1, 2003 until May 1 (144 m{sup 3}/s average), flows in the intervening 37 d period from November 25 to December 31 were increased significantly by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. During that important December spawning migration period for burbot, flows were well above those proposed in the monitoring and evaluation plan and peaked at 741 m{sup 3}/s on December 21, 2002. Furthermore, despite the low flow conditions for much of the winter, our capture of 10 burbot was the lowest since this investigation began in 1993, evidence that the stock is extremely depressed and the numbers of burbot are declining. We captured a single burbot in 2002-2003 that provided circumstantial evidence reproduction occurred during the winter of 2000-2001. This burbot of 352 mm TL was among the smallest captured since sampling began in 1993. Seven burbot were monitored with sonic telemetry; two of those were tagged the previous winter. The capture of a female burbot at Ambush Rock during the spawning period supports results of previous findings that low flows during winter enhances burbot migration and spawning. Sampling for larval burbot was conducted, but no larval burbot were captured.

  12. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  13. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    planting saltcedar for stream bank erosion control along such rivers as the Pecos River in New Mexico. The plant has spread down the Pecos River into Texas and is now known to occur along the river south of Interstate 10. More recently the plant has become...

  14. Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Fish, Wildlife, Ecosystem Monitoring and Evaluation Manager SUBJECT: Summary of Public and ISAB substitution), wildlife, habitat/ecosystem questions thereby balancing the currently predominant anadromous

  15. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River ­ Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Planning Center Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Restoration Plan

  16. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  17. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response of the Columbia River Response of the Columbia River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Implemented by a Collaboration of CREST,and Implemented by a Collaboration of CREST, NMFS, PNNL, UWNMFS, PNNL in the Columbia River estuary. #12;8 Gary Johnson, PNNL Management Curtis Roegner, NOAA Mikah Russell, CREST Fish StudiesHeida Diefenderfer, PNNL Modeling Ron Thom, PNNL Scaling Catherine Corbett, LCREP Meta Analysis

  18. Carbon flow and ecosystem dynamics in the Mississippi River plume described by inverse analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg Allen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Oceanography CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS A Thesis by GREG ALLEN BREED Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial... of Department) December 2002 Major Sublect: Oceanography ABSTRACT Carbon Flow and Ecosystem Dynamics in the Mississippi River Plume Described by Inverse Analysis. (December 2002) Greg Allen Breed, B. S. , University of Minnesota Chair of Advisory...

  19. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  20. Kootenai River Native Fish Conservation Aquaculture Master

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /incomplete incubation · predation · larval food limitation/starvation · over-wintering energy deficiency Result: Aging Idaho Dept of Fish and Game #12;Burbot conservation strategy · conservation aquaculture · habitat) · Continue small scale extensive rearing experiments in local ponds · Monitor experimental releases

  1. Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    150 miles of shoreline and hundreds of acres of marsh, mudflat, and shallow water habitats. The river

  2. Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

  3. Restoration in the Anacostia river watershed: An ecosystem management case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses various aspects of an ecosystem approach to watershed restoration as illustrated by the Anacostia River Watershed Restoration initiative. This information was derived from a case study conducted as part of the Interagency Ecosystem Management Initiative (IEMI), an outgrowth of a recommendation in the National Performance Review. The purpose of this study was to identify components of the ecosystem approach used in the Anacostia initiative that may be useful to other ecosystem restoration and management initiatives in the future. Water quality and ecological conditions within the Anacostia River watershed have become degraded due to urban and suburban development and other activities in the watershed over the last two centuries. An intergovernmental partnership has been formed to cooperatively assess the specific problems in the basin and to direct and implement restoration efforts. The Anacostia initiative includes a number of cooperative efforts that cross political boundaries, and involves numerous states, local agencies, civic groups, and private individuals in addition to the Federal players. In contrast with some of the other case studies in the IEMI, the Anacostia restoration effort is primarily driven by state and local governments. There has, however, been Federal involvement in the restoration and use of Federal grants. In addition, the establishment of a forum for setting goals, priorities and resolving differences was viewed as essential. Closer relationships between planning and regulatory functions can help advance the restoration goals. Public participation, including education, outreach and involvement, is essential to viable ecosystem initiatives. Comprehensive planning and modeling must be balanced with continuous visible results in order to sustain administrative and public support for the initiative.

  4. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  5. Hydraulic controls on river biota and the consequence for ecosystem processes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limm, Michael Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of macroinvertebrates in stream ecosystem function. Annualin marine and freshwater ecosystems. Canadian Journal ofanimals in freshwater ecosystems. Annual Review of Ecology

  6. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  7. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  8. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  9. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  10. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedThe U.S.Pinal County, Arizona

  11. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationCA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationBay–Delta Program. 2000. Ecosystem Restoration Program:

  12. EA-2003: Sandy River Delta Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assessed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed removal of a dam from the east channel of the Sandy River. The proposal would help fulfill a portion of the 2010-2013 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan to improve estuary habitat for salmon and steelhead species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  13. Analysis of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River from an Ecosystem Perspective. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology was applied to the analysis of chinook salmon in the mid-Columbia subbasins which flow through the steppe and steppe-shrub vegetation zones. The EDT examines historical changes in life history diversity related to changes in habitat. The emphasis on life history, habitat and historical context is consistent with and ecosystem perspective. This study is based on the working hypothesis that the decline in chinook salmon was at least in part due to a loss of biodiversity defined as the intrapopulation life history diversity. The mid Columbia subbasins included in the study are the Deschutes, John Day, Umatilla, Tucannon and Yakima.

  14. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  15. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.

  16. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  17. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rivers: implications for ecosystem restoration: Final reportto CALFED. Ecosystem Restoration Program Agreement No.support tools to guide ecosystem restoration planning and

  18. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

  19. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration, April 29-30, 2008, Astoria, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Sutherland, G. Bruce [Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (retired)

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C. A compact disk, attached to the back cover, contains material in hypertext-markup-language from the conference website (http://cerc.labworks.org/) and the individual presentations.

  20. Negotiating river ecosystems: Impact assessment and conflict mediation in the cases of hydro-power construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karjalainen, Timo P., E-mail: timopauli.karjalainen@oulu.f [Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 7300, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Jaervikoski, Timo, E-mail: timo.jarvikoski@oulu.f [Unit of Sociology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 2000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss how the legitimacy of the impact assessment process is a key issue in conflict mediation in environmental impact assessment. We contrast two EIA cases in hydro-power generation plans made for the Ii River, Finland in different decades, and evaluate how impact assessment in these cases has contributed to the creation, mediation and resolution of conflicts. We focus on the elements of distributional and procedural justice that made the former EIA process more legitimate and consensual and the latter more conflictual. The results indicate that it is crucial for conflict mediation to include all the values and interests of the parties in the goal-setting process and in the definition and assessment of alternatives. The analysis also indicates that procedural justice is the most important to help the people and groups involved to accept the legitimacy of the impact assessment process: how different parties and their values and interests are recognized, and how participation and distribution of power are organized in an impact assessment process. It is confirmed in this article that SIA may act as a mediator or a forum providing a process through which competing knowledge claims, various values and interests can be discussed and linked to the proposed alternatives and interventions.

  1. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  2. Kootenai River Habitat Restoration Program BPA Project 2002-002-00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libby Dam construction Floodplain diking Libby Dam operations Infrastructure development Conversion used in design Mitigation for construction & operation of Libby Dam 199500400 (MFWP) Status of fish ­ Egg suffocation (sand) ­ Incomplete incubation ­ Failure to complete life cycle ­ Larval predation · 2

  3. PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

  4. ELSEVIER Ecological Economics 14(1995) 143-159 Ecological economic modeling and valuation of ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -economicmodeling; Ecosystem models; Patuxent River basin; Spatial modeling; Land use 1. Introduction In its report, Reducing of ecological systems. Startingwith an existing spatially articulated ecosystem model of the Pqtuxent River

  5. INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

  6. Project ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia River Basin ~ Response to ISRP/RME Proposal Review Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Synder et al. 2002). The shifting habitat mosaic is controlled by the coupled relationship between flowProject ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia. 1. The ISRP cited a need to "provide better evidence of the linkages of changes in flow regimes

  7. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

  8. Chesapeake Bay ecosystem modeling program. Technical synthesis report 1993-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, S.B.; Boynton, W.R.; Kemp, W.M.; Wetzel, R.; Bartleson, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Contents: Ecosystem models for management; Ecosystem regession models; Patuxent River Sav-Littoral Ecosystem Process Model; Lower Chesapeake Bay Polyhaline Sav Model; Emergent Intertidal Marsh Process Model; Plankton-Benthos Ecosystem Process Model; Fish Bioenergetics Models; Linking Water Quality with Fish Habitat; Data Visualization; Publications and Scientific Presentations Resulting From This Research.

