Sample records for kodiak valdez seward

  1. Proposed IMS infrastructure improvement project, Seward, Alaska. Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) examines a proposal for improvements at the existing University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science (IMS), Seward Marine Center. The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS) Trustee Council is proposing to improve the existing research infrastructure to enhance the EVOS Trustee Council`s capabilities to study and rehabilitate marine mammals, marine birds, and the ecosystem injured by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The analysis in this document focuses on the effects associated with construction and operation of the proposed project and its proposed alternatives. The EIS gives a detailed description of all major elements of the proposed project and its alternatives; identifies resources of major concern that were raised during the scoping process; describes the environmental background conditions of those resources; defines and analyzes the potential effects of the proposed project and its alternatives on these conditions; and identifies mitigating measures that are part of the project design as well as those proposed to minimize or reduce the adverse effects. Included in the EIS are written and oral comments received during the public comment period.

  2. Kodiak Electric Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas: Energy Resources JumpKobe Steel LtdKodiak

  3. Kodiak, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas: Energy Resources JumpKobe SteelKodiak,

  4. Kodiak Electric Association KEA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°, -68.9242652° Show MapKodiak Electric

  5. Kodiak Island Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°, -68.9242652° Show MapKodiakWind Farm

  6. First Regional Super ESPC a Success on Kodiak Island, Alaska...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    at Kodiak Island helped pave the way for additional Super ESPC projects at other agencies. "For these projects to be successful, the agency needs to be committed at the site...

  7. Speaker Bios: Lachlan Seward | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafely DeliveringSolid-State Lightingof2 AnnualAuditLachlan Seward

  8. Bill Valdez | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained CoordinationWater10BigBill Valdez About

  9. First Regional Super ESPC: Success on Kodiak Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federal Energy Management Program

    2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study about energy saving performance contacts (ESPCs) presents an overview of how the Coast Guard at Kodiak Island, Alaska, established an ESPC contract and the benefits derived from it. The Federal Energy Management Program instituted these special contracts to help federal agencies finance energy-saving projects at their facilities.

  10. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Lower Cook Inlet and Kodiak Shelf Sediment, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Clay Minerals in Lower Cook Inlet and Kodiak Shelf Sediment, Alaska James R. llein-five surface samples from lower Cook Inlet and forty-three from Kodiak shelf, Alaska, were analyzed for clay percentages of clay minerals. This is because modern ocean currents vigorously rework surficial sediment

  11. Kodiak Island Borough School District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°, -68.9242652° Show MapKodiak

  12. First regional super ESPC a success on Kodiak Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, K.

    2000-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coast Guard military base on Kodiak Island, Alaska, is the largest Coast Guard base in the world. By taking a leadership role in a pilot program to streamline Federal financing and procurement for energy saving projects, the Coast Guard is saving more than $220,000 a year in energy costs at this base. Using the Super ESPC (Energy Savings Performance Contracting) program, the Coast Guard was able to quickly contract with an experienced contractor with energy savings expertise. Working with ERI, one of FEMP's (Federal Energy Management Program) approved energy services contractors, the Coast Guard determined areas of potential energy savings and designed a retrofit to upgrade inefficient equipment and infrastructure. When energy-efficient modifications are complete, the base will be 30% more cost effective.

  13. City of Seward, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer,City ofSeattle,Seward, Alaska

  14. City of Seward, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer,City ofSeattle,Seward, AlaskaCity

  15. City of Seward, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer,City ofSeattle,Seward,

  16. Helium and mercury in the central Seward Peninsula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wescott, E.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The central Seward Peninsula, Alaska, has one Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) at Pilgrim Springs, and has recent volcanic flows, fault systems, topographic and tectonic features which can be explained by a rift model. As part of a geothermal reconnaissance of the area we used helium and mercury concentrations in soil as indicators of geothermal resources. The largest helium concentrations were found in the vicinity of the Pilgrims Springs KGRA, and indicate prime drilling sites. Five profile lines were run across the suspected rift system. Significant helium anomalies were found on several of the traverses, where future exploration might be concentrated. Mercury values showed a great range of variability on the traverses, and seem unreliable as geothermal indicators except in the vicinity of the Pilgrim Springs. Permafrost at the surface resulting in variations in sampling depth may contribute to the mercury variations.

  17. ABILITY OF MALE KING CRAB, PARALITHODES CAMTSCHATICA, TO MATE REPEATEDLY, KODIAK, ALASKA, 1973

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Buss'). I Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game. Commercial Fisheries Diy.. Box 686. Kodiak. AK 99615. 2 Bio. Rothschild. and James A. Buss. 1972. A studY of king. PlIrt/IiI/lOd"s C(III/IS/wI/ClI (Tilesius) hrook stocks

  18. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in stream-sediment samples, Solomon and Bendeleben 1 degree by 3 degree quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.C.; King, H.D.; O'Leary, R.M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in stream-sediment samples, Solomon and Bendeleben 1{degree} by 3{degree} quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska is presented.

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Valdez NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Valdez NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System (GJOIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples.

