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1

Electrosurgical knife  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrosurgical knife blade of insulating material having a pair of electrodes adapted to be connected to a radiofrequency generator.

Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM); Cowan, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Newell, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); McCabe, Charles W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electrosurgical knife  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrosurgical knife blade of insulating material having a pair of electrodes adapted to be connected to a radiofrequency generator was developed.

Doss, J.D.; Cowan, R.E.; Newell, R.H.; McCabe, C.W.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

4

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

5

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

6

Kitchen Knife Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kitchen Knife Safety 1) Use a good quality cutting board (flat and stable). 2) Use a kitchen towel underneath a cutting board so that it won't slip. Observe above: Warped and unbalanced cutting board vs. flat and well-anchored board. 3) Sharp knives are safer knives. Dull knives can skip, slide, snag, or get stuck while cutting, leaving you off balance. 4) Use the right knife for the job. a. Serrated knives are long and lean that help grip and saw through the crust of rustic breads without using too much strength. b. Paring knives are used for smaller foods, such as limes, cherry tomatoes or shallots, for better control and lighter weight (less chance of skipping off of a smaller cutting surface). c. Chef's knives (one of the most used in the kitchen) can be used for

7

Flying between obstacles with an autonomous knife-edge maneuver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an aircraft and control system that is capable of repeatedly performing a high speed (7m/s or 16 MPH) "knife-edge" maneuver through a gap that is smaller than the aircraft's wingspan. The maneuver consists of ...

Barry, Andrew J. (Andrew James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Direct measures of mechanical energy for knife mill size reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lengthy straw/stalk of biomass may not be directly fed into grinders such as hammer mills and disc refiners. Hence, biomass needs to be preprocessed using coarse grinders like a knife mill to allow for efficient feeding in refiner mills without bridging and choking. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented knife mill. Direct power inputs were determined for different knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. Overall accuracy of power measurement was calculated to be 0.003 kW. Total specific energy (kWh/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate mill with biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy that can be assumed to reach the biomass. The difference is parasitic or no-load energy of mill. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopping increased with knife mill speed, whereas, effective specific energy decreased marginally for switchgrass and increased for wheat straw and corn stover. Total and effective specific energy decreased with an increase in screen size for all the crops studied. Total specific energy decreased with increase in mass feed rate, but effective specific energy increased for switchgrass and wheat straw, and decreased for corn stover at increased feed rate. For knife mill screen size of 25.4 mm and optimum speed of 250 rpm, optimum feed rates were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively, and the corresponding total specific energies were 7.57, 10.53, and 8.87 kWh/Mg and effective specific energies were 1.27, 1.50, and 0.24 kWh/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Energy utilization ratios were calculated as 16.8%, 14.3%, and 2.8% for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These data will be useful for preparing the feed material for subsequent fine grinding operations and designing new mills.

Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Smith, D.R. [University of Tennessee; Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SU?FF?T?388: Secondary Radiation Doses From CyberKnife SRS/RT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Because of extensive use of conventional x?rays in CyberKnife SRS/RT for treatment tracking and large number of monitor units (MU) in beam delivery

C Yu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Measurement of Gamma Knife registered helmet factors using MOSFETs  

SciTech Connect

The relative dose rate for the different Gamma Knife registered helmets (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm) is characterized by their respective helmet factors. Since the plateau of the dose profile for the 4 mm helmet is at most 1 mm wide, detector choices are limited. Traditionally helmet factors have been measured using 1x1x1 mm{sup 3} thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). However, these are time-consuming, cumbersome measurements. This article investigates the use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) (active area of 0.2x0.2 mm{sup 2}) as a more accurate and convenient dosimeter. Their suitability for these measurements was confirmed by basic characterization measurements. Helmet factors were measured using both MOSFETs and the established TLD approach. A custom MOSFET cassette was designed in analogy to the Elekta TLD cassette (Elekta Instruments AB) for use with the Elekta dosimetry sphere. Although both dosimeters provided values within 3% of the manufacturer's suggestion, MOSFETs provided superior accuracy and precision, in a fraction of the time required for the TLD measurements. Thus, MOSFETs proved to be a reasonable alternative to TLDs for performing helmet factor measurements.

Kurjewicz, Laryssa; Berndt, Anita [Department of Physics, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 2E9 (Canada); Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Winnipeg Centre for Gamma Knife Surgery, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg MB R3E 0V9 (Canada); Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3E 0V9 (Canada) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3E 0V9 (Canada)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

Sotiropoulou, Evangelia ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Stathochristopoulou, Irene [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Stathopoulos, Konstantinos ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.co ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

An algorithm for independent verification of Gamma Knife{sup TM} treatment plans  

SciTech Connect

A formalism for independent treatment verification has been developed for Gamma Knife{sup TM} radiosurgery in analogy to the second checks being performed routinely in the field of external beam radiotherapy. A verification algorithm is presented, and evaluated based on its agreement with treatment planning calculations for the first 40 Canadian Gamma Knife{sup TM} patients. The algorithm is used to calculate the irradiation time for each shot, and the value of the dose at the maximum dose point in each calculation matrix. Data entry consists of information included on the plan printout, and can be streamlined by using an optional plan import feature. Calculated shot times differed from those generated by the treatment planning software by an average of 0.3%, with a standard deviation of 1.4%. The agreement of dose maxima was comparable with an average of -0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.3%. Consistently accurate comparisons were observed for centrally located lesions treated with a small number of shots. Large discrepancies were almost all associated with dose plans utilizing a large number of collimator plugs, for which the simplifying approximations used by the program are known to break down.

Beck, James; Berndt, Anita [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Winnipeg Centre for Gamma Knife Surgery, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba (Canada); Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Winnipeg Centre for Gamma Knife Surgery, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba (Canada)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Mathematical model parameters for describing the particle size spectra of knife-milled corn stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle size distributions of Corn stover (Zea mays L.) created by a knife mill were determined using integral classifying screens with sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating at speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates ranging from 1 to 9 kg min_1. Particle distributions were classified using American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) standardised sieves for forage analysis that incorporated a horizontal sieving motion. The sieves were made from machined-aluminium with their thickness proportional to the sieve opening dimensions. A wide range of analytical descriptors that could be used to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions were examined. The correlation coefficients between geometric mean length and screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.980, 0.612, and _0.027, respectively. Screen size and feed rate directly influenced particle size, whereas operating speed had a weak indirect relation with particle size. The Rosin Rammler equation fitted the chopped corn stover size distribution data with coefficient of determination (R2) > 0.978. This indicated that particle size distribution of corn stover was well-fit by the Rosin Rammler function. This can be attributed to the fact that Rosin Rammler expression was well suited to the skewed distribution of particle sizes. Skewed distributions occurred when significant quantities of particles, either finer or coarser, existed or were removed from region of the predominant size. The mass relative span was slightly greater than 1, which indicated that it was a borderline narrow to wide distribution of particle sizes. The uniformity coefficient was corn stover produced fine-skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 50.8 mm screens. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean length, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median length, effective length, and size guide number, were well predicted at R2 values of 0.981, 0.982, 0.979, 0.950 and 0.978, respectively as a function of knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed. Results of this analysis of particle sizes could be applied to the selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of corn stover chop, and could serve as a guide for the relationships among various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

Bitra, V.S.P [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I. [University of Tennessee; Igathanathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electromagnetic Casimir Forces of Parabolic Cylinder and Knife-Edge Geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact calculation of electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly conducting parabolic cylinder is employed to compute Casimir forces in several configurations. These include interactions between a parabolic cylinder and a plane, two parabolic cylinders, and a parabolic cylinder and an ordinary cylinder. To elucidate the effect of boundaries, special attention is focused on the "knife-edge" limit in which the parabolic cylinder becomes a half-plane. Geometrical effects are illustrated by considering arbitrary rotations of a parabolic cylinder around its focal axis, and arbitrary translations perpendicular to this axis. A quite different geometrical arrangement is explored for the case of an ordinary cylinder placed in the interior of a parabolic cylinder. All of these results extend simply to nonzero temperatures.

Noah Graham; Alexander Shpunt; Thorsten Emig; Sahand Jamal Rahi; Robert L. Jaffe; Mehran Kardar

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Electromagnetic Casimir forces of parabolic cylinder and knife-edge geometries  

SciTech Connect

An exact calculation of electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly conducting parabolic cylinder is employed to compute Casimir forces in several configurations. These include interactions between a parabolic cylinder and a plane, two parabolic cylinders, and a parabolic cylinder and an ordinary cylinder. To elucidate the effect of boundaries, special attention is focused on the 'knife-edge' limit in which the parabolic cylinder becomes a half-plane. Geometrical effects are illustrated by considering arbitrary rotations of a parabolic cylinder around its focal axis, and arbitrary translations perpendicular to this axis. A quite different geometrical arrangement is explored for the case of an ordinary cylinder placed in the interior of a parabolic cylinder. All of these results extend simply to nonzero temperatures.