  9. FONSI signed 5/14/2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to benefit Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed Kootenai White Sturgeon and other native fish, would complement other restoration on the Kootenai River, and would help mitigate for...

  10. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  11. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetlands has negative impacts on ecosystem services (i.e. ,economically quanti?able ecosystem bene?ts, such as rechargeincluded the loss of natural ecosystem functions and their

  12. Lower Flathead River Fisheries Study, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James E.; Cross, Paul D.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January of 1983 a two-phase study of the lower Flathead River was initiated by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes with funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration. The study fulfills program measure 804 (a) (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. During 1983 Phase I of the study was completed resulting in a detailed study plan for the next four years and the methods to be employed during the study. Preliminary observations suggest the present operation of Kerr hydroelectric facility and land use practices within the drainage have combined to significantly reduce spawning success of salmonids and northern pike, and thus recruitment to the fisheries of the main river and tributaries. Main river spawning marshes were observed to be drained frequently during the northern pike spawning season which would result in desiccation of eggs and loss of attached fry. Water level fluctuations also caused trapping of juvenile fish and may be an important source of juvenile mortality.

  13. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  14. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  15. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystem Science SHARE Ecosystem Science Project the fate and function of ecosystems as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to...

  16. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food production affect the land...

  17. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  18. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  19. Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Projects Leads Nancy...

  20. EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Soil Composition http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebnewssoil-composition

  1. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  2. Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Frederick

    Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange David M. Blersch dblersch Shade of Blue and You 21 September 2010 #12;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange UB's ERIE Program www

  3. River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

  4. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  5. How We Got Started Sheyenne River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Riparian Ecosystems · Field Tours · Rancher Meetings · Educational Materials #12;Project Collaborators Source Program #12;· The goals of this project is to improve and strengthen the ability of resource Project #12;· 6 New Riparian ESDs · MLRA 54 · Knife River · Spring Creek · MLRA 55B · Baldhill Creek

  6. Monetising cultural ecosystem services? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinci, Igor

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT In the context of increasing degradation of the environment, the economic valuation of ecosystem services represents an attempt to quantify the contribution of nature to human wellbeing. This approach has been ...

  7. Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliaga, Daniel G.

    Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes Michel Abdul Massih Philip Jarvis Purdue University Daniel G. Aliaga Carlos A. Vanegas a) b) c) Figure 1: This example demonstrates the need for urban ecosystems. The image in a) shows a terrain occupied by a wild ecosystem and b) displays the same ecosystem grown over

  8. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems D. A. NEHER Department of Biology, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA; E-mail: dneher, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i

  9. Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World www.wiley.com  The world’s ecosystems have always been 

  10. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  11. Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

  12. Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems...

  13. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  14. Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

  15. The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Michael

    The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Australia. THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICS SCHOOL OF PHYSICS Abstract Ecosystems are systems. Ecosystems operate autonomously, by a process of self-regulation. Their flows of energy mean they cannot

  16. Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a great array Desert steppe Desert ecosystems MainMain ecosystems of Mongolia High mountain ecosystemsHigh mountain ecosystems High mountain occupies 4.48% of the total territory of Mongolia. Mountain forest ecosystems

  17. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  18. Appendix 18 Excerpt from Return to the River, Chatper 5 (Williams et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Columbia River Ecosystem. Northwest Power Planning Council Document 2000-12. Northwest Power Planning is one of the larger rivers of the world and also one of the most developed with ten major hydroelectric mainstems showing the major hydroelectric projects and the owner-operator of each project. #12;RETURN

  19. Intelligent spatial ecosystem modeling using parallel processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, T.; Costanza, R. (Maryland International Inst. for Ecological Economics, Solomons (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial modeling of ecosystems is essential if one's modeling goals include developing a relatively realistic description of past behavior and predictions of the impacts of alternative management policies on future ecosystem behavior. Development of these models has been limited in the past by the large amount of input data required and the difficulty of even large mainframe serial computers in dealing with large spatial arrays. These two limitations have begun to erode with the increasing availability of remote sensing data and GIS systems to manipulate it, and the development of parallel computer systems which allow computation of large, complex, spatial arrays. Although many forms of dynamic spatial modeling are highly amenable to parallel processing, the primary focus in this project is on process-based landscape models. These models simulate spatial structure by first compartmentalizing the landscape into some geometric design and then describing flows within compartments and spatial processes between compartments according to location-specific algorithms. The authors are currently building and running parallel spatial models at the regional scale for the Patuxent River region in Maryland, the Everglades in Florida, and Barataria Basin in Louisiana. The authors are also planning a project to construct a series of spatially explicit linked ecological and economic simulation models aimed at assessing the long-term potential impacts of global climate change.

  20. Private Lands, Public Goods: Engaging Landowners in Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferranto, Shasta Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practice: implementing ecosystem management objectives in2009. Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyondthe Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Proceedings of the

  1. Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography model version 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography] Insights into how terrestrial ecosystems affect the Earth's response to changes in climate and rising contain detailed mechanistic representations of biological processes affecting terrestrial ecosystems

  2. Applying the Patuxent Landscape Unit Model to human dominated ecosystems: the case of agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Applying the Patuxent Landscape Unit Model to human dominated ecosystems: the case of agriculture to be formulated in a general enough way to simulate all habitat elements within the landscape. Within the Patuxent River watershed, human dominated land uses, such as agriculture and urban land, are already 50

  3. The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Inception, Objectives,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , especially with controversies over the effects of even-aged timber harvest on old-growth forests, with minimal "zonation" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational use by the public. Inception of the Project

  4. Grassland diversity and ecosystem services within a Platte River agroecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    : Modified from Foley et al. 2005, Falkenmark et al. 2007. · Width of every plant (basal stem cover) touching Dornbos, Michelle Hellman, Ashley Pella. Invertebrate identification: Hank Guarisco, James Trager, Foster. Earthscan, London. Foley, J.A. et al. 2005. Glob

  5. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  6. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 8 Artificial Production304304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 8 Artificial Production304304 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 8. ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION AND THE EFFECTS OF FISH CULTURE ON NATIVE SALMONIDS largely on hatchery production, with no overt and large scale ecosystem-level recovery program is doomed

  7. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 February 2009 #12;2 #12;3 Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 buildings. By consuming solar energy in the process of evapotranspiration and blocking winter winds

  8. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE THE DEPARTMENT an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Recommendations for Establishing an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure Foreword The Internet is one of the most

  9. Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

  10. Data Compendium for the Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Huesties, L.R.; Maughan, A.D.; Miley, T.B.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). The CRCIA is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the CRCIA is to evaluate the current human and ecological risk from the Columbia River attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. Human risk will be addressed for radioactive and hazardous materials over a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The initial effort for the CRCIA is the development of a compendium of existing data on Columbia River contamination. This document provides the data compendium. It also includes a discussion of data sources, descriptions of the physical format of the data, and descriptions of the search process used to identify data.

  11. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  12. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  13. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  14. Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

  15. Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

  16. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  17. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  18. 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals or desired future conditions for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals for this Management Plan is 10-15 years. The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model was used in the Hood River and August-October streamflow records; and 2) a habitat-population modeling effort recently completed

  19. Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith.hanna@naturalengland.org.uk #12;Ecosystem services Constituents of well-beingSupporting­ecologicalprocesses:nutrient cycling:opportunityto achievewhatanindividualvaluesdoingandbeing Simplified from Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2003 #12;Source: MEA (2003) #12;Ecosystems

  20. What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons? The overarching goal of Ecosystem Commons is to enhance the use of ecosystem services and related science in conservation at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information

  1. Microsoft Word - LowerJocko_Acquisition_CX_final_081310.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of the Lower Jocko River Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract BPA-44646 Categorical Exclusion...