  20. Unlike PAHs from Exxon Valdez crude oil, PAHs from Gulf of Alaska coals are not readily bioavailable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halambage Upul Deepthike; Robin Tecon; Gerry van Kooten; Jan Roelof van der Meer; Hauke Harms; Mona Wells; Jeffrey Short [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN (United States). Department of Chemistry

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, spatially and temporally spill-correlated biological effects consistent with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure were observed. Some works have proposed that confounding sources from local source rocks, prominently coals, are the provenance of the PAHs. Representative coal deposits along the southeast Alaskan coast (Kulthieth Formation) were sampled and fully characterized chemically and geologically. The coals have variable but high total organic carbon content, technically classifying as coals and coaly shale, and highly varying PAH contents. Even for coals with high PAH content (4000 ppm total PAHs), a PAH-sensitive bacterial biosensor demonstrates nondetectable bioavailability as quantified, based on naphthalene as a test calibrant. These results are consistent with studies indicating that materials such as coals strongly diminish the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds and support previous work suggesting that hydrocarbons associated with the regional background in northern Gulf of Alaska marine sediments are not appreciably bioavailable. 44 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Depositional environments of the Kodiak Shelf, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burbach, Stuart Peter

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sinall amounts of ash. Sills separa+i;g the Trough and Ba:al Trough environments and possfble shelf edge currents are responsible ror the !ow concentrations of' ash. The Local Bank Depression sedir. ;ents are glacial till cove ed by fine-grain ash... os ity. Clay Minora'logy Uoicanic Ash Deposits Sedimentary Struci;ures. DISCUSS IOI'i Tro;! qh, Iiain Bank Basal T~ough. Local Bank Denression CONCLUSIONS. SELECTED I". EFERENCES. APPENDIII I ?2 2? 17 32 35 an 41 nq 45 4B 4B Cg...

  2. Seward, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma:Sevin Rosen Funds

  3. Microsoft Word - ATVMLP BIO_Seward.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENT OFMonday, December 1, 2008 PanelLACHLAN

  4. Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas: Energy Resources JumpKobe Steel

  5. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10, 2015 AJosé

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Copy of Valdez

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312),Microgrid WorkshopApproved forResourceSeptemberResearch

  7. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller DaveCareer

  8. area seward peninsula: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Also known as the Ogallala aquifer A water table aquifer Nearsurface sand and gravel deposits are formed as alluvium deposited Pan, Feifei 323 Opportunistic...

  9. Seward County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma:Sevin Rosen Funds (California)

  10. Seward County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma:Sevin Rosen Funds (California)Nebraska:

  11. Seward County Rrl Pub Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump638324°,Schnell ZToolsSupplySeville Board

  12. alaska exxon valdez: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth to climate variability in interior Alaska Andrea is to determine the climatic controls over the growth of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) at the warmest...

  13. U.S. Coast Guard, Kodiak Island, Alaska | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecemberInjuryU.S. Co-Sponsored IAEACoast

  14. U.S. Coast Guard, Kodiak Island, Alaska | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarchC. BERKELEY:

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - ATVMLP Talking Points_120508 (Seward-Battershel-McMillen)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312),Microgrid WorkshopApproved for PublicProgram December

  16. University of Alaska Coastal Marine Institute annual report number 5, fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, V.

    1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alaska Coastal Marine Institute (CMI) was created by a cooperative agreement between the University of Alaska and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) in June 1993 and the first full funding cycle began late in (federal) fiscal year 1994. CMI is pleased to present this 1998 Annual Report for studies ongoing in Oct 1997--Sep 1998. Only abstracts and study products for ongoing projects are included here. They include: An Economic Assessment of the Marine Biotechnology; Kachemak Bay Experimental and Monitoring Studies; Historical Changes in Trace Metals and Hydrocarbons in the Inner Shelf Sediments; Beaufort Sea: Prior and Subsequent to Petroleum-Related Industrial Developments; Physical-Biological Numerical Modeling on Alaskan Arctic Shelves; Defining Habitats for Juvenile Flatfishes in Southcentral Alaska; Relationship of Diet to Habitat Preferences of Juvenile Flatfishes, Phase 1; Subsistence Economies and North Slope Oil Development; Wind Field Representations and Their Effect on Shelf Circulation Models: A Case Study in the Chukchi Sea; Interaction between Marine Humic Matter and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Lower Cook Inlet and Port Valdez, Alaska; Correction Factor for Ringed Seal Surveys in Northern Alaska; Feeding Ecology of Maturing Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Nearshore Waters of the Kodiak Archipelago; and Circulation, Thermohaline Structure, and Cross-Shelf Transport in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

  17. Tribes Provide Input on 10-Year Plan for Renewable Energy in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Energy in the Arctic Region June 2, 2015 - 1:56pm Addthis Utility-scale wind turbines in Kodiak, Alaska. Photo from Kodiak Electric Association, NREL 16795....

