National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for knotty head gc512

  1. Some knotty problems in communicating wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ;1. Understand your audience. 2. Adapt to them. #12;#12;W. Haman Renewable Energy Program Manager, Iowa EnergySome knotty problems in communicating wind energy Jean Goodwin Professor, Speech Communication-protective motivated reasoning" 2 #12;2 #12;GMOs 2 #12;Evolution 2 #12;Climate Change 2 #12;2 identity

  2. Department Head Resource Portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    1 Department Head Resource Portal CREATING DEPARTMENT GOALS A goal is a condition we envision;2 Department Head Resource Portal NO DO YOU HAVE IT? YES ffff Achieve Preserve Avoid Eliminate NO DO YOU HAVE

  3. Department Head Resource Portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    1 Department Head Resource Portal NEW EMPLOYEE CHECKLIST New Staff Member Name: Department: Start Appearance expectations (e.g., business casual) #12;2 Department Head Resource Portal First Day Prep://myinfo.rit.edu (pay stub, benefits info, emergency contact, etc) Emergency exits #12;3 Department Head Resource Portal

  4. Bottom head assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  5. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  6. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  7. Functional Heads and Interpretation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adger, David

    on interpretation is a subsidiary concern.The argument of the thesis goes as follows: firstly, reference must be made to both an independently projecting functional head Agr and to a level of discourse representation in order to adequately analyse the phenomenon...

  8. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  9. Heater head for stirling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

    1985-07-09

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  10. HeadLock: Wide-Range Head Pose Estimation for Low Resolution Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Deb

    HeadLock: Wide-Range Head Pose Estimation for Low Resolution Video Philip DeCamp B-Range Head Pose Estimation for Low Resolution Video by Philip DeCamp Submitted to the Program in Media Arts on data mining technologies to extract head pose information from low resolution video recordings. Head

  11. OROZCO et al.: HEAD POSE CLASSIFICATION IN CROWDED SCENES 1 Head Pose Classification in Crowded Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shaogang

    attempts have been made on head pose estimation in low-resolution images by treating the problem as a multi for head pose classification given low resolution images. In their approach, 360 head pose in c 2009OROZCO et al.: HEAD POSE CLASSIFICATION IN CROWDED SCENES 1 Head Pose Classification in Crowded

  12. Rotating head and piston engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomm, T.J.; Messick, N.C.

    1992-07-21

    This patent describes a rotary piston combustion engine. It comprises a housing means, an engine block housing a single toroidal bore, a piston carrier ring spaced outwardly along the entire perimeter of the toroidal bore with at least one finger extending inwardly for piston attachment, a power transfer cylinder, a power output shaft, an auxiliary shaft with driven gearing means meshing with the driving gearing means, a rotating head with windows for piston passage, a trapezoidal porting means in the engine block and in the rotating head, an exhaust port means.

  13. Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasco, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Conversely, low-frequency variations in head, such as asensitivities al­ low one to invert transient head waveformswhich utilize low frequency information, such as static head

  14. Analyzing pulse from head motions in video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Guha

    2014-01-01

    We extract heart rate and beat lengths from videos by measuring subtle head oscillations that accompany the cardiac cycle. Our method tracks features on the head, temporally filters their trajectories and performs principal ...

  15. Automatic Head Motion Prediction from Speech Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofer, Gregor; Shimodaira, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach to generate a sequence of head motion units given some speech. The modelling approach is based on the notion that head motion can be divided into a number of short homogeneous ...

  16. Sealed head access area enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Govi, Aldo R. (Greensburg, PA)

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder power reactor is provided with a sealed head access area enclosure disposed above the reactor vessel head consisting of a plurality of prefabricated structural panels including a center panel removably sealed into position with inflatable seals, and outer panels sealed into position with semipermanent sealant joints. The sealant joints are located in the joint between the edge of the panels and the reactor containment structure and include from bottom to top an inverted U-shaped strip, a lower layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material, a separator strip defining a test space therewithin, and an upper layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material. The test space is tapped by a normally plugged passage extending to the top of the enclosure for testing the seal or introducing a buffer gas thereinto.

  17. HeadLock : wide-range head pose estimation for low resolution video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCamp, Philip (Philip James)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on data mining technologies to extract head pose information from low resolution video recordings. Head pose, as an approximation of gaze direction, is a key indicator of human behavior and interaction. ...

  18. Deferred Imitation of Human Head Movements by an Active Stereo Vision Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demiris, Yiannis

    Deferred Imitation of Human Head Movements by an Active Stereo Vision Head J. Demiriszy, S the possibilities for efficient social learning through observation and imitation, is chal­ lenging since on the deferred imitation of human head movements. 1 Introduction Robots of the near future are expected

  19. Research Report Head Up, Foot Down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    Research Report Head Up, Foot Down Object Words Orient Attention to the Objects' Typical Location, and object words encode these spatial associa- tions. We tested whether such object words (e.g., head, foot denoting low objects hindered target iden- tification at the bottom of the display. Thus, object words

  20. A novel active heads-up display for driver assistance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doshi, Anup; Cheng, Shinko Yuanhsien; Trivedi, Mohan Manubhai

    2009-01-01

    and P. Green, “The effect of HUD warning location on driverComparison of head-up display (HUD) vs. head-down display (also use heads-up displays (HUDs) to convey information to

  1. Numerical and experimental investigations of the head/disk interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duwensee, Maik

    2007-01-01

    Flying Head Slider Bearings in Magnetic Hard Disk Drives.for Flying Head Slider Bearings in Magnetic Storage. ASME J.Warner et al. Magnetic Head Air Bearing Slider. U.S. Patent

  2. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt No. 15-14-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

  3. Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and...

  4. Nanotechnology in Head and Neck Cancer: The Race Is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2010-01-01

    10.1007/s11912-010-0087-2 Nanotechnology in Head and Neckthe applications of nanotechnology in head and neck cancer,plasmonic gold nanotechnology. Keywords Nanotechnology .

  5. Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group August 31, 2011 | Tags: NERSC Jay Srinivasan has been...

  6. Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New...

  7. Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New head of stockpile manufacturing and support Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support Carl Beard is the new associate director for stockpile...

  8. KU alumna to head Spencer Research Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-18

    12/5/13 KU alumna to head Spencer Research Library www.lib.ku.edu/news/spencer_head_announced.shtml 1/2 The University of Kansas Libraries Libraries Home Articles & Databases Catalog: books & more E-journals Research by Subject Course Reserves... Library Pages A-Z Images KU ScholarWorks KU Digital Collections Hours My Account Request Articles, Books,… Friends & Benefactors Suggestions University of Kansas alumna Beth M. Whittaker will become the next head of KU’s Kenneth Spencer Research Library...

  9. Heater head for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darooka, D.K.

    1988-09-06

    A heater head is described for a compound Stirling engine modules, each including a displacer cylinder coaxially aligned with the displacer cylinder of the other of the engine modules, a displacer piston mounted for reciprocation in the displacer cylinder.

  10. Head & base production optimization : setup time reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    At Schlumberger, the make-to-order strategy and number of Head & Base product types (about 1000 types) requires a flexible manufacturing system in which the machine setup is frequent. However, the lengthy CNC machine setup ...

  11. Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conder, Alan D. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close(0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  12. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  13. ZABULIS et al.: 3D HEAD POSE ESTIMATION FROM MULTIPLE DISTANT VIEWS 1 3D head pose estimation from multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabulis, Xenophon

    imaging, despite the low-resolution appearance of subjects. 1 Introduction 3D head pose estimation. In such situations, a human head is imaged in relatively low resolution, illumination artifacts are frequentZABULIS et al.: 3D HEAD POSE ESTIMATION FROM MULTIPLE DISTANT VIEWS 1 3D head pose estimation from

  14. Most Workers Who Suffer Head Injuries- Were Not Wearing Head Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of accidents and injuries noted that most workers who suffered impact injuries to the head were not wearing head protection. In addition, the same survey showed that the majority of workers were injured while performing their normal jobs at their regular worksites.

  15. Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper Heads-up Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper 1 Heads-up Paper Training called "Training and Certification of Lock and Dam Operators." Interested individuals can send ideas of the Training and Certification program. Examples of what will be in those draft documents are as follows

  16. Architecture of the Mediator head module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Calero, Guillermo; Cai, Gang; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yamada, Kentaro; Cardelli, Francesco; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Berger, Imre; Kornberg, Guy Lorch; Asturias, Francisco J.; Kornberg, Roger D.; Takagi, Yuichiro (Stanford); (Indiana-Med); (EMBL); (Scripps); (MSKCC)

    2011-09-06

    Mediator is a key regulator of eukaryotic transcription, connecting activators and repressors bound to regulatory DNA elements with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator comprises 25 subunits with a total mass of more than one megadalton (refs 5, 6) and is organized into three modules, called head, middle/arm and tail. Our understanding of Mediator assembly and its role in regulating transcription has been impeded so far by limited structural information. Here we report the crystal structure of the essential Mediator head module (seven subunits, with a mass of 223 kilodaltons) at a resolution of 4.3 angstroms. Our structure reveals three distinct domains, with the integrity of the complex centred on a bundle of ten helices from five different head subunits. An intricate pattern of interactions within this helical bundle ensures the stable assembly of the head subunits and provides the binding sites for general transcription factors and Pol II. Our structural and functional data suggest that the head module juxtaposes transcription factor IIH and the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of Pol II, thereby facilitating phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II. Our results reveal architectural principles underlying the role of Mediator in the regulation of gene expression.

  17. Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Donald N. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

  18. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2013-12-24

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  19. Judith Sheine Professor and Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design Studio 1983-87 New York Institute of Technology, Center for Architecture, Old Westbury, NY Adjunct of Technology; Pratt Institute; School of Architecture, Marnes-la-Vallee, France; Southern California InstituteJudith Sheine Professor and Department Head Department of Architecture School of Architecture

  20. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  1. First Person -- George Neil Named Head of FEL Program (Inside...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first-person-george-neil-named-head-fel-program-inside-business First Person -- George Neil By Lakeshia Artis, Inside Business March 3, 2008 George Neil, head of the Free-Electron...

  2. Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-10-07

    An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

  3. Colour Invariant Head Pose Classification in Low Resolution Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Colour Invariant Head Pose Classification in Low Resolution Video Ben Benfold and Ian Reid,ian}@robots.ox.ac.uk Abstract This paper presents an algorithm for the classification of head pose in low res- olution video, a pose estimation from a low resolution head image can be used to determine whether or not a close

  4. Real Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    for estimating location and orientation of a person's head, from depth data acquired by a low quality device. OurReal Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras Gabriele Fanelli1 , Thibaut Weise2 and the variance of the head position and orientation. We evaluate three different approaches to jointly take

  5. Optimized electrode positions and stimulation patterns in head EIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    . One key challenge is the low distinguishability of head EIT. In this paper, we develop a strategy1 Optimized electrode positions and stimulation patterns in head EIT Yasin Mamatjan1 , Sujin Ahn2 potential for imaging of the head to image cerebral edema and stroke, and to assist the EEG inverse problem

  6. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1995-12-19

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 15 figs.

  7. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-11-17

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 22 figs.

  8. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); Wei, Bo (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Bhatia, Singh C. (Morgan Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

  9. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); Wei, Bo (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Bhatia, C. Singh (Morgan Hill, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

  10. Vision-based head pose estimation and interactivity analysis : algorithms, systems and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy-Chutorian, Erik Marshall

    2009-01-01

    estimate the low-level location and head movement of meetingup manner, following low-level facial Head Angle: Known HeadJ. Crowley, “Head pose estimation on low resolution images,”

  11. Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

  12. Low Frequency Observations of a Head-Tail Radio Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharam Vir Lal; A. Pramesh Rao

    2004-06-28

    We have mapped the head-tail radio galaxy, 3C 129 at 240 and 610 MHz using the GMRT and studied the detailed morphology and spectral index variations in this object. This is the first attempt to observe a sample of head-tail sources at low frequencies. We find weak spectral steepening as we go away from the head along the jet. The Crosspiece has a spectral index of 0.9 (S$_{\

  13. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Gu, Yi; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S. V. Hindawi Publishing Corporation None...

  14. Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine 68bhydrogreensmallhydroch11.ppt More Documents & Publications Real World Demonstration of a New American...

  15. The Use and Destruction of Minoan Stone Bull's Head Rhyta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehak, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study of Minoan bull-head rhyta examines all the surviving fragments and concludes that they were deliberately smashed, probably in some kind of ritual.

  16. Turning heads: The biology of solar tracking in sunflower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandenbrink, JP; Brown, EA; Harmer, SL; Blackman, BK

    2014-01-01

    Cessation of solar tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Solar tracking is not solely driven by the movement of theEcological function(s) of solar tracking and mature head

  17. Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council...

  18. Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Predmore

    2008-03-06

    The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.

  19. Corey Casper, MD Head, Program in Global Oncology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    Corey Casper, MD Head, Program in Global Oncology Member, Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public of Washington Dr. Casper focuses on infection-related cancers and cancer in low-resource settings. He is the Head of the Program in Global Oncology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, where he is also

  20. Stable p-Type Conduction from Sb-Decorated Head-to-Head Basal Plane Inversion Domain Boundaries in ZnO Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xudong

    Stable p-Type Conduction from Sb-Decorated Head-to-Head Basal Plane Inversion Domain Boundaries of WisconsinMadison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, United States ABSTRACT: We report that Sb-decorated head-to-head-type dopant due to low dopant solubility, native donor defects, and large acceptor ionization energies has

  1. Abstract: In this paper, we propose a fast and practical head pose estimation scheme for eye-head controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    -head controlled human computer interface with non-constrained background. The method we propose uses complete a novel image-based human computer interface controlled by eye and head, which is a subtask]. Conventional human computer interaction techniques such as keyboard and mouse are considered as bottlenecks

  2. The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Mei; Allen, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    for a mantle plume head is the unusual low velocity layerthe plume head material is expected to have a low velocitylow velocity anomaly is comparable with that expected for plume head

  3. Vision-based head pose estimation and interactivity analysis : algorithms, systems and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy-Chutorian, Erik Marshall

    2009-01-01

    1.3 Head Pose Estimation Methods . . . . . .Chapter 1 A Survey of Head Pose Estimation in Computer 1.11.4 Head Pose Estimation Comparisons . . . . . . . . 1.4.1

  4. Scalable Low-head Axial-type Venturi-flow Energy Scavenger |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scalable Low-head Axial-type Venturi-flow Energy Scavenger Scalable Low-head Axial-type Venturi-flow Energy Scavenger Scalable Low-head Axial-type Venturi-flow Energy Scavenger...

  5. Heading off the permanent oil crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKenzie, J.J.

    1996-11-01

    The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Raft...

  7. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2004 October 15, 2004 On August 25, 2004, an employee of Washington TRU Solution, LLC (WTS) sustained a head injury when he was struck by a C-clamp and rope attachment that broke...

  8. Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrer, P. J.; Jones, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents case studies of two moderately sized ammonia refrigeration systems retrofitted for floating head pressure control. It also presents a parametric analysis to assist in selecting appropriate pressures in an ammonia refrigeration...

  9. Tony Reilly appointed to be SRF Operations Department Head |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to be SRF Operations Department Head Following the appointment of Joe Preble to be the LCLS II Project Lead for Jefferson Lab, we initiated a search to replace Joe as SRF...

  10. Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.

    2007-08-15

    A high-frequency, asymptotic solution for transient head,appropriate for a medium containing smoothly varying heterogeneity,provides a basis for efficient inverse modeling. The semi analyticsolution is trajectory based, akin to ray methods used in modeling wavepropagation, and may be constructed by post processing the output of anumerical simulator. For high frequencies, the amplitude sensitivities,the relationship between changes in flow properties and changes in headampliude, are dominated by the phase term which may be computed directlyfrom the output of the simulator. Thus, transient head waveforms may beinverted with little more computation than is required to invert arrivaltimes. An applicatino to synthetic head values indicates that thetechnique can be used to improve the fit to waveforms. An application totransient head data from the Migration experiment in Switzerland revealsa narrow, high conductivity pathway within a 0.5 m thick zone offracturing.

  11. Steam Generator Group Project. Task 6. Channel head decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.P.; Clark, R.L.; Reece, W.D.

    1984-08-01

    The Steam Generator Group Project utilizes a retired-from-service pressurized-water-reactor steam generator as a test bed and source of specimens for research. An important preparatory step to primary side research activities was reduction of the radiation field in the steam generator channel head. This task report describes the channel head decontamination activities. Though not a programmatic research objective it was judged beneficial to explore the use of dilute reagent chemical decontamination techniques. These techniques presented potential for reduced personnel exposure and reduced secondary radwaste generation, over currently used abrasive blasting techniques. Two techniques with extensive laboratory research and vendors prepared to offer commercial application were tested, one on either side of the channel head. As indicated in the report, both techniques accomplished similar decontamination objectives. Neither technique damaged the generator channel head or tubing materials, as applied. This report provides details of the decontamination operations. Application system and operating conditions are described.

  12. PPE-HEAD PROTECTION GUIDE Source Assessment of Hazard Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    . Specify type. (See ANSI performance requirements) Collision with fixed object Hard Hat. (See ANSI Hat, depending upon exposure. (See ANSI performance requirements) AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE (ANSI) PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR OCCUPATIONAL HEAD PROTECTION Class A Class B Class C

  13. Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasco, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    The hydraulic head was observed in seven surrounding wellsHydraulic conductivity variation used for numerical trajectory computations. The wellhydraulic conductivity, given the significant variations in travel time to the observation wells.

  14. Running Head: EMOTION AND AGING Emotion and Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Mara

    Running Head: EMOTION AND AGING Emotion and Aging Mara Mather, M., & Ponzio, A. (in press). Emotion and aging. In L. Feldman Barrett, M. All of these basic mechanisms and contextual factors change in normal aging

  15. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt. No.- 15-33-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on February 25, 2015, by Bear Head LNG, requesting long-term multi-contract authority as further described in their...

  16. Bunker View: Limited-range head-motion-parallax visualization for complex data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    of head-motion-parallax. In particular, the frame rates are often too low for convincing headBunker View: Limited-range head-motion-parallax visualization for complex data sets Andrei State Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27514 ABSTRACT This work presents a head-motion-parallax visualization

  17. Is precise discrimination of low level motion needed for heading discrimination?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaina, Lucia M.

    Is precise discrimination of low level motion needed for heading discrimination? Constance S be that this aspect of heading perception is more reliant on low level motion perception. Another aspect of heading judgments on low level motion perception and the relationship between heading and scene reconstruction, we

  18. Priming of Head Premotor Circuits During Oculomotor Preparation Brian D. Corneil,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneil, Brian D.

    of the eyes and head. However, it remains unclear whether low-frequency activity emitted by oculomotor neurons that such low- frequency activity contributes to eye-head coordination by selectively priming head premotor that low-frequency oculomotor activity primes head premotor circuits well in advance of gaze shift

  19. Driving With Hemianopia: IV. Head Scanning and Detection at Intersections in a Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peli, Eli

    Low Vision Driving With Hemianopia: IV. Head Scanning and Detection at Intersections in a Simulator AR, Ananyev E, Mandel AJ, Goldstein RB, Peli E. Driving with hemianopia: IV. Head scanning) on head scanning behaviors at intersections and evaluated the role of inadequate head scanning

  20. A Real-Time Head Nod and Shake Detector Ashish Kapoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Real-Time Head Nod and Shake Detector Ashish Kapoor Affective Computing, MIT Media Lab 20 Ames Media Lab 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 +1-617-253-0369 picard@media.mit.edu ABSTRACT Head nods conversational functions. We describe a vision-based system that detects head nods and head shakes in real time

  1. Using Self-Context for Multimodal Detection of Head Nods in Face-to-Face Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatica-Perez, Daniel

    Using Self-Context for Multimodal Detection of Head Nods in Face-to-Face Interactions Laurent gatica@idiap.ch ABSTRACT Head nods occur in virtually every face-to-face discussion. As part communicative attention. Detecting head nods in natural interactions is a challenging task as head nods can

  2. Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

  3. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  4. Challenges Ahead Head movements and other social acts in conversations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Challenges Ahead Head movements and other social acts in conversations Dirk Heylen University of face-to-face interactions. The fact that conversations are a type of joint activity involving social in functions that are served by the multitude of movements that people display during conversations. 1

  5. Running head: Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running head: Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation Biopsychological Aspects of Motivation Oliver, O. C., & Wirth, M. M. (2008). Biopsychological aspects of motivation. In J. Heckhausen & H. Heckhausen (Eds.), Motivation and action (2 ed., pp. 247-271). New York: Cambridge University Press. #12

  6. Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power Steven J. Stanton and Oliver C. Schultheiss University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA To appear in: K. Dowding (Ed.), Encyclopedia of power-647-9440, email: stantons@umich.edu #12;Testosterone and power 2 Across many studies in humans, two functional

  7. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD Lanny C. Morley PROFESSORS Wayne P. Bailey, Robert Cacioppo, Ruthie. Miller, Anthony M. Vazzana, Dana R. Vazzana ASSISTANT PROFESSORS K. Scott Alberts, Don Bindner, Dean De Thatcher INSTRUCTORS Donna J. Bailey, Karen Croarkin, Joe Moyer D E G R E E S O F F E R E D Bachelor

  8. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD Lanny C. Morley PROFESSORS Wayne P. Bailey, Robert Cacioppo, Kevin. Scott Alberts, Don Bindner, Dean DeCock, David Garth, Alan Garvey, Carol Hoferkamp, Hyun-Joo Kim FACULTY Yuichi Iwashita, Thomas Tegtmeyer D E G R E E S O F F E R E D Bachelor of Science, BS Bachelor

  9. Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tailleux, Remi

    Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids R´emi Tailleux in classi- cal thermodynamics, however, usually relies on the concept of exergy, and is usually measured/eddy decompositions, APE in incompressible fluids, APE and irreversible turbulent mixing, and the role of mechanical

  10. AUTOMATIC AND ROBUST SEMANTIC REGISTRATION OF 3D HEAD SCANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisert, Peter

    useful for error- prone vision techniques like stereo analysis but also for model based repairing for applications such as 3D graphics production and also for computer vision research. Laser scanners are the primeAUTOMATIC AND ROBUST SEMANTIC REGISTRATION OF 3D HEAD SCANS David C. Schneider, Peter Eisert

  11. Data Mining: Where is it Heading? Database Systems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jiawei

    Data Mining: Where is it Heading? (Panel) Jiawei Han Database Systems Research Laboratory School of Computing Science Simon Fraser University, B.C., Canada V5A 1S6 E-mail: han@cs.sfu.ca Abstract Data mining on the issues in the field. Data mining has attracted popular interest recently, due to the high demand

  12. Molecular architecture of the prolate head of bacteriophage T4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    -Maklaya Street, Moscow 117997, Russia; and §Department of Biology, Center for Advanced Training in Cell) The head of bacteriophage T4 is a prolate icosahedron with one unique portal vertex to which the phage tail by the portal protein gp20. The prohead contains an internal core made up of the major core protein, gp22

  13. Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head Maria Angela Franceschini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diffuse optical imaging of the whole head Maria Angela Franceschini Danny K. Joseph Theodore J@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Abstract. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy NIRS and diffuse optical im- aging DOI are increasingly used to detect of optodes in NIRS instruments has hampered measurement of optical signals from diverse brain regions. Our

  14. Future Choices 1 Running head: EFFECT OF FUTURE CHOICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Choices 1 Running head: EFFECT OF FUTURE CHOICES The Effect of Highlighting Future Choices on Current Preferences Uzma Khan Carnegie Mellon University Ravi Dhar Yale School of Management #12;Future future choices rather than as an isolated choice. Our finding contrasts with the general wisdom

  15. Evaluation of a New Method of Heading Estimation for Pedestrian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Evaluation of a New Method of Heading Estimation for Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Using Shoe Mounted) (Email: Lachapelle@geomatics.ucalgary.ca) In this paper, a novel method of sensor based pedestrian dead with respect to a high accuracy reference trajectory. KEY WORDS 1. Pedestrian Navigation. 2. Dead Reckoning. 1

  16. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  17. Heading Off Correlated Failures through Independence-as-a-Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Heading Off Correlated Failures through Independence-as-a-Service Ennan Zhai1 Ruichuan Chen2, David Losses Data Center Outages Generate Big Losses Downtime in a data center can cost an average of $505 Operational Trends Report #12;Service Outage Losses Data Center Outages Generate Big Losses Downtime in a data

  18. RENEWABLE RESOURCES Selected SUBJECT HEADINGS for ILink catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    renewable energy sources biosphere renewable natural resources environmental policy sustainable agriculture Architecture Stks SB 469 .L3 V.93 Renewable Energy Stks TJ 807 .R46 and online SELECTED PRINT INDEXES (valuableRENEWABLE RESOURCES Selected SUBJECT HEADINGS for ILink catalog agricultural industries landscape

  19. Learning expressive human-like head motion sequences from speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    With the development of new trends in human-machine interfaces, animated feature films and video games, better avatars and virtual agents are required that more accurately mimic how humans communicate and interact. Gestures the emotional perception of facial animations [6]. Given the importance of head motion in human-human

  20. Stereo-Based Head Pose Tracking Using Iterative Closest Point and Normal Flow Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morency, Louis-Philippe

    2003-05-01

    In this text, we present two stereo-based head tracking techniques along with a fast 3D model acquisition system. The first tracking technique is a robust implementation of stereo-based head tracking designed for ...