  2. EA-1973 Public Hearing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Comments on the Draft EA should refer to “Kootenai River Habitat Restoration at Bonners Ferry” and be submitted by March 5, 2015:

  3. PERSPECTIVE www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Effects of solar UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    species and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, marshes, oceans). Solar UV radiation penetrates and high to mid latitudes have aroused concern about the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation of low temperatures.7 Exposure to solar UV radiation can reduce productivity, affect reproduction

  4. Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation by Oswald J. Schmitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation By Oswald J.Oswald J, Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation. Washington:when the protection of the ecosystem also extends outside of

  5. Size structuring of planktonic communities : biological rates and ecosystem dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taniguchi, Darcy Anne Akiko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nutrient enriched ecosystems. Limnology and Oceanographyin the pelagic ecosystem. Helgol. Wiss. Meeresunters. 30:Size-structured planktonic ecosystems: constraints, controls

  6. azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

  7. Pecos River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

  8. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  9. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://ocean.mit.edu/~mick/Downloads.html #12;What is the marine ecosystem limited Light limited Reveals environmental regulation of primary production #12;coccolithophores (CaCO3 of organic carbon Current Question: What regulatesC

  10. Platte River Cooperative Agreement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY, CO, DOE...

  11. Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration to restoreTo the extent possible, we need to restore historic conditions on the ecosystem scalehistoric conditions on the ecosystem scale to achieve these goalsto achieve these goals Habitat LossHabitat Loss #12

  12. Abstract--The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Francesco

    Abstract-- The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful emerging inter-company cooperative structures. One of the main advantages of an ecosystem companies of the ecosystem is an essential binding element among them. The intention of this paper

  13. Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services increasingly important in government policy in the last decade. Ecosystem services have also become a significant focus for government following the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA). Human wellbeing is a key

  14. Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittner, Thomas

    Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem ecosystems as a representative example of a geographic object. To achieve this goal we will develop a formalized framework for handling of the structure of ecosystem hierarchies. Our theory will be demonstrated

  15. Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism during of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545; and c Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia) Environmental sensor networks are developing rapidly to as- sess changes in ecosystems and their services. Some

  16. Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead-ing to impairment of natural ecosystem structure and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but coupling that potential with societal demands and eco- nomic feasibility.Valuation of ecosystem goods are ig- nored.Ascribing an economic value to some ecosystem goods and services,by contrastArticles Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead- ing to impairment of natural ecosystem

  17. Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    -Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael Köster · CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael Köster · CIG, TU

  18. Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Toward Predictions that Incorporate, Pocatello, Idaho 83209, USA; 2 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA; 3, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although

  19. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam April 21- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model

  20. essm.tamu.edu of Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    essm.tamu.edu Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life of Ecosystem Science and Management (ESSM) at Texas A&M University invites applications for graduate.D. students whose research will focus on the ecology and management of dryland ecosystems. James M. Carder

  1. Linking ecosystem and parasite Michel Loreau,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    13 CHAPTER 1 Linking ecosystem and parasite ecology Michel Loreau,1 Jacques Roy,2 and David Tilman3 Parasites are rarely considered in ecosystem studies. The current interest in the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, has stimulated the emergence of new synthetic approaches

  2. A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management Ratana Chuenpagdee,1 * Lisa Liguori,2 Dave ABSTRACT Although ecosystem-based management can lead to sustainable resource use, its successful imple the ecosystems with stakeholders' preferences is therefore needed. We propose here a 'Public Sen- timent Index

  3. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  4. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam November the appli- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific

  5. CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT CCLME Inception Workshop 2-3 November 2010. Two possible case studies are presented: the Imraguen social-ecosystem of the Banc d'Arguin National Park, the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate

  6. affect ecosystem metabolism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike 9 Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: and agricultural ecosystems;...

  7. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  8. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  9. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  10. Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, R.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

  11. Landscape and Urban Planning 78 (2006) 5070 Room for rivers: An integrative search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for floodplain restoration S. Rohdea,, M. Hostmannb, A. Peterc, K.C. Ewaldd a Swiss Federal Institute for Forest restoration aims to re-establish the ecological integrity of a river ecosystem. However, restoration measures to identify stream systems where present environmental (e.g. natural flow, sufficient bed load material

  12. Saving a Dwindling River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

  13. Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

  14. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTriSolarEcosystem

  15. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  16. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  17. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  18. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  19. River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

  20. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  1. The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex interrelationships, participants in the online ecosystem are deeply interdependent. These participants include consumers; online

  2. VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on and func9on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on Issue: ·Ecosystem condition affects the humans dependent on those ecosystems for life and livelihood. How do changes in ecosystem composition and function correlate with famine, exposure to harmful biotic

  3. Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest Professor: 2009-present Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT). "Novel ecosystems, rapid change, and no

  4. Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact: current and future measures James the information needs of domain scientists, software component producers, infrastructure providers, and ecosystem conclude with policy recommendations #12;designed to improve insight into the scientific software ecosystem

  5. Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and how of Engineers #12;The Issue The Corps created an ecosystem restoration mission out of congressional authorities ecosystem services enough to reduce national welfare. Implementing projects under that mission requires

  6. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  7. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  8. Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report ARB Award No. 98 of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall University Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mangement Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall

  9. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Publishedbythe. ONeill, Harold A. Mooney, Osvaldo E. Sala, Amy J. Symstad, and David Tilman Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Critical processes at the ecosystem level influence

  10. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study National Planning Center of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study Prepared by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus

  11. Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ForReview Only Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer change, community assembly, ecosystem functioning, New Zealand Nothofagus (beech) forests, priority dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities Tadashi Fukami1,2,3 , Ian A

  12. ENVS 4000, Spring (Jan-Apr) 2006 Monitoring Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    systems depend on ecosystems for food, materials, energy, purification, enjoyment, a sense of place challenges. Adaptive ecosystem management depends on knowledge of system states and dynamics, and therefore and models for ecosystem monitoring and management, including Environmental Benefit Analysis, Environmental

  13. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho: Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult Pacific lamprey counted passing Ice Harbor Dam fishway averaged 18,158 during 1962-69 and 361 during 1993-2000. Human resource manipulations in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 120 years, likely impacting the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Timber harvest, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile and larval lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass/collection systems, and over spillway structures at the four lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities have impacted Pacific lamprey populations to an unknown degree. The Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, restricted chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha passage in the 1927-1940 period, altering the migration route of outmigrating Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae and upstream adult migrants (1927-1972). Dworshak Dam, completed in 1972, eliminated Pacific lamprey spawning and rearing in the North Fork Clearwater River drainage. Construction of the Harpster hydroelectric dam on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed fish passage 1949-1963. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2001. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River drainage. Forty-three sites in Red River, South Fork Clearwater River, and their tributaries were electrofished in 2001. Sampling yielded a total of 442 juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey. Findings indicate Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution in the South Fork of the Clearwater River drainage was confined to lower reaches of Red River and the South Fork Clearwater River.

  14. aerobic microbial ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Ecosystem Viable Yields CERN Preprints Summary: The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010....

  15. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

  16. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  17. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  18. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  19. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  20. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  1. Beneficial Bees and Pesky Pests: Three Essays on Ecosystem Services to Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Brian James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region considered. Ecosystem service valuations can usefullyand valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services.

  2. Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

  3. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EB et al (2005) Valuing ecosystem services: toward bettershaping landscapes and ecosystems for human welfare. Scienceanalyzing, and managing ecosystem services. Front Ecol

  4. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security Globalisation Climate Change Health Water Security Poverty Alleviation Finance Urbanisation Population Energy

  5. Kootenai Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New EnergyKenosistecKilaraKoRenta AGKomaxKonca

  6. Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich Oregon State University, Corvallis. The emerging field of Ecosystem Informatics applies meth- ods from computer science and mathematics to address fundamental and applied problems in the ecosystem sciences. The ecosystem sciences are in the midst

  7. Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity Erika (sent for review July 27, 2009) Society places value on the multiple functions of ecosystems from ecosystems to provide threshold levels of up to eight ecosystem functions simultaneously. Across years

  8. At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    EDITORIAL At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science The science and management of ecosystems to- gether is one of the most dynamic fields of contem- porary ecology. Ecosystem science has disciplines. The scope of ecosystem science encom- passes bounded systems like watersheds as well as spatially

  9. Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures D.A. Neher a,*, J. Wu b understanding of performance among major ecosystem types is necessary before nematode community indices can and agricultural ecosystems; (2) compare nematode community composition among and within ecosystem types and report

  10. Volume 3 Number 2 2011 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Volume 3 · Number 2 · 2011 55 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with Adaptive Agents* Joseph Engler1 of innovation and its place in a global economy or ecosystem is presented. The model utilizes simple agents-based model of an innovation ecosystem is presented. The ecosystem is considered as an environment in which

  11. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S for the goods and services provided by natural ecosystems. However, relatively few studies have evalu- ated- ity to loss and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. ammonium diversity ecosystem function

  12. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

  13. Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 1 Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects Running Head: Edge effects across ecosystem types Key Words: biomass 59717-3460. hansen@montana.edu 25 February 2008 #12;Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 2

  14. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  15. Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

  16. P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

  17. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  18. Muddy River Restoration Project Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