  18. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Algae Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Seward HS in Seward, AK, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  19. UNIVERSIT PARIS 1 PANTHON-SORBONNE cole Doctorale d'Arts Plastiques, Esthtique et Sciences de l'Art (APESA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    plastiques Auteure : Esmeralda MANCILLA VALDEZ Titre de la thse : POUR UN ART BIOCRITIQUE : SEXUALIT ET

  20. Exploring the relationship between traffic-related pollutants, adverse birth outcomes, and asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DirectorGeoff Lomax, Research Director Mimi Johnson, Program CoordinatorMimi Johnson, Program Coordinator, CEHTPCraig Wolff, MS Eng, IT/GIS Manager, CEHTP Samuel Valdez, IT/GIS Technician, CEHTPSamuel Valdez, IT

  1. Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costa, C. F. EPAs Alaska oil spill bioremediation project.for the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Nature 1994, 368, 413418.from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.

  2. Staff Longevity and Awards Ceremony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences -- Seward Marine Center Dolores Baker of Arctic Biology Melody Hughes Cooperative Extension Service Donavan Kienenberger

  3. Texas Automated Buoy System Sustainable Ocean Observations to Help Protect the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico. Some were too young to remember the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989

  4. Department of Criminal Justice Indiana University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    in Bhopal, India; Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska; BP Deep horizon spill in the Gulf, Japanese earthquake

  5. 10/17/2013 A+F Share\\progress card\\01Final_OfficeofAdmin v3 Annual Performance Increase/Decrease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    Experience - ARAMARK Survey (range is 0-6, with 6 the highest score) Esmeralda Valdez Deborah Davis 4.66 4.63 4.78 5.00 5.09 5.10 0 0 2.b. Food Quality - ARAMARK Survey Esmeralda Valdez Deborah Davis 4.45 4.56 4.55 4.85 4.92 4.85 0 0 2.e. Meal Plans - Number of Students Enrolled Esmeralda Valdez Deborah Davis

  6. assessment center technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adjusted with unknown authors 2012-01-01 308 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Statemederal Natural Resource Damage Assessment Final Report Fish Histopathology Damage Assessment after the...

  7. 2006 National Marine Fisheries Service Registered Tanner List For further information, please contact Agent Les Cockreham in the NMFS Enforcement Anchorage Office at (907) 271-3021 or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Road Juneau Alaska, 99801 Jacob Gary Alpha Fur Dressing 11211 Old Seward Highway Anchorage Alaska, 99515 Stewart Richard The Bear's Den 4828 Palermo Drive, 1 S.W. Olympia Washington, 98502 Murray Remie P

  8. Reflections on Environmental Liability Schemes in the United States and European Union: Limitations and Prospects for Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We are constantly confronted with cases of severe damage to the environment resulting from human acts. High profile cases capture the international communitys attention briefly such as the infamous 1989 Exxon Valdez oil ...

  9. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    score in RoboRAVE International at first try Competitors came from as far away as China and the Czech Republic June 1, 2015 Dylan Valdez, Aubriana Duran, Caitlin Hice and...

  10. The evolution prospects of the post-OPA90 Alaskan Oil Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Matthew Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the grounding of the Exxon Valdez on March 24, 1989, the United States Congress enacted the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, a series of regulations requiring technical and operational changes in tank vessels ...

  11. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ). Solomon Gulch at top of Falls near Valdez, Alaska, Oct. 2010. Minor flood stage from Solomon Lake spill, Wyoming, Oct. 2006. Photograph by Melanie L. Clark, USGS. The Blue Marble. Image by NASA Goddard Space

  12. Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPAs Alaska oil spill bioremediation project. Environ. Sci.R. M. Effectiveness of bioremediation for the Exxon ValdezJ. B. ; Atlas, R. Bioremediation for Shoreline Cleanup

  13. Miniature fuel-cell system complete with on-demand fuel and oxidant supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hur, JI; Kim, CJ

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel cell development, Energy, vol. 31, pp. 636-649,and T. I. Valdez, High-energy portable fuel cell powerSomavat and V. Namboodiri, Energy consumption of personal

  14. Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    degradation of the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill in the Gulf ofcomparison to the BP Deepwater Horizon spill in the popularExxon Valdez and BP Deepwater Horizon spills, are natural

  15. Moraine chronosequence of the Donnelly Dome region, Alaska A. Matmon a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    GEOLOGIC Inc., PO Box 52, 12021 Middle Bay Drive, Kodiak, AK 99615, USA d Department of Geology and SchoolMoraine chronosequence of the Donnelly Dome region, Alaska A. Matmon a, , J.P. Briner b , G. Carver, Jerusalem 91904, Israel b Department of Geology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA c CARVER

  16. For Halibut Processor or Vessel Name Vessels Delivering to Processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Explorer 3011 Ocean Harvester 5130 Pacific Explorer 3010 Pacific Ram 4305 Pacific Viking 422 Pegasus 1265 Moon Bay 249 Miss Berdie 3679 Nordic Fury 1094 Ocean Hope 3 652397 Pacific Fury 421 Poseidon 1164 Royal Caravelle 3402 Dusk 4 Sea Mac 1043 Topaz 405 Ocean Beauty Seafoods, Kodiak, Alaska 30883 Pacific Star 2781