Graham, Noah [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States); Shpunt, Alexander; Kardar, Mehran [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Emig, Thorsten [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, CNRS UMR 8626, Bat. 100, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Rahi, Sahand Jamal [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Street, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Jaffe, Robert L. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics and Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bulk density and compaction behavior of knife mill chopped switchgrass,wheat straw, and corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Bulk density of comminuted biomass significantly increased by vibration during handling and transportation, and by normal pressure during storage. Compaction characteristics affecting the bulk density of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopped in a knife mill at different operating conditions and using four different classifying screens were studied. Mean loose-filled bulk densities were 67.5 18.4 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 36.1 8.6 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 52.1 10.8 kg/m3 for corn stover. Mean tapped bulk densities were 81.8 26.2 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 42.8 11.7 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 58.9 13.4 kg/m3 for corn stover. Percentage changes in compressibility due to variation in particle size obtained from a knife mill ranged from 64.3 to 173.6 for chopped switchgrass, 22.2 51.5 for chopped wheat straw and 42.1 117.7 for chopped corn stover within the tested consolidation pressure range of 5 120 kPa. Pressure and volume relationship of chopped biomass during compression with application of normal pressure can be characterized by the Walker model and Kawakita and Ludde model. Parameter of Walker model was correlated to the compressibility with Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Relationship between volume reduction in chopped biomass with respect to number of tappings studied using Sone s model indicated that infinite compressibility was highest for chopped switchgrass followed by chopped wheat straw and corn stover. Degree of difficulty in packing measured using the parameters of Sone s model indicated that the chopped wheat straw particles compacted very rapidly by tapping compared to chopped switchgrass and corn stover. These results are very useful for solving obstacles in handling bulk biomass supply logistics issues for a biorefinery.

Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

KNIFE MILL COMMINUTION ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SWITCHGRASS, WHEAT STRAW, AND CORN STOVER AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass preprocessing and pretreatment technologies such as size reduction and chemical preconditioning are aimed at reducing the cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Size reduction is an energy-intensive biomass preprocessing unit operation. In this study, switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover were chopped in an instrumented knife mill to evaluate size reduction energy and corresponding particle size distribution as determined with a standard forage sieve analyzer. Direct mechanical power inputs were determined using a dedicated data acquisition system for knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. A speed of 250 rpm gave optimum performance of the mill. Optimum feed rates for 25.4 mm screen and 250 rpm were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as the size reduction energy required to operate the knife mill plus that imparted to the biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy imparted to the biomass. For these conditions, total specific energies were 27.3, 37.9, and 31.9 MJ/Mg and effective specific energies were 10.1, 15.5, and 3.2 MJ/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These results demonstrated that biomass selection affects the size reduction energy, even for biomass with similar features. Second-order polynomial equations for the total specific energy requirement fitted well (R2 > 0.95) as a function of knife mill screen size, mass feed rate, and speed for biomass materials tested. The Rosin-Rammler equation fitted the cumulative undersize mass of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chop passed through ASABE sieves with high R2 (>0.983). Knife mill chopping of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover resulted in particle size distributions classified as 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for small knife mill screen sizes (12.7 to 25.4 mm) and distributions classified as 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for the large screen size (50.8 mm). Total and effective specific energy values per unit size reduction of wheat straw were greater compared to those for switchgrass. Corn stover resulted in reduced total and effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to wheat straw for the same operating conditions, but higher total specific energy per unit size reduction and lesser effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to switchgrass. Data on minimized total specific energy with corresponding particle spectra will be useful for preparing feed material with a knife mill for subsequent grinding with finer size reduction devices.

Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cerebral Metastases From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate clinical and physico-dosimetric variables affecting clinical outcome of patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2006, 373 patients (298 men and 75 women, median age 65 years) with brain metastases from NSCLC underwent GKRS. All of them had KPS {>=} 60%, eight or fewer brain metastases, confirmed histopathological diagnosis and recent work-up (<3 months). Thirty-five patients belonged to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class I, 307 patients were in RPA Class II, 7 patients were in RPA Class III. Median tumor volume was 3.6 cm{sup 3}. Median marginal dose was 22.5 Gy at 50% isodose.; median 10 Gy and 12 Gy isodose volumes were 30.8 cm{sup 3} and 15.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Follow-up with MRI was performed every 3 months. Overall survival data were collected from internal database, telephone interviews, and identifying registries. Results: Mean follow-up after GKRS was 51 months (range, 6 to 96 months); mean overall survival was 14.2 months. Of 373 patients, 29 were alive at time of writing, 104 had died of cerebral progression, and 176 had died of systemic progression. In 64 cases it was not possible to ascertain the cause. Univariate and multivariate analysis were adjusted for the following: RPA class, surgery, WBRT, age, gender, number of lesions, median tumor volume, median peripheral dose, and 10 Gy and 12 Gy volumes. Identified RPA class and overall tumor volume >5 cc were the only two covariates independently predictive of overall survival in patients who died of cerebral progression. Conclusions: Global volume of brain disease should be the main parameter to consider for performing GKRS, which is a first-line therapy for patient in good general condition and controlled systemic disease.

Motta, Micaela, E-mail: motta.micaela@hsr.it [Radiotherapy Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Vecchio, Antonella del [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Attuati, Luca; Picozzi, Piero [Neurosurgery Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Perna, Lucia [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Franzin, Alberto [Neurosurgery Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bolognesi, Angelo; Cozzarini, Cesare [Radiotherapy Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Medical Physics Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Mortini, Pietro [Neurosurgery Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Muzio, Nadia di [Radiotherapy Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. By using the data sets from the KESM, we can trace the neuronal and vascular structures of the whole mouse brain. I investigated effective methods for automatic seedpoint selection on 3D data sets from the KESM. Furthermore, based on the detected seedpoints, I counted the total number of somata and traced the neuronal structures in the KESM data sets. In the first step, the acquired images from KESM were preprocessed as follows: inverting, noise filtering and contrast enhancement, merging, and stacking to create 3D volumes. Second, I used a morphological object detection algorithm to select seedpoints in the complex neuronal structures. Third, I used an interactive 3D seedpoint validation and a multi-scale approach to identify incorrectly detected somata due to the dense overlapping structures. Fourth, I counted the number of somata to investigate regional differences and morphological features of the mouse brain. Finally, I traced the neuronal structures using a local maximum intensity projection method that employs moving windows. The contributions of this work include reducing time required for setting seedpoints, decreasing the number of falsely detected somata, and improving 3D neuronal reconstruction and analysis performance.

Kim, Dongkun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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21

A comparative study of small field total scatter factors and dose profiles using plastic scintillation detectors and other stereotactic dosimeters: The case of the CyberKnife  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Small-field dosimetry is challenging, and the main limitations of most dosimeters are insufficient spatial resolution, water nonequivalence, and energy dependence. The purpose of this study was to compare plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to several commercial stereotactic dosimeters by measuring total scatter factors and dose profiles on a CyberKnife system. Methods: Two PSDs were developed, having sensitive volumes of 0.196 and 0.785 mm{sup 3}, and compared with other detectors. The spectral discrimination method was applied to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal. Both PSDs were compared to four commercial stereotactic dosimeters by measuring total scatter factors, namely, an IBA dosimetry stereotactic field diode (SFD), a PTW 60008 silicon diode, a PTW 60012 silicon diode, and a microLion. The measured total scatter factors were further compared with those of two independent Monte Carlo studies. For the dose profiles, two commercial detectors were used for the comparison, i.e., a PTW 60012 silicon diode and Gafchromics EBT2. Total scatter factors for a CyberKnife system were measured in circular fields with diameters from 5 to 60 mm. Dose profiles were measured for the 5- and 60-mm cones. The measurements were performed in a water tank at a 1.5-cm depth and an 80-cm source-axis distance. Results: The total scatter factors measured using all the detectors agreed within 1% with the Monte Carlo values for cones of 20 mm or greater in diameter. For cones of 10-20 mm in diameter, the PTW 60008 silicon diode was the only dosimeter whose measurements did not agree within 1% with the Monte Carlo values. For smaller fields (<10 mm), each dosimeter type showed different behaviors. The silicon diodes over-responded because of their water nonequivalence; the microLion and 1.0-mm PSD under-responded because of a volume-averaging effect; and the 0.5-mm PSD was the only detector within the uncertainties of the Monte Carlo simulations for all the cones. The PSDs, the PTW 60012 silicon diode, and the Gafchromics EBT2 agreed within 2% and 0.2 mm (gamma evaluation) for the measured dose profiles except in the tail of the 60-mm cone. Conclusions: Silicon diodes can be used to accurately measure small-field dose profiles but not to measure total scatter factors, whereas PSDs can be used to accurately measure both. The authors' measurements show that the use of a 1.0-mm PSD resulted in a negligible volume-averaging effect (under-response of Almost-Equal-To 1%) down to a field size of 5 mm. Therefore, PSDs are strong candidates to become reference radiosurgery detectors for beam characterization and quality assurance measurements.

Morin, J.; Beliveau-Nadeau, D.; Chung, E.; Seuntjens, J.; Theriault, D.; Archambault, L.; Beddar, S.; Beaulieu, L. [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Casimir force at a knife's edge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are available, is another case where such a calculation is possible. We compute the interaction energy of a parabolic cylinder and an infinite plate (both perfect mirrors), as a function of their separation and inclination, H and {theta}, and the cylinder's parabolic radius R. As H/R{yields}0, the proximity force approximation becomes exact. The opposite limit of R/H{yields}0 corresponds to a semi-infinite plate, where the effects of edge and inclination can be probed.