  19. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM NERANG RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ALERT System The Nerang River ALERT flood warning system was completed in the early 1990's as a coFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NERANG RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Nerang ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins

  1. To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Elizabeth N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    goals and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecosystems 3:Kumar. 2008. Valuation of ecosystem services: A psycho-

  2. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  3. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  4. Rainfall-River Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

  5. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  6. Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within a larger natural ecosystem. An Eco-Logical guide waschanges in the Great Lakes ecosystem from the introductionfor a State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) Pre-

  7. Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Oran R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management Preparergovernance to assist ecosystem-based management initiativesCurrent Large Marine Ecosystem. This geographic scope

  8. Species diversity and foundation species: Potential indicators of fisheries yields and marine ecosystem functioning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracken, Matthew E.S.; Bracken, B. E.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning: a consensus ofWood. 1995. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: coastalSection 6. Biodiversity and ecosystem function: ecosys- tem

  9. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear dynamics in ecosystem response to climatic change:alteration within ecosystems. Conservation Biology 10: 1163-Paruelo, 1998. The value of ecosystem services: putting the

  10. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developinghabitat and essential ecosystems. There are a variety ofdo very little to promote ecosystem sustainability. Concern

  11. An Assessment of Ecosystem Services Provided by Street Trees in Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOONSAWAD, NATTHANIJ

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecologicalquantification and valuation of ecosystem services using i-their valuation Although research on ecosystem services has

  12. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  13. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  14. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and spatial distribution of ecosystems and users, the spatial relation- ships between them, and the presence; Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2003). Despite their importance for human well-being, eco- system services

  16. ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

  17. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  18. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Chapin, F. S; Harden, J. W; Neff, J. C; Harmon, M. E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F A. Bazzaz. August 2002 NET ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTION 1993.Net exchange of CO2 in a mid-latitude forest. ScienceN. , and E. -D. Schulze. 1999. Net CO, and H,O fluxes from

  19. Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature profiles using inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature ecosystem carbon budgets from micrometeorological methods remains nighttime ecosystem respiration theory to infer the two components of ecosystem respiration (aboveground and forest floor) from measured

  20. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  1. 5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction To understand the behaviour of an ecosystem it is important to know its resource requirements. Though numerous resources are mobilized models have attempted to represent the growth of entire plants or of entire ecosystems based on physical

  2. Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line: a Case Study on Digital increases the number of software ecosystems: software platforms developed and maintained in a decentralized YourCast from a single system to a medium- scale ecosystem, we show how organizing it as a multiple

  3. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  4. Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST to Convey Publication Metadata Peter Kraker1, Austria {pkraker, afessl, phoefler, slind}@know-center.at Abstract. In this paper we present an ecosystem of this ecosystem, semantically enriched RSS feeds are used for dissemination. These feeds are complemented

  5. California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy Winter 2014 Mondays, 4 Applying reconciliation ecology to aquatic ecosystems in California. Peter Moyle and Melanie Truan, UC of Chief Counsel, State Water Resources Control Board Feb. 10 Reconciling ecosystem goals for San Francisco

  6. Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data Dileep George, 1 Kazumi Saito, 2 Pat Langley, 1. Ecosystem models are used to interpret and predict the in- teractions of species and their environment. In this paper, we address the task of inducing ecosystem models from background knowledge and time- series data

  7. Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Mikls Herdon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Drivers Miklós Herdon1 , Mária Raffai2 , Ádám of the Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE) has been come life in order to build an Internet-based environment in which businesses will be able to interact with each other more efficiently. In a Digital Ecosystem

  8. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 that time, ecosystem restoration has advanced from planning to implementation; progress in research has

  9. Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review SelfStudy Document April, 2008 #12;ii Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review April, 2008 Table of Contents 1.0 Department of Ecosystem Science

  10. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    . Despite this uncertainty, new methods of ecosystem service valuation are suggesting that the economicRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1 benefits of restoration can outweigh costs. Payment for Ecosystem Service schemes could therefore provide

  11. The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

  12. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 1 16 .06.2008 Pastoral system and herders communities Professor D.Dorligsuren Programme Coordinator "Green Gold" Pasture Ecosystem Management Programme Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development, Mongolia "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management

  13. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

  14. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  15. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  16. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  17. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  18. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3 Management Strategies4 5 Andrew James Hansen6 Ecology property, ecosystem energy levels, which,14 while once widely recognized as important, has received little

  19. South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

  20. Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

  1. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)...

  2. Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - October 2011 October 2011 Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene...

  3. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

  4. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

  5. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014...

  6. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  7. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the- EnergyGreat-River

  8. Rhonda Whiting Bill Bradbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Libby Dam operations on the Kootenai River white sturgeon. In August 2009 the Tribe submitted a Master natural recruitment failure and uncertain prospects for restoration of successful natural recruitment

  9. factsheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 acres of land in northern Idaho along Smith Creek in the Kootenai River floodplain for wildlife habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Boundary County, the property is partly...

  10. Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) Ecosystem Restoration Plan Orleans, St. Bernard, and St. Tammany Parishes, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    into the tidal wetlands bordering the City of New Orleans and surrounding coastal communities. Dredging, pending the determination by the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) that the project is cost the cost-share requirements for implementation and has expressed unwillingness to participate unless

  11. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Castro JM, editors. Stream restoration in dynamic fluvialas part of the stream meander corridor restoration. Naturalwith stream meander corridor restoration and restored flow

  12. River Influences on Shelf Ecosystems: Introduction and synthesis B. M. Hickey,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    . Nash,3 K. W. Bruland,2 W. T. Peterson,4 P. MacCready,1 E. J. Lessard,1 D. A. Jay,5 N. S. Banas,6 A. M

  13. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

  14. The Transport of Chemicals and Biota into Coastal Rivers and Marine Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Charlene Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ng/g), DDD (max. 234 ng/g), DDT (max. 152 ng/g), dieldrin (p,p’- DDE, p,p’-DDD, p,p’-DDT, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin,that of a previous study on DDT on the Monterey Bay shelf (

  15. Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management

  16. Flloodplains of large rivers are among the most productive of ecosystems; they are also among the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis Jr., William M.

    and Cummings 1995). Information on the eco- logical characteristics of these few floodplains is the only the impression of great eco- logical complexity. The combination of constant physical change, which is driven (fishes); functioning of food webs and energy flow; and reciprocal biogeochemical relation- ships between

  17. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM HAUGHTON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment and enables moreFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Flooding Flood Forecasting Local Information Haughton ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins

  18. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BURDEKIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment below the DamFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURDEKIN RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Local Information Burdekin ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings

  19. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  20. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

  1. 4, 41254173, 2007 River discharge data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    alteration of aqueous ecosystems. An improved version of WGHM (WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model) was tuned

  2. Food chain dynamics and potential ecological risks of mercury at the Carson River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, S.C. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Lancaster, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The USEPA is conducting a remedial investigation of mercury contamination in the Carson River watershed, located near Carson City in central west Nevada. As a component of this investigation, water, sediment, and tissue samples were collected for mercury speciation and other analyses. Tissues analyses from the seven site-investigation areas and four background areas include: whole-body and fillet analyses of five species of fish, composite and individual analyses of three species of benthic macroinvertebrates, blood, feather and liver analyses of two bird species, composite analyses of zooplankton, and whole-body analyses of lizards. The data are used to develop site-specific estimates of mercury bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains of riverine/riparian, open-water, and mudflat habitats at the Carson River site. Because the behavior and food chain dynamics of mercury in semi-arid ecosystems of the southwestern US is poorly understood, these data can be compared and contrasted with bioaccumulation estimates derived from well-studied ecosystems such as northern temperate lakes. Potential ecological risks of mercury exposure through the food chain and through ingestion of and contact with contaminated media are evaluated for important wildlife receptors occurring at the Carson River site.

  3. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  4. Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport,de Nantes JumpEcosystem Japan Co Ltd

  5. alpine lake ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Lake Ecosystem Modelling: an Integrated Approach INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic eutrophication of water bodies and its consequences are of concern especially to Assess...

  6. anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Anthropogenic impacts such as fishing and eutrophication are significant challenges to the sustainable management of aquatic ecosystems....

  7. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  8. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  9. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  10. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oregon and Washington stream temperature data Figure 4 and 5. Herman Creek (Oxbow Hatchery): 7-Day Moving.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

  11. Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

  12. Case Studies in River Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

  13. Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act establishes the Niobrara Council, to assist in all aspects of the management of the Niobrara scenic river corridor and promulgate rules and regulations related to the preservation of the...