  17. Mentoring/Induction Mini-Network "Educators must fight the constant urge to believe expertise lies outside with others. They must

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Mentoring/Induction Mini-Network 2007-08 "Educators must fight the constant urge to believe representing ASD, MatSu, LKSD, Kashunamuit, Kodiak, Lake & Pen, Pribilofs, and the COE facilitating mentoring through induction systems? Our learning... "...creating a mentoring process is easier than creating

  18. An Analysis of the Burrows-Wheeler Transform Giovanni Manzini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manzini, Giovanni

    described by Burrows and Wheeler, which, despite its simplicity, outperforms the Gzip compressor. The second and compression; F.2.2 [Analysis of Algorithms and Problem Complexity]: Nonnumerical Analysis and Problems General of compression ratio, the commercial package Pkzip). More advanced BWT-based compressors, such as Bzip [Seward

  19. Lynette Adams Stephanie Bushey Georgiana Adkisson Hannah Butcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Cook Caitlin Blue Shauna Cook Shawn Bohn Benjamin Corona Bianca Bousamra Jason Cox Ryan Bozich Stefanie Tahrima Islam Tyler Gace John Gallo J Andrea Gaston Yolanda Jack Natheer Gellani Kerri Jansen Rachel Seward Enya Quain Paige Sickmiller Katarina Quain Daniel Siwka Firdaus Qureshi Talya Slaw Angela Smith R

  20. History and invention in the structure of Terra nostra by Carlos Fuentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez, Irma O

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Modern Languages HISTORIA E INVENCION EN LA ESTRUCTURA DE TERRA NOSTRA DE CARLOS FUENTES Tesis Por Irma O. Valdez Presentada a la Oficina de Estudios Graduados de Texas AKIM University En cumplimiento parcial de los requisitos para obtener el... an Garcia (Member) Victor Arizpe (Head of Department) May l991 ABSTRACT History and Invention in the Structure of T~rr ~N~r by Carlos Fuentes. (May 1991) Irma O. Valdez, B. A. , Normal Pablo Livas; M. A. , Normal Superior del Estado Chair...

  1. State Service ALABAMA 0.86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    AREA Navy 0.86 REDSTONE ARSENAL Army 0.86 ALASKA 1.78 ANCHORAGE Army 1.67 FAIRBANKS Army 1.89 ADAK NAVAL STATION Navy 4.41 CG - JUNEAU Navy 2.53 CG - KETCHIKAN Navy 2.70 CG - KODIAK Navy 3.43 CG - PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND Navy 2.90 CLEAR AIR FORCE BASE Air Force 2.00 EARECKSON AIR FORCE BASE Air Force 4

  2. An investigation of the contact between the Oakville and Catahoula Formations in Grimes County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sveter, Owen Douglas

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Directed by: Mr. Clay L. Seward The study investigated the contact between two Tertiary forma- tions, the Catahoula and the Oakville Formations. The area investi- gated was in Grimes County, Texas, near the city of Navasota. Twenty-two borings... were drilled in the area to obtain the necessary information. Laboratory methods such as Sand-Silt-Clay analysis, Calcium Carbonate Content analysis, and X-ray analysis of the clays, were used to investigate and describe the cores obtained from...

  3. Using Sediment Records to Determine Sources, Distribution, Bioavailability, and Potential Toxicity of Dioxins in the Houston Ship Channel: A Multi-proxy Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seward, Shaya M.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2010 Major Subject: Oceanography USING SEDIMENT RECORDS TO DETERMINE SOURCES, DISTRIBUTION..., BIOAVAILABILITY, AND POTENTIAL TOXICITY OF DIOXINS IN THE HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL: A MULTI-PROXY APPROACH A Thesis by SHAYA MARIE SEWARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  4. Updated 2-13 JEROME P. RAPIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Electronic Warfare Officer in USS Valdez (FF 1096), Cryptologic Division Officer and Operations Department before returning to the OPNAV Staff as Director, Cyber and Electronic Warfare Division (N2/N6F3) from Nov. Mr. Rapin enlisted in 1968 as a Cryptologic Technician (Technical) "CTT" serving as an Electronic

  5. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    -Fritsch, Sophie ( 2011) Microstructure of Ba1-xLaxTiO3- ceramics sintered by spark plasma sintering. Journal of Ba1-xLaxTiO3- ceramics sintered by Spark Plasma Sintering N. El Horra,, Z. Valdez-Navab,c, C, there has been a growing interest for Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. It offers, in comparison

  6. BOARD OF TRUSTEES MINUTES MARCH 12, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    BOARD OF TRUSTEES MINUTES MEETING OF MARCH 12, 2013 TRUSTEES PRESENT Timothy B. Anderson Phillip W Keven Rowe Geneva Thompson Joyce P. Valdez UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVES PRESENT Cathy Anderson Associate Dean of Students Allyson Mower President-elect, Academic Senate Mary Parker Associate Vice President