  1. Neural compass or epiphenomenon? Experimental and theoretical investigations into the rodent head direction cell system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Meer, Matthijs

    2007-11-28

    How does the brain convert sensory information into abstract representations that can support complex behaviours? The rodent head-direction (HD) system, whose cell ensembles represent head direction in the horizontal plane, ...

  2. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A Bayesian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work (2009), Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations

  3. Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads and tracer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads; accepted 25 April 2006; published 10 August 2006. [1] In groundwater, hydraulic heads and solute arrival times depend primarily on the hydraulic conductivity field and hydraulic boundary conditions. The spread

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Head/Disk Interface for Patterned Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthy, Aravind N.; Duwensee, Maik; Talke, Frank E.

    2010-01-01

    ying head slider bearings in magnetic hard disk drives. ASMEfor ?ying head slider bearings in magnetic storage. ASME J.slider Á Magnetic data storage Á Slider air bearing Á Finite

  5. Leakage Rate and Hydraulic Head Change Evaluation through Conduits in Deep Storage Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Jinia

    2015-04-13

    mathematical model for estimating leakage rate by hydraulic head change evaluation through different conduits or leakage pathways coupled with an injection well. The leakage rate is estimated using Darcy’s law by evaluating hydraulic head change between...

  6. Investigation of the effect of shock, vibration, surface texture and surface pattern on the dynamics of the head disk interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthy, Aravind N.

    2007-01-01

    Corrections for Very Low Spacing at the Head Disk InterfaceS, "Low Stiction/Low Glide Height Head Disk Interface forCorrections for Very Low Spacing at the Head Disk Interface

  7. Head-mounted mobility aid for low vision using scene classification techniques M R Everingham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everingham, Mark

    Head-mounted mobility aid for low vision using scene classification techniques M R Everingham1 , B by over 100% using the system. Keywords: Low Vision, Mobility Aids, Head Mounted Display, Object-network classifier is used to identify objects in images from a head mounted camera so that scene content

  8. Tracking Head Yaw by Interpolation of Template Responses Mario Romero and Aaron Bobick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haro, Antonio

    time large range head yaw given a single non-calibrated monocular grayscale low resolution imageTracking Head Yaw by Interpolation of Template Responses Mario Romero and Aaron Bobick College sequence of the head. The architecture is composed of five parallel template detectors, a Radial Basis

  9. Differences in Head Orientation Behavior for Speakers and Listeners: An Experiment in a Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    the speaker from the listeners. However, the human speaker identification results were rather low. Head2 Differences in Head Orientation Behavior for Speakers and Listeners: An Experiment in a Virtual good stimulus control. Head orientations were displayed as the only cue for focus attention

  10. Mime: Compact, Low-Power 3D Gesture Sensing for Interaction with Head-Mounted Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    Mime: Compact, Low-Power 3D Gesture Sensing for Interaction with Head-Mounted Displays Andrea Colac of Technology Figure 1: Mime is a compact, low power sensor for 3D gestural control of head mounted displays, a compact, low-power 3D sensor for unen- cumbered free-form, single-handed gestural interaction with head

  11. Simple, Robust and Accurate Head-Pose Tracking Using a Single Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Koren

    low-cost head-pose tracking system developed. Furthermore, our system is robust and re- quiresSimple, Robust and Accurate Head-Pose Tracking Using a Single Camera Simon Meers, Koren Ward of the head in real time is finding increasing application in avionics, virtual reality, augmented reality

  12. Facial Expression Invariant Head Pose Normalization using Gaussian Process Ognjen Rudovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    into a head-pose space defined by a low dimensional manifold attained by means of multi-class LDA. ThenFacial Expression Invariant Head Pose Normalization using Gaussian Process Regression Ognjen for facial- expression-invariant head pose normalization. We address the problem by mapping the locations

  13. Converting Commodity Head-Mounted Displays for Optical See-Through Augmented Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    head-mounted display. Project achieves wide field of view and low latency augmented reality displayConverting Commodity Head-Mounted Displays for Optical See-Through Augmented Reality The Challenge The current market for fully immersive virtual reality head- mounted displays is rapidly expanding, however

  14. Design of a polarized head-mounted projection display using ferroelectric liquid-crystal-on-silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Hong

    - gravated in head-mounted projection displays in which multiple beam splitting and low retroreflectanceDesign of a polarized head-mounted projection display using ferroelectric liquid 2008 It has been a common problem in optical see-through head-mounted displays that the displayed image

  15. Articulatory features for speech-driven head motion synthesis Atef Ben-Youssef 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    the very low frame-wise correlations they found between the speech and head motion features, it was shownArticulatory features for speech-driven head motion synthesis Atef Ben-Youssef 1 , Hiroshi investigates the use of articulatory features for speech-driven head motion synthesis as opposed to prosody fea

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUDIO, SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PROCESSING 1 Rigid Head Motion in Expressive Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Zhigang

    animations to effectively mimic human behaviors. In this paper, head motion sequences in expressive facial, IEEE Abstract Rigid head motion is a gesture that conveys important non-verbal information in human head motion and hand movements are combined in a non-trivial manner, as they unfold in natural human

  17. Classifying Facial Gestures in Presence of Head Motion Wei-Kai Liao and Isaac Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    expressions of a moving head. We present a systematic framework to analyze and classify the facial gestures. After estimating the head pose, the human face is modeled by a collection of face's regionsClassifying Facial Gestures in Presence of Head Motion Wei-Kai Liao and Isaac Cohen Institute

  18. In-Your-Face, Yet Unseen? Improving Head-Stabilized Warnings to Reduce Reaction Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studies in a driving simulator, comparing different warning visualizations in a head-up display (HUD compared to the HUD. Our insights can help others design better head- stabilized notifications. Author, we conducted two studies, comparing equally large HMD (head- stabilized) and HUD (cockpit

  19. Single-channel Head Orientation Estimation Based on Discrimination of Acoustic Transfer Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    of this method has been confirmed by talker localiza- tion and head orientation estimation experiments performed transfer function 1. Introduction For human-human or human-computer interaction, the talker's head on the talker's head orientation. Other approaches focus on the radiation pat- tern of the magnitude for each

  20. USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

  1. A Demonstrated Optical Tracker With Scalable Work Area for Head-Mounted Display Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    A Demonstrated Optical Tracker With Scalable Work Area for Head- Mounted Display Systems Mark Ward Hall University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3175 Abstract An optoelectronic head of an optoelectronic head-tracking concept developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In the concept

  2. Two dedicated software, voxel-based, anthropomorphic (torso and head) phantoms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    1 Two dedicated software, voxel-based, anthropomorphic (torso and head) phantoms. I. George Zubal with isotropic voxel dimensions of 2.5 mms. Secondly, a dedicated head phantom was created by similar processing isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5mm. This dedicated head phantom contains 62 index numbers designating

  3. Augmented saliency model using automatic 3D head pose detection and learned gaze following in natural scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itti, Laurent

    a combination of gaze fol- lowing, head region, and bottom-up saliency maps with a Markov chain composed of head

  4. Analysis of head pose, faces, and eye dynamics in images and videos : a multilevel framework and algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junwen

    2007-01-01

    II.C. Head Pose Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . II.D.V.D.1. Stage 1: “Coarse” Pose Estimation . . . . . . . . . .Chapter V Two Stage Head Pose Estimation: Framework and

  5. Investigation of the effect of shock, vibration, surface texture and surface pattern on the dynamics of the head disk interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthy, Aravind N.

    2007-01-01

    Flying Head Slider Bearings in Magnetic Hard Disk Drives”,Flying Head Slider Bearings in Magnetic Storage”, ASME J.of textured air bearing sliders for magnetic recording

  6. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D. (Clawson, MI); Neal, Timothy L. (Ortonville, MI); Swain, Jeff L. (Flushing, MI); Raimao, Miguel A. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    2011-12-13

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  7. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  8. The 'Sphinx' Head from the Cult Center at Mycenae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehak, Paul

    2005-01-01

    University) passed away on the 5 th of June 2004. This paper has been edited by John Younger, based on a draft that Paul prepared in the early Spring of 2004. 1 Inventory number: NMA 4575. The head is nearly complete (the preserved height is 16... at Mycenae (Immerwahr 1990: 191, MY No. 6, pl. 61). 3 Later examples include the caps of mourning women on some of the painted larnakes from Tanagra (e.g., Demakopoulou 1988: 74–5, no. 5 and colour fig. 10). Thus, the cap is worn almost exclusively...

  9. Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-10-15

    Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

  10. Indian Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. Water Res.:01 -India: Energy ResourcesHead Park,

  11. Bear Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminexInformationArkansas:InformationHead Lake, Minnesota:

  12. Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-EearnstakesLos AlamosPortableNew head of

  13. Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces.

  14. Post-Cretaceous faulting at head of Mississippi embayment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Harrison, R.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Recent mapping in southernmost Illinois and southeastern Missouri has revealed numerous faults that displace Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Units as young as the Pliocene-Pleistocene( ) Mounds Gravel are deformed; some faults possibly displace Quaternary sediments. The faults strike northeast, dip nearly vertically, and exhibit characteristics of dextral strike-slip. Pull-apart grabens occur along right-stepping fault strands, they contain chaotically jumbled blocks of Paleozoic, Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks downdropped as much as 800 m relative to wall rocks. Faults at the head of the Mississippi embayment probably originated during Cambrian rifting (Reelfoot rift) and have a long, complex history of reactivation under different stress fields. Some faults are on strike with faults in the New Madrid seismic zone. Kinematics of post-Cretaceous displacements fit the contemporary stress regime of ENE-WSW compression. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as close proximity, suggest a close link between faulting at the head of the embayment and ongoing tectonism in the New Madrid seismic zone.

  15. Head-on collisions of black holes: the particle limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos O. Lousto; Richard H. Price

    1996-09-05

    We compute gravitational radiation waveforms, spectra and energies for a point particle of mass $m_0$ falling from rest at radius $r_0$ into a Schwarzschild hole of mass $M$. This radiation is found to lowest order in $(m_0/M)$ with the use of a Laplace transform. In contrast with numerical relativity results for head-on collisions of equal-mass holes, the radiated energy is found not to be a monotonically increasing function of initial separation; there is a local radiated-energy maximum at $r_0\\approx4.5M$. The present results, along with results for infall from infinity, provide a complete catalog of waveforms and spectra for particle infall. We give a representative sample from that catalog and an interesting observation: Unlike the simple spectra for other head-on collisions (either of particle and hole, or of equal mass holes) the spectra for $\\infty>r_0>\\sim5M$ show a series of evenly spaced bumps. A simple explanation is given for this. Lastly, our energy vs. $r_0$ results are compared with approximation methods used elsewhere, for small and for large initial separation.

  16. Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit 69dhydrogreenhydrodemonstration12.ppt More Documents & Publications Laboratory Demonstration of a New American...

  17. SU-E-J-127: Real-Time Dosimetric Assessment for Adaptive Head...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    METHODS; DEFORMATION; ERRORS; GLANDS; HEAD; IMAGES; NECK; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

  18. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  19. NNSA Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing...

  20. Registration of an on-axis see-through head-mounted display and camera system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peli, Eli

    Registration of an on-axis see-through head- mounted display and camera system Gang Luo Harvard Abstract. An optical see-through head-mounted display (HMD) system integrating a miniature camera and a low registration error across a wide range of depth. In reality, a small camera-eye misalignment may

  1. INVOLVEMENT OF THE FGFR4 Arg388 ALLELE IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Axel

    INVOLVEMENT OF THE FGFR4 Arg388 ALLELE IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA Sylvia STREIT 1/Arg polymorphism (388) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx and graded into a low, intermediate, or high degree of staining. FGFR4 expression was scored as high in 17

  2. NATURE|Vol 438|8 December 2005 BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS ARISING Head et al.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    NATURE|Vol 438|8 December 2005 BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS ARISING E9 Head et al.1 interpret spectacular of Hellas. They attribute growth of the low-latitude glaciers to snow- fall during periods of increased spin. Head et al.1 identify an accumulation area for the hourglass glacier in an `alcove' above its upper

  3. Head Pose Estimation of Partially Occluded Faces Markus T. Wenzel and Wolfram H. Schiffmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiffmann, Wolfram

    Head Pose Estimation of Partially Occluded Faces Markus T. Wenzel and Wolfram H. Schiffmann.Schiffmann@FernUni-Hagen.de Abstract This paper describes an algorithm which calculates the approximate head pose of partially occluded faces with- out training or manual initialization. The presented ap- proach works on low

  4. THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head ChE enters departmental website (http:// www.che.vt.edu/). Best wishes, Professor and Head The chemical engineering Karim joined the department as an associate profes- sor of chemical engineering. Previously, Karim

  5. Frankie Phua Executive Director and Head of Credit & Country Risk Management Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Frankie Phua Executive Director and Head of Credit & Country Risk Management Division UOB Frankie Phua is the Executive Director and the Global Head of the Credit & Country Risk Management Division (PD, LGD and EAD), economic capital modelling, credit portfolio risk management, counterparty credit

  6. Role of Eye, Head, and Shoulder Geometry in the Planning of Accurate Arm Movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriques, Denise Y. P.

    Role of Eye, Head, and Shoulder Geometry in the Planning of Accurate Arm Movements D.Y.P. HENRIQUES and shoulder geometry in the planning of accurate arm movements. J Neurophysiol 87: 1677­1685, 2002; 10.1152/jn with the continuous changes in eye, head, and arm positions. This is a geometrically complex process because the eyes

  7. The Rotational Propulsion Characteristics of Scaled-up Helical Microswimmers with different heads and magnetic positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the cut-off frequency. The rotational propulsion characteristics of helical swimmers with a magnetic headThe Rotational Propulsion Characteristics of Scaled-up Helical Microswimmers with different heads and magnetic positioning Tiantian Xu1, Gilgueng Hwang2, Nicolas Andreff3 and St´ephane R´egnier1 Abstract

  8. Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska Anthony Bryant Senior Project Alaska Pacific University May 5, 2010 #12;Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION January 2009. This paper researches the possibility of using geothermal energy as an alternative energy

  9. Audio-based Head Motion Synthesis for Avatar-based Telepresence Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    ]: Three Dimensional Graphics and Realism-Animation, Virtual Reality; I.2.6 [Artificial Intelligence, Design, Experimentation, Human Factors Keywords Computer Graphics, Facial Animation, Data-driven, Head- thesis technique is presented for avatar-based telepresence systems. First, head motion of a human

  10. Leakage through Liners under High Hydraulic Heads C.T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams and other hydraulic of geomembrane and composite liners for hydraulic systems such as dams involves heads several hundreds largerLeakage through Liners under High Hydraulic Heads C.T. Weber1 and J.G. Zornberg2 1 Civil

  11. Regulation of Biosurfactant Production by Quorum Sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens 5064, the Cause of Broccoli Head Rot Disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Xiaohui

    Broccoli head rot is a destructive disease found in most broccoli production areas. The main pathogen is the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. P. fluorescens 5064, which was first isolated from an infected broccoli head ...

  12. Determinants of SNAP Participation: Employing a Structural Vulnerability of Poverty Framework to Examine SNAP Participation Among Low-Income Heads of Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Gina L

    2015-01-01

    Among  Low-­?Income   Heads  of  Households.  Association  Participation Among Low-Income Heads of Households By GinaRecession among elderly low-income heads of households. The

  13. Recruitment of a Head-Turning Synergy by Low-Frequency Activity in the Primate Superior Colliculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneil, Brian D.

    Recruitment of a Head-Turning Synergy by Low-Frequency Activity in the Primate Superior Colliculus Rezvani S, Corneil BD. Recruitment of a head-turning synergy by low-frequency activity in the primate causally by SC stimulation, our results are consistent with low-frequency dSC activity recruiting a head

  14. Listener head gestures and verbal feedback expressions in a distraction task Marcin Wlodarczak1, Hendrik Buschmeier2, Zofia Malisz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Nigel

    of narrow, linear head gestures, e.g. low amplitude single nods. More importantly, the tendency of "yesListener head gestures and verbal feedback expressions in a distraction task Marcin Wlodarczak1,skopp}@techfak.uni-bielefeld.de Abstract We report on the functional and timing relations between head movements and the overlapping verbal

  15. Head Tracking for the Oculus Rift Steven M. LaValle1 Anna Yershova1 Max Katsev1 Michael Antonov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaValle, Steven M.

    maintaining human head orientation using low-cost MEMS sensors. We particularly address gyroscope integrationHead Tracking for the Oculus Rift Steven M. LaValle1 Anna Yershova1 Max Katsev1 Michael Antonov tracking head movement in the Oculus Rift Development Kit, which is the most widely used virtual reality

  16. Linear Regression of Eye Velocity on Eye Position and Head Velocity Suggests a Common Oculomotor Neural Integrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tank, David

    . The linear regression method presented here is valid for both fixation and low head velocity VOR dataLinear Regression of Eye Velocity on Eye Position and Head Velocity Suggests a Common Oculomotor Aksay, David W. Tank, and H. S. Seung. Linear regression of eye velocity on eye position and head

  17. Aspects of co-occurring syllables and head nods in spontaneous dialogue Simon Alexanderson, David House, Jonas Beskow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskow, Jonas

    Aspects of co-occurring syllables and head nods in spontaneous dialogue Simon Alexanderson, David of head nods taken from motion capture data of spontaneous dialogue in Swedish. The head nods were. While the peak rotation of the nod is on average aligned with the stressed syllable, the results show

  18. Neck Muscle Responses to Stimulation of Monkey Superior Colliculus. II. Gaze Shift Initiation and Volitional Head Movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneil, Brian D.

    evoked by electrical stimulation of the superior colliculus (SC) in head-unrestrained monkeys. Recording volitional head movements and place important new constraints on the interpretation of electrically evoked that the electrically evoked SC drive to the head cannot be considered as a neural replicate of the SC drive during

  19. In vivo evaluation of wearable head impact sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lyndia C; Bui, Kevin; Hammoor, Bradley; Kurt, Mehmet; Hernandez, Fidel; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David B

    2015-01-01

    Human skull accelerations are difficult to measure due to imperfect skull coupling. Some approaches have been validated with dummy or cadaver experiments, but methods to evaluate sensors in vivo are lacking. Here we present a novel method using high speed video to evaluate teeth-mounted (mouthguard), soft tissue-mounted (skin patch), and headgear-mounted (skull cap) sensors during 5-10g sagittal soccer head impacts. Skull coupling is quantified by displacement from an ear-canal reference. Mouthguard displacements were within video measurement error (<1mm), while the skin patch and skull cap displaced up to 4mm and 13mm from the ear-canal reference, respectively. With close skull-coupling, we used the mouthguard as the reference to assess 6-degree-of-freedom skin patch and skull cap measurements. Linear and rotational acceleration magnitudes were over-predicted by both the skin patch (23+/-9g, 2500+/-1200rad/s^2) and the skull cap (74+/-50g, 4300+/-2700rad/s^2). Such over-predictions were largely due to out...

  20. Head-on collisions of dense granular jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellowitz, Jake

    2015-01-01

    When a dense stream of dry, non-cohesive grains hits a fixed target, a collimated sheet is ejected from the impact region, very similar to what happens for a stream of water. In this study, as a continuation of the investigation why such remarkably different incident fluids produce such similar ejecta, we use discrete particle simulations to collide two unequal-width granular jets head-on in two dimensions. In addition to the familiar coherent ejecta, we observe that the impact produces a far less familiar quasi-steady-state corresponding to a uniformly translating free surface and flow field. Upon repeating such impacts with multiple continuum fluid simulations, we show that this translational speed is controlled only by the total energy dissipation rate to the power $1.5$, and is independent of the details of the jet composition. Our findings, together with those from impacts against fixed targets, challenge the principle of scattering in which material composition is inferred from observing the ejecta prod...

  1. Muscles of Head (and Neck, in part) muscles of facial expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houde, Peter

    aponeurotica, platysma, orbiculoaris oris, orbicularis oculi, risorius, depressor angulioris, levator anguli oris,zygomaticus major and minor, nasalis, auricularis, buccinator muscles of orbit 4 rectus musclesMuscles of Head (and Neck, in part) muscles of facial expression occipitofrontalis, galea

  2. Predicting Library of Congress Classifications From Library of Congress Subject Headings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Predicting Library of Congress Classifications From Library of Congress Subject Headings Eibe Frank Gordon W. Paynter Department of Computer Science The INFOMINE Project, Science Library University This paper addresses the problem of automatically assigning a Library of Congress Classification (LCC

  3. Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the degree to which the cumulative risk index predicted school readiness in a Head Start population. In general, the reviewed studies indicated the cumulative risk model was efficacious in predicting adverse developmental...

  4. Artificial gravity : changing the intensity of coriolis cross-coupled stimulus with head-angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adenot, Sophie, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    Artificial Gravity (AG) created by high-speed rotation is a promising method for preventing the serious deconditioning associated with prolonged exposure to weightlessness. Unfortunately, head-movements in a rotating ...

  5. The Health Component of Head Start: Potential Impacts on Childhood Obesity, Immunizations, and Dental Health 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banda, Tanya Y.

    2010-01-14

    Head Start, an early intervention program administered by the Administration for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services, offers children of low-income families comprehensive services in an ...

  6. preference in humans for turning the head to the right, rather than to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    railway stations, beaches and parks) in the United States, Germany and Turkey. The head- turning behaviour, Fakultät für Psychologie, Ruhr- Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum, Germany e-mail: onur

  7. 11th HEAD Meeting March 14, 2010 Big Island, Hawaii ChaMPlane Galactic Bulge Latitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11th HEAD Meeting March 1­4, 2010 Big Island, Hawaii ChaMPlane Galactic Bulge Latitude Survey, Hilo, HI 96720 U.S.A. http://hea-www.harvard.edu/ChaMPlane/ Zhao/CfA ChaMPlane 1 #12;11th HEAD Meeting observation "Limiting Window", a low extinction window closest to the SgrA* with Av=3.9. We also completed

  8. This paper was published at the Int. Conf. on Multimodal Interaction, Santa Monica, October 2012 Using Self-Context for Multimodal Detection of Head Nods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odobez, Jean-Marc

    Using Self-Context for Multimodal Detection of Head Nods in Face-to-Face Interactions Laurent Nguyen@idiap.ch ABSTRACT Head nods occur in virtually every face-to-face discussion. As part of the backchannel domain. Detecting head nods in natural interactions is a challenging task as head nods can be sub- tle, both

  9. Head/tail Breaks for Visualization of City Structure and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The things surrounding us vary dramatically, which implies that there are far more small things than large ones, e.g., far more small cities than large ones in the world. This dramatic variation is often referred to as fractal or scaling. To better reveal the fractal or scaling structure, a new classification scheme, namely head/tail breaks, has been developed to recursively derive different classes or hierarchical levels. The head/tail breaks works as such: divide things into a few large ones in the head (those above the average) and many small ones (those below the average) in the tail, and recursively continue the dividing process for the large ones (or the head) until the notion of far more small things than large ones has been violated. This paper attempts to argue that head/tail breaks can be a powerful visualization tool for illustrating structure and dynamics of natural cities. Natural cities refer to naturally or objectively defined human settlements based on a meaningful cutoff averaged from a massi...

  10. Evaluation of preharvest chemical dessication and module storage of grain sorghum head chop when fed to cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Walter Louis

    1979-01-01

    STORED IN SMALL MODULES 10 CHEMICAL CCMPOSITION OF SORGHUM HEAD CHOP PRIOR TO STORAGE, 1975 11 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SORGHUM HEAD CHOP PRIOR TO STORAGE, 1976 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . s 12 STORAGE QUALITIES OF SORGHUM HEAD CHOP SILAGE STORED... for the purpose of developing an economical, high energy feedstuff to grow ard fatten cattle. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW Ensiled Rations. If silages are to successfully compete with other high energy feedstuffs and play an increasing role in cattle feeding...

  11. Strong genetic structure among coral populations within a conservation priority region, the Bird's Head Seascape (Papua, Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starger, Craig John; Erdmann, Mark van Nydeck; Toha, Abdul Hamid A.; Baker, Andrew Charles; Barber, Paul Henry

    2015-01-01

    Papua prov- ince, Indonesia. Conservation International,Head Seascape (Papua, Indonesia) Craig J. Starger 1,2,3 Mark4 Conservation International, Indonesia Marine Program, Jl.