  14. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  15. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  16. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  17. Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance flux–based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance S.Uncertainty of annual net ecosystem productivity estimatedand par- titioning of ecosystem respiration in a southern

  18. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous United States by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Lianhong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defensible annual sums of net ecosystem exchange. Agri. For.contrasting Florida ecosystems. Ecol. App. 9, 936- Clark,S. , 2002. Seasonality of ecosystem respiration and gross

  19. Near-surface remote sensing of canopy architecture and land-atmosphere interactions in an oak savanna ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngryel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007). Reduction of ecosystem productivity and respirationR. (2005). On the separation of net ecosystem exchange intoassimilation and ecosystem respiration: review and improved

  20. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  1. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993), Terrestrial ecosystem production – a process modeland H. L. Gholz (2005), Ecosystem and understory water andestimating per-pixel ecosystem C fluxes. Geophy. Res.

  2. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations in three ecosystems. Marine Biology 82 (2), 199–2009. Subtropical ocean ecosystem structure chang- es forcedrecent collapse of coastal ecosystems. Science 293, 629–637.

  3. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

  4. Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system inundation from storms, hurricanes, and tsunamis [Tornqvist et al., 2007; Blum and Roberts, 2009; Jerolmack

  5. EA-2006: Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing a programmatic EA for actions recommended by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. Activities under this program could include full reconnection of tidal influence through breaching dikes and levees; partial reconnection of tidal influence through culverts, bridges, and tidegates; enhancement of the quantity and quality of tidal channels; removal of invasive species; and restoration of riparian habitat conditions, such as planting native vegetation.

  6. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  7. EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

  8. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  9. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  10. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  11. Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Locatelli Carbon sequestration is recognised as a global ecosystem service (see box on next page such as the global climate (through carbon sequestration), the quantity and quality of water and the force of windsS Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store carbon, forests contribute

  12. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  13. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  14. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  15. DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

  16. Global mapping of ecosystem services and conservation priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and ecosystem services. biodiversity carbon hotspots Global 200 conservation planning Efforts to conserve wild: the goods and services from ecological systems that benefit people (e.g., water purification, carbon sequestration, and crop pollination). These ``ecosystem services'' are currently the focus of intensive re

  17. Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services and poverty and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework' Ecosystem Services, vol 7, pp. 34­45., 10.1016/j.ecoser.2013 services and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework$ Janet A. Fisher a,n , Genevieve Patenaude

  18. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  19. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  20. Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday of ecosystem services, its history and rise to prominence. We then explore the ways in which ecosystem services can be valued, measured and monetized by society, across

  1. Let's talk about symbiosis! 9:15 Matthias Horn, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science Welcome Session 1 9:30 Julie Klose Session 2 11:30 Buck Hanson, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science 13:30 Daryl Domman, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

  2. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inputs of nitrogen to forest ecosystems in south- ern Chile:forms, ?uxes, and sources. Ecosystems 3: 590–5.Ecosystems (2009) 12: 417–433 DOI: 10.1007/s10021-009-9232-x

  3. PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division rate functions of planktonic ecosystems has been hypothesized to add stability or persistence planktonic ecosystem, one indirect and two direct. 1) The indirect measure, copepod stage frequency

  4. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1029/2010JG001390, 2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxesdioxide fluxes of black spruce ecosystems in eastern Northof a stand?replacing fire on ecosystem CO 2 exchange of a

  5. Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900 provided by ecosystems, from food and medicines to a stable climate, clean water and storm protection. This course provides an introduction to the ecosystem ecology

  6. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  7. Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

  8. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  9. Energy related use conflicts for the Columbia River Estuary. Volume 1. Text. Volume 2. Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.; Loehr, L.; Richter, K.; Ahlborn, G.; Westerlund, F.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High, medium, and low probabilities of energy related development are projected for the Columbia River Estuary to river mile 93. Projections for five, fifteen, and twenty-five year planning horizons are aggregated, mapped, and described. The direct and indirect effects of projected energy-related development upon fish and wildlife in estuarine and riverine systems are summarized. Habitats affected by construction are identified, and operations of energy facility components causing impacts are characterized. Ecosystem models are developed for riverine, estuarine, channel, sandflat, mudflat, emergent vegetation, and riparian habitats to determine biological significance and pathways of projected impacts. Species accounts are furnished for 13 species and species groups that are of special concern. Cumulative impacts are integrated and described on a site-specific basis.

  10. California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, MC 3110, University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor Mediterranean species. In this changed ecosystem, grazing and pastoral practices can benefit native wildlife, and land, livestock, and ecosystem service markets. Keywords: transhumance, oak woodlands, ecosystem

  11. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

  12. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDYof the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas,

  13. Energy-related use conflicts for the Columbia River Estuary. Volume I. Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.; Loehr, L.; Richter, K.; Ahlborn, G.; Westerlund, F.; Pratt, J.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High, medium, and low probabilities of energy related development are projected for the Columbia River Estuary to river mile 93. Projections for five, fifteen, and twenty-five year planning horizons are aggregated, mapped, and described. The direct and indirect effects of projected energy-related development upon fish and wildlife in estuarine and riverine systems are summarized. Habitats affected by construction are identified, and operations of energy facility components causing impacts are characterized. Ecosystem models are developed for riverine, estuarine, channel, sandflat, mudflat, emergent vegetation, and riparian habitats to determine biological significance and pathways of projected impacts. Species accounts are furnished for 13 species and species groups that are of special concern. Cumulative impacts are integrated and described on a site-specific basis. Policy-making, planning, and regulatory processes relevant to the control of energy-related impacts in the Columbia River Estuary and lower river are outlined. Management and mitigation measures are discussed both for species of concern and for the types of energy facilities expected to be developed. This report has two volumes. Volume 1 provides a narrative description of projected energy development and describes the biological characteristics of fish and wildlife and their habitats, and gives a critique of potential environmental impacts, and measures of protection and mitigation.

  14. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

  15. Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

  16. An Inside Look at River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

  17. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

  18. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  19. Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

  20. River System Hydrology in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

  1. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  2. South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River J. Michael Jess Platte, and Arkansas rivers, for example, have been resolved through litigation brought before the U and Kansas are examples. In the Platte River watershed the State of Nebraska has experience allocating water

  3. Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior to and Following Elevated Flows in the Central Platte River, Spring 2008 Flows in the Central Platte River, Nebraska, Spring 2008 By Paul J. Kinzel Prepared in cooperation

  4. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  5. Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain: an analysis. Historical ecology of the lower Santa Clara River,Ventura River, and Oxnard Plain: an analysis of terrestrial layers are available on SFEI's website, at www.sfei.org/projects/VenturaHE. Permissions rights for images

  6. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  7. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  8. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  9. Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise businesses that interacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

    Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise ecosystems. We introduce the idea of creating an eco- system from a number of smart devices. This ecosystem is categorised as a micro ecosystem rather than macro ecosystem. The proposed model of this digital ecosystem

  10. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River estuary was a high-energy environment dominated by physical forces, with extensive sand Riddell November 28, 2000 ISAB 2000-5 #12;ISAB 2000-5 Estuary Report i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Northwest to an informed response to the Council. Consequently, this report has been prepared as a preliminary reply

  11. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  12. SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

  13. Change in Land Cover along the Lower Columbia River Estuary as Determined from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garono, Ralph; Anderson, Becci; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Columbia River Estuary Management Plan (Jerrick, 1991) recognizes the positive relationship between the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat, and sustaining their populations. An important component of fish and wildlife conservation and management is the identification of habitats, trends in habitat change, and delineation of habitat for preservation, restoration or enhancement. Alterations to the environment, such as hydropower generation, dredging, forestry, agriculture, channel alteration, diking, bank stabilization and floodplain development, have dramatically altered both the type and distribution of habitats along the Columbia River Estuary (CRE) and its floodplain. Along the Columbia River, tidally influenced habitats occur from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of 230 km. If we are to effectively manage the natural resources of the Columbia River ecosystem, there is a need to understand how habitats have changed because fish and wildlife populations are known to respond to changes in habitat quality and distribution. The goal of this study was to measure the amount and type of change of CRE land cover from 1992 to 2000. We performed a change analysis on two spatial data sets describing land cover along the lower portion of the estuary (Fig. 1). The 1992 data set was created by the NOAA Coastal Remote Sensing, Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in cooperation with Columbia River Estuary Study Task Force (CREST), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Point Adams Field Station, and State of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2000 data set was produced by Earth Design Consultants, Inc. (EDC) and the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET: University of Washington) as part of a larger Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) habitat mapping study. Although the image classification methodologies used to create the data sets differed, both data sets were produced by classifying Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery, making it feasible to assess land cover changes between 1992 and 2000.