  7. BOARD OF TRUSTEES MINUTES DECEMBER 13, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    BOARD OF TRUSTEES MINUTES MEETING OF DECEMBER 13, 2011 TRUSTEES PRESENT Timothy B. Anderson Phillip Pack Keven Rowe Taft Price Joyce P. Valdez UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVES PRESENT Cathy Anderson Associate and Planning Mary Anne Berzins Assistant Vice President, Human Resources A. Lorris Betz Interim President

  8. 5/12/10 8:53 AMPlan B in the Gulf Tribuna Libre Page 1 of 4http://www.almendron.com/tribuna/29942/plan-b-in-the-gulf/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Horizon oil spill -- placing a huge metal dome over the leak -- had failed. With the oil slick now washing YORK TIMES, 11/05/10): Over the weekend BP learned that its latest effort at stanching the Deepwater toxicologist and author of Not One Drop: Betrayal and Courage in the Wake of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill. One

  9. Subscriber access provided by -UC Berkeley Library Environmental Science & Technology is published by the American Chemical Society.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    of the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Abstract The devastating environmental impacts and BP Deepwater Horizon oil spills. Introduction to Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons Petroleum of the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989 and its media notoriety made it a frequent comparison to the BP Deepwater

  10. Deepwater Horizon oil left tuna, other species with heart defects likely to prove fatal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    shows that the 2010 BP oil spill spawned deformities in bluefin tuna thereby impeding their ability Horizon oil spill struck at the very heart of fish, a new study says. Exposed to millions of gallons anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound. Oil from Deepwater Horizon spill

  11. 5/11/10 7:21 AMOp-Ed Contributors -Plan B in the Gulf -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/11/opinion/11oped2.html?sq=hazen&st=cse&scp=1&pagewanted=print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    the weekend BP learned that its latest effort at stanching the Deepwater Horizon oil spill -- placing a huge catastrophes. Avoid Dispersants ONE of the oil industry's favorite tools in fighting oil spills is chemical the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989, came with warning labels: "prevent liquid from entering sewers, watercourses

  12. Komatsu NTC Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALTexas: Energy Resources JumpKobe SteelKodiak,NTC

  13. Kohl's | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°, -68.9242652° Show MapKodiakWind

  14. H. R. 3277: Trans-Alaska Pipeline System Reform Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, September 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bill would improve Federal laws relating to the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System in light of the recent Valdez oil spill and its environmental consequences. The bill explains provisions for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System fund and liability; the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System trust fund; improvement of the pipeline system (establishes a Presidential task force); Alaska oil spill recovery institute; penalties; provisions applicable to Alaska natives; and state laws and programs.

  15. Covering the story: a rhetorical analysis of Brownsville's television news coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groenendyk, Kathi Lynn

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the accentuation of risk and drama in the news. But not all environmental communication research involves the media. For example, Petermn and Peterson (1993) examine how nonmarket economic valuation methods constrained policy in both the Exxon Valdez disaster... and with endangered whooping cranes. In the Exxon case, Peterson and Peterson argue that "the cultural damage to area residents cannot be appropriately measured in dollars" (p. 61). The nonmarket economic valuation methods also allow shipping of petrochemicals...

  16. A closer look at non-uniqueness during dynamic data integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobenas, Rafael H.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buenos Aires, Instituto Argentino del Petroleo and Valdez Rojas y Hogg S. A. for providing me the opportunity and the financial support to pursue my Master of Science degree at Texas ASM University. I would also like to thank the following individuals... Closer Look at Non-Uniqueness during Dynamic Data Integration. (December 1997) Rafael H. Cobenas, B. S. , Instituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Akhil Datta-Gupta Characterizing heterogeneous permeable media using...

  17. Old Harbor Scammon Bay Hydro Feasibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Petrie

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The grantee, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC), is a non-profit member owned rural electric generation and distribution cooperative. The proposed Project is located near the community of Old Harbor, Alaska. Old Harbor is on the southeastern coast of Kodiak Island, approximately 70 miles southwest of the City of Kodiak and 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. In 1998 sufficient information had been developed to apply for a license to construct the project and the cost was estimated to be $2,445,000 for a 500 KW project on Lagoon Creek. Major features of the project included an eight-foot high diversion dam on Mountain Creek, a desander box, a 9,800-foot long penstock to the powerhouse on Lagoon Creek, and a 5,500-foot long access road. It was also anticipated that the project could provide an additional source of water to Old Harbor. The report details the history and lessons learned in designing and permiting the proposed hydroelectric facility.

  18. Search for R-parity violation in multilepton final states in pp-bar collisions at s?=1.8?TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.

    2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    . We consider the selection criteria of Ref. @3# adequate for the present analysis. Our search is most sensitive to decays with highest elec- tron and muon multiplicity, i.e., those with no t lepton among the decay products of the LSP. The detection.... Buchholz,34 M. Buehler,32 V. Buescher,49 V. S. Burtovoi,21 J. M. Butler,42 F. Canelli,49 W. Carvalho,3 D. Casey,45 Z. Casilum,50 H. Castilla-Valdez,17 D. Chakraborty,50 K. M. Chan,49 S. V. Chekulaev,21 D. K. Cho,49 S. Choi,28 S. Chopra,51 B. C. Choudhary,28...