  12. The BWR lower head response during a large-break LOCA with core damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alammar, M.A. [GPU Nuclear Corp., Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Some of the important issues in severe accident management guidelines development deal with estimating the time to lower head vessel failure after core damage and the time window available for water injection that would prevent vessel failure. These issues are obviously scenario dependent, but bounding estimates are needed. The scenario chosen for this purpose was a design-basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) because it was one of the contributors to the Oyster Creek containment failure frequency. Oyster Creek is a 1930-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR)-2. The lower head response models have improved since the Three Mile Island unit 2 (TMI-2) vessel investigation project (VIP) results became known, specifically the addition of rapid- and slow-cooling models. These mechanisms were found to have taken place in the TMI-2 lower head during debris cooldown and were important contributors in preventing vessel failure.

  13. Double-stranded DNA organization in bacteriophage heads: An alternative toroid-based model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hud, N.V.

    1995-10-01

    Studies of the organization of double-stranded DNA within bacteriophage heads during the past four decades have produced a wealth of data. However, despite the presentation of numerous models, the true organization of DNA within phage heads remains unresolved. The observations of toroidal DNA structures in electron micrographs of phage lysates have long been cited as support for the organization of DNA in a spool-like fashion. This particular model, like all other models, has not been found to be consistent with all available data. Recently, the authors proposed that DNA within toroidal condensates produced in vitro is organized in a manner significantly different from that suggested by the spool model. This new toroid model has allowed the development of an alternative model for DNA organization within bacteriophage heads that is consistent with a wide range of biophysical data. Here the authors propose that bacteriophage DNA is packaged in a toroid that is folded into a highly compact structure.

  14. Dynamic structural analysis of a head assembly for a large loop-type LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is presented on the dynamic structural response of the primary vessel's head closure to slug impact loadings generated from a 1000 MJ source term. The reference reactor considered was designed in a loop configuration. The head structure consisted of a deck and a triple rotatable plug assembly. Two designs were considered for the deck structure: a reference design and an alternate design. The reference deck was designed as a single flat annular plate. For the alternate design, the deck plate was reinforced by adding an extender cylinder with a flange and flanged webs between the deck-plate and cylinder. The investigation showed that the reference design cannot maintain containment integrity when subjected to slug loading generated by a 1000 MJ source term. It was determined that the head deformed excessively.

  15. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

  17. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

  18. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

    1998-12-29

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Earth Pressure on Head Chamber of Shield Machine with FEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shouju; Kang Chengang [State Key Laboratory of structural analysis for industrial equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Shangguan Zichang [School of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute of Civil Engineering, Dalian Fishery University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2010-05-21

    Model parameters of conditioned soils in head chamber of shield machine are determined based on tree-axial compression tests in laboratory. The loads acting on tunneling face are estimated according to static earth pressure principle. Based on Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic constitutive model, the earth pressures on head chamber of shield machine are simulated in different aperture ratio cases for rotating cutterhead of shield machine. Relationship between pressure transportation factor and aperture ratio of shield machine is proposed by using aggression analysis.

  20. In Memory of V.P. Koptev January 12, 2012, died Head of the Laboratory Meson Physics of Condensed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    In Memory of V.P. Koptev January 12, 2012, died Head of the Laboratory Meson Physics of Condensed, he rose from trainee to head a research laboratory. Over the years of employment in PNPI Vladimir synchrocyclotron he was actively involved in creating an experimental basis: setup and measurament of the low

  1. Network Modeling Identifies Molecular Functions Targeted by miR-204 to Suppress Head and Neck Tumor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstein, Mark

    Network Modeling Identifies Molecular Functions Targeted by miR-204 to Suppress Head and Neck Tumor targets predicted by sequence-alignment databases and the relative low accuracy of such predictions which with tumor progression in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). We further demonstrate

  2. Cool the worker with cold compresses to the head, neck, and face or have the worker wash his or her

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Cool the worker with cold compresses to the head, neck, and face or have the worker wash his or her head, face and neck with cold water. Encourage fre- quent sips of cool water. Workers with signs reflec- Factors that May Cause Heat-related Illness · High temperature and humidity · Low fluid

  3. An Adaptive Finite Element Startegy for Analysis of Air Lubrication in the Head-Disk Interface of a Hard Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    An Adaptive Finite Element Startegy for Analysis of Air Lubrication in the Head-Disk Interface, interface de tête-disque KEYWORDS: air lubrication, finite elements, adaptive mesh, head-disk interface #12). Air lubrication between the rotating disk and the slider is critical to maintain this gap; a delicate

  4. Running head: PHARMACEUTICAL ADVERTISING Of Plight and Providence: Big Pharma and The Effects of Pharmaceutical Advertising on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    Running head: PHARMACEUTICAL ADVERTISING 1 Of Plight and Providence: Big Pharma and The Effects of Pharmaceutical Advertising on U.S. patients with RLS, Insomnia, GERD, and GAD Farley Hamada Advisor: Dr. Keith Murphy University of California, Irvine Spring 2011 #12;Running head: PHARMACEUTICAL ADVERTISING 2

  5. Estimation of Talker's Head Orientation Based on Discrimination of the Shape of Cross-power Spectrum Phase Coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    localization and head orientation estimation experiments performed in a real environ- ment. Index Terms coefficients 1. Introduction For human-human or human-computer interaction, the talker's location on the talker's head orientation. Other approaches focus on the radiation pattern of the magni- tude for each

  6. Talk to the Virtual Hands: Self-Animated Avatars Improve Communication in Head-Mounted Display Virtual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talk to the Virtual Hands: Self-Animated Avatars Improve Communication in Head-Mounted Display Virtual Environments Trevor J. Dodds1 *, Betty J. Mohler1 , Heinrich H. Bu¨ lthoff1,2 1 Human Perception¨lthoff HH (2011) Talk to the Virtual Hands: Self-Animated Avatars Improve Communication in Head

  7. Running Head: Hyperspecificity, Autism, and Neural Nets The Basis of Hyperspecificity in Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClelland, James L. "Jay"

    1 Running Head: Hyperspecificity, Autism, and Neural Nets The Basis of Hyperspecificity in Autism)-268-5060 (Fax) #12;Hyperspecificity, Autism, and Neural Nets 2 Abstract This article reviews a few key ideas to address one aspect of autism, namely the apparent hyperspecificity that is often seen in autistic children

  8. Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1976 Head and Hand: Rhetorical Resources in British

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapin, Steven

    Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1976 Head and Hand: Rhetorical Resources in British treatments of the process of education tend to be developed on the basis of particular conceptions shall examine these conceptions as they are manifested in a selection of educational writings

  9. MEDIA RELEASE --John Herbert, Head of Digital Technologies, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    MEDIA RELEASE Contacts: --John Herbert, Head of Digital Technologies, J. Willard Marriott Library Maps at the University of Utah's J. Willard Marriott Library. The library has completed digitization Marriott Library, 801-585-9391, walter.jones@utah.edu --Dale Snyder, External Relations Director, J

  10. Running head: IMPLICIT POWER MOTIVATION A Biobehavioral Model of Implicit Power Motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Running head: IMPLICIT POWER MOTIVATION A Biobehavioral Model of Implicit Power Motivation Arousal: Schultheiss, O. C. (2007). A biobehavioral model of implicit power motivation arousal, reward and frustration and psychological explanations of social behavior (pp. 176-196). New York: Guilford. #12;Implicit power motivation 2

  11. Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation 1 Running head: Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation 1 Running head: Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation Public speaking in front of an unreceptive audience increases implicit power motivation: Oliver.Schultheiss@fau.de #12;Public speaking arouses implicit power motivation 2 Abstract The present

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming may freeze the invasion of big-headed ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming may freeze the invasion of big-headed ants Cleo Bertelsmeier · Gloria is that these threats interact, and that a globally warming climate could favour invasive species. In this study we techniques, 3 Global Circu- lation Models and 2 CO2 emission scenarios, we generated world maps with suitable

  13. Use of Regression Equations 1 Running head: Equations from summary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    Use of Regression Equations 1 Running head: Equations from summary data Neuropsychology, in press the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record Using regression equations.crawford@abdn.ac.uk #12;Use of Regression Equations 2 Abstract Regression equations have many useful roles

  14. Quantum Information Processing Theory 1 Running head: QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    Quantum Information Processing Theory 1 Running head: QUANTUM INFORMATION PROCESSING THEORY Quantum, IN USA jstruebl@indiana.edu jbusemey@indiana.edu In D. Quinones (Ed.) Encyclopedia of the Sciences provides new conceptual tools for constructing social and behavioral science theories. Theoretical

  15. Running head: Diagenesis of Beacon Sandstone Diagenetic history of Triassic sandstone from the Beacon Supergroup in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Running head: Diagenesis of Beacon Sandstone Diagenetic history of Triassic sandstone from of shallow burial diagenesis, contact diagenesis (temperatures of 200-300ºC), and post-contact diagenesis, on the basis of petrographic and geochemical analyses. Shallow burial diagenesis is characterised by minor

  16. DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY 1 Running head: DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY 1 Running head: DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY Developing A Software Testing Ontology in UML for A Software Growth Environment of Web-Based Applications;DEVELOPING A SOFTWARE TESTING ONTOLOGY 2 Developing A Software Testing Ontology in UML for A Software Growth

  17. Neural Networks 1 Running Head: NETWORKS AND SPEED-ACCURACY TRADEOFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neural Networks 1 Running Head: NETWORKS AND SPEED-ACCURACY TRADEOFF Neural Networks Associated@columbia.edu (Y. Stern) #12;Neural Networks 2 Abstract This functional neuroimaging (fMRI) study examined the neural networks (spatial patterns of covarying neural activity) associated with the speed

  18. Hallucigenia’s head and the pharyngeal armature of early ecdysozoans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Martin R.; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2015-06-16

    . Budd, G. E. Tardigrades as ‘stem-group arthropods’: the evidence from the Cambrian 167 fauna. Zool. Anz. 240, 265–279 (2001). 168 15. Eriksson, B. J. & Budd, G. E. Onychophoran cephalic nerves and their bearing on our 169 understanding of head...

  19. Simon Fraser University Athletics & Recreation Employment Opportunity Head Instructor -Mountain Madness & Outdoor Adventures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    - Mountain Madness & Outdoor Adventures Position Title: Head Instructor - Mountain Madness & Outdoor camp, Mountain Madness and Outdoor Adventures. Both camps are full day, one week camps; Mountain Madness is for children 8-11 years and Outdoor Adventures is for children 11-14 years. Mountain Madness

  20. Tangible Programming 1 Running head:TANGIBLE PROGRAMMING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    to help solve human problems. Early childhood education hasn't ignored this; it is common to see young in notions of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP), a perspective within early childhood educationTangible Programming 1 Running head:TANGIBLE PROGRAMMING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD Tangible Programming

  1. Modeling of Human Brain Tissues and Head Injuries Induced by Blast and Ballistic Impact 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Sahil G

    2013-11-07

    .............................................................................. 162 56 Absence of the fluid cavitation on the coup side in the CSF for a helmet protected head ........................................................................ 163 57 Fluid cavitation damage observed on the coup side in the CSF... to the impact site. Irreversible cavitation damage was also observed. However...

  2. Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS TITLE: A psychological construction account of emotion regulation and dysregulation: The role Boston, MA 02115 Phone: 617-373-2044 Fax: 617-373-8714 Email: l.barrett@neu.edu #12;Emotion Regulation

  3. IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION How to Bite Your Tongue without Blowing Your Top: Implicit Evaluation of Emotion Regulation Predicts EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 2 Abstract People frequently have to control their emotions to function

  4. Eddies as Offshore Foraging Grounds for Melon-headed Whales (Peponocephala electra)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Eddies as Offshore Foraging Grounds for Melon- headed Whales (Peponocephala electra) Phoebe, NOAA 5School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska SeaLife Center eddies occur frequently in the lee of the Hawaiian Islands ­ Formed and sustained by easterly trade winds

  5. Identifying the Addressee in Human-Human-Robot Interactions based on Head Pose and Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Tanja

    Identifying the Addressee in Human-Human-Robot Interactions based on Head Pose and Speech Michael In this work we investigate the power of acoustic and visual cues, and their combination, to identify the addressee in a human-human-robot interaction. Based on eighteen audio- visual recordings of two human beings

  6. Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 1 Running head: DANGERS OF UNILATERAL FORGIVENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 1 Running head: DANGERS OF UNILATERAL FORGIVENESS On the Dangers Northwestern University Word Count: 5096 #12;Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 2 On the Dangers of Resolving forgiveness helps victims preserve a relationship #12;Dangers of Unilateral Forgiveness 3 that is likely

  7. THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head Working of the Virginia Tech Department of Chemical Engineering, It is my pleasure to pres- ent to you this latest edition. As a student, she helped establish the Alpha Omega Epsilon sorority at Virginia Tech for female engineering

  8. THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head A year at Kentucky. Thank you, John, for your years of service to the chemical engineering family at Virginia Tech with every- one's support. Chemical engineering continues to be a popular major. Our graduating class

  9. THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT Of CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT Of CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head faculty of chemical engineering Dear Alumni and Friends of the Virginia Tech Depart- ment of Chemical Engineer- ing for early 2014. #12;The VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT of CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 2 CONNECTION ford joins advisory

  10. THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    THE VIRGINIA TECH DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Greetings from the Department Head of Chemical Engineer- ing: Greetings from Blacks- burg. I hope this latest edition of the ChE Connection finds. Chemical engineering continues to be a popular major. Our graduating class in spring 2014 numbered 96. We

  11. The trans-Himalayan ights of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Graham

    | high altitude | satellite tracking | vertebrate migration | climbing ight Mountains and high plateaus). However, bar-headed geese have adapted in a variety of ways for living and ying at high altitudes (4, 5 stillness of the night. They appear to strategically avoid higher speed winds during the after- noon, thus

  12. January 12, 2005Washington University Teaching Center Two Heads are Better than One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 12, 2005Washington University Teaching Center Two Heads are Better than One: Using Peer, 2005Washington University Teaching Center Outline Peer editing? Objectives of peer editing Mechanics assessment of peer editing #12;January 12, 2005Washington University Teaching Center Peer Editing? Peer

  13. Page 1 of 33 3 STYLE HEADING NUMBER FOR CHP. (USED FOR FIG. NUMBERING)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    Page 1 of 33 3 STYLE HEADING NUMBER FOR CHP. (USED FOR FIG. NUMBERING) ACCOUNTING FOR GROUND MOTION intensities considered in the original building design. For modern buildings in the western United States for this spectral shape effect is through selection of a set of ground motions that is specific to the building

  14. It's not simple which is why the University of Houston is facing the challenge head on.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasser, Adrian

    -45, hosts the University's cutting edge energy research and academic programs. The energy crisis is our kind of crisis. UH ENERGY #12;UH.EdU/EnERgy Marathon Oil Schlumberger Technology Vinson & ElkinsIt's not simple ­ which is why the University of Houston is facing the challenge head on. UH Energy

  15. Highway 280 North or South Take the Sand Hill Road exit, head east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Highway 280 North or South · Take the Sand Hill Road exit, head east · Turn right on Stock Farm for "all" below From Bayshore US Highway 101 NorthFrom Bayshore US Highway 101 North or South · Take · Turn left on Stock Farm Road LKSC ParkingTurn left on Stock Farm Road · Make the next lefthand turn

  16. An Energy Efficient Wireless Communication Mechanism for Sensor Node Cluster Heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    An Energy Efficient Wireless Communication Mechanism for Sensor Node Cluster Heads Edoardo Regini mechanism to achieve significant energy savings in heterogeneous wireless sensor networks such as HPWREN the backbone. The routing is done by battery-powered nodes using license free radios such as 802

  17. Risk Assessment 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ISSUES IN SEX OFFENDER RISK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grove, William M.

    Risk Assessment 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ISSUES IN SEX OFFENDER RISK ASSESSMENT Prediction Issues and the Role of Incremental Validity in Sex Offender Risk Assessment Martin D. Lloyd University of Minnesota #12;Risk Assessment 2 Abstract We review issues of prediction and discuss their relevance

  18. Letter and word priming 1 Running head: Letter and word priming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Jeff

    Letter and word priming 1 Running head: Letter and word priming Orthographic, phonological, and articulatory contributions to masked letter and word priming Jeffrey S. Bowers Rice University Gabriella Vigliocco University of Wisconsin-Madison Richard Haan University of Arizona #12;Letter and word priming 2

  19. Word and psuedoword priming 1 Running head: Word and pseudoword priming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Jeff

    Word and psuedoword priming 1 Running head: Word and pseudoword priming Different perceptual codes support priming for words and pseudowords: Was Morton right all along? Jeffrey S. Bowers Rice University #12;Word and psuedoword priming 2 Abstract A perceptual identification task was used to assess priming

  20. Student Award Competition Finite Element EEG and MEG Simulations for Realistic Head Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhukov, Leonid

    than would be possible using linear elements alone. [1] D.S. Burnett. Finite Element Analysis: FromStudent Award Competition Finite Element EEG and MEG Simulations for Realistic Head Models be approximated by a technique such as the finite element method [1]. Most applications of the finite element

  1. Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digital library as a controversy Running head: DIGITAL LIBRARY AS A CONTROVERSY Digital library nouvelle 1 hal-00718385,version1-16Jul2012 Author manuscript, published in "Digital library as a controversy: Gallica vs Google, Dubrovnik : Croatia (2009)" #12;Digital library as a controversy Abstract

  2. Objective extraction of channel heads from high resolution topographic data1 Fiona J. Clubb*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    ,48 mitigation of pollution, prediction of ecosystem functioning and landscape evolution.49 Channel Andrews, St Andrews,10 United Kingdom KY16 9AL11 *Corresponding Author (email: F.Clubb@ed.ac.uk)12 Key from a number of different localities.15 We present a new method of predicting channel heads which

  3. Analytical modeling of saturated zone head response to evapotranspiration and river-stage fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    : Evapotranspiration Unconfined aquifer Phreatophyte Hydraulic conductivity s u m m a r y We investigate the response. These solutions are fitted to observed groundwater head fluctuations recorded in observation wells at the Boise of the ET flux, aquifer hydraulic conductivity, specific storage and specific yield are obtained

  4. Classifying Facial Gestures in Presence of Head Motion Wei-Kai Liao and Isaac Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Issac

    -computer interaction. Besides, it has many other potential applications, such as virtual reality and facial animation. After estimating the head pose, the human face is modeled by a collection of face's regions vector machine. Our experiments show that this approach could classify human expressions in interactive

  5. A Polarized Head-Mounted Projective Display and Chunyu Gao2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Hong

    projection system in [6]. Rolland has been developing an OLED-based (organic light emitting display in a head- mounted projective display (HMPD) due to the fact that light passes through the beamsplitter a custom-designed ultra-light projection system with a 52-degree field of view (FOV) [5, 6]. Hua recently

  6. Observation of the 'head-tail' effect in nuclear recoils of low-energy neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Dujmic; H. Tomita; M. Lewandowska; S. Ahlen; P. Fisher; S. Henderson; A. Kaboth; G. Kohse; R. Lanza; J. Monroe; A. Roccaro; G. Sciolla; N. Skvorodnev; R. Vanderspek; H. Wellenstein; R. Yamamoto

    2007-10-09

    Directional detection of dark matter can provide unambiguous observation of dark matter interactions even in the presence of background. This article presents an experimental method to measure the direction tag ("head-tail") of the dark matter wind by detecting the scintillation light created by the elastic nuclear recoils in the scattering of dark matter particles with the detector material. The technique is demonstrated by tagging the direction of the nuclear recoils created in the scattering of low-energy neutrons with CF4 in a low-pressure time-projection chamber that is developed by the DMTPC collaboration. The measurement of the decreasing ionization rate along the recoil trajectory provides the direction tag of the incoming neutrons, and proves that the "head-tail" effect can be observed.

  7. Chemical effects head-loss research in support of generic safety issue 191.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J. H.; Kasza, K.; Fisher, B.; Oras, J.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-10-31

    This summary report describes studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the potential for chemical effects on head loss across sump screens. Three different buffering solutions were used for these tests: trisodium phosphate (TSP), sodium hydroxide, and sodium tetraborate. These pH control agents used following a LOCA at a nuclear power plant show various degrees of interaction with the insulating materials Cal-Sil and NUKON. Results for Cal-Sil dissolution tests in TSP solutions, settling rate tests of calcium phosphate precipitates, and benchmark tests in chemically inactive environments are also presented. The dissolution tests were intended to identify important environmental variables governing both calcium dissolution and subsequent calcium phosphate formation over a range of simulated sump pool conditions. The results from the dissolution testing were used to inform both the head loss and settling test series. The objective of the head loss tests was to assess the head loss produced by debris beds created by Cal-Sil, fibrous debris, and calcium phosphate precipitates. The effects of both the relative arrival time of the precipitates and insulation debris and the calcium phosphate formation process were specifically evaluated. The debris loadings, test loop flow rates, and test temperature were chosen to be reasonably representative of those expected in plants with updated sump screen configurations, although the approach velocity of 0.1 ft/s used for most of the tests is 3-10 times that expected in plants with large screens . Other variables were selected with the intent to reasonably bound the head loss variability due to arrival time and calcium phosphate formation uncertainty. Settling tests were conducted to measure the settling rates of calcium phosphate precipitates (formed by adding dissolved Ca to boric acid and TSP solutions) in water columns having no bulk directional flow. For PWRs where NaOH and sodium tetraborate are used to control sump pH and fiberglass insulation is prevalent, relatively high concentrations of soluble aluminum can be expected. Tests in which the dissolved aluminum (Al) resulted from aluminum nitrate additions were used to investigate potential chemical effects that may lead to high head loss. Dissolved Al concentrations of 100 ppm were shown to lead to large pressure drops for the screen area to sump volume ratio and fiber debris bed studied. No chemical effects on head loss were observed in sodium tetraborate buffered solutions even for environments with high ratios of submerged Al area to sump volume. However, in tests with much higher concentrations of dissolved Al than expected in plants, large pressure drops did occur. Interaction with NUKON/Cal-Sil debris mixtures produced much lower head losses than observed in corresponding tests with TSP, although tests were not performed over the full range of Cal-Sil that might be of interest.

  8. LOCA analyses for nuclear steam supply systems with upper head injection. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, R.K.; Bartel, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    The term Upper Head Injection describes a relatively new addition to a nuclear reactor's emergency cooling system. With this feature, water is delivered directly to the top of the reactor vessel during a loss-of-coolant accident, in addition to the later injection of coolant into the primary operating loops. Established computer programs, with various modifications to models for heat transfer and two-phase flow, were used to analyze a transient following a large break in one of the main coolant loops of a reactor equipped with upper head injection. The flow and heat transfer modifications combined to yield fuel cladding temperatures during blowdown which were as much as 440K (800/sup 0/F) lower than were obtained with standard versions of the codes (for best estimate calculations). The calculations also showed the need for more uniformity of applications of heat transfer models in the computer programs employed.

  9. MD Simulation for Head-on Collision of Liquid Nanodroplets Obeying Modified L-J Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    This project models and studies the `head-on' collision of liquid helium nanodroplets within a vacuum, using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Programs written in MATLAB and C are utilized in tandem to facilitate computer experimentation that achieves this goal. The most expensive computation, that of collision simulation, is handled by a HPC cluster `ALICE' at the University of Leicester. Colliding droplets are modelled as roughly spherical collections of points, cut from a simple cubic lattice, obeying a modified Lennard-Jones potential, with average velocities initialized to ensure a `head-on' collision. These point-sets are then allowed to collide within a cuboid region, designed to take advantage of the observed angular distribution of post-collision fragmentation (favoring a plane orthogonal to `collision axis'). To implement the developed theoretical model, an existing C script by D. C. Rapaport, for modelling a homogeneous liquid state, is edited by the author to fit the given, highly heteroge...

  10. Recent studies related to head-end fuel processing at the Hanford PUREX plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of studies addressing several problems in the head-end processing (decladding, metathesis, and core dissolution) of N Reactor fuel elements in the Hanford PUREX plant. These studies were conducted over 2 years: FY 1986 and FY 1987. The studies were divided into three major areas: 1) differences in head-end behavior of fuels having different histories, 2) suppression of /sup 106/Ru volatilization when the ammonia scrubber solution resulting from decladding is decontaminated by distillation prior to being discharged, and 3) suitability of flocculating agents for lowering the amount of transuranic (TRU) element-containing solids that accompany the decladding solution to waste. 16 refs., 43 figs.