  14. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  15. Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

  16. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute control during this interval. During the 1st year after harvest, K concentrations tripled in shallow soil

  17. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  18. arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

  19. Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

  20. Stakeholder value network analysis for the mobile services ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind, A. S. (Amarnath Sury)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile services ecosystem has evolved and continues to evolve at a rapid pace adjusting to the different players competing to be part of the value creation and capture. This thesis attempts to capture a holistic view ...

  1. aquatic ecosystem restoration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. A. Aguirre 2006-01-01 124 Climate change as an ecosystem architect: Implications to rare plant ecology, conservation, and restoration CiteSeer Summary: Recent advances in...

  2. agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

  3. Modeling power-plant impacts on multipopulation systems: application of loop analysis to the Hudson River white perch population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The white perch population of the Hudson River suffers unusually high mortality due to impingement and entrainment at power plants. The long-term consequences of this mortality for the Hudson River ecosystem depend in part on interactions between the white perch population and its prey, competitors, and predators, many of which are themselves subject to mortality at power plants. Size multipopulation models were analyzed, using a technique known as loop analysis, to determine how patterns of interaction affect population responses to stress and to identify the parameters that have the greatest influence on those responses. These theoretical results, together with information on life history and vulnerability to power plants for Hudson River fish and macroinvertebrate populations, were used to assess the likely effects of power plant mortality on the white perch population and its prey, competitors, and predators. The results suggest that effects of interactions with other populations are insufficient to offset the effects of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. The results also suggest that if mortality imposed by power plants does cause a substantial decline in the white perch population, then piscivore populations in the Hudson River should not be noticeably affected, a complementary increase in the abundance of competitors that are relatively invulnerable to power plants should occur, and a shift in the distribution of biomass within the white perch population toward the older age classes should occur.

  4. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  5. Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 , Lingzhi believed that an E-Learning ecosystem is the next generation E-Learning. Nowadays, the current trend of Web-Learning ecosystem. A mashup approach to an E-Learning ecosystem enhances the flourish and sustainability of E

  6. Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di.2.1 Ecosystem Resource Dynamics, with Emphasis on Primary Production 11.2.2 Ecosystem Stability, with Emphasis.3.5 Biodiversity Effects on Human Disease Regulation 11.4 Biodiversity Effects on the Provision of Marine Ecosystem

  7. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  8. Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, David. S.

    Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias Department ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially

  9. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem services Forest , and there is consensus that this can decrease ecosystem functioning and services2­7 . It remains unclear, though, whether few8 or many9 of the species in an ecosystem are needed to sustain the provisioning of ecosystem

  10. Ris-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions Merete Bang Selsted Risø-PhD-63(EN) July 2010 #12;Author: Merete Bang Selsted Title: Ecosystem environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems

  11. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America B. D. Amiro,1 A. G, and New Brunswick). Net ecosystem production (NEP) showed a carbon loss from all ecosystems following a standreplacing disturbance, becoming a carbon sink by 20 years for all ecosystems and by 10 years for most

  12. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

  13. Balancing the Need to Develop Coastal Areas with the Desire for an Ecologically Functioning Coastal Environment: Is Net Ecosystem Improvement Possible?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global human population is growing exponentially, a majority lives and works near the coast, and coastal commerce and development are critical to the economies of many nations. Hence, coastal areas will continue to be a major focus of development and economic activity. People want and need the economics provided by coastal development but they also want and need the fisheries and social commodities supported by estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Because of these facts, we view the challenge of balancing coastal development with enhancing nearshore marine and estuarine ecosystems (i.e., net ecosystem improvement) as the top priority for coastal researchers in this century. Our restoration research in Pacific Northwest estuaries and participation in the design and mitigation of nearshore structures has largely dealt with these competing goals. To this end, we have applied conceptual models, comprehensive assessment methods, and principles of restoration ecology, conservation biology and adaptive management to incorporate science into decisions about use of estuarine systems. Case studies of Bainbridge Island and the Columbia River demonstrate the use of objective, defensible methods to prioritize estuarine areas for preservation, conservation and restoration. Case studies of Clinton, WA and Port Townsend, WA demonstrate the incorporation of an ecological perspective and technological solutions into design projects that affect the nearshore. Adaptive management has allowed coastal development and restoration uncertainties to be better evaluated, with the information used to improve management decisions. Although unproven on a large scale, we think that these kinds of methods can contribute to the net improvement of already degraded ecosystems. The challenges include applied science to understand the issues, education, incentives, empirical data (not rehashing of reviews), cumulative impact analysis, and an effective adaptive management program. Because the option of net ecosystem improvement is often more costly than other alternatives, commitment by the local or regional community to this approach is essential.

  14. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

  15. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen) and a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity

  17. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  18. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  19. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    employee Matthew Gay uses critical electronic rounds to take a reading at the Savannah River National Laboratory. In one Continuous Improvement initiative, SRNS switched to...

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) More Documents & Publications PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite...

  3. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  4. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

  8. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

  9. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  11. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  12. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: river current energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  14. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  16. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  17. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  19. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater beneath much of Hanford's 100 Areas is contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) as a consequence of treating reactor cooling water to prevent corrosion. Several treatment systems are in place to remove Cr{sup +6} from the groundwater; however, these systems currently do not reduce Cr{sup +6} to concentrations below aquatic standards. Of concern is the transport of Cr{sup +6} to areas within the channel of the river, as sensitive species inhabit the river and its associated transition zone. The aquatic standard for Cr{sup +6} is currently 11 ug/l under the Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Action and Department of Energy (DOE) currently plans to pursue remediation of the groundwater to achieve the 11 ug/l standard. Because the compliance wells used to monitor the current remediation systems are located some distance from the river, they may not provide an accurate indication of Cr{sup +6} concentrations in the water that reaches the riverbed. In addition, because salmon spawning areas are considered a high priority for protection from Hanford contaminants, it would be advantageous to understand (1) to what extent Cr{sup +6} discharged to the near-shore or river ecosystems is diluted or attenuated and (2) mechanisms that could mitigate the exposure of the river ecosystems to the discharging Cr{sup +6}. The current concentration target for Cr{sup +6} at near-river groundwater monitoring locations is 20 {micro}g/L; it is assumed that this groundwater mixes with river water that contains virtually no chromium to meet Washington Department of Ecology's (Ecology) water quality standard of 10 {micro}g/L in the river environment. This dynamic mixing process is believed to be driven by daily and seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater remediation system operations, and has been validated using analytical data from numerous groundwater samples obtained adjacent to and within the banks of the river. Although the mean mixing factor of river water and site groundwater in this zone has been estimated to be equal parts of groundwater and river water, a wide range of mixing ratios likely occurs at various times of the day and year. The degree of mixing and dilution appears to be greatly influenced by the river stage and other groundwater/surface water interaction. The extent of mixing, thus, has implications for the design and operation of the groundwater remediation systems. Improved understanding of this 'dilution' mechanism is needed to design an optimum 'systems approach' to accelerate remediation of the near-shore contaminant plumes. More information on the pathway from near-river mapped plumes to riverbed receptor locations is also needed to develop a defensible proposed plan for a future ROD for final remedial action of contaminated groundwater. In April 2008, an expert panel of scientists was convened to review existing information and provide observations and suggestions to improve the current understanding of groundwater surface water interactions in the 100 Areas (primarily focusing on 100-D Area), and to identify what additional analyses or approaches may provide critical information needed to design and implement remediation systems that will minimize impacts to river aquatic systems. Specific objectives provided to the panel included: (1) comment on approaches and methods to improve the current understanding of groundwater-surface water interactions, specifically how contaminated groundwater enters the riverbed and how this relates to remediation of chromate in the groundwater in the 100 Areas; (2) evaluate past and current data collection methods, data analysis techniques, assumptions, and groundwater transport and mixing mechanisms; (3) evaluate the current monitoring network (monitoring wells, aquifer tubes, and shoreline/river monitoring); (4) evaluate the role played by modeling; and (5) suggest additional research to fill data gaps and perform modeling.

  20. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  1. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Savannah River Field Office Savannah River Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report...

  2. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  3. alligator rivers region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  4. aliakmon river greece: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  5. allegheny river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  6. almendares river havana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  7. amu dar river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  8. amazon river system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use in indigenous and Colonist Communities of the Palcazu Basin, Peruvian Amazon McClain, Michael 159 Charlotte, Manatee River, Sarasota, Hardee, and Peace River Soil Biology...

  9. Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm...

  10. Preliminary Notice of Violation,Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC - WEA-2012-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC - WEA-2010-05...

  11. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site...

  12. John C. Barnes of Savannah River Operations named 2012 Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    right, discusses a transuranic (TRU) waste container with Charles Fairburn of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. The TRU waste container was repackaged in the Savannah River Site...

  13. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

  14. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Field Office Tritium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Site (SRS) tritium facilities implemented at the activity-level by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC and its subcontractors. The review was performed by the...

  15. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Salt...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Startup Test Plans - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste...

  16. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

  17. Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear...

  18. Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning...

  19. Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and...

  20. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of...

  1. assessment columbia river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and disturbances may be ineffective are being spent in the United States on river and stream restoration projects. In the Columbia River basin Montgomery, David R. 311 A...

  2. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER...

  3. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

  4. Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional Laboratory Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional Laboratory January 28, 2015 -...

  5. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site...

  7. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

  8. Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomicSavannah River

  9. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0InputYear Jan FebtotalRiver

  10. Caney River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind IICaney River Jump to: navigation,

  11. Kootenai County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas: Energy ResourcesKooskia, Idaho:

  12. Microsoft Word - Final Kootenai EA FONSI_May 2013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S.Fluor-B&W Portsmouth,BARACK OBAMATEC1-23452699

  13. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  14. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enables. Flood ALERT System The initial Ipswich Creeks ALERT flood warning system was completed in the earlyFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH This brochure describes the flood warning

  15. RiverFalls,Wisconsin SolarinSmall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), which services approximately 5,800 customers, the largest being UW-RF.ii Together, the utility are solar (most are biogas and wind), the program has helped to raise awareness and interest in renewable energy within the community.v Bringing Solar to River Falls The success of the River Falls Renewable

  16. Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan (WPP) began in November 2009 upon acceptance of the WPP by EPA. The primary goals of implementing the plan are to improve the health of the Pecos River watershed and instream water quality...

  17. Restoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , the first-ever comprehensive database of more than 37,000 stream and restoration projects nationwideRestoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila Maryland has the largest number of river restoration projects restoration and conservation. On a sweltering July afternoon, an assortment of men and women clad in T

  18. California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

  19. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  20. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

  1. Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental health and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. Concentrations of contaminants in water, suspended and bed sediment and biological tissues (fish, or non-point source pollution, include: elevated levels of contaminants in water and sediment aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some dioxin and furan congeners in sediment exceed guidelines or draft

  2. How important is diversity for capturing environmental-change responses in ecosystem models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowe, A. E. F.

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic plankton diversity. Diversity, however, may affect functions such as primary production ...

  3. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We foundPerennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; b Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US Department

  4. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  5. Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

  6. Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

  7. Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

  8. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  9. Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

  10. Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results from field experiments fire frequency Woody mortality Introduction of exotic grasses Is cover dominated by annuals or short intensity precipitation Low wind speeds Low P/PE High variability High intensity precipitation High wind

  11. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  12. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  13. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  14. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments ­ NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report December 31, 2011 A progress Dynamics Model Used to Design Permafrost Simulator 2 Details at a Glance 3 Progress and Accomplishments 3 sample in a sleeve of highly conductive copper foil (shown in red) and then cooling coils placed

  15. Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

  16. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  17. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis design. This paper explores how to support energy as a first-class operating system resource. En- ergy the limited energy resource among competing tasks. 1. INTRODUCTION Traditionally, the operating system plays

  18. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  19. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  20. Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

  1. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  2. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  3. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  5. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  6. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  7. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), up and walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opgenoorth, Lars; Faith, Daniel P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    valuation, and accounting (3d)  Platform goal  Strengthen the science?policy interface for biodiversity and ecosystem services   

  8. SEDIMENTS, SEC 4 SEDIMENT-ECOLOGY INTERACTIONS POSITION PAPER Anthropogenic pollutants affect ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ecosystem services of freshwater sediments: the need for a "triad plus x" approach Sabine Ulrike Gerbersdorf ecosystem services such as nutrient recycling or self-purification which extend beyond the aquatic systems, microbiological/molecular approaches to unravel changes of microbial ecosystems, up

  9. 2012 NSTIC/IDtrust Workshop: "Technologies and Standards Enabling the Identity Ecosystem"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    2012 NSTIC/IDtrust Workshop: "Technologies and Standards Enabling the Identity Ecosystem" March, Gartner 9:30 am Keynote Mapping the Global IDentity Ecosystem Speakers: Karen O'Donoghue, ISOC and Lucy Lynch, ISOC 10:00 am Panel: Gaps and Challenges for Advancing the Global Identity Ecosystem

  10. Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process Janet R to occur with climate change will likely influence how predators indirectly affect an essential ecosystem and severity of droughts (1, 2). Changes in rainfall will likely affect ecosystem processes such as primary

  11. The Loss of Ecosystem Services on the Yucatn Peninsula in the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    The Loss of Ecosystem Services on the Yucatán Peninsula in the 21st Century Case study: mangrove loss in Mexico (MX) & Belize (BZ) Natallia Leuchanka Environmental Science: Ecosystems; International Reardon #12;#12;Akumal, Mexico (MX) Sarteneja, Belize (BZ) #12;· Ecosystem: a dynamic complex of plant

  12. Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy-makers, society and scientists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy-makers, society and scientists B., Martinez C., Imbach P., 2009. Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy and livelihoods depend largely on ecosystem services, policies for adaptation to climate change should take

  13. Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations and differences in ecosystem and plant type responses to global change M . T. VA N W I J K *w , K, Darwin Building, King Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JU, UK, wThe Ecosystem Center, Marine

  14. Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Jian-Ping

    Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling Y. H. Spitz 2005; accepted 19 August 2005; published 22 October 2005. [1] Three-dimensional ecosystem response-based ecosystem model coupled to a high-resolution circulation model. We investigate, in particular, the influence

  15. Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Matthew

    1 Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications Peter Q. Olsson1 ecosystem processes. During the two autumnal stages (Early Snow and Early Cold) soils remain warm, unfrozen with the least amount of biological activity and have the least impact on the ecosystem. However, Early Snow

  16. A site-based approach to delivering rangeland ecosystem Joel BrownA,C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A site-based approach to delivering rangeland ecosystem services Joel BrownA,C and Neil Mac Range, Las Cruces, NM 88003-0003, USA. B CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia. C Corresponding author. Email: joelbrow@nmsu.edu Abstract. Rangeland ecosystems are capable of providing an array

  17. Anchoring policy development around stable points : an approach to regulating the co-evolving ICT ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    to regulating the co-evolving ICT ecosystem David D. Clark MIT Computer Science of the natural rates of change in different parts of the ecosystem, and examine why hinder its feasibility in the ICT ecosystem. As a means to achieve more

  18. Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses and error subspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, John J.

    Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses the seasonal ecosystem dynamics of the Lagoon of Venice and provide guidance on the monitoring and management stochastic ecosystem modeling components are developed to represent prior uncertainties in the Lagoon

  19. November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem More than 99% of food worldwide comes from the soil ecosystem. Rapid ero- sion of soil is reducing food production--and causing ecosystem. --DAVID PIMENTAL College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University Soil and biological

  20. How Do Developers React to API Deprecation? The Case of a Smalltalk Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    How Do Developers React to API Deprecation? The Case of a Smalltalk Ecosystem Romain Robbes PLEIAD extent and impact of these API changes in practice, on an entire software ecosystem associated effects across an entire ecosystem. Our case study subject is the development community gravitating around

  1. Viability Kernel for Ecosystem Management Models Eladio Oca~na Anaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Viability Kernel for Ecosystem Management Models Eladio Oca~na Anaya Michel De Lara Ricardo task in general. We study the viability of nonlinear generic ecosystem models under preservation in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem. Key words: control theory; state constraints; viability; predator

  2. Disturbance dynamics and ecosystem-based forest management KALEV JO~ GISTE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREFACE Disturbance dynamics and ecosystem-based forest management KALEV JO~ GISTE1 , W. KEITH and Analysis Program, St Paul, Minnesota, USA Ecosystem-based management is intended to bal- ance ecological ecosystem is usually defined through productivity, biodiversity, stability or other terms. However

  3. IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant on the ecosystem, even though the available scientific literature is scanty and somewhat contradictory and other infestants. A simple mathematical model may explain these data. 1 IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM

  4. Climate-sensitive ecosystem carbon dynamics along the soil chronosequence of the Damma glacier forefield,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate-sensitive ecosystem carbon dynamics along the soil chronosequence of the Damma glacier formation and ecosystem development. We determined soil carbon and nitrogen contents and their stable by small end moraines that resulted from two gla- cier re-advances. The net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB

  5. Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models Y. H; published 6 March 2003. [1] The behavior of three ecosystem models is analyzed for upwelling off the Oregon coast as a function of the number of model components. The first ecosystem model includes dissolved

  6. An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 that an e-learning ecosystem is the next generation e- learning. However, the current models of e-learning ecosystems lack the support of underlying infrastructures, which can dynamically allocate the required

  7. The trophic-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The trophic-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses Agrocampus ouest / INRA Ecologie et Sante´ des Ecosyste`mes, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, CS 84215, 35042 Rennes-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses. ­ ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi

  8. Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from Microbes to Jellyfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    SYMPOSIUM Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from, Engineering and Applied Science, Pasadena, CA, 91125, USA From the symposium ``Marine Ecosystem Engineers@si.edu Synopsis Ecosystem engineers are species that alter the physical environment in ways that create new

  9. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  10. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30013002 A synthesis of soil biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ecosystem functioning in Victoria Land, Antarctica Since the 1970s, ecological research on the ice and nutritional resources. These ecosystems are taxonomically and functionally simple, thus providing and comprehensively than is normally the case for soils and to link soil species explicitly with ecosystem functioning

  11. Ecological Risk Assessment: A Tool for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    #12;#12;Ecological Risk Assessment: A Tool for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach for Southern Current Large Marine Ecosystem Programme (BCLME), the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and Integrating Multiple Demands on Coastal Zones with Emphasis on Aquatic Ecosystems and Fisheries (INCOFISH

  12. Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) plantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex, 1998. We apportioned ecosystem respi- ration among heterotrophic, root, stem and foliage based on re respiration component at selected sampling points, and scaled the mea- surements up to the ecosystem based

  13. Balkanized research in ecological engineering revealed by a bibliometric analysis of earthworms and ecosystem services.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and ecosystem services. Manuel Blouin, Nicolas Sery, Daniel Cluzeau, Jean-Jacques Brun, Alain Bédécarrats are believed to be potentially useful organisms for managing ecosystem services, there is actually of the association of ,,earthworms and other terms such as ecosystem services (primary production, nutrient cycling

  14. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Navigation and Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Independent External Peer Review Report Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program, Project P2, Lock

  15. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order Watershed Ecosystem Restoration at Springville Dam, Draft Detailed Project Report/Environmental Assessment

  16. Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25° C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

  17. This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

  18. A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , and on topics related to urban ecosystem services and their valuation. This conference will once again provideACES 2014 A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making December, DC, USA 1 Welcome to ACES 2014! On behalf of A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) and our

  19. Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    Keywords: Ecosystem services Economic valuation Hedonic pricing Spatial econometrics a b s t r a c t A need. These include production function methods in which an ecosystem service or amenity is viewed as an inputEstimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic

  20. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  1. 13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    humans (Daily 1997). In this chapter, we introduce concepts associated with the valuation of ecosystem services, and discuss how costs generated by invasions relate to impacts on ecosystem services.We link13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes 13

  2. BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1 Jess K in Caribbean ecosystems. Most (11) of the articles describe the responses of Caribbean forests to hurricane of the comparative responses of Caribbean ecosystems to different disturbances. Finally, we identify those areas

  3. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

  4. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

  5. Impact of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon significantly weaken under the influence of climate change. Here we investigate the response of this ecosystem

  6. Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

  7. River Influences on Shelf Ecosystems: Introduction and Synthesis1 , B.M. and R.M. Kudela2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    .M. Kudela2 , J.D. Nash3 , K.W. Bruland2 , W.T. Peterson4 , P.4 MacCready1 , E.J. Lessard1 , D.A. Jay5 , N

  8. Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

  9. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

  10. River Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

  11. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  12. River Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in fiscal year 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River.

  13. Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State aims to preserve and protect Minnesota rivers and adjacent lands with outstanding scenic, recreational, natural, historical, scientific and similar values. Chapter 103F defines...

  14. Rescuing ecosystems from extinction cascades through compensatory perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagar Sahasrabudhe; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Food-web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and habitat degradation often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions, posing considerable challenges to ecosystem conservation efforts. Here we devise a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions using a predictive modeling framework. We show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal or population suppression of other specific species, which is a counterintuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not evident from local predator-prey relationships. In numerous cases, even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. These compensatory perturbations only exploit resources available in the system, and illustrate the potential of human intervention combined with predictive modeling for ecosystem management.

  15. The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. J.

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-44 1973 The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas By: William J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 44 Texas A&M University System...

  16. Math 360 Sample Project: River Crossing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linner, Anders

    corresponding to the east-west difference between the entry and the exit points at the river. Assume the crossing is from north to south, so g is positive if the exit point is east of the entry point

  17. Think water : reconditioning the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

  18. The Ecohydrology of South American Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Michael

    The Ecohydrology of South American Rivers and Wetlands edited by Michael E. McClain Department research integrating the physical processes of hydrology with the biological processes of ecology. Together

  19. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  20. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  1. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  2. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special...

  3. Microsoft Word - CX_Okanogan_River.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confederated Tribes for the purchase of two parcels of land along the Okanogan River. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-224-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

  4. Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership. The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of land on the north side of the Columbia River in Cowlitz County, Wash., to protect fish habitat. An additional 75 acres of land will be donated by the Port of Longview. BPA...

  5. Clinch River MRS Task Force Recommendations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clinch River HRS Task Force was appointed in July 1985 by the Roane County Executive and the Oak Ridge City Council to evaluate the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility proposed by the...

  6. Radionuclide transport in the Yenisei River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Vakulovsky; E. G. Tertyshnik; A. I. Kabanov

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data characterizing the pollution of the Yenisei River (water and bottom sediment) by radionuclide resulting from the use of the river water for cooling industrial reactors in the Mining-Chemical Complex are presented. Studies have been made of the contamination of the river during the period when reactors with direct flow cooling were used and after these were shut down. Distinctive features of the migration of radionuclide in the Yenisei are noted, in particular, their distribution between the solid and liquid phases. The amounts of 137Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn, and 152Eu in the channel are determined from the effluent discharge site to Dudinka port. The rate of continuous self removal of 137Cs is estimated to be 0.19 1/year, corresponding to a half purification time of 3.6 years for a 600 km long segment of the river bed.

  7. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W. [ed.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. An attempt also has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs.

  8. Flint River Drought Protection Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Flint River Drought Protection Act is to maintain in-stream flow in times of drought by providing incentives for farmers to take acres out of irrigation. It allows Environmental...

  9. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help its residential members increase the energy efficiency of their homes. Loans up to $10,000 are available for...

  10. Response of South American ecosystems to precipitation variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Bras, Rafael L [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Demography Model 2 is a dynamic ecosystem model and land surface energy balance model. ED2 discretizes landscapes of particular terrain and meteorology into fractional areas of unique disturbance history. Each fraction, defined by a shared vertical soil column and canopy air space, contains a stratum of plant groups unique in functional type, size and number density. The result is a vertically distributed representation of energy transfer and plant dynamics (mortality, productivity, recruitment, disturbance, resource competition, etc) that successfully approximates the behaviour of individual-based vegetation models. In previous exercises simulating Amazonian land surface dynamics with ED2, it was observed that when using grid averaged precipitation as an external forcing the resulting water balance typically over-estimated leaf interception and leaf evaporation while under estimating through-fall and transpiration. To investigate this result, two scenario were conducted in which land surface biophysics and ecosystem demography over the Northern portion of South America are simulated over {approx}200 years: (1) ED2 is forced with grid averaged values taken from the ERA40 reanalysis meteorological dataset; (2) ED2 is forced with ERA40 reanalysis, but with its precipitation re-sampled to reflect statistical qualities of point precipitation found at rain gauge stations in the region. The findings in this study suggest that the equilibrium moisture states and vegetation demography are co-dependent and show sensitivity to temporal variability in precipitation. These sensitivities will need to be accounted for in future projections of coupled climate-ecosystem changes in South America.

  11. Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Voorhis, David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

  12. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  13. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  14. Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program AK-SG-99-01, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program · AK-SG-99-01, 1999 Ecosystem Considerations and the Limitations of Ecosystem Models in Fisheries Management: Insights for the implementation of ecosystem approaches. The major criticism of single- species models is that they cannot predict

  15. 139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1, in part or collectively, changed many forests. However well- meaning at the time, in some ecosystems the role of fire in ecosystem management and it answers these three questions: 1) what is ecosystem manage

  16. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

  17. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

  18. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  19. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  20. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most