  19. Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

  20. Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained CoordinationWater10BigBill Valdez

  1. CFB: technology of the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankship, S.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel flexibility and a smaller carbon footprint are behind renewed interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology. The article explains the technology of CFB and discusses development of CFB units since the late 1990s. China is seeing an explosion in the number of utility-size CFBs. Alstom, Foster Wheeler, Babcock and Wilson and Alex Kvaener are today's major CFB boiler manufacturers. Alstom is testing and developing oxy-firing and post-combustion carbon capture strategies on CFB boilers. One CFB asset is its ability to burn a variety of fuels including waste coal, high sulfur coal and even discarded tires. The article mentions successful CFB projects at the Seward Station using waste coal and at the Gilbert 3 plant in the USA. Lamar is converting its Light and Power Plant from natural gas to burn coal in a 38.5 MW CFB boiler. 1 tab., 3 photos.

  2. FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. Quarterly technical report, April 1-June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, E.; Tillman, D.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Program has accelerated the pace of cofiring development by increasing the testing activities plus the support activities for interpreting test results. Past tests conducted and analyzed include the Allen Fossil Plant and Seward Generating Station programs. On-going tests include the Colbert Fossil Plant precommercial test program, the Greenidge Station commercialization program, and the Blount St. Station switchgrass program. Tests in the formative stages included the NIPSCO cofiring test at Michigan City Generating Station. Analytical activities included modeling and related support functions required to analyze the cofiring test results, and to place those results into context. Among these activities is the fuel availability study in the Pittsburgh, PA area. This study, conducted for Duquesne Light, supports their initial investigation into reburn technology using wood waste as a fuel. This Quarterly Report, covering the third quarter of the FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Program, highlights the progress made on the 16 projects funded under this cooperative agreement.

  3. FETC/EPRI BIOMASS COFIRING COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. TILLMAN; E. HUGHES

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During April 1 st , 1998 to June 31 st , 1998, significant work was done in preparation for a series of test involving cofiring at power plants. A biomass material handling system was designed for the Seward testing, a gasification system was designed for the Allen Fossil Plant, and a test program plan was developed for testing at NIPSCO?s Bailly Station. Also completed this quarter was a cyclone combustion model that provides a color visual representation of estimated temperatures within a plant. This report summarizes the activities during the second quarter in 1998 of the FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. It focuses upon reporting the results of testing in order to highlight the progress at utilities.

  4. Confined zone dispersion project. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the performance of the confined zone dispersion (CZD) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system in removing sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from flue gas in the coal-fired boiler. The CZD-FGD system, installed at Pennsylvania Electric Company`s (Penelec`s) Seward Power Station, was designed to remove 50% of the SO{sub 2} from one-half of Unit No. 5`s flue gas when the boiler is fired with 1.5% sulfur coal. Section 1 discusses the significance of CZD, the purpose of this report, the history of the project, and the role of DOE in the project, describes the project organization, and lists the six design areas involving proprietary information. Section 2 presents project location, objectives, and phases, and discusses the test program. Section 3 explains the process flow diagram, piping and instrumentation diagrams and operating controls, site plan, equipment layouts, and process equipment. Section 4 provides an integrated discussion of all the test results obtained during the test program, backed by tabulations and graphics. Section 5 describes the testing failures and corrective actions taken. Section 6, reliability/availability/maintainability analysis data of major equipment, covers the following systems: atomizing, sootblowing, lime, flue gas, and controls and instrumentation. Section 7 summarizes the capital cost requirements for the Seward CZD demonstration unit and discusses the capital and operating costs of installing the process at plants with various unit capacities. Section 8 discusses plans to continue the CZD demonstration to achieve longer term continuous operation at SO{sub 2} removals of 50%. Section 9 presents the principal findings of the CZD demonstration and recommends additional testing.

  5. Risk management & organizational uncertainty implications for the assessment of high consequence organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, C.T.

    1995-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Post hoc analyses have demonstrated clearly that macro-system, organizational processes have played important roles in such major catastrophes as Three Mile Island, Bhopal, Exxon Valdez, Chernobyl, and Piper Alpha. How can managers of such high-consequence organizations as nuclear power plants and nuclear explosives handling facilities be sure that similar macro-system processes are not operating in their plants? To date, macro-system effects have not been integrated into risk assessments. Part of the reason for not using macro-system analyses to assess risk may be the impression that standard organizational measurement tools do not provide hard data that can be managed effectively. In this paper, I argue that organizational dimensions, like those in ISO 9000, can be quantified and integrated into standard risk assessments.