Graham, Noah [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States); Shpunt, Alexander; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Emig, Thorsten [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, CNRS UMR 8626, Batiment 100, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Jaffe, Robert L. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics and Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Casimir Force at a Knife's Edge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are available, is another case where such a calculation is possible. We compute the interaction energy of a parabolic cylinder and an infinite plate (both perfect mirrors), as a function of their separation and inclination, $H$ and $\\theta$, and the cylinder's parabolic radius $R$. As $H/R\\to 0$, the proximity force approximation becomes exact. The opposite limit of $R/H\\to 0$ corresponds to a semi-infinite plate, where the effects of edge and inclination can be probed.

Noah Graham; Alexander Shpunt; Thorsten Emig; Sahand Jamal Rahi; Robert L. Jaffe; Mehran Kardar

2009-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Casimir force at a knife's edge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are ...

Graham, Noah

25

Iron aluminide knife and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating an article of manufacture having a Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy cutting edge. The fabrication comprises the steps of casting an Fe.sub.3 Al-based alloy, extruding into rectangular cross section, rolling into a sheet at 800.degree. C. for a period of time followed by rolling at 650.degree. C., cutting the rolled sheet into an article having an edge, and grinding the edge of the article to form a cutting edge.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

107°0'0W 106°30'0W 106°0'0W 105°30'0W 49°0'0N Williston Basin ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

poplar e lustre vaux fork e flat lake goose lake rough rider d wyer sidney mondak w divide flat top butte indian hill glass bluff poe fairview camp bicentennial ...

27

On the output factor measurements of the CyberKnife iris collimator small fields: Experimental determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for microchamber and diode detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To measure the output factors (OFs) of the small fields formed by the variable aperture collimator system (iris) of a CyberKnife (CK) robotic radiosurgery system, and determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for a microchamber and four diode detectors. Methods: OF measurements were performed using a PTW PinPoint 31014 microchamber, four diode detectors (PTW-60017, -60012, -60008, and the SunNuclear EDGE detector), TLD-100 microcubes, alanine dosimeters, EBT films, and polymer gels for the 5 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm iris collimators at 650 mm, 800 mm, and 1000 mm source to detector distance (SDD). The alanine OF measurements were corrected for volume averaging effects using the 3D dose distributions registered in polymer gel dosimeters. k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for the PinPoint microchamber and the diode dosimeters were calculated through comparison against corresponding polymer gel, EBT, alanine, and TLD results. Results: Experimental OF results are presented for the array of dosimetric systems used. The PinPoint microchamber was found to underestimate small field OFs, and a k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor ranging from 1.127 {+-} 0.022 (for the 5 mm iris collimator) to 1.004 {+-} 0.010 (for the 15 mm iris collimator) was determined at the reference SDD of 800 mm. The PinPoint k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor was also found to increase with decreasing SDD; k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} values equal to 1.220 {+-} 0.028 and 1.077 {+-} 0.016 were obtained for the 5 mm iris collimator at 650 mm and 1000 mm SDD, respectively. On the contrary, diode detectors were found to overestimate small field OFs and a correction factor equal to 0.973 {+-} 0.006, 0.954 {+-} 0.006, 0.937 {+-} 0.007, and 0.964 {+-} 0.006 was measured for the PTW-60017, -60012, -60008 and the EDGE diode detectors, respectively, for the 5 mm iris collimator at 800 mm SDD. The corresponding correction factors for the 15 mm iris collimator were found equal to 0.997 {+-} 0.010, 0.994 {+-} 0.009, 0.988 {+-} 0.010, and 0.986 {+-} 0.010, respectively. No correlation of the diode k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors with SDD was observed. Conclusions: This work demonstrates an experimental procedure for the determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors required to obtain small field OF results of increased accuracy.

Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Zourari, K.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Sakelliou, L.; Kilby, W.; Antypas, C.; Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Georgiou, E.; Seimenis, I. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece) and CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-MagnitikiTomografia, 54-56 Ethnikis-Antistaseos, 152 31 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athen (Greece); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, California 94089 (United States); 1st Department of Radiology, Aretaieion Hospital, Medical School, University of Athens, Vas. Sophias, 115 28 Athens (Greece) and CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-MagnitikiTomografia, 54-56 Ethnikis-Antistaseos, 152 31 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 2nd Building of Preclinical Section, University Campus, 68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electromagnetic Casimir forces of parabolic cylinder and knife-edge geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact calculation of electromagnetic scattering from a perfectly conducting parabolic cylinder is employed to compute Casimir forces in several configurations. These include interactions between a parabolic cylinder and ...

Graham, Noah

29

Gamma knife radiosurgery of radiation-induced intracranial tumors: Local control, outcomes, and complications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine local control (LC) and complication rates for patients who underwent radiosurgery for radiation-induced intracranial tumors. Methods and Materials: Review of a prospectively maintained database (2,714 patients) identified 16 patients (20 tumors) with radiation-induced tumors treated with radiosurgery between 1990 and 2004. Tumor types included typical meningioma (n = 17), atypical meningioma (n = 2), and schwannoma (n 1). Median patient age at radiosurgery was 47.5 years (range, 27-70 years). The median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 10.8-146.2 months). Time-to-event outcomes were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Three-year and 5-year LC rates were 100%. Three-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 92% and 80%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 100%. Three patients died: 1 had in-field progression 65.1 months after radiosurgery and later died of the tumor, 1 died of progression of a preexisting brain malignancy, and 1 died of an unrelated cause. One patient had increased seizure activity that correlated with development of edema seen on neuroimaging. Conclusions: LC, survival, and complication rates in our series are comparable to those in previous reports of radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas. Also, LC rates with radiosurgery are at least comparable to those of surgical series for radiation-induced meningiomas. Radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for radiation-induced intracranial tumors, most of which are typical meningiomas.

Jensen, Ashley W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Foote, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Gorman, Deborah A. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Schomberg, Paula J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Patients With Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas: Results From a 15-Year Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and complications of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 62 patients with NFA undergoing radiosurgery between 1992 and 2004, of whom 59 (95%) underwent prior tumor resection. The median treatment volume was 4.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.8-12.9). The median treatment dose to the tumor margin was 16 Gy (range, 11-20). The median maximum point dose to the optic apparatus was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.0-12.6). The median follow-up period after radiosurgery was 64 months (range, 23-161). Results: Tumor size decreased for 37 patients (60%) and remained unchanged for 23 patients (37%). Two patients (3%) had tumor growth outside the prescribed treatment volume and required additional treatment (fractionated radiation therapy, n = 1; repeat radiosurgery, n 1). Tumor growth control was 95% at 3 and 7 years after radiosurgery. Eleven (27%) of 41 patients with normal (n = 30) or partial (n = 11) anterior pituitary function before radiosurgery developed new deficits at a median of 24 months after radiosurgery. The risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits at 5 years was 32%. The 5-year risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits was 18% for patients with a tumor volume of {4.0 cm{sup 3} (risk ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-14.9, p = 0.02). No patient had a decline in visual function. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery is effective in the management of patients with residual or recurrent NFA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. The primary complication is hypopituitarism, and the risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits correlates with the size of the irradiated tumor.

Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Cochran, Joseph [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Natt, Neena [Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Erickson, Dana [Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Materiality and ‘Enchantment’ of the Gebel el-Arak Knife and the Gerzean Flint Blade Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

side of the Gebel el-Arak flint blade. As published ins replication of Gerzean flint blades with Danish material.10: Polished side of a Gerzean flint blade from Abu Zaidan (

Kim, Patricia E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Small-Field Therapy Using EPR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the AAPM to address the difficult problems of small-field dosimetry in radiation therapy (eg, GammaKnife, IMRT, Cyber Knife, TomoTherapy ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

33

Tcl/Tk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Swiss Army Knife of Web Applications: Tcl/Tk offers many uses to the web programmer. Mr. Schongar describes a few of them

Bill Schongar

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and Low Power Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric Oven, gas Refrigerator Water heating Water heating,Heating pad Hot plate (kitchen) Iron Juicer Kettle Knife Mug warmer Oven,

Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Casting & Solidification 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 4, 2012 ... Study on Electromagnet-Air Knife DC Casting Process of Large-Size AA .... High shear melt conditioning of aluminum alloy melts disperses ...

36

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11. Upper Egyptian rhomboid flint knife found at Maadi. (author. ) Figure 12. Flint hippopotamus from Hierakonpolis (lithique In ancient Egypt, flint or chert was used for

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

This is the title slide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Possibly appropriate for mobile forensics labs! recent ad in Microscopy Today Page 19. ... E FWHM ~ 17 eV Forensics: SS-420 (knife blades). Page 22. ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

BUILDING MA TERIALS and STRUCTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SALE BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS, WASHINGTON, DC PRIC E 10 CENTS ... brands; g and k stand for gun grade and knife ~de ...

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are used to supply electrical energy for the welding operation. The transformer tap switch frequently is a rotary, eight-step, knife-type, fully enclosed locking switch, which provides convenient adjustment of the welding voltage to suit work

40

Processing Poultry at Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With hot water for scalding, ice water for chilling and a sharp knife, poultry can be processed at home for dressed poultry shows or home consumption. This publication discusses facilities and equipment, New York dressing, evisceration, chilling, packing and skinning.