  11. Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

    1983-08-01

    Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Supplement 19, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Subject Headings And Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Martha L.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Shaw, Judith H.; Kirby, Margie D.; Edwards, Shirley J.

    1974-01-01

    HUMPHREY SHAW, Zoologist MARGIE D. KIRBY, Technical Information Specialist SHIRLEY J. EDWARDS, Technical Information Specialist ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY INSTITUTE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE Issued March 1974 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE... AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY Supplement 19, ftirt 6 PARASITE-SUBJECT CATALOGUE SUBJECT HEADINGS AND TREATMENT By MARTHA L. WALKER, JANE D. RAYBURN, JUDITH H. SHAW, MARGIE D. KIRBY, and SHIRLET J. EDWARDS Abnormalities. See Anomalies. Abortion Archer, J. F...

  13. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  14. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  15. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part I. chemically generated precipitates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C. B.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K.; Klein, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the current program was to evaluate the properties of chemical precipitates proposed by industry that have been used in sump strainer head loss testing. Specific precipitates that were evaluated included aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) and sodium aluminum silicate (SAS) prepared according to the procedures in WCAP-16530-NP, along with precipitates formed from injecting chemicals into the test loop according to the procedure used by one sump strainer test vendor for U.S. pressurized water reactors. The settling rates of the surrogate precipitates are strongly dependent on their particle size and are reasonably consistent with those expected from Stokes Law or colloid aggregation models. Head loss tests showed that AlOOH and SAS surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across a perforated pump inlet strainer that has an accumulated fibrous debris bed. The characteristics of aluminum hydroxide precipitate using sodium aluminate were dependent on whether it was formed in high-purity or ordinary tap water and whether excess silicate was present or not.

  16. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Yi; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S. V.

    2010-01-01

    Many complex sensor network applications require deploying a large number of inexpensive and small sensors in a vast geographical region to achieve quality through quantity. Hierarchical clustering is generally considered as an efficient and scalable way to facilitate the management and operation of such large-scale networks and minimize the total energy consumption for prolonged lifetime. Judicious selection of cluster heads for data integration and communication is critical to the success of applications based on hierarchical sensor networks organized as layered clusters. We investigate the problem of selecting sensor nodes in a predeployed sensor network to be the cluster headsmore »to minimize the total energy needed for data gathering. We rigorously derive an analytical formula to optimize the number of cluster heads in sensor networks under uniform node distribution, and propose a Distance-based Crowdedness Clustering algorithm to determine the cluster heads in sensor networks under general node distribution. The results from an extensive set of experiments on a large number of simulated sensor networks illustrate the performance superiority of the proposed solution over the clustering schemes based on k -means algorithm. « less

  17. Of Boys and girls and Bumps on the Head (414th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biegon, Anat

    2006-04-19

    If you are a young man driving your wife and her parents, be very careful. If you are involved in a serious car accident, you and your mother-in-law are most likely to survive. This 'warning' is one conclusion of Anat Biegon's upcoming 414th Brookhaven Lecture, entitled 'Of Boys and Girls and Bumps on the Head.' Joanna Fowler of the Chemistry Department, Director of BNL's Translational Neuroimaging Center, will introduce the lecturer. Biegon, a senior medical scientist in the Medical Department, will detail how research has refined scientists view of gender differences in the prevalence and outcome of diseases affecting the brain. Although it has been well documented that gender affects the prevalence of disorders such as depression and Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, recent head injury trials suggest that both age and sex affect the likelihood and degree of recovery from injuries to the brain. While girls are more likely to die following a traumatic brain injury than boys, that result is reversed after the age of 50, when men die twice as often. Although it has been well documented that gender affects the prevalence of disorders such as depression and Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, recent head injury trials suggest that both age and sex affect the likelihood and degree of recovery from injuries to the brain. While girls are more likely to die following a traumatic brain injury than boys, that result is reversed after the age of 50, when men die twice as often.

  18. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a low-cost flexural bearing based 3D printing tool head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Aaron Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This thesis discusses the design, characterization and optimization of a low-cost additive rapid-prototyping tool head for a technology known as Fused Filament Fabrication for use in an educational curriculum. Building a ...

  19. Characterisation of individual airborne particles by using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) at Mace Head, Ireland, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C S; Kinnersley, Robert P; Harrison, Roy M; Donovan, Robert J; Heal, Mathew R

    2004-01-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer was deployed at Mace Head (Ireland) during August 2002. The measurements provide qualitative chemical composition and size distribution (0.3–3 ?m) information for single ...

  20. Computational evaluation of a novel approach to process planning for circuit card assembly on dual head placement machines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Nilanjan Dutta

    2006-04-12

    Dual head placement machines are commonly used in industry for placing components on circuit cards with great speed and accuracy. This thesis evaluates a novel approach for prescribing process plans for circuit card assembly ...

  1. Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

    2006-04-12

    Many senescent individuals demonstrate an inability to regulate mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to standing or head-up tilt; however, whether this aging effect is the result of depressed cardiac function or an inability to reduce peripheral...

  2. Rapidly re-computable EEG (electroencephalography) forward models for realistic head shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ermer, J. J.; Mosher, J. C.; Baillet, S.; Leahy, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Solution of the EEG source localization (inverse) problem utilizing model-based methods typically requires a significant number of forward model evaluations. For subspace based inverse methods like MUSIC [6], the total number of forward model evaluations can often approach an order of 10{sup 3} or 10{sup 4}. Techniques based on least-squares minimization may require significantly more evaluations. The observed set of measurements over an M-sensor array is often expressed as a linear forward spatio-temporal model of the form: F = GQ + N (1) where the observed forward field F (M-sensors x N-time samples) can be expressed in terms of the forward model G, a set of dipole moment(s) Q (3xP-dipoles x N-time samples) and additive noise N. Because of their simplicity, ease of computation, and relatively good accuracy, multi-layer spherical models [7] (or fast approximations described in [1], [7]) have traditionally been the 'forward model of choice' for approximating the human head. However, approximation of the human head via a spherical model does have several key drawbacks. By its very shape, the use of a spherical model distorts the true distribution of passive currents in the skull cavity. Spherical models also require that the sensor positions be projected onto the fitted sphere (Fig. 1), resulting in a distortion of the true sensor-dipole spatial geometry (and ultimately the computed surface potential). The use of a single 'best-fitted' sphere has the added drawback of incomplete coverage of the inner skull region, often ignoring areas such as the frontal cortex. In practice, this problem is typically countered by fitting additional sphere(s) to those region(s) not covered by the primary sphere. The use of these additional spheres results in added complication to the forward model. Using high-resolution spatial information obtained via X-ray CT or MR imaging, a realistic head model can be formed by tessellating the head into a set of contiguous regions (typically the scalp, outer skull, and inner skull surfaces). Since accurate in vivo determination of internal conductivities is currently not currently possible, the head is typically assumed to consist of a set of contiguous isotropic regions, each with constant conductivity.

  3. Heading 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    willingly give and accept constructive feedback and coaching. On-going Dialogue I have good interpersonal skills. I am a good listener. I seek to find out information through...

  4. Heading 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29HaiWhy Is ItHarry1-1642 Unlimited

  5. Tobacco Smoking During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Is Associated With Unfavorable Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Leon M.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sreeraman, Radhika; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of continued cigarette smoking among patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer by comparing the clinical outcomes among active smokers and quitters. Methods and Materials: A review of medical records identified 101 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who continued to smoke during radiation therapy. Each active smoker was matched to a control patient who had quit smoking before initiation of radiation therapy. Matching was based on tobacco history (pack-years), primary site, age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Status, disease stage, radiation dose, chemotherapy use, year of treatment, and whether surgical resection was performed. Outcomes were compared by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis. Normal tissue effects were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 49 months, active smokers had significantly inferior 5-year overall survival (23% vs. 55%), locoregional control (58% vs. 69%), and disease-free survival (42% vs. 65%) compared with the former smokers who had quit before radiation therapy (p < 0.05 for all). These differences remained statistically significant when patients treated by postoperative or definitive radiation therapy were analyzed separately. The incidence of Grade 3 or greater late complications was also significantly increased among active smokers compared with former smokers (49% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer is associated with unfavorable outcomes. Further studies analyzing the biologic and molecular reasons underlying these differences are planned.

  6. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and ?H2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  7. The repairs on the joint head dam on the Salt River in Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Luther Rudolph

    1916-01-01

    on the Salt River. This structure impounds the flood waters of the Salt and holds them in a reservoir to be used as needed in the valley below. The next structure un­ dertaken was on the site of the old Granite Reef Dam. This new work is of concrete..., leaving the Joint Head Dam h igh and dry. The government rebuilt this dam of concrete, as shown. It further built dykes of earth over the arroyas south of the river which formed the high level river bed. A p rofile of these washed-out por­ tions...

  8. Determination of selected trace elements in human head hair by neutron activation analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courson, Leonard Austin

    1981-01-01

    ) Leonard Austin Courson, B. S. , Auburn University Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. Richard D. Neff Trace element determination utilizing neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been shown to be a powerful tool in the 1nvesti gati on of human head hair...- culate a probab1lity that two different hair samples are of common origin. By sampling 299 members of the population of the Central Texas area and uti li z1 ng NAA to determine the concentrations of the short lived activation products, such a data base...

  9. Head Loss Through Fibrous Debris Bed with Different Types of Perforated Strainers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulsattar, Suhaeb S

    2014-05-03

    than the randomly generated debris bed on the sump strainer of the NPP. The U.S. NRC began their analysis in 1996 in order to predict and estimate the loss of the Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) by establishing GSI-191. In 1995, NUREG/CR-6224....0964 ft3 (0.00273 m3). The density of the NUKON debris particle was specified to be equal to 2.88 g/cm3 in the (NURE/CR- 6224), however, it was specified to be 2.5 g/cm3 according to the NUKON insulation Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)[10...

  10. Head of the Harbor, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent| Open EnergyCapital JumpHead

  11. Head Erosion with Emittance Growth in PWFA (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) |different scalesTHEScalejitter-freenucleiHead

  12. Optimization of UAV Heading for the Ground-to-Air Uplink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Feng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a collection of single-antenna ground nodes communicating with a multi-antenna unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a multiple-access ground-to-air wireless communications link. The UAV uses beamforming to mitigate the inter-user interference and achieve spatial division multiple access (SDMA). First, we consider a simple scenario with two static ground nodes and analytically investigate the effect of the UAV heading on the system sum rate. We then study a more general setting with multiple mobile ground-based terminals, and develop an algorithm for dynamically adjusting the UAV heading in order to maximize a lower bound on the ergodic sum rate of the uplink channel, using a Kalman filter to track the positions of the mobile ground nodes. Fairness among the users can be guaranteed through weighting the bound for each user's ergodic rate with a factor inversely proportional to their average data rate. For the common scenario where a high $K$-factor channel exists between the ground node...

  13. Selective evaporation of focusing fluid in two-fluid hydrodynamic print head.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keicher, David M.; Cook, Adam W.

    2014-09-01

    The work performed in this project has demonstrated the feasibility to use hydrodynamic focusing of two fluid steams to create a novel micro printing technology for electronics and other high performance applications. Initial efforts focused solely on selective evaporation of the sheath fluid from print stream provided insight in developing a unique print head geometry allowing excess sheath fluid to be separated from the print flow stream for recycling/reuse. Fluid flow models suggest that more than 81 percent of the sheath fluid can be removed without affecting the print stream. Further development and optimization is required to demonstrate this capability in operation. Print results using two-fluid hydrodynamic focusing yielded a 30 micrometers wide by 0.5 micrometers tall line that suggests that the cross-section of the printed feature from the print head was approximately 2 micrometers in diameter. Printing results also demonstrated that complete removal of the sheath fluid is not necessary for all material systems. The two-fluid printing technology could enable printing of insulated conductors and clad optical interconnects. Further development of this concept should be pursued.

  14. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

    1998-02-24

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

  16. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  17. Observations of supra-arcade fans: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Schmit, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2014-11-20

    Supra-arcade fans are bright, irregular regions of emission that develop during eruptive flares above flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection sites which are extremely difficult to observe directly because of their low densities. It has been suggested that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low-density jet directed toward higher-density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low- and high-density fingers along the interface. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 Å images, we show details of SADs seen from three different orientations with respect to the flare arcade and current sheet, and highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations suggests that SADs are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type in the exhaust of reconnection jets.

  18. SU-E-T-603: Analysis of Optical Tracked Head Inter-Fraction Movements Within Masks to Access Intracranial Immobilization Techniques in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsi, W; Zeidan, O

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a quantitative methodology utilizing an optical tracking system for monitoring head inter-fraction movements within brain masks to assess the effectiveness of two intracranial immobilization techniques. Methods and Materials: A 3-point-tracking method was developed to measure the mask location for a treatment field at each fraction. Measured displacement of mask location to its location at first fraction is equivalent to the head movement within the mask. Head movements for each of treatment fields were measured over about 10 fractions at each patient for seven patients; five treated in supine and two treated in prone. The Q-fix Base-of-Skull head frame was used in supine while the CIVCO uni-frame baseplate was used in prone. Displacements of recoded couch position of each field post imaging at each fraction were extracted for those seven patients. Standard deviation (S.D.) of head movements and couch displacements was scored for statistical analysis. Results: The accuracy of 3PtTrack method was within 1.0 mm by phantom measurements. Patterns of head movement and couch displacement were similar for patients treated in either supine or prone. In superior-inferior direction, mean value of scored standard deviations over seven patients were 1.6 mm and 3.4 mm for the head movement and the couch displacement, respectively. The result indicated that the head movement combined with a loose fixation between the mask-to-head frame results large couch displacements for each patient, and also large variation between patients. However, the head movement is the main cause for the couch displacement with similar magnitude of around 1.0 mm in anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Conclusions: Optical-tracking methodology independently quantifying head movements could improve immobilization devices by correctly acting on causes for head motions within mask. A confidence in the quality of intracranial immobilization techniques could be more efficient by eliminating the need for frequent imaging.

  19. Long-Range And Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation Studies in RHIC With Lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  20. Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.-J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

    2009-01-12

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  1. Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer,W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J. -P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H. -J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

    2008-11-24

    Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both RIDC and the LHC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

  2. Head-on collisions of binary white dwarf-neutron stars: Simulations in full general relativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2011-03-15

    We simulate head-on collisions from rest at large separation of binary white dwarf-neutron stars (WDNSs) in full general relativity. Our study serves as a prelude to our analysis of the circular binary WDNS problem. We focus on compact binaries whose total mass exceeds the maximum mass that a cold-degenerate star can support, and our goal is to determine the fate of such systems. A fully general relativistic hydrodynamic computation of a realistic WDNS head-on collision is prohibitive due to the large range of dynamical time scales and length scales involved. For this reason, we construct an equation of state (EOS) which captures the main physical features of neutron stars (NSs) while, at the same time, scales down the size of white dwarfs (WDs). We call these scaled-down WD models 'pseudo-WDs (pWDs)'. Using pWDs, we can study these systems via a sequence of simulations where the size of the pWD gradually increases toward the realistic case. We perform two sets of simulations; One set studies the effects of the NS mass on the final outcome, when the pWD is kept fixed. The other set studies the effect of the pWD compaction on the final outcome, when the pWD mass and the NS are kept fixed. All simulations show that after the collision, 14%-18% of the initial total rest mass escapes to infinity. All remnant masses still exceed the maximum rest mass that our cold EOS can support (1.92M{sub {center_dot}}), but no case leads to prompt collapse to a black hole. This outcome arises because the final configurations are hot. All cases settle into spherical, quasiequilibrium configurations consisting of a cold NS core surrounded by a hot mantle, resembling Thorne-Zytkow objects. Extrapolating our results to realistic WD compactions, we predict that the likely outcome of a head-on collision of a realistic, massive WDNS system will be the formation of a quasiequilibrium Thorne-Zytkow-like object.

  3. Postradiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on postradiation {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with head-and-neck cancer who received pretreatment and posttreatment PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. The PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub 2.0}-MTV{sub 4.0}; where MTV{sub 2.0} refers to the volume above a standardized uptake value threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival and overall survival. Results: Multiple postradiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome; however, the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV{sub 2.0}. An increase in MTV{sub 2.0} of 21cm{sup 3} (difference between 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]= 2.5, p = 0.0001) and death (HR = 2.0, p = 0.003). In patients with nonnasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 34), MTV{sub 2.0} <18 cm{sup 3} and MTV{sub 2.0} {>=}18 cm{sup 3} yielded 2-year disease-free survival rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p = 0.006) and 2-year overall survival rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p = 0.009). There was no correlation between MTV{sub 2.0} and disease-free survival or overall survival with nasopharyngeal carcinoma histology (n = 13). On multivariate analysis, only postradiation MTV{sub 2.0} was predictive of disease-free survival (HR = 2.47, p = 0.0001) and overall survival (HR = 1.98, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Postradiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies.

  4. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  5. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  6. College Grads, Young Moms, Big Bucks, State Reps and Racial Composition: Evaluating the Impact of Social, Political and Economic Factors on State-Level Head Start Uptake Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Angela N

    2013-04-11

    The Head Start Program aims to equip pre-school age children from low-income families with the social, academic and emotional development that is essential upon entry to Kindergarten. While much research and debate exists about whether or not Head...

  7. Simulations of Octupole Compensation of head-tail instability at the Tevatron M. Xiao and T. Sen, FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large Hadron Collider Program

    Simulations of Octupole Compensation of head-tail instability at the Tevatron M. Xiao and T. Sen in the Tevatron depends sensitively on chromaticities. Too low chromaticities can make the beam unstable due to the weak head-tail instability. One way to compensate this effect is to introduce octupoles to create

  8. Testosterone and prolactin in two songbirds that differ in paternal care: the blue-headed vireo and the red-eyed vireo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketterson, Ellen D.

    ) and prolactin (PRL). Concentrations of plasma T and PRL were compared in breeding Blue-headed Vireos (Vireo incubation, respectively. In male Blue-headed Vireos, plasma T remained low from prenesting to fledgling stages; whereas in male Red-eyed Vireos, plasma T was highest during prenesting and progressively

  9. Career Break Record of Contact Days Staff on a career break may, by agreement with their Head of School/Unit, undertake a number of days'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    with their Head of School/Unit, undertake a number of days' paid work during their career break ("contact days"). The type of work undertaken is a matter of agreement between the member of staff and the Head of School/Unit: _________________________________________________________________ Staff ID/NI Number/ Date of Birth:_________________________________________ School/Unit

  10. [To be printed on the headed notepaper of the Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer Group (if an independent organisation) or the Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    [To be printed on the headed notepaper of the Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer of Signature:___________________________ [Signed by Head Technology Transfer Office (TTO) or Group on behalf of Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer Group if independent or if the University does not have

  11. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

  12. Scanning of Scenes in Autism and Schizophrenia 1 Running Head: SCANNING OF SCENES IN AUTISM AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    Scanning of Scenes in Autism and Schizophrenia 1 Running Head: SCANNING OF SCENES IN AUTISM AND SCHIZOPHRENIA Orienting to Social Stimuli Differentiates Social Cognitive Impairment in Autism and Schizophrenia: (919) 966-7080 #12;Scanning of Scenes in Autism and Schizophrenia 2 Abstract Context. Both autism

  13. Head of Technical Services The University of Arkansas Libraries are seeking a highly experienced and nationally engaged individual to lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Head of Technical Services The University of Arkansas Libraries are seeking a highly experienced and nationally engaged individual to lead the Technical Services Department. The position is responsible for oversight of acquisition, processing, and accessibility of materials for the Libraries' collections

  14. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01

    Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  15. Modeling long-term fire regimes of southern California shrublands1 (Suggested running head: "Modeling fire regimes with HFire")3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    1 Modeling long-term fire regimes of southern California shrublands1 2 (Suggested running head: "Modeling fire regimes with HFire")3 4 Seth H. Petersona , Max A. Moritzb , Marco E. Moraisc , Philip E for Fire Research & Outreach, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, & Management,10 UC Berkeley, CA

  16. IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 30, NO. 5, JUNE 2012 993 Optimization of UAV Heading for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 30, NO. 5, JUNE 2012 993 Optimization of UAV-antenna unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a multiple-access ground-to-air communi- cations link. The UAV uses of the UAV's heading on the system sum rate. We then study a more general setting with multiple mobile ground

  17. Running head: PLSCA FOR BEHAVIORALAND GENETIC DATA 1 Partial Least Squares-Correspondence Analysis: A framework to simultaneously analyze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdi, Hervé

    : A framework to simultaneously analyze behavioral and genetic data Derek Beaton* School of Behavioral and BrainRunning head: PLSCA FOR BEHAVIORALAND GENETIC DATA 1 Partial Least Squares-Correspondence Analysis Sciences The University of Texas at Dallas MS: GR4.1 800 West Campbell Rd. Richardson, TX 75080 USA Joseph

  18. Analytical and semi-analytical solutions of horizontal well capture times under no-ow and constant-head boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    for oil and gas production in the past decade [15,21]. Extensive studies on pressure anal- ysis-head. The third scenario is recovery from a low-permeability layer bounded above and below by much higher developed analytical solutions of the transient and steady-state gas pressure and the steady-state stream

  19. Submitted to and accepted for the Expert Systems in Production and Operations Management Conference, Hilton Head, South Carolina, 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    Conference, Hilton Head, South Carolina, 1990 TEST+: The Extension of an Application Shell For Turbine a unique and powerful solution to the diagnosis of turbine generators. #12;2 1 Introduction As a variety+ in the turbine-generator domain. Features of this domain motivated a particular set of system requirements

  20. SmartColor: Real-Time Color Correction and Contrast for Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -through head-mounted displays (OHMD) perceive color as a blend of the display color and the background. Color-blending correction aims at mitigating color blending by producing an alternative color which, when blended present SmartColor, a middleware for color management of user- interface components in OHMD. Smart

  1. RUNNING HEAD: THE FOSSIL CALIBRATION DATABASE Title: The Fossil Calibration Database, A New Resource for Divergence Dating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    1 RUNNING HEAD: THE FOSSIL CALIBRATION DATABASE Title: The Fossil Calibration Database, A New Street NW, Washington, DC, 20059, USA; 19 Centre of Evolutionary and Ecological Studies, Marine Evolution continually lest they become obsolete. Here, we announce the Fossil Calibration Database (http

  2. Seeing the whole elephant in the room: a holistic approach to ebooks Pamela Jacobs, Head (Acting), Information Resources & Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    ), Information Resources & Collections Robin Bergart, User Experience Librarian University of Guelph Introduction the various aspects of the ebook ecosystem and to place these in a framework to help guide decision making, Liaison, Information Literacy and User Experience Design: Pam Jacobs ­ Acting Head, Information Resources

  3. Laboratory life-fertility table assessment and field biology of millet head miner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Niger 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou Kadi Kadi, Hame

    1999-01-01

    and developmental rate. More millet head miners survived better when fed Bio-Serv® than any of the millet-based diets. Fed Bio-Serv® diet, survival from eggs to adults was greatest (5.4%) at 30C?. Developmental times from eggs to adults were longest (51.1-55.4 d...

  4. What You See Is What You Touch: Visualizing Touch Screen Interaction in the Head-Up Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the position of the user's hand in relation to it, within the car's head-up display (HUD). In an initial study is visualized in the HUD. In this paper, we present the "What You See Is What You Touch" (WYSIWYT) technique

  5. Examining the Effects of Conformal Terrain Features in Advanced Head-Up Displays on Flight Performance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    and EVS imagery in an advanced head-up display (HUD) during a simulated landing approach under instrument meteorological conditions. Videos of the landing with various HUD configurations were presented to eight pilots with a superimposed tracking task. The independent variables included four HUD feature configurations (baseline [no

  6. RUNNING HEAD: A SCALED WORLD FOR APPLIED COGNITIVE RESEARCH Contending with complexity: Developing and Using a Scaled World in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    RUNNING HEAD: A SCALED WORLD FOR APPLIED COGNITIVE RESEARCH Contending with complexity: Developing and Using a Scaled World in Applied Cognitive Research Brian D. Ehret Wayne D. Gray George Mason University with complexity: Developing and using a scaled world in applied cognitive research. Human Factors, 42(1), 8

  7. Central auditory neurons display flexible feature recombination1 Running head: Flexible logic of central auditory neurons3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    these operations in individual neurons, violating the fixed neuron-to-38 computation mapping posited in the state but are generic, the flexible neuron-to-computation mapping43 demonstrated in this study in the auditory system1 Central auditory neurons display flexible feature recombination1 functions2 Running head

  8. Mach-like Angular Correlations Arise Only From the Head Zone of AdS/CFT String Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Noronha; Miklos Gyulassy

    2008-06-26

    We show that Mach-like azimuthal correlations of associated hadrons in the wake of heavy quark jets modeled in the AdS/CFT string drag picture originate only from the near-quark ``Head'' region. The contributions from the far zones lead only to a yield peaked in the opposite direction with respect to the trigger jet.

  9. Absolute distance perception during in-depth head movement: calibrating optic flow with extra-retinal information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fah, Cheong Loong

    Absolute distance perception during in-depth head movement: calibrating optic flow with extra-retinal Processing and Application Laboratory (IPAL-CNRS), KDRL, 21 Heng Mui Keng Terrace, Singapore 119613 d reserved. Keywords: Self-motion; Object-motion; Absolute distance perception; Optic flow; Extra-retinal cue

  10. Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging and Emotion 1 RUNNING HEAD: Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging and Emotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabeza, Roberto

    Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging and Emotion 1 RUNNING HEAD: Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging and Emotion Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging and Emotion: Fronto:peggy.st.jacques@duke.edu #12;Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging and Emotion 2 Abstract Emotional processes are enhanced

  11. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric C.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Hanlon, Lorraine; Alessio, Adam; Rajendran, Joseph; Schwartz, David L.; Phillips, Mark [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States) and Puget Sound Veterans Administration, 18801 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 and School of Physics, University College Dublin (Ireland); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas 77030 and Puget Sound Veterans Administration, 1880 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Tumor boundary delineation using positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for radiation therapy applications. In this study we quantify the uncertainties in tumor boundary delineation as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using FDG-PET images and evaluate the dosimetric impact on radiotherapy plans. FDG-PET images were acquired for eight patients with a GE Advance PET scanner. In addition, a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom with six FDG-filled spheres with volumes of 1.2 to 26.5 cm{sup 3} was imaged. PET emission scans were reconstructed with the OSEM and FBP algorithms with different smoothing parameters. PET-based tumor regions were delineated using an automatic contouring function set at progressively higher threshold contour levels and the resulting volumes were calculated. CT-based tumor volumes were also contoured by a physician on coregistered PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100% of the actual volume, I{sub V100}, was measured. We generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for an example head and neck patient, treating 66 Gy to CT-based gross disease and 54 Gy to nodal regions at risk, followed by a boost to the FDG-PET-based tumor. The volumes of PET-based tumors are a sensitive function of threshold contour level for all patients and phantom datasets. A 5% change in threshold contour level can translate into a 200% increase in volume. Phantom data indicate that I{sub V100} can be set as a fraction, f, of the maximum measured uptake. Fractional threshold values in the cylindrical water phantom range from 0.23 to 0.51. Both the fractional threshold and the threshold-volume curve are dependent on lesion size, with lesions smaller than approximately 5 cm{sup 3} displaying a more pronounced sensitivity and larger fractional threshold values. The threshold-volume curves and fractional threshold values also depend on the reconstruction algorithm and smoothing filter with more smoothing requiring a higher fractional threshold contour level. The threshold contour level affects the tumor size, and therefore the ultimate boost dose that is achievable with IMRT. In an example head and neck IMRT plan, the D95 of the planning target volume decreased from 7770 to 7230 cGy for 42% vs 55% contour threshold levels. PET-based tumor volumes are strongly affected by the choice of threshold level. This can have a significant dosimetric impact. The appropriate threshold level depends on lesion size and image reconstruction parameters. These effects should be carefully considered when using PET contour and/or volume information for radiotherapy applications.

  12. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  13. Weak-strong simulation on head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; McIntosh, E.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Abreu, N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams collide in the two interaction points IP6 and IP8. To further increase the bunch intensity above 2 x 10{sup 11} or further reduce the transverse emittance in polarized proton operation, there will not be enough tune space between the current working area [2/3, 7/10] to hold the beam-beam generated tune spread. We proposed a low energy DC electron beam (e-lens) with similar Gaussian transverse profiles to collide with the proton beam at IP10. Early studies have shown that e-lens does reduce the proton-proton beam-beam tune spread. In this article, we carried out numerical simulation to investigate the effects of the head-on beam-beam effect on the proton's colliding beam lifetime and emittance growth. The preliminary results including scans of compensation strength, phase advances between IP8 and IP10, electron beam transverse sizes are presented. In these studies, the particle loss in the multi-particle simulation is used for the comparison between different conditions.

  14. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Min Kim, Hyung [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  15. Efficacy and Toxicity of Peritumoral Delivery of Nanoconjugated Cisplatin in an In Vivo Murine Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Marcus Laird

    2013-04-01

    , Simis YJ, Verkaik RS, et al. Hearing loss due to concurrent daily low- dose cisplatin chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Ra- diother Oncol. 2008;89(1):38-43. 13. Conley BA. Treatment of advanced head and neck cancer: what lessons... Efficacy and Toxicity of Peritumoral Delivery of Nanoconjugated Cisplatin in an In Vivo Murine Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stephanie M. Cohen, MD, MS; Nick Rockefeller, BS; Ridhwi Mukerji, MD; Dianne Durham, PhD; M. Laird Forrest, Ph...

  16. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Kaushik; Chatterjee, Prasanta Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  17. Read/write head having a GMR sensor biased by permanent magnets located between the GMR and the pole shields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Samuel W. (San Carlos, CA); Rottmayer, Robert Earl (Fremont, CA); Carey, Matthew J. (San Jose, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A compact read/write head having a biased giant magnetoresistive sensor. Permanent magnet films are placed adjacent to the giant magnetoresistive sensor operating in the current-perpendicular-to the-plane (Cpp) mode and spaced with respect to the sensor by conducting films. These permanent magnet films provide a magnetic bias. The bias field is substantial and fairly uniform across sensor height. Biasing of the giant magnetoresistive sensor provides distinguishable response to the rising and falling edges of a recorded pulse on an adjacent recording medium, improves the linearity of the response, and helps to reduce noise. This read/write head is much simpler to fabricate and pattern and provides an enhanced uniformity of the bias field throughout the sensor.

  18. A comparison of techniques for simulating set-up error and uncertainty in head and neck IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploquin, Nicolas; Kay, Ian; Rangel-Baltazar, Alejandra; Lau, Harold; Dunscombe, Peter [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Physics, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2500 University Drive, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Physics, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2500 University Drive, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Physics, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2500 University Drive, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Physics, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2500 University Drive, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada) and University of Calgary, Department of Oncology, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    We have compared four computational methods for quantifying the effect of set-up error and uncertainty on delivered doses to targets and organs at risk in the intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment of head and neck cancer. These four methods were direct simulation, simple convolution, plus two modified convolution approaches. Discrepancies of up to 20% in the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) between direct simulation and simple convolution were estimated for the relatively superficial parotid gland at a systematic set-up error of 6 mm standard deviation and a random uncertainty of 2 mm standard deviation. Truncated convolution agreed with direct simulation to within 6% for all situations studied. However, of the four methods, only direct simulation can quantify the range of outcomes (EUD) associated with a finite number of courses and fractions. Our results are particularly relevant to the design of dose escalation studies in head and neck cancer.

  19. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  20. Operational head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    Head-on beam-beam compensation has been implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in order to increase the luminosity delivered to the experiments. We discuss the principle of combining a lattice for resonance driving term compensation and an electron lens for tune spread compensation. We describe the electron lens technology and its operational use. As of this date the implemented compensation scheme approximately doubled the peak and average luminosities.

  1. Report on a randomized trial comparing two forms of immobilization of the head for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednarz, Greg; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Downes, Beverly; Bogner, Joachim; Hyslop, Terry; Galvin, James; Evans, James; Curran, Walter Jr.; Andrews, David

    2009-01-15

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires accurate and reproducible immobilization of the patient's head. This randomized study compared the efficacy of two commonly used forms of immobilization used for SRT. Two routinely used methods of immobilization, which differ in their approach to reproduce the head position from day to day, are the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the BrainLab thermoplastic mask. The GTC frame fixates on the patient's upper dentition and thus is in direct mechanical contact with the cranium. The BrainLab mask is a two-part masking system custom fitted to the front and back of the patient's head. After patients signed an IRB-approved informed consent form, eligible patients were randomized to either GTC frame or mask for their course of SRT. Patients were treated as per standard procedure; however, prior to each treatment a set of digital kilovolt images (ExacTrac, BrainLabAB, Germany) was taken. These images were fused with reference digitally reconstructed radiographs obtained from treatment planning CT to yield lateral, longitudinal, and vertical deviations of isocenter and head rotations about respective axes. The primary end point of the study was to compare the two systems with respect to mean and standard deviations using the distance to isocenter measure. A total of 84 patients were enrolled (69 patients evaluable with detailed positioning data). A mixed-effect linear regression and two-tiled t test were used to compare the distance measure for both the systems. There was a statistically significant (p<0.001) difference between mean distances for these systems, suggesting that the GTC frame was more accurate. The mean 3D displacement and standard deviations were 3.17+1.95 mm for mask and 2.00+1.04 mm for frame. Both immobilization techniques were highly effective, but the GTC frame was more accurate. To optimize the accuracy of SRT, daily kilovolt image guidance is recommended with either immobilization system.

  2. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  3. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong; Booth, Christopher M.; Mackillop, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  4. Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

    2002-08-01

    The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

  5. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Mayekar, Sonal U.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ?30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  6. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A; Mah, D; Leven, T; Cahlon, O; Lee, N; Hunt, M; Mechalakos, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these deliveries would be expected to further improve conformality and normal tissue sparing.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  8. The Journal of Neuroscience, February 1990, fO(2): 420-435 Head-Direction Cells Recorded from the Postsubiculum in Freely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    /computer system monitored cell discharge while simultaneously tracking the position of 2 colored light emitting diodes (LEDs) secured to the animal's head. The animal's location was calculated from the position of one

  9. An examination of the viability of Title VII as a mechanism to compel racial diversity among the composition of head coaches at NCAA football bowl subdivision institutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatfield, Lance Carlos

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the legal strategy of utilizing Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to compel change to the racial composition of head coaches at NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision institutions. ...

  10. Experiments on Corium Dispersion after Lower Head Failure at Moderate Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLANCHAT,THOMAS K.; GARGALLO,M.; JACOBS,G.; MEYER,L.; WILHELM,D.

    1999-09-21

    Concerning the mitigation of high pressure core melt scenarios, the design objective for future PWRS is to transfer high pressure core melt to low pressure core melt sequences, by means of pressure relief valves at the primary circuit, with such a discharge capacity to limit the pressure in the reactor coolant system to less than 20 bar. Studies have shown that in late in-vessel reflooding scenarios there may be a time window where the pressure is indeed in this range, at the moment of the reactor vessel rupture. It has to be verified that large quantities of corium released from the vessel after failure at pressures <20 bar cannot be carried out of the reactor pit, because the melt collecting and cooling concept of future PWRs would be rendered useless. Existing experiments investigated the melt dispersal phenomena in the context of the DCH resolution for existing power plants in the USA, most of them having cavities with large instrument tunnels leading into subcompartments. For such designs, breaches with small cross sections at high vessel failure pressures had been studied. However, some present and future European PWRs have an annular cavity design without a large pathway out of the cavity other than through the narrow annular gap between the RPV and the cavity wall. Therefore, an experimental program was launched, focusing on the annular cavity design and low pressure vessel failure. The first part of the program comprises two experiments which were performed with thermite melt steam and a prototypic atmosphere in the containment in a scale 1:10. The initial pressure in the RPV-model was 11 and 15 bars, and the breach was a hole at the center of the lower head with a scaled diameter of 100 cm and 40 cm, respectively. The main results were: 78% of melt mass were ejected out of the cavity with the large hole and 21% with the small hole; the maximum pressures in the model containment were 6 bar and 4 bar, respectively. In the second part of the experimental program a detailed investigation of geometry effects is being carried out. The test facility DISCO-C has been built for performing dispersion experiments with cold simulant materials in a 1/18 scale. The fluids are water or bismuth alloy instead of melt, and nitrogen or helium instead of steam.

  11. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  12. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  13. SU-E-T-08: A Convolution Model for Head Scatter Fluence in the Intensity Modulated Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M; Mo, X; Chen, Y; Parnell, D; Key, S; Olivera, G; Galmarini, W; Lu, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To efficiently calculate the head scatter fluence for an arbitrary intensity-modulated field with any source distribution using the source occlusion model. Method: The source occlusion model with focal and extra focal radiation (Jaffray et al, 1993) can be used to account for LINAC head scatter. In the model, the fluence map of any field shape at any point can be calculated via integration of the source distribution within the visible range, as confined by each segment, using the detector eye's view. A 2D integration would be required for each segment and each fluence plane point, which is time-consuming, as an intensity-modulated field contains typically tens to hundreds of segments. In this work, we prove that the superposition of the segmental integrations is equivalent to a simple convolution regardless of what the source distribution is. In fact, for each point, the detector eye's view of the field shape can be represented as a function with the origin defined at the point's pinhole reflection through the center of the collimator plane. We were thus able to reduce hundreds of source plane integration to one convolution. We calculated the fluence map for various 3D and IMRT beams and various extra-focal source distributions using both the segmental integration approach and the convolution approach and compared the computation time and fluence map results of both approaches. Results: The fluence maps calculated using the convolution approach were the same as those calculated using the segmental approach, except for rounding errors (<0.1%). While it took considerably longer time to calculate all segmental integrations, the fluence map calculation using the convolution approach took only ?1/3 of the time for typical IMRT fields with ?100 segments. Conclusions: The convolution approach for head scatter fluence calculation is fast and accurate and can be used to enhance the online process.

  14. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne, Pramila Rani . E-mail: rani.anne@mail.tju.edu; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients.

  15. Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Charpentier, Danielle [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Belair, Manon [Department of Radiology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  16. The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, Pierre [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Doctoral School BioSE (EA4360), Nancy (France); Kirby, Neil [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Lambert, Louise [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal (Canada); Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

  17. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L.; Rao, Shyam; Heguy, Adriana; Shen, Ronglai; Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna; Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Haque, Sofia; Katabi, Nora; Pfister, David G.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ?3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  18. Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sparacino; M. G. Farías; P. W. Lamberti

    2013-02-11

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  19. First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

    2008-09-10

    We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

  20. Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.; (IIT); (Vermont); (Duke)

    2010-02-02

    X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

  1. Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, Ling-yu; Yang, Lei E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn

    2014-08-15

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

  2. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-12-06

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  3. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Auna L. Hsu, Scott C.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex equations of state.

  4. Theoretical study of head-on collision of dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, S., E-mail: surabhi@ipr.res.in; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-05-15

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of two counter propagating dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) undergoing a head-on collision, in the presence of strong coupling between micron sized charged dust particles in a complex plasma. A coupled set of nonlinear dynamical equations describing the evolution of the two DASWs using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation technique is derived. The nature and extent of post collision phase-shifts of these solitary waves are studied over a wide range of dusty plasma parameters in a strongly and a weakly coupled medium. We find a significant change in the nature and amount of phase delay in the strongly coupled regime as compared to a weakly coupled regime. The phase shift is seen to change its sign beyond a threshold value of compressibility of the medium for a given set of dusty plasma parameters.

  5. Reduced 30% scanning time 3D multiplexer integrated circuit applied to large array format 20KHZ frequency inkjet print heads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, J -C

    2008-01-01

    Enhancement of the number and array density of nozzles within an inkjet head chip is one of the keys to raise the printing speed and printing resolutions. However, traditional 2D architecture of driving circuits can not meet the requirement for high scanning speed and low data accessing points when nozzle numbers greater than 1000. This paper proposes a novel architecture of high-selection-speed three-dimensional data registration for inkjet applications. With the configuration of three-dimensional data registration, the number of data accessing points as well as the scanning lines can be greatly reduced for large array inkjet printheads with nozzles numbering more than 1000. This IC (Integrated Circuit) architecture involves three-dimensional multiplexing with the provision of a gating transistor for each ink firing resistor, where ink firing resistors are triggered only by the selection of their associated gating transistors. Three signals: selection (S), address (A), and power supply (P), are employed toge...

  6. Evaluating the Role of Prophylactic Gastrostomy Tube Placement Prior to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Lau, Derick H.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Stuart, Kerri; Newman, Kathleen; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan M.D.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of prophylactic gastrostomy tube (GT) placement on acute and long-term outcome for patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty consecutive patients were treated with chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV head and neck cancer to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 64-74 Gy). The most common primary site was the oropharynx (66 patients). Sixty-seven patients (56%) were treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Seventy patients (58%) received prophylactic GT placement at the discretion of the physician before initiation of chemoradiotherapy. Results: Prophylactic GT placement significantly reduced weight loss during radiation therapy from 43 pounds (range, 0 to 76 pounds) to 19 pounds (range, 0 to 51 pounds), which corresponded to a net change of -14% (range, 0% to -30%) and -8% (range, +1% to -22%) from baseline, respectively (p < 0.001). However, the proportion of patients who were GT-dependent at 6- and 12-months after treatment was 41% and 21%, respectively, compared with 8% and 0%, respectively, for those with and without prophylactic GT (p < 0.001). Additionally, prophylactic GT was associated with a significantly higher incidence of late esophageal stricture compared with those who did not have prophylactic GT (30% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although prophylactic GT placement was effective at preventing acute weight loss and the need for intravenous hydration, it was also associated with significantly higher rates of late esophageal toxicity. The benefits of this strategy must be balanced with the risks.

  7. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  8. Volumetric tumor burden and its effect on brachial plexus dosimetry in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of gross tumor volume of the primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) disease on planned radiation dose to the brachial plexus (BP) in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Overall, 75 patients underwent definitive IMRT to a median total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. The right BP and left BP were prospectively contoured as separate organs at risk. The GTV was related to BP dose using the unpaired t-test. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine optimized volumetric thresholds of GTV-P and GTV-N corresponding to a maximum BP dose cutoff of > 66 Gy. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for factors associated with a higher maximal BP dose. A higher maximum BP dose (> 66 vs ? 66 Gy) correlated with a greater mean GTV-P (79.5 vs 30.8 cc; p = 0.001) and ipsilateral GTV-N (60.6 vs 19.8 cc; p = 0.014). When dichotomized by the optimized nodal volume, patients with an ipsilateral GTV-N ? 4.9 vs < 4.9 cc had a significant difference in maximum BP dose (64.2 vs 59.4 Gy; p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that an ipsilateral GTV-N ? 4.9 cc was an independent predictor for the BP to receive a maximal dose of > 66 Gy when adjusted individually for BP volume, GTV-P, the use of a low anterior neck field technique, total planned radiation dose, and tumor category. Although both the primary and the nodal tumor volumes affected the BP maximal dose, the ipsilateral nodal tumor volume (GTV-N ? 4.9 cc) was an independent predictor for high maximal BP dose constraints in head and neck IMRT.

  9. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: sandra.nuyts@uzleuven.be; Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Clement, Paul M.J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Schoenaers, Joseph [Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaert, Walter van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut, University Hospitals Leuven, campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  10. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosini, M; GALAL, M; Emam, I; Kamal, G; Algohary, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  11. SU-E-J-137: Incorporating Tumor Regression Into Robust Plan Optimization for Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, P; Hu, J; Tyagi, N; Mageras, G; Lee, N; Hunt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust planning paradigm which incorporates a tumor regression model into the optimization process to ensure tumor coverage in head and neck radiotherapy. Methods: Simulation and weekly MR images were acquired for a group of head and neck patients to characterize tumor regression during radiotherapy. For each patient, the tumor and parotid glands were segmented on the MR images and the weekly changes were formulated with an affine transformation, where morphological shrinkage and positional changes are modeled by a scaling factor, and centroid shifts, respectively. The tumor and parotid contours were also transferred to the planning CT via rigid registration. To perform the robust planning, weekly predicted PTV and parotid structures were created by transforming the corresponding simulation structures according to the weekly affine transformation matrix averaged over patients other than him/herself. Next, robust PTV and parotid structures were generated as the union of the simulation and weekly prediction contours. In the subsequent robust optimization process, attainment of the clinical dose objectives was required for the robust PTV and parotids, as well as other organs at risk (OAR). The resulting robust plans were evaluated by looking at the weekly and total accumulated dose to the actual weekly PTV and parotid structures. The robust plan was compared with the original plan based on the planning CT to determine its potential clinical benefit. Results: For four patients, the average weekly change to tumor volume and position was ?4% and 1.2 mm laterally-posteriorly. Due to these temporal changes, the robust plans resulted in an accumulated PTV D95 that was, on average, 2.7 Gy higher than the plan created from the planning CT. OAR doses were similar. Conclusion: Integration of a tumor regression model into target delineation and plan robust optimization is feasible and may yield improved tumor coverage. Part of this research is supported by Varian Medical System.

  12. Percutaneous Palliation of Pancreatic Head Cancer: Randomized Comparison of ePTFE/FEP-Covered Versus Uncovered Nitinol Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krokidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.com [Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospitals, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Fanelli, Fabrizio ['La Sapienza' University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Orgera, Gianluigi [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Tsetis, Dimitrios [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Radiology (Greece); Mouzas, Ioannis [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Gastroenterology (Greece); Bezzi, Mario ['La Sapienza' University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Kouroumalis, Elias [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Gastroenterology (Greece); Pasariello, Roberto ['La Sapienza' University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Hatzidakis, Adam [Medical School of Crete (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated-ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered stents with that of uncovered nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer. Eighty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study. Bare nitinol stents were used in half of the patients, and ePTFE/FEP-covered stents were used in the remaining patients. Patency, survival, complications, and mean cost were calculated in both groups. Mean patency was 166.0 {+-} 13.11 days for the bare-stent group and 234.0 {+-} 20.87 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.007). Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 77.5, 69.8, and 69.8% for the bare-stent group and 97.5, 92.2, and 87.6% for the covered-stent group, respectively. Mean secondary patency was 123.7 {+-} 22.5 days for the bare-stent group and 130.3 {+-} 21.4 days for the covered-stent group. Tumour ingrowth occurred exclusively in the bare-stent group in 27.5% of cases (p = 0.002). Median survival was 203.2 {+-} 11.8 days for the bare-stent group and 247.0 {+-} 20 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.06). Complications and mean cost were similar in both groups. Regarding primary patency and ingrowth rate, ePTFE/FEP-covered stents have shown to be significantly superior to bare nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer and pose comparable cost and complications. Use of a covered stent does not significantly influence overall survival rate; nevertheless, the covered endoprosthesis seems to offer result in fewer reinterventions and better quality of patient life.

  13. SU-E-T-149: Electron Beam Profile Differences Between Elekta MLCi2 and Elekta Agility Treatment Heads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C; Hatcher, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report and investigate observed differences in electron beam profiles at various energies/applicators between Elekta MLCi2 and Agility treatment head on Elekta Infinity LINAC Methods: When we upgraded from MLCi2 to Agility on one of our Elekta Infinity LINAC's, electron beam PDDs and profiles were acquired for comparison purpose. All clinical electron energies (6/9/12/15/12/18 MeV) and electron applicators (6/10/14/20/25 square) were included in measurement. PDDs were acquired at 100 SSD in water (PTW MP3 water tank) with a plane-parallel ion chamber (PTW Roos). X and Y Profiles were acquired using IC Profiler (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at 1cm and maximum PDD depths (water equivalent). Results: All PDD curves match very well between MLCi2 and Agility treatment head. However, some significant differences on electron profiles were found. On Agility, even after increasing the default auto-tracking offset values for backup diaphragms in Y and MLC in X by 2.8 cm (the maximum allowed change is 3.0 cm), electron profiles still have rounder shoulders comparing to corresponding MLCi2 profiles. This difference is significantly more pronounced at larger applicators (20 and 25 square), for all electron energies. Conclusion: The significant design change between MLCi2 and Agility beam limiting device seems to affect exit electron beam profiles. In IEC1217 X direction, the main change on Agility is the removal of the original MLCi2 X backup diaphragms and replacing it with MLC leaves; In Y direction, the main change is the radius and materials on Y backup diaphragms.

  14. Joint probabilistic pedestrian head and body orientation estimation Fabian Flohr1,2, Madalin Dumitru-Guzu1,3, Julian F. P. Kooij1,2 and Dariu M. Gavrila1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    Joint probabilistic pedestrian head and body orientation estimation Fabian Flohr1,2, Madalin for the joint probabilistic estimation of pedestrian head and body orientation in the context of intelligent involve 37 pedestrian tracks obtained from an external stereo vision-based pedestrian detector

  15. Running head: EFFECTS OF ORBICULARIS ORIS AND JAW POSTURE ON LIP SHAPE A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payan, Yohan

    Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape Ian StavnessaRunning head: EFFECTS OF ORBICULARIS ORIS AND JAW POSTURE ON LIP SHAPE A Biomechanical Modeling@gmail.com #12;EFFECTS OF ORBICULARIS ORIS AND JAW POSTURE ON LIP SHAPE 2 Abstract Purpose: We used

  16. Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head of Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head and an improved environment. 1 Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) A. Background In line with the growing global technology is receiving a great deal of attention. Hydrogen and fuel cells have the potential to replace

  17. Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources: Appendix A - Assessment Results by Hydrologic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A

  18. Comparison of Repositioning Accuracy of Two Commercially Available Immobilization Systems for Treatment of Head-and-Neck Tumors Using Simulation Computed Tomography Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotondo, Ronny L. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sultanem, Khalil [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: ksultane@roc.jgh.mcgill.ca; Lavoie, Isabelle; Skelly, Julie; Raymond, Luc [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the setup accuracy, comfort level, and setup time of two immobilization systems used in head-and-neck radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between February 2004 and January 2005, 21 patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors were assigned to one of two immobilization devices: a standard thermoplastic head-and-shoulder mask fixed to a carbon fiber base (Type S) or a thermoplastic head mask fixed to the Accufix cantilever board equipped with the shoulder depression system. All patients underwent planning computed tomography (CT) followed by repeated control CT under simulation conditions during the course of therapy. The CT images were subsequently co-registered and setup accuracy was examined by recording displacement in the three cartesian planes at six anatomic landmarks and calculating the three-dimensional vector errors. In addition, the setup time and comfort of the two systems were compared. Results: A total of 64 CT data sets were analyzed. No difference was found in the cartesian total displacement errors or total vector displacement errors between the two populations at any landmark considered. A trend was noted toward a smaller mean systemic error for the upper landmarks favoring the Accufix system. No difference was noted in the setup time or comfort level between the two systems. Conclusion: No significant difference in the three-dimensional setup accuracy was identified between the two immobilization systems compared. The data from this study reassure us that our technique provides accurate patient immobilization, allowing us to limit our planning target volume to <4 mm when treating head-and-neck tumors.

  19. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi; Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

  20. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jetsa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moser, Auna L.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2015-05-01

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions [A. L. Moser & S. C. Hsu, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2014)]. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease inmore »the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex equations of state.« less

  1. A Space Weather Information Service Based Upon Remote and In-Situ Measurements of Coronal Mass Ejections Heading for Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Birgit; Miles, Oscar; Rußwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Roldán, Andrés; Hartkorn, Oliver; Jüstel, Peter; Réville, Victor; Lupu, Sorina; Ruffenach, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather (SW) forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CM...

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shock formation via head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Hsu, S. C.

    2013-08-15

    We describe numerical simulations, using the particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid-PIC code lsp[T. P. Hughes et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 110401 (1999)], of the head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets. The goals of these experiments are to form and study astrophysically relevant collisionless shocks in the laboratory. Using the plasma jet initial conditions (density ?10{sup 14}–10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}, temperature ? few eV, and propagation speed ?20–150 km/s), large-scale simulations of jet propagation demonstrate that interactions between the two jets are essentially collisionless at the merge region. In highly resolved one- and two-dimensional simulations, we show that collisionless shocks are generated by the merging jets when immersed in applied magnetic fields (B?0.1–1 T). At expected plasma jet speeds of up to 150 km/s, our simulations do not give rise to unmagnetized collisionless shocks, which require much higher velocities. The orientation of the magnetic field and the axial and transverse density gradients of the jets have a strong effect on the nature of the interaction. We compare some of our simulation results with those of previously published PIC simulation studies of collisionless shock formation.

  3. Practical Considerations in the Re-Irradiation of Recurrent and Second Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer: Who, Why, How, and How Much?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Despite progress in surgical and reconstructive techniques, as well as advances in radiotherapy delivery methods, a significant proportion of patients irradiated for head-and-neck cancer develop locoregional recurrence. These patients are also at high risk of developing new second primary cancers of the head and neck. Because of the heterogeneity of this population with respect to disease-related and patient-related factors, such as previous treatment, tumor recurrence site, disease extent, and performance status, the optimal treatment of locoregionally recurrent or second primary cancers of the head and neck remains to be defined. Although surgical resection typically constitutes the mainstay of treatment, effective salvage therapy is often precluded by anatomic inaccessibility and the risk of perioperative complications. Although chemotherapy alone has traditionally been considered an alternative to surgery, the response rates have been poor, with nearly all patients dying of disease progression within months. Similarly, salvage therapy using re-irradiation has historically been avoided because of concerns regarding toxicity. Although the results of more recent studies using contemporary treatment techniques and conformal delivery methods have been somewhat more promising, the role of re-irradiation after previous full-course radiotherapy is still considered investigational by many. Numerous questions remain unanswered, and practical guidelines for clinical decision-making are sparse.

  4. High Stromal Carbonic Anhydrase IX Expression Is Associated With Decreased Survival in p16-Negative Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockton, Nigel, E-mail: nigel.brockton@albertahealthservices.c [Department of Population Health Research, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dort, Joseph [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Lau, Harold; Hao, Desiree [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Brar, Sony [Department of Population Health Research, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Klimowicz, Alexander; Petrillo, Stephanie; Diaz, Roman [Department of Pathology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Doll, Corinne [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Magliocco, Anthony [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide. Alcohol use and tobacco use are the most established risk factors; however, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a subset of HNSCCs. Although HPV-positive tumors typically present at a more advanced stage at diagnosis, they are associated with a better prognosis. Tumor hypoxia confers poor prognosis and treatment failure, but direct tumor oxygen measurement is challenging. Endogenous markers of hypoxia (EMHs) have been proposed but have not replicated the prognostic utility of direct oxygen measurement. The expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia may be influenced by oxygen-independent factors, such as the HPV status of the tumor. Methods and Materials: Consecutive cases of locally advanced HNSCC, treated with a uniform regimen of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, were identified. Tissue microarrays were assembled from triplicate 0.6-mm cores of archived tumor tissue. HPV status was inferred from semiquantitative p16 immunostaining and directly measured by use of HPV-specific chromogenic in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Automated quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemistry was conducted to measure epithelial and stromal expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Results: High stromal CAIX expression was associated with significantly reduced overall survival (p = 0.03) in patients with p16-negative tumors. Conclusions: This is the first study to use quantitative immunohistochemistry to examine endogenous markers of hypoxia stratified by tumor p16/HPV status. Assessment of CAIX expression in p16-negative HNSCC could identify patients with the least favorable prognosis and inform therapeutic strategies.

  5. Hypopharyngeal Dose Is Associated With Severe Late Toxicity in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: An RTOG Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Moughan, Jennifer; Farach, Andrew; University of Texas Health Science Center Martin-O'Meara, Elizabeth; Galvin, James; Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Cooper, Jay S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) increases local tumor control but at the expense of increased toxicity. We recently showed that several clinical/pretreatment factors were associated with the occurrence of severe late toxicity. This study evaluated the potential relationship between radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal wall and toxicity. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of long-term survivors from 3 previously reported Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials of CCRT for locally advanced SCCHN (RTOG trials 91-11, 97-03, and 99-14). Severe late toxicity was defined in this secondary analysis as chronic grade 3-4 pharyngeal/laryngeal toxicity and/or requirement for a feeding tube {>=}2 years after registration and/or potential treatment-related death (eg, pneumonia) within 3 years. Radiation dosimetry (2-dimensional) analysis was performed centrally at RTOG headquarters to estimate doses to 4 regions of interest along the pharyngeal wall (superior oropharynx, inferior oropharynx, superior hypopharynx, and inferior hypopharynx). Case-control analysis was performed with a multivariate logistic regression model that included pretreatment and treatment potential factors. Results: A total of 154 patients were evaluable for this analysis, 71 cases (patients with severe late toxicities) and 83 controls; thus, 46% of evaluable patients had a severe late toxicity. On multivariate analysis, significant variables correlated with the development of severe late toxicity, including older age (odds ratio, 1.062 per year; P=.0021) and radiation dose received by the inferior hypopharynx (odds ratio, 1.023 per Gy; P=.016). The subgroup of patients receiving {<=}60 Gy to the inferior hypopharynx had a 40% rate of severe late toxicity compared with 56% for patients receiving >60 Gy. Oropharyngeal dose was not associated with this outcome. Conclusions: Severe late toxicity following CCRT is common in long-term survivors. Age is the most significant factor, but hypopharyngeal dose also was associated.

  6. Phase I Trial Using the Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib and Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubicek, Gregory J.; Axelrod, Rita S.; Machtay, Mitchell; Ahn, Peter H.; Anne, Pramila R.; Fogh, Shannon; Cognetti, David; Myers, Thomas J.; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC) remains a difficult disease to cure. Proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib have the potential to improve survival over chemoradiotherapy alone. This Phase I dose-escalation study examined the potential of bortezomib in combination with cisplatin chemotherapy and concurrent radiation in the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent HNC. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received cisplatin once weekly at 30 mg/m{sup 2} per week and bortezomib along with concurrent radiation. Bortezomib was given on Days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 3 weeks, with an initial starting dose of 0.7 mg/m{sup 2} and escalation levels of 1.0 and 1.3 mg/m{sup 2}. Dose escalation was performed only after assessment to rule out any dose-limiting toxicity. Results: We enrolled 27 patients with HNC, including 17 patients with recurrent disease who had received prior irradiation. Patients received bortezomib dose levels of 0.7 mg/m{sup 2} (7 patients), 1.0 mg/m{sup 2} (10 patients), and 1.3 mg/m{sup 2} (10 patients). No Grade 5 toxicities, 3 Grade 4 toxicities (all hematologic and considered dose-limiting toxicities), and 39 Grade 3 toxicities (in 20 patients) were observed. With a median follow-up of 7.4 months, the overall median survival was 24.7 months (48.4 months for advanced HNC patients and 15.4 months for recurrent HNC patients). Conclusion: Bortezomib in combination with radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy is safe in the treatment of HNC with a bortezomib maximum tolerated dose of 1.0 mg/m{sup 2} in patients previously treated for HNC and 1.3 mg/m{sup 2} in radiation-naive patients.

  7. Observational Study Designs for Comparative Effectiveness Research: An Alternative Approach to Close Evidence Gaps in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulart, Bernardo H.L.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Parvathaneni, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has emerged as an approach to improve quality of care and patient outcomes while reducing healthcare costs by providing evidence to guide healthcare decisions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have represented the ideal study design to support treatment decisions in head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. In RCTs, formal chance (randomization) determines treatment allocation, which prevents selection bias from distorting the measure of treatment effects. Despite this advantage, only a minority of patients qualify for inclusion in H and N RCTs, which limits the validity of their results to the broader H and N cancer patient population seen in clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials often do not address other knowledge gaps in the management of H and N cancer, including treatment comparisons for rare types of H and N cancers, monitoring of rare or late toxicity events (eg, osteoradionecrosis), or in some instances an RCT is simply not feasible. Observational studies, or studies in which treatment allocation occurs independently of investigators' choice or randomization, may address several of these gaps in knowledge, thereby complementing the role of RCTs. This critical review discusses how observational CER studies complement RCTs in generating the evidence to inform healthcare decisions and improve the quality of care and outcomes of H and N cancer patients. Review topics include a balanced discussion about the strengths and limitations of both RCT and observational CER study designs; a brief description of design and analytic techniques to handle selection bias in observational studies; examples of observational studies that inform current clinical practices and management of H and N cancers; and suggestions for relevant CER questions that could be addressed by an observational study design.

  8. SU-E-T-206: Improving Radiotherapy Toxicity Based On Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Daniel D; Wernicke, A Gabriella; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, KSC; Parashar, Bhupesh; Chang, Jenghwa [Weill Cornell Medical College, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study is to build the estimator of toxicity using artificial neural network (ANN) for head and neck cancer patients Materials/Methods: An ANN can combine variables into a predictive model during training and considered all possible correlations of variables. We constructed an ANN based on the data from 73 patients with advanced H and N cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy at our institution. For the toxicity estimator we defined input data including age, sex, site, stage, pathology, status of chemo, technique of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), length of treatment, dose of EBRT, status of post operation, length of follow-up, the status of local recurrences and distant metastasis. These data were digitized based on the significance and fed to the ANN as input nodes. We used 20 hidden nodes (for the 13 input nodes) to take care of the correlations of input nodes. For training ANN, we divided data into three subsets such as training set, validation set and test set. Finally, we built the estimator for the toxicity from ANN output. Results: We used 13 input variables including the status of local recurrences and distant metastasis and 20 hidden nodes for correlations. 59 patients for training set, 7 patients for validation set and 7 patients for test set and fed the inputs to Matlab neural network fitting tool. We trained the data within 15% of errors of outcome. In the end we have the toxicity estimation with 74% of accuracy. Conclusion: We proved in principle that ANN can be a very useful tool for predicting the RT outcomes for high risk H and N patients. Currently we are improving the results using cross validation.

  9. Blazing trails: Microquasars as head-tail sources and the seeding of magnetized plasma into the ISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heinz; H. J. Grimm; R. A. Sunyaev; R. P. Fender

    2008-08-14

    We discuss the dynamics of microquasar jets in the interstellar medium, with specific focus on the effects of the X-ray binaries' space velocity with respect to the local Galactic standard of rest. We argue that, during late stages in the evolution of large scale radio nebulae around microquasars, the ram pressure of the interstellar medium due to the microquasar's space velocity becomes important and that microquasars with high velocities form the Galactic equivalent of extragalactic head-tail sources, i.e., that they leave behind trails of stripped radio plasma. Because of their higher space velocities, low-mass X-ray binaries are more likely to leave trails than high-mass X-ray binaries. We show that the volume of radio plasma released by microquasars over the history of the Galaxy is comparable to the disk volume and argue that a fraction of a few percent of the radio plasma left behind by the X-ray binary is likely mixed with the neutral phases of the ISM before the plasma is removed from the disk by buoyancy. Because the formation of microquasars is an unavoidable by-product of star formation, and because they can travel far from their birth places, their activity likely has important consequences for the evolution of magnetic fields in forming galaxies. We show that radio emission from the plasma inside the trail should be detectable at low frequencies. We suggest that LMXBs with high detected proper motions like XTE J1118+480 will be the best candidates for such a search.

  10. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2009-07-14

    now to build on this experience. Mathematics Learning Technologies ..... the founding of the scholarly journals Eco- nomic Theory and Annals of Finance, and.

  11. Click to add heading

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with High-Performance Concrete for Accelerated Construction of Nuclear Concrete Structures Primary Objective Reduce field construction times and fabrication costs of...

  12. Click to add heading

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (ACI 349) - most common lateral load resisting members in nuclear structures (pressure vessels not in scope) 4 * Aim to reduce complexities in rebar to improve construction quality...

  13. Peter Reiners Department Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    . Alumni support for SEES Units (.25 FTE) Technical Support David Steinke Senior Staff Engineer 1. Repair/design with other support) 1. Repair/design/construct research equipment 2. Install infrastructure in labs 3. Upkeep electronics shop, wood shop 4. Upkeep field gear and storage 5. Process surplus and inventory 6. General labor

  14. Heads and Tails 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    in the time window for his contact; after that, he was going to concede defeat and yield to temptation. Someone sitting down beside him; his own glance measuring, before professionalism kicked in and he looked at this man as something beyond a convenient... cursed his inability to keep his own mouth shut?in more ways that one, given what he?d just done. ?I guess it?s too late to ask if you want to?? ?Wipe your mouth.? Shit. Shit, shit, shit. Mulder pulled the hem of his T-shirt up, wiped his mouth...

  15. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2010-06-30

    Faculty research is well funded by the National Science. Foundation, other ... Provided scientific programming on weather satellite program at Missile and Space. Division of General .... Canada. The $50,000 fellowship is awarded for a two-year period. Mayboroda .... Edray has devoted much time and energy to working.

  16. from the Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Goeke

    2009-07-14

    modifications in the graduate student Ph.D. qualifying exam system .... take effect for the fall 2011 incoming class and will apply ... to associate professor; Aaron Yip to full professor. ...... multi-scale approaches to (elastic) wave-equation model-.

  17. HEAD OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMatFermiGuido DeHoratiis -PDF version of the

  18. Click to add heading

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energyof the Clean EnergyLocalDepartmentDay

  19. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help tailoring therapies to reduce toxicities among patients treated with RT for HNC.

  20. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  1. Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Li Baoqing; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Vazquez, Esther G.; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  3. Development and Validation of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Brachial Plexus: Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis Among Patients Treated With IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, William H.; Guiou, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Dublin, Arthur [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California, Davis, Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Narayan, Samir; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Allen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)], E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Although Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols have proposed a limiting dose to the brachial plexus for patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer, essentially no recommendations exist for the delineation of this structure for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Using anatomic texts, radiologic data, and magnetic resonance imaging, a standardized method for delineating the brachial plexus on 3-mm axial computed tomography images was devised. A neuroradiologist assisted with identification of the brachial plexus and adjacent structures. This organ at risk was then contoured on 10 consecutive patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histogram curves were generated by applying the proposed brachial plexus contour to the initial treatment plan. Results: The total dose to the planning target volume ranged from 60 to 70 Gy (median, 70). The mean brachial plexus volume was 33 {+-} 4 cm{sup 3} (range, 25.1-39.4). The mean irradiated volumes of the brachial plexus were 50 Gy (17 {+-} 3 cm{sup 3}), 60 Gy (6 {+-} 3 cm{sup 3}), 66 Gy (2 {+-} 1 cm{sup 3}), 70 Gy (0 {+-} 1 cm{sup 3}). The maximal dose to the brachial plexus was 69.9 Gy (range, 62.3-76.9) and was {>=}60 Gy, {>=}66 Gy, and {>=}70 Gy in 100%, 70%, and 30% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: This technique provides a precise and accurate method for delineating the brachial plexus organ at risk on treatment planning computed tomography scans. Our dosimetric analysis suggest that for patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer, brachial plexus routinely receives doses in excess of historic and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group limits.

  4. Accuracy of Computed Tomography for Predicting Pathologic Nodal Extracapsular Extension in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Undergoing Initial Surgical Resection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhu, Roshan S.; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Hanasoge, Sheela; Aiken, Ashley H.; Hudgins, Patricia A.; Hall, William A.; Chen, Susie A.; Eaton, Bree R.; Higgins, Kristin A.; Saba, Nabil F.; Beitler, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Nodal extracapsular extension (ECE) in patients with head-and-neck cancer increases the loco-regional failure risk and is an indication for adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). To reduce the risk of requiring trimodality therapy, patients with head-and-neck cancer who are surgical candidates are often treated with definitive CRT when preoperative computed tomographic imaging suggests radiographic ECE. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of preoperative CT imaging for predicting pathologic nodal ECE (pECE). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 432 consecutive patients with oral cavity or locally advanced/nonfunctional laryngeal cancer who underwent preoperative CT imaging before initial surgical resection and neck dissection. Specimens with pECE had the extent of ECE graded on a scale from 1 to 4. Results: Radiographic ECE was documented in 46 patients (10.6%), and pECE was observed in 87 (20.1%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 43.7%, 97.7%, 82.6%, and 87.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of radiographic ECE increased from 18.8% for grade 1 to 2 ECE, to 52.9% for grade 3, and 72.2% for grade 4. Radiographic ECE criteria of adjacent structure invasion was a better predictor than irregular borders/fat stranding for pECE. Conclusions: Radiographic ECE has poor sensitivity, but excellent specificity for pECE in patients who undergo initial surgical resection. PPV and NPV are reasonable for clinical decision making. The performance of preoperative CT imaging increased as pECE grade increased. Patients with resectable head-and-neck cancer with radiographic ECE based on adjacent structure invasion are at high risk for high-grade pECE requiring adjuvant CRT when treated with initial surgery; definitive CRT as an alternative should be considered where appropriate.

  5. EA-2017: Real-World Demonstration of a New, American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine, Monongahela River, approximately ten miles east of Pittsburg, PA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with a DOE proposal to provide federal funding to Hydro Green Energy (HGE) to fabricate and install one (1) interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT) which would be inserted in a Large Frame Module (LFM) and supporting civil infrastructure as part of a larger project that would include the design and installation of seven MBTs to create a 5.2 megawatt, low head hydropower system that would be integrated into the existing Braddock Locks and Dam.

  6. Modeling the dosimetry of organ-at-risk in head and neck IMRT planning: An intertechnique and interinstitutional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, Jun, E-mail: jun-lian@med.unc.edu; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Lulin, E-mail: lulin.yuan@duke.edu; Yoo, David P.; Yin, FangFang; Wu, Q. Jackie, E-mail: jackie.wu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Ge, Yaorong [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)] [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To build a statistical model to quantitatively correlate the anatomic features of structures and the corresponding dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head and neck (HN) Tomotherapy (Tomo) plans. To study if the model built upon one intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique (such as conventional Linac) can be used to predict anticipated organs-at-risk (OAR) DVH of patients treated with a different IMRT technique (such as Tomo). To study if the model built upon the clinical experience of one institution can be used to aid IMRT planning for another institution. Methods: Forty-four Tomotherapy intensity modulate radiotherapy plans of HN cases (Tomo-IMRT) from Institution A were included in the study. A different patient group of 53 HN fixed gantry IMRT (FG-IMRT) plans was selected from Institution B. The analyzed OARs included the parotid, larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, and submandibular gland. Two major groups of anatomical features were considered: the volumetric information and the spatial information. The volume information includes the volume of target, OAR, and overlapped volume between target and OAR. The spatial information of OARs relative to PTVs was represented by the distance-to-target histogram (DTH). Important anatomical and dosimetric features were extracted from DTH and DVH by principal component analysis. Two regression models, one for Tomotherapy plan and one for IMRT plan, were built independently. The accuracy of intratreatment-modality model prediction was validated by a leave one out cross-validation method. The intertechnique and interinstitution validations were performed by using the FG-IMRT model to predict the OAR dosimetry of Tomo-IMRT plans. The dosimetry of OARs, under the same and different institutional preferences, was analyzed to examine the correlation between the model prediction and planning protocol. Results: Significant patient anatomical factors contributing to OAR dose sparing in HN Tomotherapy plans have been analyzed and identified. For all the OARs, the discrepancies of dose indices between the model predicted values and the actual plan values were within 2.1%. Similar results were obtained from the modeling of FG-IMRT plans. The parotid gland was spared in a comparable fashion during the treatment planning of two institutions. The model based on FG-IMRT plans was found to predict the median dose of the parotid of Tomotherapy plans quite well, with a mean error of 2.6%. Predictions from the FG-IMRT model suggested the median dose of the larynx, median dose of the brainstem and D2 of the brainstem could be reduced by 10.5%, 12.8%, and 20.4%, respectively, in the Tomo-IMRT plans. This was found to be correlated to the institutional differences in OAR constraint settings. Re-planning of six Tomotherapy patients confirmed the potential of optimization improvement predicted by the FG-IMRT model was correct. Conclusions: The authors established a mathematical model to correlate the anatomical features and dosimetric indexes of OARs of HN patients in Tomotherapy plans. The model can be used for the setup of patient-specific OAR dose sparing goals and quality control of planning results. The institutional clinical experience was incorporated into the model which allows the model from one institution to generate a reference plan for another institution, or another IMRT technique.

  7. Construction and installation summary for fiscal year 1992 of the hydraulic head monitoring stations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreier, R.B.; Switek, J.; Couzens, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    During FY 1992, as part of the Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) Project, three multiport wells (HHMS 12, 13, and 14) were constructed along or near the boundaries of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Haw Ridge water gap. The purpose of this report is to document well construction and multiport component installation activities. The hydraulic head monitoring stations (HHMS) are well clusters and single multiport wells that provide data required for evaluation of the transition between shallow and deep groundwater systems and of the nature of these systems. This information is used for required characterization of the hydrologic framework as dictated by state and federal regulatory agencies. Groundwater contaminants may move laterally across WAG boundaries or offsite; they may also move in a vertical direction. Because the HHMS Project was designed to address otential contamination problems, the project provides a means for defining the bounds of the uppermost aquifer; identifying potential pathways for offsite contamination for shallow; intermediate, and deep groundwater flow; and evaluating the capacity for contaminant transport in intermediate and deep groundwater flow systems.

  8. Construction and installation summary for fiscal year 1992 of the hydraulic head monitoring stations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreier, R.B.; Switek, J.; Couzens, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    During FY 1992, as part of the Hydraulic Head Monitoring Station (HHMS) Project, three multiport wells (HHMS 12, 13, and 14) were constructed along or near the boundaries of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Haw Ridge water gap. The purpose of this report is to document well construction and multiport component installation activities. The hydraulic head monitoring stations (HHMS) are well clusters and single multiport wells that provide data required for evaluation of the transition between shallow and deep groundwater systems and of the nature of these systems. This information is used for required characterization of the hydrologic framework as dictated by state and federal regulatory agencies. Groundwater contaminants may move laterally across WAG boundaries or offsite; they may also move in a vertical direction. Because the HHMS Project was designed to address otential contamination problems, the project provides a means for defining the bounds of the uppermost aquifer; identifying potential pathways for offsite contamination for shallow; intermediate, and deep groundwater flow; and evaluating the capacity for contaminant transport in intermediate and deep groundwater flow systems.

  9. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of signal-to-noise ratio mainly to the peripheral region of the phantom. Conclusions: Despite typical peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain, and RBM from the standard low-dose brain perfusion 256-slice CT protocol are well below the corresponding thresholds for the induction of erythema, cataract, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively, every effort should be made toward optimization of the procedure and minimization of dose received by these tissues. The current study provides evidence that the use of the narrower bowtie filter available may considerably reduce peak absorbed dose to all above radiosensitive tissues with minimal deterioration in image quality. Considerable reduction in peak eye-lens dose may also be achieved by positioning patient head center a few centimeters above isocenter during the exposure.

  10. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake kinetics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A PET imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dan Fenwick, John D.; Chalkidou, Anastasia; Landau, David B.; Marsden, Paul K.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To analyze the kinetics of 3{sup ?}-deoxy-3{sup ?}-[F-18]-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and involved nodes imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Two- and three-tissue compartment models were fitted to 12 tumor time-activity-curves (TACs) obtained for 6 structures (tumors or involved nodes) imaged in ten dynamic PET studies of 1 h duration, carried out for five patients. The ability of the models to describe the data was assessed using a runs test, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and leave-one-out cross-validation. To generate parametric maps the models were also fitted to TACs of individual voxels. Correlations between maps of different parameters were characterized using Pearson'sr coefficient; in particular the phosphorylation rate-constants k{sub 3-2tiss} and k{sub 5} of the two- and three-tissue models were studied alongside the flux parameters K{sub FLT-2tiss} and K{sub FLT} of these models, and standardized uptake values (SUV). A methodology based on expectation-maximization clustering and the Bayesian information criterion (“EM-BIC clustering”) was used to distil the information from noisy parametric images. Results: Fits of two-tissue models 2C3K and 2C4K and three-tissue models 3C5K and 3C6K comprising three, four, five, and six rate-constants, respectively, pass the runs test for 4, 8, 10, and 11 of 12 tumor TACs. The three-tissue models have lower AIC and cross-validation scores for nine of the 12 tumors. Overall the 3C6K model has the lowest AIC and cross-validation scores and its fitted parameter values are of the same orders of magnitude as literature estimates. Maps ofK{sub FLT} and K{sub FLT-2tiss} are strongly correlated (r = 0.85) and also correlate closely with SUV maps (r = 0.72 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, 0.64 for K{sub FLT}). Phosphorylation rate-constant maps are moderately correlated with flux maps (r = 0.48 for k{sub 3-2tiss} vs K{sub FLT-2tiss} and r = 0.68 for k{sub 5} vs K{sub FLT}); however, neither phosphorylation rate-constant correlates significantly with SUV. EM-BIC clustering reduces the parametric maps to a small number of levels—on average 5.8, 3.5, 3.4, and 1.4 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, K{sub FLT}, k{sub 3-2tiss}, and k{sub 5.} This large simplification is potentially useful for radiotherapy dose-painting, but demonstrates the high noise in some maps. Statistical simulations show that voxel level noise degrades TACs generated from the 3C6K model sufficiently that the average AIC score, parameter bias, and total uncertainty of 2C4K model fits are similar to those of 3C6K fits, whereas at the whole tumor level the scores are lower for 3C6K fits. Conclusions: For the patients studied here, whole tumor FLT uptake time-courses are represented better overall by a three-tissue than by a two-tissue model. EM-BIC clustering simplifies noisy parametric maps, providing the best description of the underlying information they contain and is potentially useful for radiotherapy dose-painting. However, the clustering highlights the large degree of noise present in maps of the phosphorylation rate-constantsk{sub 5} and k{sub 3-2tiss}, which are conceptually tightly linked to cellular proliferation. Methods must be found to make these maps more robust—either by constraining other model parameters or modifying dynamic imaging protocols.

  11. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  12. Prospective Trial of High-Dose Reirradiation Using Daily Image Guidance With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Recurrent and Second Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Cheng, Suzan; Donald, Paul J.; Purdy, James A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image-guided radiotherapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one consecutive patients were prospectively treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy from February 2006 to March 2009 to a median dose of 66 Gy (range, 60-70 Gy). None of these patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Daily helical megavoltage CT scans were obtained before each fraction as part of an image-guided radiotherapy registration protocol for patient alignment. Results: The 1- and 2-year estimates of in-field control were 72% and 65%, respectively. A total of 651 daily megavoltage CT scans were obtained. The mean systematic shift to account for interfraction motion was 1.38 {+-} 1.25 mm, 1.79 {+-} 1.45 mm, and 1.98 {+-} 1.75 mm for the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Pretreatment shifts of >3 mm occurred in 19% of setups in the medial-lateral, 27% in the superior-inferior, and 33% in the anterior-posterior directions, respectively. There were no treatment-related fatalities or hospitalizations. Complications included skin desquamation, odynophagia, otitis externa, keratitis, naso-lacrimal duct stenosis, and brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image guidance results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

  13. Ultrasonic Nakagami-parameter characterization of parotid-gland injury following head-and-neck radiotherapy: A feasibility study of late toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yuefeng; Tridandapani, Srini; School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 ; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Bruner, Deborah W.; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322; School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The study aims to investigate whether Nakagami parameters—estimated from the statistical distribution of the backscattered ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) signals—could provide a means for quantitative characterization of parotid-gland injury resulting from head-and-neck radiotherapy. Methods: A preliminary clinical study was conducted with 12 postradiotherapy patients and 12 healthy volunteers. Each participant underwent one ultrasound study in which ultrasound scans were performed in the longitudinal, i.e., vertical orientation on the bilateral parotids. For the 12 patients, the mean radiation dose to the parotid glands was 37.7 ± 9.5 Gy, and the mean follow-up time was 16.3 ± 4.8 months. All enrolled patients experienced grade 1 or 2 late salivary-gland toxicity (RTOG/EORTC morbidity scale). The normal parotid glands served as the control group. The Nakagami-scaling and Nakagami-shape parameters were computed from the RF data to quantify radiation-induced parotid-gland changes. Results: Significant differences in Nakagami parameters were observed between the normal and postradiotherapy parotid glands. Compared with the control group, the Nakagami-scaling parameter of the postradiotherapy group decreased by 25.8% (p < 0.001), and the Nakagami-shape parameter decreased by 31.3% (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85 for the Nakagami-scaling parameter and was 0.95 for the Nakagami-shape parameter, which further demonstrated the diagnostic efficiency of the Nakagami parameters. Conclusions: Nakagami parameters could be used to quantitatively measure parotid-gland injury following head-and-neck radiotherapy. Moreover, the clinical feasibility was demonstrated and this study provides meaningful preliminary data for future clinical investigation.

  14. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Dublin, Arthur B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  15. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C.; Pyakuryal, A; Narayanasamy, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  16. Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, Vitali, E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hovan, Allan [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Harrow, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Thompson, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

  17. CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Beltran, Maria T.

    2012-10-10

    We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

  18. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  19. Alpha-2 Heremans Schmid Glycoprotein (AHSG) Modulates Signaling Pathways in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line SQ20B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Pamela D.; Sakwe, Amos [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37208 (United States); Koumangoye, Rainelli [Division of Surgical Oncology and Endocrine Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Yarbrough, Wendell G. [Division of Otolaryngology, Departments of Surgery and Pathology and Yale Cancer Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Ochieng, Josiah [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37208 (United States); Marshall, Dana R., E-mail: dmarshall@mmc.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37208 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    This study was performed to identify the potential role of Alpha-2 Heremans Schmid Glycoprotein (AHSG) in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) tumorigenesis using an HNSCC cell line model. HNSCC cell lines are unique among cancer cell lines, in that they produce endogenous AHSG and do not rely, solely, on AHSG derived from serum. To produce our model, we performed a stable transfection to down-regulate AHSG in the HNSCC cell line SQ20B, resulting in three SQ20B sublines, AH50 with 50% AHSG production, AH20 with 20% AHSG production and EV which is the empty vector control expressing wild-type levels of AHSG. Utilizing these sublines, we examined the effect of AHSG depletion on cellular adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in a serum-free environment. We demonstrated that sublines EV and AH50 adhered to plastic and laminin significantly faster than the AH20 cell line, supporting the previously reported role of exogenous AHSG in cell adhesion. As for proliferative potential, EV had the greatest amount of proliferation with AH50 proliferation significantly diminished. AH20 cells did not proliferate at all. Depletion of AHSG also diminished cellular migration and invasion. TGF-? was examined to determine whether levels of the TGF-? binding AHSG influenced the effect of TGF-? on cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas higher levels of AHSG blunted TGF-? influenced SMAD and ERK signaling, it did not clearly affect proliferation, suggesting that AHSG influences on adhesion, proliferation, invasion and migration are primarily due to its role in adhesion and cell spreading. The previously reported role of AHSG in potentiating metastasis via protecting MMP-9 from autolysis was also supported in this cell line based model system of endogenous AHSG production in HNSCC. Together, these data show that endogenously produced AHSG in an HNSCC cell line, promotes in vitro cellular properties identified as having a role in tumorigenesis. Highlights: • Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines synthesize and secret AHSG. • AHSG depleted cell lines are significantly inhibited in their ability to proliferate, adhere, migrate, invade and protect MMP-9. • Human AHSG and bovine fetuin-A are functionally equivalent in regards to growth promotion of cancer cell lines.

  20. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy.

  1. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasin, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.krasin@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Wiese, Kristin M. [Department of Rehabilitation Services, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Spunt, Sheri L. [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States); Hua, Chia-ho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Daw, Najat [Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Navid, Fariba [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States); Davidoff, Andrew M. [Department of Surgery, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States); McGregor, Lisa [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States); Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); McCrarey, Lola [Department of Rehabilitation Services, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by the degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.

  2. SU-E-T-225: It Is Necessary to Contouring the Brainstem On MRI Images in Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, G; Liu, C; Liu, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the error in contouring the brainstem for patients with head and neck cancer who underwent radiotherapy based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods: 20 brain tumor and 17 nasopharyngeal cancer patients were randomly selected. Each patient underwent MR and CT scanning. For each patient, one observer contoured the brainstem on CT and MR images for 10 times, and 10 observers from five centers delineated the brainstem on CT and MR images only one time. The inter- and intra-observers volume and outline variations were compared. Results: The volumes of brainstem contoured by inter- and intra-observers on CT and MR images were similar (p>0.05). The reproducibility of contouring brainstem on MR images was better than that on CT images (p<0.05) for both inter- and intra-observer variability. The inter- and intra-observer for contouring on CT images reached mean values of 0.81±0.05 (p>0.05) and of 0.85±0.05 (p>0.05), respectively, while on MR images these respective values were 0.90±0.05 (p>0.05) and 0.92±0.04 (p>0.05). Conclusion: Contouring the brainstem on MR images was more accurate and reproducible than that on CT images. Precise information might be more helpful for protecting the brainstem radiation injury the patients whose lesion were closed to brainstem.

  3. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Racquel E. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheets, Nathan C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Wheeler, Stephanie B. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Nutting, Chris [Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kindom (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Division of Clinical Studies, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  4. Phase I Study of Preoperative Short-Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Womens' Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kwak, Eunice L. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mino-Kenudson, Mari [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Winrich, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of 1 week of chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with localized resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the head were enrolled from May 2006 to September 2008. Patients received radiation with proton beam. In dose level 1, patients received 3 GyE x 10 (Week 1, Monday-Friday; Week 2, Monday-Friday). Patients in Dose Levels 2 to 4 received 5 GyE x 5 in progressively shortened schedules: level 2 (Week 1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; Week 2, Tuesday and Thursday), Level 3 (Week 1, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; Week 2, Monday), Level 4 (Week 1, Monday through Friday). Capecitabine was given as 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. Weeks 1 and 2 Monday through Friday for a total of 10 days in all dose levels. Surgery was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemotherapy for Dose Levels 1 to 3 and then after 1 to 3 weeks for Dose Level 4. Results: Three patients were treated at Dose Levels 1 to 3 and 6 patients at Dose Level 4, which was selected as the MTD. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. Grade 3 toxicity was noted in 4 patients (pain in 1; stent obstruction or infection in 3). Eleven patients underwent resection. Reasons for no resection were metastatic disease (3 patients) and unresectable tumor (1 patient). Mean postsurgical length of stay was 6 days (range, 5-10 days). No unexpected 30-day postoperative complications, including leak or obstruction, were found. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with 1 week of proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery is feasible. A Phase II study is underway.

  5. The dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor AZD8055 inhibits head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Xin-mao; Ji, Yang-yang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Lin-gen, E-mail: drlingenxu@126.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •AZD8055 induces significant cytotoxic effects in cultured HNSCC cells. •AZD8055 blocks mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation in cultured HNSCC cells. •JNK activation is required for AZD8055-induced HNSCC cell death. •AZD8055 inhibits Hep-2 cell growth in vivo, and was more efficient than rapamycin. -- Abstract: The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell survival and proliferation, and is constitutively activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus mTOR is an important target for drug development in this disease. Here we tested the anti-tumor ability of AZD8055, the novel mTOR inhibitor, in HNSCC cells. AZD8055 induced dramatic cell death of HNSCC lines (Hep-2 and SCC-9) through autophagy. AZD8055 blocked both mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2 activation without affecting Erk in cultured HNSCC cells. Meanwhile, AZD8055 induced significant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, which was also required for cancer cell death. JNK inhibition by its inhibitors (SP 600125 and JNK-IN-8), or by RNA interference (RNAi) alleviated AZD8055-induced cell death. Finally, AZD8055 markedly increased the survival of Hep-2 transplanted mice through a significant reduction of tumor growth, without apparent toxicity, and its anti-tumor ability was more potent than rapamycin. Meanwhile, AZD8055 administration activated JNK while blocking mTORC1/2 in Hep-2 tumor engrafts. Our current results strongly suggest that AZD8055 may be further investigated for HNSCC treatment in clinical trials.

  6. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Chaitali [Immunobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Goswami, Ramansu [Immunobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Centre for Environmental Studies, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235 (India); Datta, Soma [Immunobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Rajagopal, R. [Gut Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Mazumder, Shibnath, E-mail: shibnath1@yahoo.co.in [Immunobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

    2011-10-01

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 {mu}M) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: > Altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. > ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  7. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BH?N, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making.

  8. SU-E-J-217: Accuracy Comparison Between Surface and Volumetric Registrations for Patient Setup of Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y; Li, R; Na, Y; Jenkins, C; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Optical surface imaging has been applied to radiation therapy patient setup. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the surface registration of the optical surface imaging compared with that of the conventional method of volumetric registration for patient setup in head and neck radiation therapy. Methods: Clinical datasets of planning CT and treatment Cone Beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare the surface and volumetric registrations in radiation therapy patient setup. The Iterative Closest Points based on point-plane closest method was implemented for surface registration. We employed 3D Slicer for rigid volumetric registration of planning CT and treatment CBCT. 6 parameters of registration results (3 rotations and 3 translations) were obtained by the two registration methods, and the results were compared. Digital simulation tests in ideal cases were also performed to validate each registration method. Results: Digital simulation tests showed that both of the registration methods were accurate and robust enough to compare the registration results. In experiments with the actual clinical data, the results showed considerable deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations. The average root mean squared translational error was 2.7 mm and the maximum translational error was 5.2 mm. Conclusion: The deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations was considerable. Special caution should be taken in using an optical surface imaging. To ensure the accuracy of optical surface imaging in radiation therapy patient setup, additional measures are required. This research was supported in part by the KIST institutional program (2E24551), the Industrial Strategic technology development program (10035495) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, KOREA), and the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission, and the NIH (R01EB016777)

  9. The Role of Computed Tomography in the Management of the Neck After Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Charron, Marie-Pierre [Faculte de medicine, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Belair, Manon [Department of Radiology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Delouya, Guila; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Filion, Edith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the outcome in patients with head-and neck-squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) followed up without neck dissection (ND) after concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) based on computed tomography (CT) response. The second objective was to establish CT characteristics that can predict which patients can safely avoid ND. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, 369 patients with node-positive HNSCC were treated with primary CRT at our institution. After a clinical and a radiologic evaluation based on CT done 6 to 8 weeks after CRT, patients were labeled with a complete neck response (CR) or with a partial neck response (PR). Results: The median follow-up was 44 months. The number of patients presenting with N3, N2, or N1 disease were 54 (15%), 268 (72%), and 47 (13%), respectively. After CRT, 263 (71%) patients reached a CR, and 253 of them did not undergo ND. Ninety-six patients reached a PR and underwent ND. Of those, 34 (35%) had residual disease on pathologic evaluation. A regression of the diameter of {>=}80% and a residual largest diameter of 15 mm of nodes had negative pathologic predictive values of 100% and 86%, respectively. The 3-year regional control and survival rates were not different between patients with CR who had no ND and patients with PR followed by ND. Conclusion: Node-positive patients presenting a CR as determined by CT evaluation 6 to 8 weeks after CRT had a low rate of regional recurrence without ND. This study also suggests that lymph node residual size and percentage of regression on CT after CRT may be useful criteria to guide clinical decisions regarding neck surgery. Those results can help diminish the number of ND procedures with negative results and their associated surgical complications.

  10. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  11. Nuclear NF-?B Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Michel, Yvonne [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Senckenberg Institute of Pathology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, J. W. Goethe – University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-?B expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-?B p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-?B and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-?B/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-?B/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  12. HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, ?II-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the development of faster and more accurate techniques for diagnosing TBI in fi sh.

  13. Running head: Reading Mathematical Proofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglis, Matthew

    , and is increasingly seen as essential to a coherent school-level mathematics curriculum (e.g., Cowen, 1991; Hanna, 2007; National Council of Teachers of Mathematics [NCTM], 2000; Selden & Selden, 2003; Weber, 2008. #12;4 In this paper we report the first direct comparison of the proof reading behavior of research

  14. (K. Martin, Head) University Librarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    (Elisabeth Long, Assoc Univ Lib) Law (S. Lewis) Sciences (B. Kern & A. TwissBrooks) Hum, SocSci & Spec Coll

  15. Porcine head response to blast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyein, Michelle K.

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational ...

  16. Head LiceHead Lice Head lice can infest anybody, but children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    also be cut out with small safety scissors. 3 Remove lice and nits from the household. · Wash clothing (stuffed animals, car seats).Vacuum carpets and upholstery. Pesticide sprays are not recommended. 4 Check

  17. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  18. SU-E-J-229: Quantitative Assessment for Timely Adaptive Re-Planning Using Weekly Dose Monitoring for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with head and neck (HN) cancer, mid-course adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a common practice in our institution to accommodate anatomic changes. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether dose re-calculation on weekly verification images can provide quantitative assessment for timely adaptive re-planning with daily image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: We retrospectively selected sixty daily verification images acquired on CT-on-rail/CBCT from ten HN patients. These image sets were typically a week apart. Among these patients, six patients received a mid-course ART. Contours of the tumors and organ-at-risks (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on each verification CT. After placing the treatment iso-center on the verification CTs according to the recorded clinical shifts, daily dose was re-calculated with the same beam configuration as the original plan. For the purpose of this study, electron densities for both verification CTs and planning CTs were set to 1.0 g/cm3. Results: Two patients had D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose for more than three fractions due to remarkable tumor volume shrinkages. D-max of the spinal cord exceeded a tolerance of 45 Gy for four fractions in additional two patients. D-mean of the parotid increased within 25% of the planned value. D-max of the brainstem and D-mean of the oral cavity did not show significant variation. If the re-planning criteria included D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose and D-max of the spinal cord > 45 Gy, two out ten patients required ART at week 2 and two patients required ART at week 3, respectively. Conclusion: Weekly dose monitoring with re-calculation on verification images can provide quantitative dose guidance for timely adaptive re-planning. Future work will include accumulative dose analysis for the decision of adaptive re-planning. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  19. Tumor suppressive microRNA-133a regulates novel targets: Moesin contributes to cancer cell proliferation and invasion in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Nohata, Nijiro; Fuse, Miki [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Kikkawa, Naoko [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Fujimura, Lisa; Watanabe-Takano, Haruko [Biomedical Research Center, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Center, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Yamada, Yasutoshi; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshitaka [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Seki, Naohiko, E-mail: naoseki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor suppressive microRNA-133a regulates moesin (MSN) expression in HNSCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of MSN in HNSCC cells suppressed proliferation, migration and invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression level of MSN was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Recently, many studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the development, invasion and metastasis of various types of human cancers. Our recent study revealed that expression of microRNA-133a (miR-133a) was significantly reduced in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and that restoration of miR-133a inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HNSCC cell lines, suggesting that miR-133a function as a tumor suppressor. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-133a transfectants and TargetScan database showed that moesin (MSN) was a promising candidate of miR-133a target gene. MSN is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin and moesin) protein family and ERM function as cross-linkers between plasma membrane and actin-based cytoskeleton. The functions of MSN in cancers are controversial in previous reports. In this study, we focused on MSN and investigated whether MSN was regulated by tumor suppressive miR-133a and contributed to HNSCC oncogenesis. Restoration of miR-133a in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu, HSC3, IMC-3 and SAS) suppressed the MSN expression both in mRNA and protein level. Silencing study of MSN in HNSCC cell lines demonstrated significant inhibitions of cell proliferation, migration and invasion activities in si-MSN transfectants. In clinical specimen with HNSCC, the expression level of MSN was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. These data suggest that MSN may function as oncogene and is regulated by tumor suppressive miR-133a. Our analysis data of novel tumor-suppressive miR-133a-mediated cancer pathways could provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis.

  20. Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Waldron, John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(?)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(?). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (?1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(?) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(?) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(?) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(?) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(?) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(?) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(?) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(?) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(?) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12 weeks after treatment. Post radiation neck dissection is advisable for all non-CR HPV(?)/non-CR N3 HPV(+) cases, but it may be avoided for selected non-CR N2 HPV(+) cases with a significant LN involution if they can undergo continued imaging surveillance. The role of positron emission tomography for response assessment should be investigated.

  1. Evaluation of the Planning Target Volume in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: What Is the Appropriate Expansion Margin in the Setting of Daily Image Guidance?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.; Perks, Julian; Purdy, James A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare patterns of disease failure among patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in conjunction with daily image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer, according to the margins used to expand the clinical target volume (CTV) to create a planning target volume (PTV). Methods and Materials: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients were treated with IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Daily IGRT scans were acquired using either kilovoltage or megavoltage volumetric imaging prior to each delivered fraction. The first 95 patients were treated with IMRT with 5-mm CTV-to-PTV margins. The subsequent 130 patients were treated using 3-mm PTV expansion margins. Results: Two-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and distant metastasis-free survival were 76%, 78%, and 81%, respectively. There were no differences with respect to any of these endpoints among patients treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV expansion margins (p > 0.05, all). The 2-year local-regional control rate for patients treated with IMRT with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins was 78% and 78%, respectively (p = 0.96). Spatial evaluation revealed no differences in the incidences of marginal failures among those treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins. Conclusions: The use of 3-mm PTV expansion margins appears adequate and did not increase local-regional failures among patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. These data demonstrate the safety of PTV reduction of less than 5 mm and support current protocols recommending this approach in the setting of daily IGRT.

  2. The Moroccan flag carries a pentafoil knot (Image: Image Broker/Rex Features)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, David A.

    (in the case of the trefoil, only one form was made). Knotty chainmail ADVERTISEMENT Home | Tech of the pentafoil knot interact with light would differ. "The material would rotate light in equal and opposite

  3. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  4. San Francisco Bay Estuary and its Delta. It is the complex system of waterways at the head of the estuary, formed by the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers that drain California's Central Valley (~40% of the state's watershed). [GIS figur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Bay Estuary and its Delta. It is the complex system of waterways at the head of the estuary, formed by the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers that drain California's Central by the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board.] #12;Environmental Research 105 (2007) 1

  5. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Lango, Miriam N.; Burtness, Barbara; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ridge, John A.; Feigenberg, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causing aspiration), and analysis was done with {chi}{sup 2} and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.

  6. Low head, high volume pump apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avery, Don E. (45-437 Akimala St., Honolulu, HI 96744); Young, Bryan F. (66-489 Pikai St., Honolulu, HI 96712)

    1989-01-01

    An inner cylinder and a substantially larger outer cylinder are joined as two verticle concentric cylinders. Verticle partitions between the cylinders divide the space between the cylinders into an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber which is substantially larger in volume than the inner chamber. The inner cylinder has a central pumping section positioned between upper and lower valve sections. In the valve section ports extend through the inner cylinder wall to the inlet and outlet chambers. Spring loaded valves close the ports. Tension springs extend across the inlet chamber and compression springs extend across the inner cylinder to close the inlet valves. Tension springs extend across the inner cylinder the close the outlet valves. The elastomeric valve flaps have rigid curved backing members. A piston rod extends through one end cover to move a piston in the central section. An inlet is connected to the inlet chamber and an outlet is connected to the outlet chamber.

  7. Electro-optical voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, Gregory K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages. The system employs a transmitter, a sensor disposed adjacent to but out of direct electrical contact with a conductor on which the voltage is to be measured, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor where the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect causes phase shifting in the beam, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent beams, from which the voltage of a system based on its E-field is determined when the two beams are normalized by the signal processor. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse whose ellipticity varies between -1 and +1 in proportion to voltage) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.

  8. Electro-optical voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, G.K.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages is disclosed. The system employs a transmitter, a sensor disposed adjacent to but out of direct electrical contact with a conductor on which the voltage is to be measured, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor where the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect causes phase shifting in the beam, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent beams, from which the voltage of a system based on its E-field is determined when the two beams are normalized by the signal processor. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam`s polarization state (an ellipse whose ellipticity varies between -1 and +1 in proportion to voltage) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured. 6 figs.

  9. Unilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia after Minor Head Injur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bamford, Richard; Singh-Ranger, Gurpreet

    2012-01-01

    such as stroke or multiple sclerosis and is extremely rarein patients with multiple sclerosis or vascular disease 1

  10. New Director Heads Actuarial Science Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally

    2002-01-03

    successes—we hold you and your classmates up as models for them to follow! ... Michael Golomb (second from the right) is pictured in the Math library lounge .... Shahidi's work has been the subject of intensive seminars at the Institute for Advanced ..... Good luck and be sure to join me next time for a discussion on topics.

  11. Main Heading Caption describing picture or graphic.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and make it easier to read. R P Documentary Film 11 AM Saturday November 8, 2014 Philippine Cultural Center 4857 Baxter Rd, Virginia Beach, VA 23462 "Rescue in The Philippines" is a onehour documentary

  12. Thomas Elton Furtak Professor and Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ", Peer-Tutoring in Web-based ConcepTests", The Physics Teacher, 48, 39-41 (2010). A. D. Price, J. Ignés

  13. Issues and ideas Heading for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    School, a specialist school for gifted 16-18 year old mathematicians which was established by King of the way in which resources for teaching in the adult skills sector have declined, whilst resources sources and structure 4 2 | Where are we now: the adult skills budget 2002­2014 5 Learner numbers

  14. Assessment of biological communities at Rame Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) compared to the two stations located at a greater distance from the disposal site (G8 and G28) in all years 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 g8 g18 g16 g13 g19 g3 g28 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 g8 g18 g16 g13 g19 g3 g28 D E O G3A02 G8A02 G18B02 G16A01 G19B03 G13A03 G19A03 G19C03 G13B03 G13C03 G3A01 G3B02 G3A03 G3B03 G3

  15. Wind energy for low head irrigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, J.L.; Bender, A.R.

    1982-12-01

    An air-lift pump utilizing a wind turbine driven air compressor is a viable method of furnishing irrigation water for the establishment of a tree shelter belt. The performance characteristics of the air-lift pump are quantified for use in a design procedure.

  16. William Milsom eception/Head S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Spencer

    -3373 2-3291 Page 1 of 5 ogy ­ Contac -2131 Fax 604 ROOM/L BioScience BioScience BioScience BioScience Bio

  17. Fish & Wildlife Section Head Smithers BC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    assessment support, cumulative effects assessment, natural resource research, geospatial analysis Market Adjustment The vision of the Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO of program and project management across a range of natural resource fields. As part of the regional Resource

  18. Landbase Stewardship (Ecosystems) Section Head Smithers BC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    assessment support, cumulative effects assessment, natural resource research, geospatial analysis activities for B.C. The vision of the Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO of program and project management across a range of natural resource fields. As part of the regional Resource

  19. ESnet Update Steve Cotter, Dept Head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Operations End-site education, best practices and consulting services Performance management' integrated services that deliver `end-to-end' high-performance data transfer, HPC/cloud computing-CHI, EQX-SJ, LASV, LVK, NREL, NSO, SNLA, SRS · PPPL M120: to be replaced with MX480 TBD #12;Lawrence

  20. Uranium enrichment: heading for a cliff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, C.

    1987-05-22

    Thanks to drastic cost cutting in the past 2 years, US enrichment plants now have the lowest cost production in the world, but US prices are still higher than those of overseas competitors because the business is paying for past mistakes. The most serious difficulty is that the Department of Energy (DOE), which owns and operates the US enrichment enterprise, is paying more than $500 million a year to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for electricity it once thought it would need but no longer requires. Another is that billions of dollars were spent in the 1970s and early 1980s to build new capacity that is now not needed. As a result, the enrichment enterprise has accumulated a debt to the US Treasury that the General Accounting Office (GAO) estimates at $8.8 billion. This paper presents the background and current debate in Congress about the difficulties facing the enrichment industry. In the midst of this debate over the future of the enterprise, the development of the next generation of enrichment technology is being placed in jeopardy. Known as atomic vapor laser isotope separation, or AVLIS, the process was viewed as the key to the long-term competitiveness of US enrichment. As the federal deficit mounted, however, funding for the AVLIS program was cut back and the timetable was stretched out. The US enrichment program has reached the point at which Congress will be forced to make some politically difficult decisions.

  1. TO: Procurement Directors Heads of Contracting Activities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease |RecordsDepartment of Energy byAboutupdate |Research & Development8

  2. Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget ||EnergyMark Holecek |MarkMarsMars

  3. SU-E-J-275: Impact of the Intra and Inter Observer Variability in the Delineation of Parotid Glands On the Dose Calculation During Head and Neck Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jodda, A; Piotrowski, T [Greater Poland Cancer Centre Poznan (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The intra- and inter-observer variability in delineation of the parotids on the kilo-voltage computed tomography (kVCT) and mega-voltage computed tomography (MVCT) were examined to establish their impact on the dose calculation during adaptive head and neck helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods: Three observers delineated left and right parotids for ten randomly selected patients with oropharynx cancer treated on HT. The pre-treatment kVCT and the MVCT from the first fraction of irradiation were selected to delineation. The delineation procedure was repeated three times by each observer. The parotids were delineated according to the institutional protocol. The analyses included intra-observer reproducibility and inter-structure, -observer and -modality variability of the volume and dose. Results: The differences between the left and right parotid outlines were not statistically significant (p>0.3). The reproducibility of the delineation was confirmed for each observer on the kVCT (p>0.2) and on the MVCT (p>0.1). The inter-observer variability of the outlines was significant (p<0.001) as well as the inter-modality variability (p<0.006). The parotids delineated on the MVCT were 10% smaller than on the kVCT. The inter-observer variability of the parotids delineation did not affect the average dose (p=0.096 on the kVCT and p=0.176 on the MVCT). The dose calculated on the MVCT was higher by 3.3% than dose from the kVCT (p=0.009). Conclusion: Usage of the institutional protocols for the parotids delineation reduces intra-observer variability and increases reproducibility of the outlines. These protocols do not eliminate delineation differences between the observers, but these differences are not clinically significant and do not affect average doses in the parotids. The volumes of the parotids delineated on the MVCT are smaller than on the kVCT, which affects the differences in the calculated doses.

  4. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  5. Segmental Dynamics of Head-to-Head Polypropylene and Polyisobutylene in Their Blend and Pure Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, Ralph H.

    to determine the local motion of each component in the blend through isotopic labeling. The spin in the component dynamics upon blending, but the shift becomes larger at lower temperatures. One factor in predicting the changes in component dynamics upon blending for hhPP, while it describes the temperature

  6. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR - BEAR HEAD LNG CORPORATION AND BEAR HEAD (USA) LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OF COLUMBIANorth Pitt Street,12-47-LNG - ORDER- FE DKT. NO.

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR - BEAR HEAD LNG CORPORATION AND BEAR HEAD (USA) LLC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE- FE DKT. NO. 15-33-LNG - ORDER

  8. Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Council on Environmental Quality reiterates its previous guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response...

  9. World’s Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world’s largest solar energy system by the end of 2013.

  10. Low-head feeding system for thin section castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, Sabah S. (Allegheny County, PA); Kleeb, Thomas R. (Allegheny County, PA); Lewis, Thomas W. (Allegheny County, PA); McDermott, John F. (Allegheny County, PA); Ozgu, Mustafa R. (Northhampton County, PA); Padfield, Ralph C. (Lehigh County, PA); Rego, Donovan N. (Lehigh County, PA); Vassilicos, Achilles (Allegheny County, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A feed system is provided for conveying molten metal to a thin section caster having mold surfaces moving exclusively in the direction of casting. The feed system has a passage of circular cross section adjacent to one end thereof for receiving molten metal and a rectangular cross section at the delivery end thereof adjacent to the caster. The feed system is designed for supplying molten metal to the caster at low pressure for "closed-pool" type caster operation. The point of highest elevation in the metal flow passage of the feed system is on the upper surface of a transition portion where the cross section changes from circular to rectangular adjacent to the nozzle. The level or height of the high point above the centerline of the nozzle exit is selected so as to be less than the pressure of the metal measured in inches at the nozzle exit. This feature enables the maintenance of positive pressure in the metal within the feed system so that ingress of air into the metal is prevented.

  11. Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  12. Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the national title, which will be awarded on June 21. Action Facilities Management is a Small Business Administration certified Native-American, woman-owned business. They began...

  13. Virgil: Objects on the Head of a Pin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titzer, B L

    2006-01-01

    Spain, June 2002. [7] D. Bacon and P. Sweeney. Fast StaticSpoonhower, J. Auerbach, D. Bacon, P. Cheng, and D. Grove.CA. June 2003. [5] D. Bacon. Kava: a Java Dialect with a

  14. Natural Head Motion Synthesis Driven by Acoustic Prosodic Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Zhigang

    facial expression, under the assumption that the articulation of the mouth and jaw modify facial muscles

  15. Natural Head Motion Synthesis Driven by Acoustic Prosodic Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    of the mouth and jaw modify facial muscles, producing different faces poses. Examples of these approaches

  16. HPV & head and neck cancer: a descriptive update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goon, Peter K. C.; Stanley, Margaret A.; Ebmeyer, Jorg; Steinstraesser, Lars; Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Gorner, Martin; Sudhoff, Holger H.

    2009-10-14

    - vant radiotherapy is historically added if there are positive or close margins, bone erosion or pathologically positive lymphnodes, although combined radiochemotherapy has been shown to further improve outcome in some high risk patients [49]. Although...

  17. Numerical and experimental investigations of the head/disk interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duwensee, Maik

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics and the E?ect of Lubricant. ASME J. Trib. , 126:Dynamics and the E?ect of Lubricant. ASME J. Trib. , 126:roughness, and the disk lubricant. An experimental setup was

  18. An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

    1995-01-01

    During the last decade, various brain imaging methods using radionuclides have become available. Due to the introduction of new techniques, a small-scale dosimetry study of the brain, and more specifically the organs of ...

  19. A novel active heads-up display for driver assistance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doshi, Anup; Cheng, Shinko Yuanhsien; Trivedi, Mohan Manubhai

    2009-01-01

    Research Laboratory, Volkswagen of America. This paper wasin conjunction with Volkswagen, the DAD is able to use a

  20. Supplement 15, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Subject Headings, Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Judith M.; Segal, Dorothy B.; Beard, Mary I.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.

    1966-01-01

    HOSUPNPUsXNdUhiRHcNPh&hsBSNHMNMFPRMSUNXMOFGBHhMFPmN0KNeMFHSBPHNHRUhSNGUUuNdBHUSN eMOFHUSuBSHPN&OPHNSUPhPHNHUFPhMFNsMBGPNXSM&NyOMKBFHNXMSeUPcNPh&hsBSNHMNBFNBFeRMSUGNRMHNBhSN yBssMMFmNlOeHhMFNeBhPPMFPNBFGNGSBiNU&yUG&UFHNBFeRMSPNo 1fPxcNN2himNAmAcBSUNHdMN PKPHU&PNeM&&MFs...

  1. Development of Power-head based Fan Airflow Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2005-01-01

    ............................................ 17 2.9 Effect of Particle Size on NOx Emission from Numerical Modeling (A) and Experimentation (B) ............................................. 19 2.10 Effect of Coal Rank and Particle Size on NOx Emission ................... 21 2.11 Effect... with CCOFA and SOFA for improved NOx emissions. They described the process the utility used to tune the airflow patterns to maximize NOx reduction with minimal impact on combustion performance. The boiler studied was a tangentially fired boiler with five...

  2. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    , Candy C. Young, Thomas Zoumaras ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Natalie Alexander, Mark Appold, William Ashcraft, Kathryn Brammall, Marijke Breuning, Bruce Coggins, David Conner, Douglas Davenport, Martin Eisenberg, Jeff

  3. Virgil: Objects on the Head of a Pin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titzer, B L

    2006-01-01

    Approach to Networked Embedded Systems. In Proceedings ofCompilers, and Tools for Embedded Systems (LCTES ’03). SanVerification. Keywords Embedded systems, microcontrollers,

  4. Mars Rover Navigation Results Using Sun Sensor Heading Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpe, Richard

    -actuator mobility, ap- pendages and algorithms for sampling and periscopic view- ing, improved actuation and sensing

  5. Heading to go here strapline to go here if required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Capital International Limited Clay Finlay Inc Deutsche Asset Management Limited Deutsche Investment Gartmore Investment Management plc International Asset Management Limited Investec Investment Management Limited JF Asset Management Limited JO Hambro Capital Management Limited John W Bristol & Co. Inc

  6. Simon Fraser University Athletics & Recreation Employment Opportunity Head Instructor -Badminton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    in a team. Badminton Camp is a half-day, one week long introduction to intermediate level program for children 8-14 years. Emphasis is on skill development, technical drills and team building. Mini games

  7. Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

    2006-06-30

    Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

  8. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clustering is generally considered as an efficient and scalable way to facilitate the management and operation of such large-scale networks and minimize the total energy...

  9. Student Pages Diamond Head Tuff Ring Field Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    or steam. Tuff cones range in size from 60 to 2000 m (200 to 6,500 feet) across and from 10 to 200 m (30 conduit. The fragments may be held tightly together by cementing material, creating a rock you can break pattern; if the unit appears to be layered, indicate these with lines. If the units have distinctive

  10. MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    I SUPPLY MANAGEMENT (NA-63) NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change 2010-03 Chapter 3 Federal Acquisition Certification in...

  11. MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS OTHER THAN THE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    lCSRHelpDesk@hq.doe.gov or by telephone at 301-903-2500, Option 4, and Option 4 again. cc: Human Resources Directors Headquarters Resource Directors Headquarters Administrative...

  12. Virtual Iron Network Head node (currently not being used)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Russ

    . Installation of UB's version of Fedora Linux on the nodes. This is accomplished by inserting an operating this information from UBIT office. 8. You are finished installing UB's version of Fedora Linux. Virtual Iron 1

  13. Library of Congress Subject Headings for Environmental Topics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Groat, Greta

    1997-01-01

    aspects RF Ecology RF Permaculture LC Class No. : S441 S482conservation sh 96-010625 Permaculture [May Subd Geog] UFWork cat. : Mollison, B.C. Permaculture, 1990 (permanent

  14. Splicing and regularity Tom Head and Dennis Pixton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pixton, Dennis

    , ribonucleotides, and amino acids, respectively. Let us adopt this view and consider how we might represent is represented by the string w = pv. It is natural to say that we have cut the molecules represented by m and m0, from such molecules m = pq and m0 = uv, a new molecule w = pv may be produced. This is a greatly

  15. Splicing and regularity Tom Head and Dennis Pixton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pixton, Dennis

    , and amino acids, respectively. Let us adopt this view and consider how we might represent the making of one by the string w = pv. It is natural to say that we have cut the molecules represented by m and m and spliced, from such molecules m = pq and m = uv, a new molecule w = pv may be produced. This is a greatly

  16. Splicing and regularity Tom Head and Dennis Pixton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pixton, Dennis

    , and amino acids, respectively. Let us adopt this view and consider how we might represent the making of one by the string w = pv. It is natural to say that we have cut the molecules represented by m and m # and spliced, from such molecules m = pq and m # = uv, a new molecule w = pv may be produced. This is a greatly

  17. MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Environmental Quality SUBJECT: DRAFT NEPA GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS I. INTRODUCTION The Council on Environmental...

  18. Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (CTBTO), visited NNSA's Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) on November 23, as part of a multi-day itinerary that also included tours of national laboratories overseen by the...

  19. UNITED STATES: NOAA Head Vows to Protect Marine Re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moratorium on Northern Stock of Pacific Sardine Recommended Review Pacific Northwest Coastal-Pollution Bay Roundnose Flounder Hatched Experunentally Special Shipboard Scale Developed Thermal Efnuent Used

  20. Published October 2001 Dancing on the Head of a Pin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    warming and cure any disease. But while some nano enthusiasts expect this new technology to free us from as scientists unpack. The sixth floor of the building will house the nanotechnology institute until 2005 when

  1. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    politics, and social reform movements. Students will lead discus- sion of journal articles and prepare P T I O N S ECONOMICS ECON 503G -- The Economics of Taxation 3 hours This course analyzes the impact of the tax system on the United States economy. Topics of discussion include the ability to pay theory

  2. FINITE ELEMENTS AND FINITE DIFFERENCE HUMAN HEAD MODELING: FORWARD PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowd, Daniel

    .T. Vetterling, B.P. Flannery, The Numerical Recipes in C: The art of Scientific Computing, 2nd edition. New York/MEG Fundamental problems in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalograpy (MEG), in particular , source DISCUSSION AND FUTURE RESEARCH When using FD methods one should be aware about the following "pros" and "cons

  3. Virgil: Objects on the Head of a Pin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titzer, B L

    2006-01-01

    and distributed languages and programming paradigms haveOriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications (Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems, 13(4),

  4. Gulf of Mexico pipelines heading into deeper waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1987-06-08

    Pipeline construction for Gulf of Mexico federal waters is following drilling and production operations into deeper waters, according to U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS) records. Review of MMS 5-year data for three water depth categories (0-300 ft, 300-600 ft, and deeper than 600 ft) reveals this trend in Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction. Comparisons are shown between pipeline construction applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed. This article is the first of annual updates of MMS gulf pipeline data. Future installments will track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. These figures will also be evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data.

  5. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  6. Maneuverability and heading control of compliant biomimetic swimming devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Anirban

    2007-01-01

    Biomimetic swimming devices that employ compliant mechanisms have shown promise as an alternative to current biomimetic design approaches that involve the use of complex mechanisms. The additional stealth, ruggedness, and ...

  7. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    -- Numerical Analysis 3 hours The propagation of errors in computing, solution of linear systems of equations and Computer Science G R A D U A T E C A T A L O G 311 2003-2005 #12;MATH 562G -- Mathematical Analysis II 3, MS Lanny C. Morley, PhD Steve Smith, PhD Shingmin Wang, PhD MASTER OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS The Master

  8. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    -- Numerical Analysis 3 hours The propagation of errors in computing, solution of linear systems of equations and Computer Science G R A D U A T E C A T A L O G 319 2001-2003 #12;MATH 562 -- Mathematical Analysis II 3, MS Lanny C. Morley, PhD Steve Smith, PhD Shingmin Wang, PhD MASTER OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS The Master

  9. Accurate 100:1 Rangeability Linear Response Head Meter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    by Gilflo shc.~t sU;Jpo~ spi;::er spring op;:losed conloured plug ~ ~~~~~~F~'--~~.w } -:>-..5' i -> -~l-'~ .VJ-";U]~~ locking nul : , ',,! 10\\'; C,p. iZ!;;;JI:-:g I ESL-IE-86-06-99 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology...

  10. OUR OCEAN PRIORITIES ARE CHANGING, NOAA HEAD SAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It conforms to the purpose s of the Environmental Policy Act of 1969, t he clean Water Act of 1969, pending As a percent of annual ocean expenditures, national security program s "suffered the greatest loss in r e of the Resources and Engineering Act of 1966. It represents U.S. determination "to seek the understanding

  11. 2010 RAL Space Head, Space Engineering &Technology Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the solar wind; thermite reaction; ionized by solar radiation; hoped to trace ions down to CCE in lower

  12. Virgil: Objects on the Head of a Pin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titzer, B L

    2006-01-01

    Intrinsics are library code and types, other thanis generic types [8], which will allow library designers toapplications and libraries with interfaces. Parametric types

  13. DOE Head of Contracting Activity and Procurement Directors' Directory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015.xlsx Other DOE HCA List May 26 2015.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Site Facility Management Contracts Internet Posting High Risk Plan Microsoft Word - AcqGuide71pt1.doc...

  14. Fly Head Sections Using Martin Heisenberg Fly Collars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a VWR plastic casting tray with OCT and quickly invert collar into tray. Immediately place tray/collar onto a metal rack suspended in an ethanol/dry ice bath. Be careful to keep ethanol from contacting from casting tray, being careful to avoid any contact of ethanol with the sample. 8. Using a clean

  15. Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-17wlodarczyk.pdf More Documents & Publications Glow...

  16. NATIONAL CONTEXT AND Robin Clegg, Head of Science in Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pa of taxpayers' money · Support for Govt Science & Innovation Agenda (especially, the STEM strategy for this type of work (basic science, facilities, energy research, etc) Clegg & Edmunds, STFC Town Meeting 30 November 2007 #12;DRIVERS 2 · Also note overlap with Corporate Communications strategy · For example

  17. Virgil: Objects on the Head of a Pin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titzer, B L

    2006-01-01

    become reachable from the entry points of the program. RMAthat are unreachable from the entry point to the program; inon the entry method of the program. At this point there are

  18. Head/disk interface tribology in the nanometer regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jianfeng

    2008-01-01

    magnetic spacing for a number of sliders using a velocity-sensitive air bearingmagnetic spacing for a series of sliders on a single disk using a velocity-sensitive air bearing.bearing pressure and heat flux distribution. In recent hard disk drives, thermal protrusion of the magnetic

  19. Iraq cracks a few heads in the Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, J.

    1990-08-20

    Last month Saddam Hussein charged that oil overproduction by his neighbors was costing Iraq dearly. When an OPEC meeting collapsed last week, he sent 100,000 troops to seize Kuwait, which he had accused of stealing oil. The US is scrambling to organize a Western boycott, but some analysts question just how effective such a more would be.

  20. Nanotechnology in Head and Neck Cancer: The Race Is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2010-01-01

    route) and 57% (direct injection into tumor) reduction ofImaging revealed the direct injection group had 2.18 timesbottom) reveal that direct injection achieves nearly twice

  1. Incremental adaptation to yaw head movements during 30 RPM centrifugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias, Paul Z. (Paul Ziad)

    2006-01-01

    Artificial Gravity (AG) provided by short-radius centrifugation is a promising countermeasure against the harmful physiological effects of prolonged weightlessness. However, the vestibular stimulus associated with making ...

  2. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    University; MLIS, University of Oklahoma. (1993) Patricia Ann Ferguson Cataloger BSE, Northeast Missouri

  3. F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Special Collections Librarian BA, Southern Methodist University; MBA, Oklahoma City University; MLIS, University of Oklahoma. (1993) Janette Garcia Catalog Librarian BA, Kalamazoo College; MLIS, University

  4. BLUETEC - Heading for 50 State Diesel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006deergodwin.pdf More Documents & Publications Review of...

  5. Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark Morris of South Bend, Ind., is among many in the country who were already retired, but whose 401(k) account took a big hit when the stock market crashed. Mark had retired as a utility-company supervisor in mid-2007, but he lost 40 percent of his retirement money and knew he had to go back to work.

  6. Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to: navigation, search59 HazardousNaRec NewGreenNagquNags

  7. Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOver Core StressOwen, Wisconsin:Owls

  8. Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurity Complex Bauer

  9. Beard to lead Business, Operations Directorate; Girrens named head of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1 Print0.2 Print0.2

  10. Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum - ScienceBrendan M. White About

  11. New Theory Head to join PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNewStaff ResearchDepartment

  12. ESnet Update Steve Cotter, Dept Head Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDieselAbsorptionPowering6106Meeting OrganizesStaffUpdate

  13. Sprinkler Head Replacement (4586), 4/24/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines CandidatesSpring

  14. Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment ofof Energy Test andExternal

  15. Bay Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminexInformationArkansas: Energy Resources JumpBayHarbor

  16. Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to:| Openof Forest

  17. MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31Bondurant Chute

  18. MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon CoveHydroKachemak

  19. Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis,DepartmentAboveProgram toCarbontoCitesEnergy

  20. Particle removal and head loss development in biological filters (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding access to(Conference) |ofPDVGLENELG(JournalShallowreactionsArticle) |