  6. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  7. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  8. Chemical contaminants in gray whales (eschichtius robustus) stranded in Alaska, Washington, and California, USA. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E.; Tilbury, K.L.; Meador, J.P.; Sloan, C.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethanes (DDTs), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p- chlorophenyl) ethenes (DDEs), and chlordanes, and essential (e.g., zinc, selenium, copper) and toxic (e.g., mercury, lead) elements were measured in tissues and stomach contents from 22 gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) stranded between 1988 and 1991. The stranding sites ranged from the relatively pristine areas of Kodiak Island, Alaska, to more urbanized areas in Puget Sound, Washington, and San Francisco Bay, California, with the majority of the sites on the Washington outer coast and in Puget Sound. Similar to concentrations in tissues, no significant differences were observed in concentrations of elements in stomach contents between whales stranded in Puget Sound and whales stranded at the more pristine sites. The lack of data from apparently healthy gray whales limits the assessment of whether the levels of anthropogenic contaminants found in tissues may have deleterious effects on the health of gray whales.

  9. Archaeofaunal insights on pinniped-human interactions in the northeastern Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford-Gonzales, D; Newsome, S; Koch, P; Guilderson, T; Snodgrass, J; Burton, R

    2004-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exploitation of pinnipeds has considerable antiquity but shows increasing impacts on population numbers in the Holocene. Pinnipeds are a rich source of fat as well as protein. A few well-documented cases of regional extirpation of seals and sea lions by non-industrial peoples exist. The northeastern Pacific region, from southern California to Alaska, has yielded archaeological evidence for distributions and abundances of eared seals that differs markedly from historically documented biogeography. This is especially true of the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), among the most common pinnipeds in many archaeological sites from the Santa Barbara Channel area through to Kodiak Islands. This chapter reviews contemporary eared seal biogeography, evidence for the earlier timing and extent, of occurrence of northern fur seals along the northeastern Pacific coast, zooarchaeological and isotopic evidence for their foraging and probable maintenance of rookeries in lower latitudes, and for their disappearance from the southernmost part of their ancient distribution well before European contact. It also reviews ongoing debates over the behavioral ecology of ancient fur seals and over humans role in contributing to their disappearance.

  10. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed task progress reports and schedules are provided for the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The focus of the project is on developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-I, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Fayette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG) and Dunkirk Station (NMPC). Phase-H of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. Cofiring willow is also under consideration for GPU`s Seward Station where testing is under way. There will be an evaluation of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials occurring at BED`s McNeill power station. Phase-III will represent fullscale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis.

  11. Preliminary geothermal investigations at Manley Hot Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    East, J.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manley Hot Springs is one of several hot springs which form a belt extending from the Seward Peninsula to east-central Alaska. All of the hot springs are low-temperature, water-dominated geothermal systems, having formed as the result of circulation of meteoric water along deepseated fractures near or within granitic intrusives. Shallow, thermally disturbed ground at Manley Hot Springs constitutes an area of 1.2 km by 0.6 km along the lower slopes of Bean Ridge on the north side of the Tanana Valley. This area includes 32 springs and seeps and one warm (29.1/sup 0/C) well. The hottest springs range in temperature from 61/sup 0/ to 47/sup 0/C and are presently utilized for space heating and irrigation. This study was designed to characterize the geothermal system present at Manley Hot Springs and delineate likely sites for geothermal drilling. Several surveys were conducted over a grid system which included shallow ground temperature, helium soil gas, mercury soil and resistivity surveys. In addition, a reconnaissance ground temperature survey and water chemistry sampling program was undertaken. The preliminary results, including some preliminary water chemistry, show that shallow hydrothermal activity can be delineated by many of the surveys. Three localities are targeted as likely geothermal well sites, and a model is proposed for the geothermal system at Manley Hot Springs.

  12. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Quarterly report No. 10, February 17--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CZD process involves injecting a finely atomized slurry of reactive lime into the flue gas duct work of a coal-fired utility boiler. The principle of the confined zone is to form a wet zone of slurry droplets in the middle of the duct walls. The lime slurry reacts with part of the SO{sub 2} in the gas, and the reaction products dry to form solid particles. A solids collector, typically an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) downstream from the point of injection, captures the reaction products along with the fly ash entrained in the flue gas. The demonstration is being conducted at Penelec`s Seward Station, Unit No. 15. This boiler is a 147 MWe coal-fired unit, which utilizes Pennsylvania bituminous coal (approximately 1.2 to 2.5% sulfur). One of the two flue gas ducts leading from the boiler has been retrofitted with the CZD technology. The first existing ESP installed in the station is immediately behind the air preheater. The second ESP, installed about 15 years ago, is about 80 feet away from the first ESP. The goal of this demonstration is to prove the technical and economic feasibility of the CZD technology on a commercial scale. The process is expected to achieve 50% SO{sub 2}