Davis, Michael

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "knife fryburg mondak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

IBM Research and Columbia University TRECVID-2012 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A typical output, for example, is: ”A Sin- gle Person does Violent Action to a Home Appliance using a Knife at a Kitchen or at a Laundry Room, with ...

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NQAATechnical Memorandum NMFS APRIL BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES FORWASHINGTON corrpletsformalreview,editorialamtrd,ordetailedediting. APRIL 1990 BIOMASS-BASEDMODELSAND HARVESTINGPOLICIES rockfish (S.jordani). A biomass-based delay- difference model with knife-edge recruitment appeared

43

NETL: Educational Initiatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

middle that is 18 centimeters (7") long and 23 centimeters (8") wide. Step 14. Use brass fasteners to attach the platform to the sides. Step 15. Using a utility knife or other...

44

A Simple Parameterization of Turbulent Tidal Mixing near Supercritical Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple parameterization for tidal dissipation near supercritical topography, designed to be applied at deep midocean ridges, is presented. In this parameterization, radiation of internal tides is quantified using a linear knife-edge model. ...

Jody M. Klymak; Sonya Legg; Robert Pinkel

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

68 HARPER'S MAGAZINE / JANUARY 2013 he fork is worth considering. It's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

placing of dirty fingers in the communal meat bowl-- and he encouraged it when he returned to England eats his peas with a knife, and that says it all. Steven Shapin teaches history of science at Harvard

Shapin, Steven

46

For years I have been driving by a huge bass tree next to the road by the Souhegan River and never noticed it. It's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow. I have only see one year where the basswood flow was intense. The roar of the bees was audible 20 slice open with a knife. Inside are one or two seeds surrounded by some hollow space. The fresh green

New Hampshire, University of

47

One-dimensional hard x-ray field retrieval using a moveable structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a technique that allows measuring the field of an x-ray line focus using far-field intensity measurements only. One-dimensional phase retrieval with transverse translation diversity is used to recover a hard x-ray beam focused by a compound kinoform lens. The reconstruction is found to be in good agreement with independent knife-edge scan measurements taken at separated planes. The approach avoids the need for measuring the beam profile at focus and allows narrower beams to be measured than the traditional knife-edge scan.

Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Isakovic, A.F.; Stein, A.; Warren, J.B.; Sandy, A.R.; Narayanan, S.; Fienup, J.R.

2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

Valve for cryogenic service  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a valve for use with a liquefied gas at cryogenic temperatures in which a pair of joined knife edges are bellows controlled to contact an indium alloy seat in an annular slot when flow is to be stopped. The sealing alloy may be renewed by heating in situ. (auth)

Worwetz, H.A.

1975-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

49

Method Of Making An Ultracapacitor Electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A paste of organic solvent with dissolved organic salt and active carbon is formed and a uniform film of the paste is applied onto a substrate by casting the paste into a clearance between a knife blade and the substrate. The paste is evaporated to form a paste electrode for an ultracapacitor.

Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); DeJager, Katherine Dana (BJ Goes, NL); LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris (Schenectady, NY)

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

50

The effect of Vinculin deletion on myofilament architecture and the implications for systolic force generation in the heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass knife was advanced manually with the hand wheel until it was aligned with the surface of the block.block was then trimmed into a trapezoid with sides at 10 o [44]; this shape helped relieve stress on the glass

Janssen, Matthew Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES NR220 Natural Resource Ecology & Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, white printer paper for reports. Graph paper may also be helpful. 9. 7.5-minute, USGS Pingree Park, CO, pencils and pens (including a variety of Sharpie/permanent colors), scissors, knife, paper clips, etc. (a biology/botany paper for mounting specimens (can share a pack with 2 or 3 other students). 15. Binoculars

52

Quality assurance for gamma knives  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and summarizes the results of a quality assurance (QA) study of the Gamma Knife, a nuclear medical device used for the gamma irradiation of intracranial lesions. Focus was on the physical aspects of QA and did not address issues that are essentially medical, such as patient selection or prescription of dose. A risk-based QA assessment approach was used. Sample programs for quality control and assurance are included. The use of the Gamma Knife was found to conform to existing standards and guidelines concerning radiation safety and quality control of external beam therapies (shielding, safety reviews, radiation surveys, interlock systems, exposure monitoring, good medical physics practices, etc.) and to be compliant with NRC teletherapy regulations. There are, however, current practices for the Gamma Knife not covered by existing, formalized regulations, standards, or guidelines. These practices have been adopted by Gamma Knife users and continue to be developed with further experience. Some of these have appeared in publications or presentations and are slowly finding their way into recommendations of professional organizations.

Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description Dry ice (solid) is put into the bulb of a pipette, plastic pipette 1 ice cube sized piece of dry ice Butter knife (or some object to break dry ice) Gloves (surgical gloves will not work, they must protect hands from dry ice) Safety glasses for demonstrator

54

Conceptual Combination Stimuli (Swinney et al, 2007 Psych Science)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it difficult to conceal themselves in the dry1 grass2 along the river. Compound property ­ brown Noun property The only trace of the lost hunting party was a knife found in the burnt1 meadow2 across the river. Compound ­ crystal No

55

Invisible Ink Lesson Adapted From  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

invisible ink and have fun with science! Materials: Paper Lemons and a knife and bowl Q-tips An iron the experiment, I cut the lemons in half and squeezed the juice into the bowl. It needs to be fresh lemon juice

56

Hard Disk:Users:mbroman:Desktop:MIT_Crime_Statistic_Form.doc Matthew Broman 1/28/13 9:11 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife or other weapon is used which could or probably would, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly. Drug Abuse Violations: Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale

Reuter, Martin

57

Campus Security Authority Crime Report Form CSA ____________ Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or great bodily harm. It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale Abuse Violations: Violations of laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing

Farritor, Shane

58

PURDUE UNIVERSITY CRIME STATISTIC REPORT FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

harm. It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife or other or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession: Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing

Jiang, Wen

59

Apparatus and method for measuring critical current properties of a coated conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The transverse critical-current uniformity in a superconducting tape was determined using a magnetic knife apparatus. A critical current I.sub.c distribution and transverse critical current density J.sub.c distribution in YBCO coated conductors was measured nondestructively with high resolution using a magnetic knife apparatus. The method utilizes the strong depression of J.sub.c in applied magnetic fields. A narrow region of low, including zero, magnetic field in a surrounding higher field is moved transversely across a sample of coated conductor. This reveals the critical current density distribution. A Fourier series inversion process was used to determine the transverse J.sub.c distribution in the sample.

Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Haenisch, Jens (Dresden, DE)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Micromachined electrical cauterizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micromachined electrical cauterizer. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 .mu.m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures.

Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "knife fryburg mondak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Direct observation of molecular arrays in the organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resembles the ER stress-induced ER expansion in yeast, where sequestration of the ER membranes into autophagosome-like multilamellar tial for survival [19]. This suggestion is corroborated by the observation that OSER structures induced in mamma- lian cells... with 35° dia- mond knife (Diatome) under standard cutting condi- tions, at -140°C. The cryosections were collected on 1000- mesh grids (Agar Scientific, Essex, United Kingdom) coated with carbon and stored in liquid nitrogen or trans- ferred immediately...

Korkhov, Vladimir M; Zuber, Benoit

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Laser Cutting and Size Reduction. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The project utilizes a Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to cut and size reduce equipment in the 324 Laboratory B Hot Cell located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This project will demonstrate the ability of the Nd:Yag laser to remotely and safely dismantle equipment faster, cheaper, and more efficiently than baseline cutting methods, such as the plasma torch and the water knife, in a highly radioactive area using fiber optics.

None

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparative analysis of sex chromosomes in Leporinus species (Teleostei, Characiformes) using chromosome painting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pelleted and resuspended three times in fresh ice cold fixative (3:1 methanol:acetic acid), then kept at ?20°C until use. The chromosomes of other Anostomidae species (L. friderici, L. striatus, L. lacustris, Schizodon borelii and S. isognathus) were... . latipes. Genetics 2007, 175:1335–1340. 29. Henning F, Moysés CB, Calcagnotto D, Meyer A, Almeida-Toledo LF: Independent fusions and recent origins of sex chromosomes in the evolution and diversification of glass knife fishes (Eigenmannia). Heredity 2011...

Parise-Maltempi, Patrícia P; da Silva, Edson L; Rens, Willem; Dearden, Frances; O’Brien, Patricia CM; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Production Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Figure 1 shows the sequence of shapes in the production of a hollow handle for a table knife formed and coined in a 410 kg (900 lb) pneumatic drop hammer. The work metal was 0.81 mm (0.032 in.) thick copper alloy C75700 (nickel silver, 65â??12) annealed to a hardness of 35 to 45 HRB; blank size was 25 by...

65

Design strategies for optically-accessible, high-temperature, high-pressure reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Dismantling techniques for reactor steel piping  

SciTech Connect

Two cutting techniques have been developed for dismantling the pipes connected to the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) pressure vessel. They are the rotary disk knife cutting system for dismantling relatively large pipes, such as the primary cooling system, and the shaped explosive cutting systems for cutting relatively small pipes in air or water. Basic cutting tests were performed to determine the optimum characteristics of the cutting systems and to conduct a safety evaluation by studying the effects of blasting on surrounding areas. Mock-up tests confirmed the applicability of the newly developed dismantling systems for JPDR dismantlement by successfully cutting test pipes with these systems.

Yanagihara, S.; Hiraga, F.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Note: Spatial resolution of Fuji BAS-TR and BAS-SR imaging plates  

SciTech Connect

The spatial resolution of two types of imaging plates, Fuji BAS-TR and Fuji BAS-SR, has been measured using a knife-edge x-ray source of 8-keV Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation. The values for the spatial resolution, defined as the distance between 10% and 90% levels of the edge spread function, are 94 {mu}m and 109 {mu}m, respectively. The resolution values are important for quantitative analysis of x-ray and particle imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics.

Fiksel, G.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Rd., Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Consecutive conveyors may be connected by an intermediate vibratory plate. An air knife can be used to further separate materials based on weight.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Lithium-Ion Battery Teacher Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Ion Battery Teacher Workshop Lithium Ion Battery Teacher Workshop 2012 2 2 screw eyes 2 No. 14 rubber bands 2 alligator clips 1 plastic gear font 2 steel axles 4 nylon spacers 2 Pitsco GT-R Wheels 2 Pitsco GT-F Wheels 2 balsa wood sheets 1 No. 280 motor Also: Parts List 3 Tools Required 1. Soldering iron 2. Hobby knife or coping saw 3. Glue gun 4. Needlenose pliers 5. 2 C-clamps 6. Ruler 4 1. Using a No. 2 pencil, draw Line A down the center of a balsa sheet. Making the Chassis 5 2. Turn over the balsa sheet and draw Line B ¾ of an inch from one end of the sheet. Making the Chassis 6 3. Draw a 5/8" x ½" notch from 1" from the top of the sheet. Making the Chassis 7 4. Draw Line C 2 ½" from the other end of the same sheet of balsa. Making the Chassis 8 5. Using a sharp utility knife or a coping saw, cut

71

BY SILICON CRYSTALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

c October 29, 1942 a 1 1 _MIGH aECTgFXCATIOH - BY SILICON CRYSTALS . . c .. I n. The excellent pesformmce of Brftieh "red dot" c r y s t a l s f e explained R R due t o the kgife edge contact i n a t A polfehod ~ X ' f l i C B o H i g h frequency m c t l f f c n t f o n 8ependre c r i t i c a l l y on the ape%e;y of the rectifytnc boundary layer o f the crystal, C, For hl#$ comvere~on e f f i c i e n c y , the product c d t h i ~ capacity m a o f ' t h e @forward" (bulk) re-. sistance Rb o f the crystnl must b@ sm%P, depende primarily on the breadth of tha b f f e edge i t s lbngth. The contact am &harefore ~ E L V Q a rather large area wMQh prevents burn-out, thh3 t h e breadth of &h@ knife edge should be bdt8~1 than E~$O$B% % f I - ' amo For a knife edge, this produet very 14ttle upom For a wavsIL~n+3tih of PO emo the eowp,o%a%8sne 4

72

An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limites soft x-ray nanofocusing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing.The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

Merthe, Daniel; Goldberg, Kenneth; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory; Rakawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

Systematic measurements of whole-body dose distributions for various treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Contemporary radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, could increase the radiation-induced malignancies because of the increased beam-on time, i.e., number of monitor units needed to deliver the same dose to the target and the larger volume irradiated with low doses. In this study, whole-body dose distributions from typical radiotherapy patient plans using different treatment techniques and therapy machines were measured using the same measurement setup and irradiation intention. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from 6 MV beams were compared in terms of treatment technique (3D-conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical TomoTherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, hard wedges, and flattening filter-free radiotherapy) and therapy machine (Elekta, Siemens and Varian linear accelerators, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy). Results: Close to the target, the doses from intensity-modulated treatments (including flattening filter-free) were below the dose from a static treatment plan, whereas the CyberKnife showed a larger dose by a factor of two. Far away from the treatment field, the dose from intensity-modulated treatments showed an increase in dose from stray radiation of about 50% compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. For the flattening filter-free photon beams, the dose from stray radiation far away from the target was slightly lower than the dose from a static treatment. The CyberKnife irradiation and the treatment using hard wedges increased the dose from stray radiation by nearly a factor of three compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. Conclusions: This study showed that the dose outside of the treated volume is influenced by several sources. Therefore, when comparing different treatment techniques, the dose ratios vary with distance to the isocenter. The effective dose outside the treated volume of intensity-modulated treatments with or without flattening filter was 10%-30% larger when compared to 3D-conformal radiotherapy. This dose increase is much lower than the monitor unit scaled effective dose from a static treatment.

Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 30, 2013 November 30, 2013 Environment / Health / Safety DIVISION Injury/Illness Cases - November 2013 * Contusion on hand * While entering the lower level of Building 47, the Computer Systems Engineer tripped over a one inch rise of the floor slab at the doorway and fell striking the left hand against the ground. * Lower leg fracture * The Research Associate's ankle rolled to the side after slipping on small gravel while walking across the patio between Buildings 74 and 84. This resulted in a fracture of the lower leg. Slip Trip Fall 2 Environment / Health / Safety DIVISION Injury/Illness Cases - November 2013 * Laceration on finger * The Electronics Engineering Technologist lacerated the middle finger while using a utility knife to cut cable sheathing.

75

Training Program Graduates Weatherization-Ready Workers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Program Graduates Weatherization-Ready Workers Training Program Graduates Weatherization-Ready Workers Training Program Graduates Weatherization-Ready Workers April 29, 2010 - 5:45pm Addthis Daniel Tello demonstrates how to prepare an attic space for insulation using skills learned from the First Choice Program. | Photo courtesy of HCDC, Human Capital Development Corp., Inc. and Scott Anderson Daniel Tello demonstrates how to prepare an attic space for insulation using skills learned from the First Choice Program. | Photo courtesy of HCDC, Human Capital Development Corp., Inc. and Scott Anderson Lindsay Gsell On graduation day, students at Human Capital Development Corp., Inc. (HCDC) leave with more than just a diploma. They receive a hard hat, tool belt, hammer, utility knife and a tape measure. Graduates from Racine, Wis.-based HCDC First Choice Program are literally

76

HSS Safety Shares  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Shares Safety Shares HSS Safety Shares Home Health, Safety and Security Home HSS Safety Shares 2013 Safety Shares National Weather Service - Lightning Safety General Lightning Safety 7 Important Parts of a Cleaning Label Kitchen Knife Safety Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards Rabies Hearing Loss Winter Driving Tips 2012 Safety Shares Holiday Decoration Safety Tips Countdown to Thanksgiving Holiday Fall Season Safety Tips Slips, Trips and Fall Safety Back To School Safety Tips for Motorists Grills Safety and Cleaning Tips Glass Cookware Safety Water Heater Safety FAQs Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards First Aid for the Workplace Preventing Colon Cancer Yard Work Safety Yard Work Safety - Part 1 Yard Work Safety - Part 2 High Sodium Risks Heart Risk Stair Safety New Ways To Spot Dangerous Tires

77

Reapers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reapers Reapers Nature Bulletin No. 759 June 6, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor REAPERS The early settlers in Illinois and Indiana grew corn, but not much wheat other than patches of it to be ground into flour by local grist mills. There was a reason. In those days wheat had to be sown, cut and threshed in virtually the same way as it had been for 6000 years -- by hand -- and that meant countless hours of monotonous backbreaking toil. The earliest tool for cutting grain was a long knife of wood or bone with flakes of flint inserted to give it a saw like edge. Late Stone Age people used curved flint tools similar to the sickles made by ancient Egyptians of bronze and, later, of steel. The Romans developed a two-handed scythe that was gradually improved until, after the Middle Ages, a cradle was added.

78

Fermilab Today | Result of the Week Archive | 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Dec. 16, 2010 Subatomic color Dec. 9, 2010 Living flavorfully with biases Dec. 2, 2010 Searching for new particles Nov. 18, 2010 Top quark mass measured by CDF to a 0.7 percent accuracy Nov. 11, 2010 No sting in study of three "b"s Nov. 4, 2010 Improved CDF Higgs search: No event left behind Oct. 28, 2010 A better way to sharpen a knife Oct. 21, 2010 Measurement of W spin from CDF top quark decays Oct. 14, 2010 SpokespersonsÂ’ perspective: The Tevatron and an opportunity to answer one of the most fundamental scientific questions Oct. 7, 2010 Direct measurement of the top quark width Sep. 30, 2010 The top quarkÂ’s elusive cousin Sep. 23, 2010 Searching for super top Sep. 16, 2010 Quirky subatomic skid marks Sep. 9, 2010 A search for new physics in Z + photon

79

Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch  

SciTech Connect

Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Las Heras 644, Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe 2600 (Argentina); Artana, G. [Departamento Ing. Mecanica, Laboratorio de Fluidodinamica, Facultad de Ingenieria (UBA), Paseo Colon 850 (C1063ACV), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA), Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Efficacy of Consumer-Available Antimicrobials for the Disinfection of Pathogen Contaminated Green Bell Pepper and Efficacy of Consumer Cleaning Methods for the Decontamination of Knives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limited information exists regarding the efficacy of consumer-available antimicrobials for the use on produce surfaces. There is a strong focus on eliminating pathogens from produce at a commercial level, but consumers can achieve pathogen reduction in a domestic setting. The objectives were to determine the ability of consumer-available antimicrobials to disinfect waxed green bell peppers, determine the efficacy of knife cleaning methods, and assess the transfer of contamination. Peppers were inoculated via immersion in a cocktail of rifampicin-resistant Salmonella serovars and Escherichia coli O157:H7 to a final concentration of 5.6 ± 0.5 log CFU/cm2. In study 1, samples of 3 10-cm2 pieces of inoculated pepper were excised from smooth tissue and immersed in 3% (v/v) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), 2.5% (v/v) acetic acid, 70% (v/v) ethyl alcohol (EtOH), or sterile distilled water (SDW) for various lengths of time. Following treatment, samples were immersed for 30 s in a neutralizer solution. For study 2, inoculated peppers were chopped into 1-cm2 pieces. Knives were treated with one cleaning method: no treatment (control), towel wipe (TW), running hot water for 5 s (5SW), running hot water for 10 s (10SW) or 1% (v/v) detergent solution followed by hot running water for 10 s (ST). After treatments, knives were used to chop cucumbers. Surviving Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 for both studies were selectively enumerated on lactose-sulfite-phenol red-rifampicin agar following aerobic incubation of plates for 24 h at 35 °C. Hydrogen peroxide exposure for 5 min resulted in reductions of 1.3 ± 0.3 log CFU/cm2 for both pathogens. Following 1 min exposure to EtOH, pathogens were reduced by 1.3 ± 0.1 3 log CFU/cm2; exposure for >1 min did not result in additional reduction. Acetic acid exposure after 5 min resulted in a Salmonella reduction of 1.0 ± 0.7 log CFU/cm2, but for E. coli O157:H7, exposure resulted in no significant reduction (p<0.05) of pathogens compared to SDW at the various points. For study 2, 5SW, 10SW, and ST were equally effective for knife decontamination. No significant difference (p<0.05) was found between log CFU/cm2 on knife blade and log CFU/cm2 transferred to surface of cucumber; therefore, viable organisms remaining on the knife blade were transferred onto the surface of the cucumber. Findings suggest EtOH and H2O2 may be effective consumer-deployable antimicrobials for surface decontamination of smooth produce, and contaminated produce can contaminate other produce. Further research of antimicrobial exposure on produce sensorial characteristics is also advised in order to determine how various antimicrobial exposure times will affect the quality and sensorial characteristics of the produce commodity.

Perez, Keila Lizth

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "knife fryburg mondak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a comparison of models for the variance of trajectories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe results from the second stage of a project to build a statistical model for hurricane tracks. In the first stage we modelled the unconditional mean track. We now attempt to model the unconditional variance of fluctuations around the mean. The variance models we describe use a semi-parametric nearest neighbours approach in which the optimal averaging length-scale is estimated using a jack-knife out-of-sample fitting procedure. We test three different models. These models consider the variance structure of the deviations from the unconditional mean track to be isotropic, anisotropic but uncorrelated, and anisotropic and correlated, respectively. The results show that, of these models, the anisotropic correlated model gives the best predictions of the distribution of future positions of hurricanes.

Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assignment #1: Developing Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this assignment is to give you some experience developing algorithms. According to Wikipedia, an algorithm is “a finite list of well-defined instructions for accomplishing some task that, given an initial state, will terminate in a defined end-state ” [1]. 1. Consider the following initial state: • A bag containing sliced bread • A jar containing peanut butter • A jar containing jelly • A plastic knife Develop an algorithm for producing, as an end-state, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Be as precise as possible when developing your list of instructions. 2 Hand-In Instructions The assignment is due at the start of class on August 27 th. You are required to turn in a typed document. The document should include your name, your username, the date, the course number, and the assignment number. For example:

Andrew R. Dalton; Andy Dalton (adalton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas, E-mail: kalishhadas@gmail.com [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Reich, Ehud [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Gal, Lior [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Rappaport, Zvi Harry [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Nissim, Ouzi [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Pfeffer, Raphael [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Spiegelmann, Roberto [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Phase I, study of a miniature X-ray source for interstitial radiotherapy of brain metastases  

SciTech Connect

Despite a variety of stereotactic techniques used to increase intracranical local control, dose escalation strategies remain controversial, with respect to therapeutric gain, convenience, and cost effectiveness, in the setting of brain metastases. In this report, we summarize our experience with the safety and efficacy of a new miniature X-ray device for interstitial radiosurgical treatment of intracranial metastatic neoplasms. Although the role of surgical resection of solitary metastases is established, aggressive treatment with proton, gamma knife, and linac radiation therapy for these lesions is under investigation. The new miniature X-ray device offers a very localized, convenient, time and cost efficient means of delivering radiotherapy to these lesions, with lower normal tissue exposure than gamma knife or proton beam techniques. Retreatment of previously irradiated areas are also now under investigation as part of a Phase II trial. The photon radiosurgery system is a miniature battery operated 40 kV x-ray device designed by the Photoelectron Corporation for use in the interstitial treatment of small tumors ({ge}3 cm in diameter) in humans. This 10 cm long, low current, high voltage X-ray generator is easily mounted in a stereotactic frame and produces low energy (10-20 KeV) x-rays to be emitted from the 10 cm long, 3.2 mm diameter probe, after stereotactic insertion into the tumor. Two scintillation detectors positioned on the stereotactic frame near the patient`s scalp monitor radiation. The spherical X-ray beam behaves essentially as a point source, with dose rate nominally 150 cGy/min. at a distance of 10mm, for a beam current of 40 {mu}A and a voltage of 40 kv.

Douglas, R.M.; Beatty, J.; Biggs, P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others] [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Intracranial Germinoma After Reduced-Volume Radiotherapy: A Single-Institution Experience and Review of the Literature  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intracranial germinomas (IGs) are highly curable with radiotherapy (RT). However, recurrence still occurs, especially when limited-field RT is applied, and the optimal salvage therapy remains controversial. Methods and Materials: Between January 1989 and December 2010, 14 patients with clinically or pathologically diagnosed recurrent IGs after RT were reviewed at our institution. Of these, 11 received focal-field RT, and the other 3 received whole-brain irradiation, whole-ventricle irradiation, and Gamma Knife radiosurgery as the respective first course of RT. In addition, we identified from the literature 88 patients with recurrent IGs after reduced-volume RT, in whom the details of salvage therapy were recorded. Results: The median time to recurrence was 30.3 months (range, 3.8-134.9 months). One patient did not receive further treatment and was lost during follow-up. Of the patients, 7 underwent salvage with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) plus chemotherapy (CT), 4 with CSI alone, 1 with whole-brain irradiation plus CT, and 1 with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The median follow-up time was 105.1 months (range, 24.2-180.9 months). Three patients died without evidence of disease progression: two from second malignancies and one from unknown cause. The others remained disease free. The 3-year survival rate after recurrence was 83.3%. A total of 102 patients from our study and the literature review were analyzed to determine the factors affecting prognosis and outcomes. After recurrence, the 5-year survival rates were 71% and 92.9% for all patients and for those receiving salvage CSI, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that initial RT volume, initial RT dose, initial CT, and salvage RT type were significant prognostic predictors of survival. On multivariable analysis, salvage CSI was the most significant factor (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Protracted follow-up is recommended because late recurrence is not uncommon. CSI with or without CT is an effective salvage treatment for recurrence after reduced-volume RT.

Hu, Yu-Wen [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pin-I [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wong, Tai-Tong [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ho, Donald Ming-Tak [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kai-Ping [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Cheng-Yin [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Muh-Lii; Lee, Yi-Yen [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); and others

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Rocks, Color, and Rings River Rocks, Color, and Rings Name: Sean Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: WA Country: USA Date: Spring 2012 Question: I was walking a beach on the Deschutes River in Olympia Washington with a friend last night. We were picking up rocks and checking them out and we came across a few that were black with white, crystal-like rings around them. We also found a few that were other primary colors with secondary colored rings around them. What is the most likely cause of the white and black rings around the rocks? They are beautiful and I would like to know more about them. Replies: Melissa, Sean: It depends upon what you mean by rings. Some of the river rock may be coated with deposits of lime from the waters or soils in which they rested for a while. The black color would be from minerals included in the lime crusts. These coatings should fizz slightly if you drop some vinegar on them and you would also be able to scratch them with a knife blade or pair of scissors.

88

A laboratory based system for Laue micro x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory diffraction system capable of illuminating individual grains in a polycrystalline matrix is described. Using a microfocus x-ray source equipped with a tungsten anode and prefigured monocapillary optic, a micro-x-ray diffraction system with a 10 mum beam was developed. The beam profile generated by the ellipsoidal capillary was determined using the"knife edge" approach. Measurement of the capillary performance, indicated a beam divergence of 14 mrad and a useable energy bandpass from 5.5 to 19 keV. Utilizing the polychromatic nature of the incident x-ray beam and application of the Laue indexing software package X-Ray Micro-Diffraction Analysis Software, the orientation and deviatoric strain of single grains in a polycrystalline material can be studied. To highlight the system potential the grain orientation and strain distribution of individual grains in a polycrystalline magnesium alloy (Mg 0.2 wt percent Nd) was mapped before and after tensile loading. A basal (0002) orientation was identified in the as-rolled annealed alloy; after tensile loading some grains were observed to undergo an orientation change of 30 degrees with respect to (0002). The applied uniaxial load was measured as an increase in the deviatoric tensile strain parallel to the load axis (37 References).

Advanced Light Source; Tamura, Nobumichi; Lynch, P.A.; Stevenson, A.W.; Liang, D.; Parry, D.; Wilkins, S.; Tamura, N.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cascaded Multiple Classifiers for Secondary Structure Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new classifier for protein secondary structure prediction which is formed by cascading together different types of classifiers using neural networks and linear discrimination. The new classifier achieves an accuracy of 76.7% (assessed by a rigorous full Jack-knife procedure) on a new non-redundant dataset of 496 non-homologous sequences (obtained from G.J. Barton and J.A. Cuff). This database was especially designed to train and test protein secondary structure prediction methods, and it uses a more stringent definition of homologous sequence than in previous studies. We show that it is possible to design classifiers which can highly discriminate the 3 classes (H, E, C) with an accuracy of up to 78% for b-strands, using only a local window and resampling techniques. This indicates that the importance of long range interactions for the prediction of b-strands has been previously overestimated. 2 Introduction Although the protein folding process may require catalysts suc...

Mohammed Ouali; Ross D. King

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High energy physics program at Texas A M University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Texas A M high energy physics program has achieved significant mile-stones in each of its research initiatives. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO; the development of two new detector technologies, liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry and knife-edge chambers; and two SSC detector proposals, SDC and TEXAS/EMPACT. We have developed prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry in TEXAS/EMPACT. A new element in this program is the inclusion of a theoretical high energy physics research program being carried out by D. Nanopoulos and C. Pope. D. Nanopoulos has succeeded in building a string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. The impact of this work on string phenomenology certainly has far reaching consequences. C. Pope is currently working on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two- dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity, and W-string theory. The following report presents details of the accomplishments of the Texas A M program over the past year and the proposed plan of research for the coming year.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

Post, R.F.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

Robert J. Englar

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent or Unresectable Pilocytic Astrocytoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients with recurrent or unresectable pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 18 patients (20 lesions) with biopsy-confirmed PA having SRS at our institution from 1992 through 2005. Results: The median patient age at SRS was 23 years (range, 4-56). Thirteen patients (72%) had undergone one or more previous surgical resections, and 10 (56%) had previously received external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The median SRS treatment volume was 9.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.7-26.7). The median tumor margin dose was 15 Gy (range, 12-20). The median follow-up was 8.0 years (range, 0.5-15). Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 94%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. Tumor progression (local solid progression, n = 4; local solid progression + distant, n = 1; distant, n = 2; cyst development/progression, n = 4) was noted in 11 patients (61%). Progression-free survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 65%, 41%, and 17%, respectively. Prior EBRT was associated with inferior overall survival (5-year risk, 100% vs. 50%, p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (5-year risk, 71% vs. 20%, p = 0.008). Nine of 11 patients with tumor-related symptoms improved after SRS. Symptomatic edema after SRS occurred in 8 patients (44%), which resolved with short-term corticosteroid therapy in the majority of those without early disease progression. Conclusions: SRS has low permanent radiation-related morbidity and durable local tumor control, making it a meaningful treatment option for patients with recurrent or unresectable PA in whom surgery and/or EBRT has failed.

Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Schomberg, Paula J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stafford, Scott L., E-mail: Stafford.scott@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Corn stalk orientation effect on mechanical cutting  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts that increase the efficiency of size reduction of biomass can lead to a significant energy saving. This paper deals with the determination of the effect of sample orientation with respect to cutting element and quantify the possible cutting energy reduction, utilising dry corn stalks as the test material (15%e20% wet basis). To evaluate the mechanical cutting characteristics of corn stalks, a Warnere Bratzler device was modified by replacing its blunt edged cutting element with one having a 30_ single bevel sharp knife edge. Cutting force-deformation characteristics obtained with a universal testing machine were analysed to evaluate the orientation effects at perpendicular (90o), inclined (45o), and parallel (0o) orientations on internodes and nodes for cutting force, energy, ultimate stress, and specific energy of corn stalks. The corn stalks cutting force-displacement characteristics were found to differ with orientation, and internode and node material difference. Overall, the peak failure force, and the total cutting energy of internodes and nodes varied significantly (P < 0.05) with stalk cross-sectional area. The specific energy values (total energy per unit cut area) of dry corn stalk internodes ranged from 11.3 to 23.5 kN m_1, and nodes from 8.6 to 14.0 kN m_1. The parallel orientation (along grain) compared to perpendicular (across grain) produced a significant reduction of the cutting stress and the specific energy to one tenth or better for internodes, and to about one-fifth for nodes.

Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Brain Metastases: An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The objective of this study was to report our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery performed with the Gamma Knife (GK) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases and to compare survival for those treated with radiosurgery alone with survival for those treated with radiosurgery and whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Prospectively collected demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment and survival data on 237 patients with intracranial metastases who underwent radiosurgery with the GK between 2003 and 2007 were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to compare survival by demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment. Results: The mean age of the patient population was 56 years. The most common tumor histologies were non-small-cell lung carcinoma (34.2%) and breast cancer (13.9%). The median overall survival time was 8.5 months from the time of treatment. The median survival times for patients with one, two/three, and four or more brain metastases were 8.5, 9.4, and 6.7 months, respectively. Patients aged 65 years or greater and those aged less than 65 years had median survival times of 7.8 and 9 months, respectively (p = 0.008). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment was a significant predictor of survival: those patients with a KPS of 70 or less had a median survival of 2.9 months compared with 10.3 months (p = 0.034) for those with a KPS of 80 or greater. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients treated with radiosurgery alone and those treated with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with the GK is an efficacious treatment modality for brain metastases. A KPS greater than 70, histology of breast cancer, smaller tumor volume, and age less than 65 years were associated with a longer median survival in our study.

Frazier, James L.; Batra, Sachin; Kapor, Sumit; Vellimana, Ananth; Gandhi, Rahul [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carson, Kathryn A. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shokek, Ori [Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lim, Michael [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence [Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, Daniele, E-mail: dr@jhmi.ed [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Radiosurgical Treatment of Arteriovenous Malformations: Obliteration, Morbidities, and Performance Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: This study examined the single-center treatment outcomes of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain using stereotactic radiosurgery, with regard to obliteration, predictive factors, morbidities, and patient performance status. Patients and Methods: 127 patients were treated between 1990 and 2008 by use of linear accelerator or Gamma Knife. Their median age was 37 years, the median AVM volume was 7.3 cc (range, 0.014-113.13 cc), and the median follow-up duration was 42 months (range, 6-209 months). Forty-two percent of patients presented with intracranial hemorrhage, 31% received embolization, and 8% underwent prior resection. Thirty-one percent of patients received more than one round of radiosurgery. Results: 64% of patients had complete obliteration confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. Positive predictors of obliteration included pretreatment hemorrhage (p = 0.042), smaller AVM volume (odds ratio = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03-1.52), and larger marginal dose (odds ratio = 0.292; 95% CI, 0.100-0.820), whereas embolization (p < 0.001) was a negative predictor . The annual risk of hemorrhage after radiosurgery was 2.2%, and the risk of death as a result of hemorrhage was 0.6-1.3%. Eleven percent of patients reported new or worsened neurologic symptoms. Radiosurgery was effective in treating AVM-related headaches (p < 0.001) but did not improve the performance status of patients. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective tool in the treatment of AVMs and amelioration of AVM-related headaches, but it did not affect the patients' performance status. Factors affecting obliteration include prior hemorrhage, marginal dose, prior embolization, and AVM volume. Risk of hemorrhage persists in the latency period after radiosurgery, and it remains finite even after complete obliteration.

Sun, Daniel Q. [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carson, Kathryn A. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Raza, Shaan M.; Batra, Sachin [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lim, Michael; Huang, Judy [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, Daniele, E-mail: dr@jhmi.ed [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Integration of Functional MRI and White Matter Tractography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Clinical Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the efficacy of the integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging tractography data into stereotactic radiosurgery clinical practice. Methods and Materials: fMRI and tractography data sets were acquired and fused with corresponding anatomical MR and computed tomography images of patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), astrocytoma, brain metastasis, or hemangioma and referred for stereotactic radiosurgery. The acquired data sets were imported into a CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery system and used to delineate the target, organs at risk, and nearby functional structures and fiber tracts. Treatment plans with and without the incorporation of the functional structures and the fiber tracts into the optimization process were developed and compared. Results: The nearby functional structures and fiber tracts could receive doses of >50% of the maximum dose if they were excluded from the planning process. In the AVM case, the doses received by the Broadmann-17 structure and the optic tract were reduced to 700 cGy from 1,400 cGy and to 1,200 cGy from 2,000 cGy, respectively, upon inclusion into the optimization process. In the metastasis case, the motor cortex received 850 cGy instead of 1,400 cGy; and in the hemangioma case, the pyramidal tracts received 780 cGy instead of 990 cGy. In the astrocytoma case, the dose to the motor cortex bordering the lesion was reduced to 1,900 cGy from 2,100 cGy, and therefore, the biologically equivalent dose in three fractions was delivered instead. Conclusions: Functional structures and fiber tracts could receive high doses if they were not considered during treatment planning. With the aid of fMRI and tractography images, they can be delineated and spared.

Pantelis, Evaggelos, E-mail: vpantelis@phys.uoa.g [CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-Magnitiki Tomografia, Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Papadakis, Nikolaos; Verigos, Kosmas; Stathochristopoulou, Irene [CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-Magnitiki Tomografia, Athens (Greece); Antypas, Christos [CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-Magnitiki Tomografia, Athens (Greece); First Department of Radiology, Aretaieion Hospital, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Lekas, Leonidas; Tzouras, Argyrios [CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-Magnitiki Tomografia, Athens (Greece); Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Salvaras, Nikolaos [CyberKnife Center, Iatropolis-Magnitiki Tomografia, Athens (Greece)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DEVELOPMENT OF A POPULATION BALANCE MODEL TO SIMULATE FRACTIONATION OF GROUND SWITCHGRASS  

SciTech Connect

The population balance model represents a time-dependent formulation of mass conservation for a ground biomass that flows through a set of sieves. The model is suitable for predicting the change in size and distribution of ground biomass while taking into account the flow rate processes of particles through a grinder. This article describes the development and application of this model to a switchgrass grinding operation. The mass conservation formulation of the model contains two parameters: breakage rate and breakage ratio. A laboratory knife mill was modified to act as a batch or flow-through grinder. The ground switchgrass was analyzed over a set of six Tyler sieves with apertures ranging from 5.66 mm (top sieve) to 1 mm (bottom sieve). The breakage rate was estimated from the sieving tests. For estimating the breakage ratio, each of the six fractions was further ground and sieved to 11 fractions on a set of sieves with apertures ranging from 5.66 to 0.25 mm (and pan). These data formed a matrix of values for determining the breakage ratio. Using the two estimated parameters, the transient population balance model was solved numerically. Results indicated that the population balance model generally underpredicted the fractions remaining on sieves with 5.66, 4.00, and 2.83 mm apertures and overpredicted fractions remaining on sieves with 2.00, 1.41, and 1.00 mm apertures. These trends were similar for both the batch and flow-through grinder configurations. The root mean square of residuals (RSE), representing the difference between experimental and simulated mass of fractions, was 0.32 g for batch grinding and 0.1 g for flow-through grinding. The breakage rate exhibited a linear function of the logarithm of particle size, with a regression coefficient of 0.99.

Naimi, L.J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lau, A.K. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation; Emami, M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Afzal, M [University of New Brunswick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Web-based Stereo Rendering for Visualization and Annotation of Scientific Volumetric Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancement in high-throughput microscopy technology such as the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy (KESM) is enabling the production of massive amounts of high-resolution and high-quality volumetric data of biological microstructures. To fully utilize these data, they should be efficiently distributed to the scientific research community through the Internet and should be easily visualized, annotated, and analyzed. Given the volumetric nature of the data, visualizing them in 3D is important. However, since we cannot assume that every end user has high-end hardware, an approach that has minimal hardware and software requirements will be necessary, such as a standard web browser running on a typical personal computer. There are several web applications that facilitate the viewing of large collections of images. Google Maps and Google Maps-like interfaces such as Brainmaps.org allow users to pan and zoom 2D images efficiently. However, they do not yet support the rendering of volumetric data in their standard web interface. The goal of this thesis is to develop a light-weight volumetric image viewer using existing web technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript while exploiting the properties of stereo vision to facilitate the viewing and annotations of volumetric data. The choice of stereogram over other techniques was made since it allows the usage of raw image stacks produced by the 3D microscope without any extra computation on the data at all. Operations to generate stereo images using 2D image stacks include distance attenuation and binocular disparity. By using HTML and JavaScript that are computationally cheap, we can accomplish both tasks dynamically in a standard web browser, by overlaying the images with intervening semi-opaque layers. The annotation framework has also been implemented and tested. In order for annotation to work in this environment, it should also be in the form of stereogram and should aid the merging of stereo pairs. The current technique allows users to place a mark (dot) on one image stack, and its projected position onto the other image stack is calculated dynamically on the client side. Other extra metadata such as textual descriptions can be entered by the user as well. To cope with the occlusion problem caused by changes in the z direction, the structure traced by the user will be displayed on the side, together with the data stacks. Using the same stereo-gram creation techniques, the traces made by the user is dynamically generated and shown as stereogram. We expect the approach presented in this thesis to be applicable to a broader scientific domain, including geology and meteorology.

Eng, Daniel C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

Einstein, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.einstein@khnetwork.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Wessels, Barry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Bangert, Barbara [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Fu, Pingfu [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Nelson, A. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Cohen, Mark [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sagar, Stephen [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Lewin, Jonathan [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Maciunas, Robert [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of a carcass sanitizing spray system for small and very small slaughterhouses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small and very small slaughterhouses generally spray lactic acid for carcass decontamination utilizing a hand held sprayer. Even though this tool represents a very small investment, it may present important disadvantages such as uneven delivery of the spray over the carcass surface. If the decontamination treatment is not applied properly, the untreated areas of the carcass will still have high bacterial loads present and could be a source for recontamination of the areas that have been treated. A sanitizer spraying system (sanitizing halo system) was designed and assembled. The sanitizing halo system was tested at the Rosenthal Meat Science and Technology Center, Texas A&M University. Thirteen carcasses were split in halves. Thirteen halves were sampled and used as control after knife trimming and water wash; then they were sprayed with 2% L-Lactic at 55�°C with the sanitizing halo system. The other 13 halves were sprayed by the RMSTC employees utilizing a hand held sprayer. Counts of aerobic and mesophilic bacteria obtained from carcasses sprayed with the sanitizing halo system and the hand held sprayer were both significantly lower than the control counts. In addition, coliforms counts were below the detectable limit for the sanitizing halo system and the hand held sprayer. After testing, the sanitizing halo system was installed at two small commercial slaughter plants processing beef and pork carcasses. At each slaughter plant, 24 carcass halves were treated with 2% L-Lactic at 55�°C using the sanitizing halo system, and the other 24 halves were used as control. Mesophilic bacteria populations were reduced in beef and pork carcasses by 2.9 and 1.9 log cycles, respectively, after the lactic acid treatment. Also E. coli counts were significantly lower in the three regions sampled after application of the 2% L-Lactic acid with the sanitizing halo system. From the data collected during this study, we recommend the sanitizing halo system as a tool to reduce the bacterial loads on the surface of beef and pork carcasses. The use of this system should help small and very small slaughterhouses to improve food safety performance while providing cost-efficiency, simplicity, and convenience.

Rodriguez, Jose Gabriel

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend leading submodels of coal transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation energy technologies. During the first two projects years, significant progress was made on most of the tasks, as described in detail in the two previous annual reports. In the current third annual report, we report in detail on the BYU task on the properties and intrinsic reactivities of chars prepared at high-pressure. A flat-flame burner was used in a high pressure laminar flow facility to conduct high temperature, high heating rate coal pyrolysis experiments. Heating rates were approximately 10{sup 5} K/s, which is higher than in conventional drop tube experiments. Char samples from a Pitt No.8 coal and lignite were collected at 1300 C at 1, 6, 10, and 15 atm. Swelling ratios of the lignite were less than 1.0, and only about 1.3 for the Pitt No.8 coal. All coals showed slight increases in swelling behavior as pressure increased. The swelling behavior observed for the Pitt No.8 coal at each pressure was lower than reported in high pressure drop tube experiments, indicating the effect of heating rate on particle swelling. This heating rate effect was similar to that observed previously at atmospheric pressure. SEM photos revealed that bituminous coal has large physical structure transformations, with popped bubbles due to the high heating rate. TGA char oxidation reactivities were measured at the same total pressure as the char preparation pressure. The general trend was that the TGA reactivity on a gram per gram available basis decreased for both Pitt No.8 and Knife River lignite coal chars with increasing char formation pressure. The Pitt No.8 char intrinsic activation energy and oxygen reaction order remained relatively constant with increasing pressure. This new data provides some of the only information available on the morphology, structure, and reactivity of chars prepared in high pressure flames.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas Fletcher; Alan Sayre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized hardening. The RPD has a great potential for heat treating surgical knives and tools. Unavailability of the full amount of the DOE award prevented further development of this exciting technology. Significant progress was made during the 5th quarter, specially the invention of the wider-area plasma and the resultant benefits in terms of rapid melting of aluminum and thermal treatments of larger size steel parts. Coating of nickel base superalloys was demonstrated (an additional task over that proposed). Directed low cost surface enhancement of steel and the directed clean low dross energy efficient melting of aluminum are industrial needs that require new technologies. These are large volume markets which can benefit from energy savings. Estimated energy savings are very large, in the order of 1015 J/year when the equipment is universally used. Compact and directed heating technology/product market in these two sectors could potentially reach over $1B in sales. The results of the research, presented at the DOE annual Review meeting on Aluminum held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the 4-5 October 2005, were very well received by the delegates and panel reviewers. Insufficient DOE funds to fully fund the project at the end of the 5th quarter necessitated some key tasks being only partially completed.

Reddy, G.S.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z