  13. FETC/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. Quarterly technical report, September 26-December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, E. Tillman, D.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass utilization to reduce fossil C0{sub 2} emissions is being supported by sixteen (16) EPRI research projects, each contributing to the commercialization of systems to address greenhouse gas emissions. These projects include: (1) cofiring combustion testing at the Seward Generating Station of GPU Genco; (2) fuel preparation testing at the Greenidge Generating Station of NYSEG; (3) precommercial testing of cofiring at the Allen and Colbert Fossil Plants of TVA; (4) testing of switchgrass cofiring at the Blount St. Station of Madison Gas & Electric; (5) high percentage biomass cofiring with Southern Company; (6) urban wood waste cofiring at the supercritical cyclone boiler at Michigan City Generating Station of Northern Indiana Public Service Co. (NIPSCO); (7) evaluation of switchgrass cofiring with Nebraska Public Power District at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA; (8) waste plastics cofiring with Duke Power in a tangentially-fired pulverized coal (PC) boiler; (9) cofiring a mixture of plastics, fiber, and pulp industry wastes with South Carolina Electric and Gas; (10) urban wood waste cofiring evaluation and testing by the University of Pittsburgh in stoker boilers; (11) assessment of toxic emissions from cofiring of wood and coal; (12) development of fuel and power plant models for analysis and interpretation of cofiring results; (13) analysis of C0{sub 2} utilization in algal systems for wastewater treatment; (14) combustion testing and combustor development focusing on high percentage cofiring; (15) analysis of problems and potential solutions to the sale of flyash from coal- fired boilers practicing cofiring; and (16) analysis of C0{sub 2} capture and disposal systems. EPRI is supported in these efforts by numerous contractors including: Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation, Battelle Columbus Laboratories, New York State Electric and Gas Co., Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NIPSCO, the University of Pittsburgh, John Benneman, and others. These projects address various aspects of cofiring for C0{sub 2} mitigation including testing of cofiring with various fuels, and in all types of boilers; development of analytical tools to support the cofiring assessment; addressing specific barriers to cofiring such as the sale of flyash; longer term technology development; and evaluating alternative methods for C0{sub 2} mitigation. Taken together, they address the critical concerns associated with this approach to biofuel utilization. As such, they support implementation of the most promising near-term approach to biomass usage for greenhouse gas mitigation. This report contains a brief description of each project. It then reports the progress made during the first quarter of the contract, focusing upon test results from the Allen Fossil Plant, where precommercial testing at a cyclone boiler was used to evaluate particle size and NO{sub x} emissions from cofiring.

  14. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  15. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

  16. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  17. Analysis of Renewable Energy Potential on U. S. National Forest Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvolanek, E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Kuiper, J. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Carr, A. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Hlava, K.

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) completed an assessment of the potential for solar and wind energy development on National Forest System (NFS) public lands managed by the US Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service (USFS). This report provides an update of the analysis in the NREL report, and extends the analysis with additional siting factors for solar and wind energy. It also expands the scope to biomass and geothermal energy resources. Hydropower is acknowledged as another major renewable energy source on NFS lands; however, it was not analyzed in this project primarily because of the substantially different analysis that would be needed to identify suitable locations. Details about each renewable energy production technology included in the study are provided following the report introduction, including how each resource is converted to electrical power, and examples of existing power plants. The analysis approach was to use current and available Geographic Information System (GIS) data to map the distribution of the subject renewable energy resources, major siting factors, and NFS lands. For each major category of renewable energy power production, a set of siting factors were determined, including minimum levels for the renewable energy resources, and details for each of the other siting factors. Phase 1 of the analysis focused on replicating and updating the 2005 NREL analysis, and Phase 2 introduced additional siting factors and energy resources. Source data were converted to a cell?based format that helped create composite maps of locations meeting all the siting criteria. Acreages and potential power production levels for NFS units were tabulated and are presented throughout this report and the accompanying files. NFS units in the southwest United States were found to have the most potentially suitable land for concentrating solar power (CSP), especially in Arizona and New Mexico. In total, about 136,032 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for CSP development, potentially yielding as much as 13,603 megawatts (MW) of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. For photovoltaic solar power (PV), the top NFS units were more widely distributed than CSP. Notably, more than 150,000 acres in Comanche National Grassland in Colorado were found to be potentially suitable for PV development, accounting for more than 25% of the potentially suitable NFS lands combined. In total, about 564,698 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for PV development, potentially yielding as much as 56,469 MW of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. NFS units most suitable for wind power are concentrated in the northern Great Plains. In total, about 3,357,792 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for wind development, potentially yielding as much as 67,156 MW of electricity, assuming 50 acres per MW. Of that area, 571,431 acres (11,429 MW) are located within the Bankhead?Jones Farm Tenant Act Land in Montana. NFS lands in Alaska have considerable wind resources, but other siting factors eliminated almost the entire area. The southwest coast of Chugach National Forest, near Seward, Alaska, maintains the majority of the remaining acreage. NFS units with highly suitable biomass resources are located from Idaho to Louisiana. In total, about 13,967,077 acres of NFS lands are potentially highly suitable for biomass from logging and thinning residue development. Of that, 1,542,247 acres is located in Fremont?Winema National Forest in Oregon. Not surprisingly, most NFS units have at least some level of potentially suitable biomass resources. In general, biomass resources such as these could significantly offset consumption of coal and petroleum?based fuels. NFS units deemed potentially highly suitable for enhanced geothermal system (EGS) development were distributed widely from California to Virginia, accounting for some 6,475,459 acres. Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri has the largest area of all the NFS units, with 900,637 acres. While more rigorous studies are needed

  18. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea