National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for km satellite modeled

  1. PV output variability modeling using satellite imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J.

    2010-11-01

    High frequency irradiance variability measured on the ground is caused by the formation, dissipation, and passage of clouds in the sky. If we can identify and associate different cloud types/patterns from satellite imagery, we may be able to predict irradiance variability in areas lacking sensors. With satellite imagery covering the entire U.S., this allows for more accurate integration planning and power flow modeling over wide areas. Satellite imagery from southern Nevada was analyzed at 15 minute intervals over a year. Methods for image stabilization, cloud detection, and textural classification of clouds were developed and tested. High Performance Computing parallel processing algorithms were also investigated and tested. Artificial Neural Networks using imagery as inputs were trained on ground-based measurements of irradiance to model the variability and were tested to show some promise as a means for predicting irradiance variability.

  2. Validation of the SUNY Satellite Model in a Meteosat Evironment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R.; Schlemmer, J.; Renne, D.; Cowlin, S.; George, R.; Bandyopadhyay, B.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a validation of the SUNY satellite-to-irradiance model against four ground-truth stations from the Indian solar radiation network located in and around the province of Rajasthan, India. The SUNY model had initially been developed and tested to process US weather satellite data from the GOES series and has been used as part of the production of the US National Solar Resource Data Base (NSRDB). Here the model is applied to processes data from the European weather satellites Meteosat 5 and 7.

  3. Modelling and control of satellite formations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaddi, Veera Venkata Sesha Sai

    2004-09-30

    ®erent satellites in a formation. To achieve the various mission objectives it is necessary for a formation to recon¯gure itself periodically. An analytical impulsive control scheme has been developed for this purpose. This control scheme has the distinct advantage... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.4.2 Impulsive Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.5 Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.6 Nonlinearity and Eccentricity Perturbations . . . . . . . . 18 1.7 Linear and Nonlinear Controllers...

  4. An Investigation into Satellite Drag Modeling Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mance, Stephen

    2010-03-23

    The errors in current atmospheric drag modeling are the primary source of error for orbit determination for objects in low Earth orbit (LEO) at lower altitudes in periods of high solar activity. This is a direct result of significant advancements...

  5. SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

    2011-09-01

    Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

  6. A nonsteady one-dimensional theoretical model of Mars' neutral atmospheric composition between 30 and 200 km

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigo, R.; Garcia-Alvarez, E.; Lopez-Gonzalez, M.J.; Lopez-Moreno, J.J. (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada (Spain))

    1990-08-30

    There has been a big advance in the knowledge of the composition of the atmosphere of the planet Mars since its exploration by different missions in the 1970s, and this will be deeply increased in the following years as the upcoming programs to Mars develop. In this context, the authors have elaborated a model of the Mars' neutral atmosphere including the following compounds: O({sup 3}P), O({sup 1}D), O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, H, H{sub 2}, OH, H{sub 2}O, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}, between 30 and 200 km of altitude. The model is carried out for middle latitudes in equinox conditions and with moderate solar activity and provides the day-to-night evolution of the atmosphere. The scarcity of observations corresponding to the nightside of the planet has made it necessary to calculate the atmospheric temperature profile based on the available observations and on theoretical estimations. The model includes a detailed treatment of both the photochemical and the dynamical processes. In this sense, the most recent values of the reaction rates and photodissociation cross sections have been used, and a new height profile of the eddy diffusion coefficient has been computed which is able to explain the vertical distribution of carbon monoxide. The concentration profiles obtained show, in general, a very good agreement with the available experimental measurements.

  7. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin; Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  8. A Comparative Study of Estimation Models for Satellite Relative Motion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Uri

    2013-01-31

    The problem of relative spacecraft motion estimation is considered with application to various reference and relative orbits. Mean circular and elliptic orbits are analyzed, with relative orbits ranging in size from 1 km to 10 km. Estimators...

  9. PV Output Variability Modeling Using Satellite Imagery and Neural Matthew J. Reno1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PV Output Variability Modeling Using Satellite Imagery and Neural Networks Matthew J. Reno1, Albuquerque, NM, USA Abstract -- Variability and ramp rates of PV systems are increasingly important to understand and model for grid stability as PV penetration levels rise. Using satellite imagery to identify

  10. Impact Assessment of Satellite-Derived Leaf Area Index Datasets Using a General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Impact Assessment of Satellite-Derived Leaf Area Index Datasets Using a General Circulation Model the impact of two different remote sensing­derived leaf area index (RSLAI) datasets retrieved from the same using the RSLAI and other satellite-derived land surface products showed sub- stantial improvements

  11. RETHINKING SATELLITE BASED SOLAR IRRADIANCE MODELLING R. W. Mueller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    into the electricity grid, accurate solar irradiance data in a high spatial and temporal resolution are necessary. Solar irra- diance schemes provide these data using weather satellites such as METEOSAT and MSG

  12. Real-time Global Flood Estimation using Satellite-based Precipitation and a Coupled Land Surface and Routing Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Jianjian

    2014-04-09

    A community land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model system, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood-monitoring parameters for the latitude-band 50{degree sign}N-50{degree sign}S at relatively high spatial (~12km) and temporal (3-hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Statistical results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (three-day events vs. one-day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1,121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30ºS-30ºN) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coef?cients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. There were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  13. A thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (time-GCM): Equinox solar cycle minimum simulations (30-500 km)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1994-03-15

    A new simulation model of the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere with coupled electrodynamics has been developed and used to calculate the global circulation, temperature and compositional structure between 30-500 km for equinox, solar cycle minimum, geomagnetic quiet conditions. The model incorporates all of the features of the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM) but the lower boundary has been extended downward from 97 to 30 km (10 mb) and it includes the physical and chemical processes appropriate for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The first simulation used Rayleigh friction to represent gravity wave drag in the middle atmosphere and although it was able to close the mesospheric jets it severely damped the diurnal tide. Reduced Rayleigh friction allowed the tide to penetrate to thermospheric heights but did not close the jets. A gravity wave parameterization developed by Fritts and Lu allows both features to exist simultaneously with the structure of tides and mean flow dependent upon the strength of the gravity wave source. The model calculates a changing dynamic structure with the mean flow and diurnal tide dominant in the mesosphere, the in-situ generated semi-diurnal tide dominating the lower thermosphere and an in-situ generated diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere. The results also show considerable interaction between dynamics and composition, especially atomic oxygen between 85 and 120 km. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  15. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  16. Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite and Aircraft Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are compared to those generated by state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction controlling cloud processes at the subgrid scale in NWP and climate models (Cusack et al. 1999; Tompkins 2002Temperature and Water Vapor Variance Scaling in Global Models: Comparisons to Satellite

  17. A 1-D evolutionary model for icy satellites, applied to Enceladus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prialnik, Uri Malamud Dina

    2015-01-01

    We develop a long-term 1-D evolution model for icy satellites that couples multiple processes: water migration and differentiation, geochemical reactions and silicate phase transitions, compaction by self-gravity, and ablation. The model further considers the following energy sources and sinks: tidal heating, radiogenic heating, geochemical energy released by serpentinization or absorbed by mineral dehydration, gravitational energy and insolation, and heat transport by conduction, convection, and advection. We apply the model to Enceladus, by guessing the initial conditions that would render a structure compatible with present-day observations, assuming the initial structure to have been homogeneous. Assuming the satellite has been losing water continually along its evolution, we postulate that it was formed as a more massive, more icy and more porous satellite, and gradually transformed into its present day state due to sustained long-term tidal heating. We consider several initial compositions and evolution...

  18. Combining satellite multispectral image data and a digital elevation model for mapping debris-covered glaciers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Combining satellite multispectral image data and a digital elevation model for mapping debris classification alone. Based on the observation of low slope angles for debris-covered glacier tongues, we of automated multispectral classification for clean glacier ice and vegetation with slope information derived

  19. Using models and satellite observations to evaluate the strength of snow albedo feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using models and satellite observations to evaluate the strength of snow albedo feedback; revised 9 May 2012; accepted 10 May 2012; published 15 June 2012. [1] Snow albedo feedback (SAF to the albedo contrast of snow covered and snow-free land (SNC), and 20% was related to the temperature

  20. VALIDATION OF PV PERFORMANCE MODELS USING SATELLITE-BASED IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS: A CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    VALIDATION OF PV PERFORMANCE MODELS USING SATELLITE-BASED IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS: A CASE STUDY Clean Power Research Kirkland, WA e-mail: aparkins@cleanpower.com ABSTRACT Photovoltaic (PV) system and existing PV systems under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Ground based meteorological

  1. Linking Satellite Ammonia Retrievals with the AIRPACT Air Quality Modeling System.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Linking Satellite Ammonia Retrievals with the AIRPACT Air Quality Modeling System. 1 Ayrton Bryan program under grant number 0754990 Introduction Ammonia (NH3) is an important atmospheric pollutant to retrieve ammonia spectra and derive nadir profiles. AIRPACT (Air Indicator Report for Public Awareness

  2. VALIDATION OF THE SUNY SATELLITE MODEL IN A METEOSAT ENVIRONMENT Richard Perez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    ]. In this paper we evaluate the model's performance with another set of satellites: the European Meteosat 5 and 7 NREL, 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80847 David_renne@nrel.gov Shannon Cowlin NREL Shannon_cowlin@nrel.gov Ray George NREL Ray_george@nrel.gov Bibek Bandyopadhyay Solar Energy Centre New Delhi, India bbibek

  3. Sesso Temtica: Uso de satlites, modelos de ecossistemas e inventrios florestais para apoio s polticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    políticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory, France) Challenges related to estimating forest biomass and quantifying its uncertainty for informing. Presentations will cover (i) REDD+ project design, (ii) satellite remote sensing, (iii) ecosystem modeling

  4. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  5. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  6. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2010-03-12

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

  7. Evaluation of a new model to calculate direct normal irradiance based on satellite images of Meteosat Second Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Evaluation of a new model to calculate direct normal irradiance based on satellite images irradiance DNI from MSG data. For this we apply the Heliosat method to extract cloudiness from the satellite of the irradiance is introduced to calculate DNI. The clear sky irradiance is mainly determined by the aerosol

  8. Model predicts space weather and protects satellite hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 AssessmentBusinessAlternativeModel Verification

  9. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Roos, Joseph W. [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)] [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the {sup 7}S:{sup 5}S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  10. Radar, satellite, and modelling studies of the low-latitude protonosphere. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    A study of the variations in the composition of the topside ionosphere at low and equatorial latitudes is presented. Observations of (H+)/n(sub e) are used to study the behavior of the transition altitude over Arecibo during summer solstice for both solar minimum and solar maximum conditions. The solar maximum observations are complemented with DE-2 RPA data from passes over Arecibo to estimate the concentration of helium ions in the topside at that location. The transition altitude over Arecibo is found to be very dependent on solar activity level. For summer solar maximum conditions, the transition altitude varies anywhere from 2000 to 2500 km in altitude during the day (depending on solar flux) down to 1000 km at night. The DE-2 composition data show that during solar maximum conditions, helium ions are an important fraction of the total ionospheric plasma near 900 km over Arecibo with typical concentrations od 1-3 x 10(exp 4) ions cm(sup {minus}3). Observations from the BIMS and RPA instruments aboard the AEE spacecraft are used to study O+, H+, and He+ concentrations in the equatorial topside ionosphere during solar minimum conditions. For these conditions He+ is found to be a minor species and essentially negligible at all times. The transition altitude is found to be near 800 km during the day and below 600 km during the night for all seasons. Finally, the authors present simulations using the University of Sheffield coupled ionosphere thermosphere theoretical model. The results of these simulations are used to try to reproduce their observations and also to study the effect of equatorial E x B drifts on the transition altitude. The model reproduces the major diurnal features in qualitative agreement with the Arecibo solar maximum conditions, the simulations predict peak helium ion concentrations in the topside over Arecibo for equinox with the lowest concentrations occurring during summer solstice.

  11. Assimilation of satellite images into a sediment transport model of Lake Michigan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroud, J.; Lesht, B.; Beletsky, D.; Stein, M.; Univ. of Pennsylvania; NOAA; Univ. of Michigan; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we develop and examine several schemes for combining daily images obtained from the Sea-viewing Wide Field Spectrometer (SeaWiFS) with a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Lake Michigan. We consider two data assimilation methods, direct insertion and a kriging-based approach, and perform a forecasting study focused on a 2-month period in spring 1998 when a large storm caused substantial amounts of sediment resuspension and horizontal sediment transport in the lake. By beginning with the simplest possible forecast method and sequentially adding complexity we are able to assess the improvements offered by combining the satellite data with the numerical model. In our application, we find that data assimilation schemes that include both the data and the lake dynamics improve forecast root mean square error by 40% over purely model-based approaches and by 20% over purely data-based approaches.

  12. A study of mesoscale gravity waves over the North Atlantic with satellite observations and a mesoscale model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A study of mesoscale gravity waves over the North Atlantic with satellite observations and a mesoscale model Dong L. Wu Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena and compare AMSU-A observations to simulations from a mesoscale model (MM5). The simulated gravity waves

  13. Generating carbon flux model parameters and drivers via space/time geostatistics As we know, our best moderate scale (1-10 Km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to parameterise and drive models with ground based data from sparse measurement networks. One characteristic the ecology, management, etc. Remotely sensed data offers a unique, large area data source to constrain models models: Kriging allows us to more objectively interpolate our data over the domain of interest

  14. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  15. Physics-Based GOES Satellite Product for Use in NREL's National Solar Radiation Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Gotseff, P.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Molling, C.; Heidinger, A.

    2014-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), University of Wisconsin, and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration are collaborating to investigate the integration of the Satellite Algorithm for Shortwave Radiation Budget (SASRAB) products into future versions of NREL's 4-km by 4-km gridded National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This paper describes a method to select an improved clear-sky model that could replace the current SASRAB global horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiances reported during clear-sky conditions.

  16. An observation of a mutual event between two satellites of Uranus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Hidas; A. A. Christou; T. M. Brown

    2007-11-13

    We present observations of the occultation of Umbriel by Oberon on 4 May, 2007. We believe this is the first observed mutual event between satellites of Uranus. Fitting a simple geometric model to the lightcurve, we measure the mid-event time with a precision of 4 seconds. We assume previously measured values for the albedos of the two satellites (Karkoschka 2001), and measure the impact parameter to be 500 +/- 80 km. These measurements are more precise than estimates based on current ephemerides for these satellites. Therefore observations of additional mutual events during the 2007-2008 Uranian equinox will provide improved estimates of their orbital and physical parameters.

  17. A unified solution to the small scale problems of the ?CDM model II: introducing parent-satellite interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popolo, A. Del [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, University Of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Delliou, M. Le, E-mail: adelpopolo@oact.inaf.it, E-mail: delliou@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Fisica Teorica IFT-UNESP, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco 2 - Barra Funda, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP Brazil (Brazil)

    2014-12-01

    We continue the study of the impact of baryon physics on the small scale problems of the ?CDM model, based on a semi-analytical model (Del Popolo, 2009). With such model, we show how the cusp/core, missing satellite (MSP), Too Big to Fail (TBTF) problems and the angular momentum catastrophe can be reconciled with observations, adding parent-satellite interaction. Such interaction between dark matter (DM) and baryons through dynamical friction (DF) can sufficiently flatten the inner cusp of the density profiles to solve the cusp/core problem. Combining, in our model, a Zolotov et al. (2012)-like correction, similarly to Brooks et al. (2013), and effects of UV heating and tidal stripping, the number of massive, luminous satellites, as seen in the Via Lactea 2 (VL2) subhaloes, is in agreement with the numbers observed in the MW, thus resolving the MSP and TBTF problems. The model also produces a distribution of the angular spin parameter and angular momentum in agreement with observations of the dwarfs studied by van den Bosch, Burkert, and Swaters (2001)

  18. Design and modelling of an airship station holding controller for low cost satellite operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric N.

    been directed in the use of autonomous airships as less expensive alternatives to satellites. A key in the modern aviation era has been limited. This may be changing. The airship's ability to hover and lift heavy loads over long periods of time with very low fuel consumption has renewed the interest

  19. From Measurements to Models: What Satellite and Sub-Orbital Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uncertainty upper bounds for ~1 W/m2 TOA DARF accuracy: ~ 0.02 CCSP - SAP 2.3, 2009 #12;Aerosol-location time series Regional Context R. Kahn #12;The NASA Earth Observing System's Terra Satellite ASTER First Light: February 24, 2000 MODIS CERES MISR MOPITT Terra Project Office / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  20. Study of Ice Cloud Properties from Synergetic Use of Satellite Observations and Modeling Capabilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2011-02-22

    Shaima Nasiri Gerald North Head of Department, Kenneth Bowman December 2010 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences iii ABSTRACT Study of Ice Cloud Properties from Synergetic Use of Satellite..., Shaima Nasiri, and Gerald North. Their detailed and constructive comments have been most helpful in shaping this dissertation. I also wish to acknowledge Drs. Patrick Minnis and Bryan Baum who gave me important guidance throughout this work...

  1. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  2. Mesoscale model cloud scheme assessment using satellite observations Jean-Pierre Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre Cammas, Patrick J. Mascart, and Jean-Pierre Pinty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    Mesoscale model cloud scheme assessment using satellite observations Jean-Pierre Chaboureau, Jean of the mesoscale nonhydrostatic (Meso-NH) model has been conducted by comparing synthetic METEOSAT brightness combines the output from a bulk explicit cloud scheme routinely used in mesoscale simulations

  3. Passive millimeter-wave retrieval of global precipitation utilizing satellites and a numerical weather prediction model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops and validates the MM5/TBSCAT/F([lambda]) model, composed of a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model (MM5), a two-stream radiative transfer model (TBSCAT), and electromagnetic models for ...

  4. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  5. Quantifying the impact of model errors on topdown estimates of carbon monoxide emissions using satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, Colette L.

    Quantifying the impact of model errors on topdown estimates of carbon monoxide emissions using use of inverse modeling to better quantify regional surface emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), which to or larger than the combustion source, optimizing the CO from NMVOC emissions on larger spatial scales than

  6. CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    between two different core radiation transfer models that will be applied during the SWERA (Solar and Wind ­ 048°31'42"W / 10m) 2. BASIC DESCRIPTION OF SOLAR RADIATION SITES The two sites were chosen because they provide high quality radiation data and represent different climatic/environmental regions and different

  7. Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yue

    2012-02-14

    of the physical mechanism governing the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis and test of FAT hypothesis with CTT measurements; and 3) the intercomparison of cloud fraction and radiative effects between satellite-based observations and reanalysis product...

  8. An observational study of the South Pacific Convergence Zone using satellite and model re-analysis data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocks, Stephen Brenton

    2004-09-30

    Satellite derived wind, rain rate and sea surface temperature data combined with NCEP analysis data are used to examine the structure of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) during La Nina conditions. Annual means indicate that the axes...

  9. A spectral comparison of (379) Huenna and its satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMeo, Francesca E.

    We present near-infrared spectral measurements of Themis family Asteroid (379) Huenna (D ? 98 km) and its 6 km satellite using SpeX on the NASA IRTF. The companion was farther than 1.5? from the primary at the time of ...

  10. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  11. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Matthias Fink; Johannes Handsteiner; Bernhard Wittmann; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-02-06

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g. for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e. entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 standard deviations beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Since our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our assay to lay the ground for a fully-fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  12. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  13. (Virtual) Thermospheric/Ionospheric Geospheric Research (TIGER) Symposium Satellite-based empirical models of ionospheric convection and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    = (By 2 + Bz 2 ) 1/2 = 5 nT and average solar wind conditions (n = 5 cm-3 , V = 400 km/s): for the northern and southern equinoxes (Figures 1 and 2), for the northern summer and southern winter (Figures 3 understand underlying physics of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Figure 1 shows that during equinox

  14. Pblico -Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id: 1038362 #12;Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id: 1038350.768,80 EUR #12;Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id

  15. Chameleon gravity and satellite geodesy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2014-09-29

    We consider the possibility of the detection of a chameleon effect by an earth orbiting satellite such as LAGEOS, and possible constraints that might be placed on chameleon model parameters. Approximate constraints presented here result from using a simple monopole approximation for the gravitational field of the earth, along with results from the Khoury-Weltman chameleon model, solar system constraints obtained from the Cassini mission, and parameter bounds obtained from the LAGEOS satellite. It is furthermore suggested that a comparison of ground-based and space-based multipole moments of the geopotential could reveal a possible chameleon effect.

  16. OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF MUTUAL EVENTS BETWEEN THE URANUS MAIN SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assafin, M.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Da Silva Neto, D. N.; Andrei, A. H. [Observatorio do Valongo/UFRJ, Ladeira Pedro Antonio 43, CEP 20.080-090 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: massaf@astro.ufrj.br, E-mail: rvm@on.br, E-mail: darionneto@gmail.com

    2009-04-15

    Every 42 years, the Earth and the Sun pass through the plane of the orbits of the main satellites of Uranus. In these occasions, mutual occultations and eclipses between these bodies can be seen from the Earth. The current Uranus equinox from 2007 to 2009 offers a precious opportunity to observe these events. Here, we present the analysis of five occultations and two eclipses observed from Brazil during 2007. For the reduction of the CCD images, we developed a digital coronagraphic method that removed the planet's scattered light around the satellites. A simple geometric model of the occultation/eclipse was used to fit the observed light curves. Dynamical quantities such as the impact parameter, the relative speed, and the central time of the event were then obtained with precisions of 7.6 km, 0.18 km s{sup -1}, and 2.9 s, respectively. These results can be further used to improve the parameters of the dynamical theories of the main Uranus satellites.

  17. Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

  18. Evaluating spectral radiances simulated by the HadGEM2 global climate model using longwave satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Emma Catherine

    2015-06-30

    A 'model-to-radiance' comparison of simulated brightness temperatures and radiances from the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 2 (HadGEM2-A) with longwave measurements from the High Resolution Infrared Radiation ...

  19. Investigating wave data from the FAST satellite by reconstructing the wave distribution function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Investigating wave data from the FAST satellite by reconstructing the wave distribution function G September 2001; published 15 August 2002. [1] We study wave measurements made by the FAST satellite at 4100-km altitude in the auroral region. Three electric and three magnetic wave field components

  20. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01

    This study evaluates the simulation of tropical precipitation by the Community Climate Model, Version 3, developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. For an evaluation of the annual cycle of precipitation, ...

  1. The diurnal variation of NO, N( sup 2 D), and ions in the thermosphere: A comparison of satellite measurements to a model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusch, D.W. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA)); Gerard, J.C. (Univ. de Liege, Liege-Ougee (Belgium)); Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (USA))

    1991-07-01

    A data base derived from Atmosphere Explorer C measurements of parameters important to the understanding of the diurnal variation of odd-nitrogen and ions in the thermosphere near equinox, at low latitudes, and for quiet geomagnetic conditions is presented. The data were taken during the period from August to September 1974, when perigee was near the equator and reached an altitude of about 135 km. The data base contains profiles of the odd-nitrogen species NO, and N({sup 2}D); the ions NO{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sup +}; the total ion density; O an N{sub 2}; and the neutral, ion, and electron temperatures. The measured time-dependent variations of NO, N({sup 2}D), O{sub 2}{sup +}, and NO{sup +} compare favorably to the results of a time dependent, photochemical, diffusion model for odd-nitrogen and ion chemistry. In particular, the model reproduces the rapid increase in NO density in the morning hours, the mid-afternoon maximum, and the late afternoon decrease. The model also predicts the measured absolute densities for NO to within 20% over most of the diurnal cycle but falls below the measured density by as much as a factor of 2 in the late afternoon. The agreement between the data and the model indicates that the most important chemical processes for the production and loss of odd-nitrogen in the Earth's thermosphere are induced in the model.

  2. Status of the KM3NeT project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margiotta, A

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will be installed at three sites: KM3NeT-Fr, offshore Toulon, France, KM3NeT-It, offshore Portopalo di Capo Passero, Sicily (Italy) and KM3NeT-Gr, offshore Pylos, Peloponnese, Greece. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will search for Galactic and extra-Galactic sources of neutrinos, complementing IceCube in its field of view. The detector will have a modular structure and consists of six building blocks, each including about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared in France near Toulon and in Italy, near Capo Passero in Sicily....

  3. Central South Pacific thermocline water circulation from a high-resolution ocean model validated against satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Central South Pacific thermocline water circulation from a high-resolution ocean model validated. Introduction [2] Most South Pacific Ocean studies have been focused on its western or eastern part, leaving 12 January 2009; accepted 28 January 2009; published 13 May 2009. [1] The oceanic circulation

  4. Extraordinary dust event over Beijing, China, during April 2006: Lidar, Sun photometric, satellite observations and model validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ratio for the dust particles (84 sr) during the most intense dust period. The DREAM forecast model the Beijing area, are located in Xingjiang and the Inner Mongolia provinces [Sun et al., 2001]. Strong winds [Dillner et al., 2006]. The increasing urbanization and industrialization of the East Asia region

  5. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27

    Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

  6. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. ); Griffee, J.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P.; Griffee, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  8. The European Optical Module for Paris, KM-3 electronics meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    V) Tref optical link single mode (500 Mbd) Control, Ocean cable (30km) String-Controller(SC) Data (Ocean bottom) Sea water return #12;Why 2 di erent OMs in DUMAND II ? JOM and EOM are complementary Currents Voltages HighVoltage #12;The EOM Scintillator Electrical penetrator 432 mm 345 mm Philips XP2600

  9. Improved Model of Isoprene Emissions in Africa using Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Satellite Observations of Formaldehyde: Implications for Oxidants and Particulate Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D.; Guenther, Alex B.; Chance, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Murphy, J. G.; Reeves, C. E.; Pye, H.

    2014-08-01

    We use a 2005-2009 record of isoprene emissions over Africa derived from OMI satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) to better understand the factors controlling isoprene emission on the scale of the continent and evaluate the impact of isoprene emissions on atmospheric composition in Africa. OMI-derived isoprene emissions show large seasonality over savannas driven by temperature and leaf area index (LAI), and much weaker seasonality over equatorial forests driven by temperature. The commonly used MEGAN (version 2.1) global 31 isoprene emission model reproduces this seasonality but is biased high, particularly for 32 equatorial forests, when compared to OMI and relaxed-eddy accumulation measurements. 33 Isoprene emissions in MEGAN are computed as the product of an emission factor Eo, LAI, and 34 activity factors dependent on environmental variables. We use the OMI-derived emissions to 35 provide improved estimates of Eo that are in good agreement with direct leaf measurements from 36 field campaigns (r = 0.55, bias = -19%). The largest downward corrections to MEGAN Eo values are for equatorial forests and semi-arid environments, and this is consistent with latitudinal transects of isoprene over West Africa from the AMMA aircraft campaign. Total emission of isoprene in Africa is estimated to be 77 Tg C a-1, compared to 104 Tg C a-1 in MEGAN. Simulations with the GEOS-Chem oxidant-aerosol model suggest that isoprene emissions increase mean surface ozone in West Africa by up to 8 ppbv, and particulate matter by up to 1.5 42 ?g m-3, due to coupling with anthropogenic influences.

  10. The reionization of galactic satellite populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocvirk, P.; Gillet, N.; Aubert, D.; Chardin, J. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Knebe, A.; Yepes, G. [Grupo de Astrofísica, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Modulo C-8, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco E-280049 (Spain); Libeskind, N.; Gottlöber, S. [Leibniz-Institute für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Hoffman, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-10-10

    We use high-resolution simulations of the formation of the local group, post-processed by a radiative transfer code for UV photons, to investigate the reionization of the satellite populations of an isolated Milky Way-M31 galaxy pair in a variety of scenarios. We use an improved version of ATON which includes a simple recipe for radiative feedback. In our baseline models, reionization is initiated by low-mass, radiatively regulated halos at high redshift, until more massive halos appear, which then dominate and complete the reionization process. We investigate the relation between reionization history and present-day positions of the satellite population. We find that the average reionization redshift (z {sub r}) of satellites is higher near galaxy centers (MW and M31). This is due to the inside out reionization patterns imprinted by massive halos within the progenitor during the epoch of reionization, which end up forming the center of the galaxy. Due to incomplete dynamical mixing during galaxy assembly, these early patterns survive to present day, resulting in a clear radial gradient in the average satellite reionization redshift, up to the virial radius of MW and M31 and beyond. In the lowest emissivity scenario, the outer satellites are reionized about 180 Myr later than the inner satellites. This delay decreases with increasing source model emissivity, or in the case of external reionization by Virgo or M31, because reionization occurs faster overall and becomes spatially quasi-uniform at the highest emissivity.

  11. Satellite Products and Services Review Board ATBD: Satellite-Derived

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Satellite Products and Services Review Board ATBD: Satellite-Derived Ocean Heat Content Version 1.0 July 2012 ___________________________________ #12;NOAA /RSMAS ATBD : Satellite-Derived Ocean Heat/STAR) #12;NOAA /RSMAS ATBD : Satellite-Derived Ocean Heat Content Product Page 3 of 32 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  12. Bias reduction in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forecasts based on GOES satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Bias reduction in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forecasts based on GOES satellite data Based on comparisons with infrared (GOES) and microwave (AMSE-R) satellite data, our coastal ocean forecast model set circulation model and satellite data helps to improve forecasting of ocean conditions (esp. currents and SST

  13. Aerosol-cloud radiative effects from passive satellite instruments Mar%n de Graaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Satellite measurements of absorbing aerosols Reflectance Difference Method Cloud modelling Results Outlook Aerosol-Radiation Interac. Aerosol-Cloud Interac. Total anthropogenic Solar irradiance #12;Absorbing aerosols: SCIAMACHY Results Outlook #12;SCIAMACHY on ESA's Environmetal Satellite: ENVISAT Polar orbi

  14. Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations and food-web models D Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Abstract The export of organic carbon from cycle. Here we introduce a mechanistic assessment of the global ocean carbon export using satellite

  15. Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

  16. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zolotov, Adi, E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-10

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  17. Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    detection ­ Change detection ­ Thematic classification · Thematic classification results · Future studies resolution panchromatic (B&W) ­ 4 m resolution multispectral (color) #12;Satellite Digital Data clouds/night ­ Radar image speckle ­ Interferometry to get digital elevation models or temporal movements

  18. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  19. Experimental Single-Photon Transmission from Satellite to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Yin; Yuan Cao; Shu-Bin Liu; Ge-Sheng Pan; Jin-Hong Wang; Tao Yang; Zhong-Ping Zhang; Fu-Min Yang; Yu-Ao Chen; Cheng-Zhi Peng; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-06-04

    Free-space quantum communication with satellites opens a promising avenue for global secure quantum network and large-scale test of quantum foundations. Recently, numerous experimental efforts have been carried out towards this ambitious goal. However, one essential step - transmitting single photons from the satellite to the ground with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at realistic environments - remains experimental challenging. Here, we report a direct experimental demonstration of the satellite-ground transmission of a quasi-single-photon source. In the experiment, single photons (~0.85 photon per pulse) are generated by reflecting weak laser pulses back to earth with a cube-corner retro-reflector on the satellite Champ, collected by a 600-mm diameter telescope at the ground station, and finally detected by single-photon counting modules (SPCMs) after 400-km free-space link transmission. With the help of high accuracy time synchronization, narrow receiver field-of-view (FOV) and high-repetition-rate pulses (76 MHz), a SNR of better than 16:1 is obtained, which is sufficient for a secure quantum key distribution. Our experimental results represent an important step towards satellite-ground quantum communication.

  20. Accurate, practical simulation of satellite infrared radiometer spectral data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study's purpose is to determine whether a relatively simple random band model formulation of atmospheric radiation transfer in the infrared region can provide valid simulations of narrow interval satellite-borne infrared sounder system data. Detailed ozonesondes provide the pertinent atmospheric information and sets of calibrated satellite measurements provide the validation. High resolution line-by-line model calculations are included to complete the evaluation.

  1. Mean zonal acceleration and heating of the 70- to 100-km region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyahara, S.; Portnyagin, Yu.I.; Forbes, J.M. (Boston Univ., MA (USA)); Solovjeva, T.V. (Inst. for Experimental Meteorology, Obninsk (USSR))

    1991-02-01

    The dynamical interactions which occur in the atmospheric region around the mesopause ({approximately} 90 km) determine the boundary characteristics for the thermospheric region above. In the present work, using an empirical model of Eulerian-mean meridional motions based on monthly climatological winds from these radar data, the net vertical motions in this atmospheric regime are derived from the continuity equation. Assuming empirical prescriptions of the mean density and temperature fields, mean heat flux divergences and momentum flux divergences are estimated which exhibit very specific characteristics in the height versus latitude domain for winter, summer, and equinox conditions in both hemispheres. A numerical circulation model including gravity wave/mean flow and tide/mean flow interactions is utilized to examine possible origins of these heat and acceleration sources. At low latitudes ({le}30{degree}), it is evident that atmospheric tides represent the primary wave source contribution to zonal mean acceleration and heating of this region of the atmosphere; similarly, at middle and high latitudes ({ge}30{degree}) below about 90 km, dissipation of vertically propagating gravity waves appears to provide the dominant momentum source for the mean zonal circulation. However, above approximately 90 km and between about 40{degree} and 70{degree} latitude, very significant regions of mean heating and acceleration exist which are not accounted for by the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves and tides. The possible origins of these effects are examined. The authors suggest that the two most likely candidates to explain these observed features are (1) obliquely propagating gravity waves and/or (2) planetary scale waves.

  2. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  3. Transport and Evolution of a Pollution Plume from Northern China: A Satellite-Based Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    of pollution transport and their impact on weather and climate. 2 #12;1. Introduction China's air pollutionTransport and Evolution of a Pollution Plume from Northern China: A Satellite-Based Case Study Can the EAST-AIRE aircraft campaign, heavy loadings of SO2 (20 ppb near ground, 1-3 ppb at ~2 km altitude

  4. A multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization methodology for the conceptual design of distributed satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jilla, Cyrus D., 1974-

    2002-01-01

    A multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization methodology for mathematically modeling the distributed satellite system (DSS) conceptual design problem as an optimization problem has been developed to advance the ...

  5. Satellite-Based Solar Resource Data Sets for India 2002-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Perez, R.; Gueymard, C.; Anderberg, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2014-02-01

    A new 10-km hourly solar resource product was created for India. This product was created using satellite radiances from the Meteosat series of satellites. The product contains global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI) for the period from 2002 to 2011. An additional solar resource data set covering the period from January 2012 to June 2012 was created solely for validation because this period overlaps ground measurements that were made available from the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy's (MNRE's) National Institute for Solar Energy for five stations that are part of MNRE's solar resource network. These measurements were quality checked using the SERI QC software and used to validate the satellite product. A comparison of the satellite product to the ground measurements for the five stations shows good agreement. This report also presents a comparison of the new version of solar resource data to the previous version, which covered the period from 2002 to 2008.

  6. Satellite-based estimates of net radiation and modeling the role of topography and vegetation on inter-annual hydro-climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisht, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change acknowledged that the lack of relevant observations in various regions of the world is a crucial gap in understanding and modeling impacts of ...

  7. High rate, long-distance quantum key distribution over 250km of ultra low loss fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stucki; N. Walenta; F. Vannel; R. T. Thew; N. Gisin; H. Zbinden; S. Gray; C. R. Towery; S. Ten

    2009-03-23

    We present a fully automated quantum key distribution prototype running at 625 MHz clock rate. Taking advantage of ultra low loss fibres and low-noise superconducting detectors, we can distribute 6,000 secret bits per second over 100 km and 15 bits per second over 250km.

  8. Simulation for KM3NeT using ANTARES-Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kuch

    2006-06-21

    The KM3NeT project is a common European effort for the design of a km3-scale deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean. For the upcoming Design Study simulations have been done using modified ANTARES software. Several concepts and ideas have been tested for their merits and feasibility.

  9. Characterizing switching problems in low earth orbit satellite constellations with satellite failures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadsworth, Brandon Scott

    1999-01-01

    In this research, we study the ability of LEO satellite constellations to handle data traffic. LEO satellites offer a number of advantages over traditional space based communications via geosynchronous orbit satellites (GEO). However...

  10. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore »methane source of 539 Tg a?1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a-1.« less

  11. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore »methane source of 539 Tg a?1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a?1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a?1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a?1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a?1.« less

  12. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore »for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a?1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a?1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a?1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a?1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a?1 source from wetlands.« less

  13. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  14. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  15. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  16. Use of Visible Geostationary Operational Meteorological Satellite Imagery in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is typically computed at specific locations based on weather station data. Estimates of incoming solar radiation (insolation, or Rs) have been made from geostationary satellite data over a 14-year period (1 June must be included in many hydrologic models. As actual ET (AET) data are often lacking, ET is usually

  17. CCRS Landcover Maps From Satellite Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Trishchenko, Alexander

    The Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) presents several landcover maps over the SGP CART site area (32-40N, 92-102W) derived from satellite data including AVHRR, MODIS, SPOT vegetation data, and Landsat satellite TM imagery.

  18. CCRS Landcover Maps From Satellite Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Trishchenko, Alexander

    2008-01-15

    The Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) presents several landcover maps over the SGP CART site area (32-40N, 92-102W) derived from satellite data including AVHRR, MODIS, SPOT vegetation data, and Landsat satellite TM imagery.

  19. Research Councils UK Satellites and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    data and energy-efficient computing; Satellites and commercial applications of space; Robotics and nanotechnology; and Energy and its storage. Space has an important influence on our everyday lives and is one, the UK space industry is strong and growing, with a favourable balance of commercial and public sector

  20. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  1. Naked eye star visibility and limiting magnitude mapped from DMSP-OLS satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Cinzano; F. Falchi; C. D. Elvidge

    2000-11-16

    We extend the method introduced by Cinzano et al. (2000a) to map the artificial sky brightness in large territories from DMSP satellite data, in order to map the naked eye star visibility and telescopic limiting magnitudes. For these purposes we take into account the altitude of each land area from GTOPO30 world elevation data, the natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction, based on Garstang modelling, the eye capability with naked eye or a telescope, based on the Schaefer (1990) and Garstang (2000b) approach, and the stellar extinction in the visual photometric band. For near zenith sky directions we also take into account screening by terrain elevation. Maps of naked eye star visibility and telescopic limiting magnitudes are useful to quantify the capability of the population to perceive our Universe, to evaluate the future evolution, to make cross correlations with statistical parameters and to recognize areas where astronomical observations or popularisation can still acceptably be made. We present, as an application, maps of naked eye star visibility and total sky brightness in V band in Europe at the zenith with a resolution of approximately 1 km.

  2. Fiber-Level Modeling of Dynamic Strength KM2 Ballistic Fabric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    .g., as reinforcements in rigid polymer matrix composites (PMCs) for lightweight vehicle- armor systems). Flexible agile, and more mobile so that they can be quickly transported to operations conducted throughout-amide) fabric and an E-glass fiber/ethyl cellulose composite in body-armor systems can be linked to the Korean

  3. Single-Column Modeling D. A. Randall and K.-M. Xu Colorado State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vapor andParticle DatabaseC.J.AC.

  4. Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays Daniel W. Kwon and David W. Miller February 2005 SSL # 2-05 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays By DANIEL W. KWON S;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays by DANIEL W. KWON Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics

  5. Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;SMCD Roadmap 2 NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap September 2005 NOAA Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 712, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;SMCD

  6. The mass dependence of dwarf satellite galaxy quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2014-09-10

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M {sub *} ? 10{sup 7} M {sub ?}) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  7. Ionization satellites of the ArHe dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miteva, Tsveta; Klaiman, Shachar; Gokhberg, Kirill [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gromov, Evgeniy V., E-mail: Evgeniy.Gromov@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Laboratory of Quantum Chemistry, Computer Center, Irkutsk State University, K. Marks 1, 664003 Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-28

    Ionization satellites are key ingredients in the control of post ionization processes such as molecular dissociation and interatomic Coulombic decay. Here, using the high-level ab initio method of multi-reference configuration interaction up to triple excitations, we study the potential energy curves (PECs) of the ionization satellites of the ArHe dimer. With this model system, we demonstrate that the simple model used in alkaline earth metal and rare gas complexes to describe the satellites as a Rydberg electron moving on top of a dicationic core does not fully hold for the rare gas clusters. The more complex valence structure in the rare gas atom leads to the mixing of different electronic configurations of the dimer. This prevents one from assigning a single dicationic parent state to some of the ionization satellites. We further analyze the structure of the different PECs, demonstrating how the density of the Rydberg electron is reflected in the structure of the PEC wherever the simple model is applicable.

  8. THE 300 km s{sup -1} STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frebel, Anna; Casey, Andrew R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lunnan, Ragnhild [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Norris, John E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyse, Rosemary F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 300 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilmore, Gerard [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s{sup -1} stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.46 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.23 (random and systematic uncertainties) for star 300S-1, and find an abundance pattern similar to typical halo stars at this metallicity. Comparing our stellar parameters to theoretical isochrones, we estimate a distance of 18 {+-} 7 kpc. Both the metallicity and distance estimates are in good agreement with what can be inferred from comparing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data of the stream stars to globular cluster sequences. While several other structures overlap with the stream in this part of the sky, the combination of kinematic, chemical, and distance information makes it unlikely that these stars are associated with either the Segue 1 galaxy, the Sagittarius Stream, or the Orphan Stream. Streams with halo-like abundance signatures, such as the 300 km s{sup -1} stream, present another observational piece for understanding the accretion history of the Galactic halo.

  9. The orbital poles of Milky Way satellite galaxies: a rotationally supported disc-of-satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Metz; Pavel Kroupa; Noam I. Libeskind

    2008-02-26

    Available proper motion measurements of Milky Way (MW) satellite galaxies are used to calculate their orbital poles and projected uncertainties. These are compared to a set of recent cold dark-matter (CDM) simulations, tailored specifically to solve the MW satellite problem. We show that the CDM satellite orbital poles are fully consistent with being drawn from a random distribution, while the MW satellite orbital poles indicate that the disc-of-satellites of the Milky Way is rotationally supported. Furthermore, the bootstrapping analysis of the spatial distribution of theoretical CDM satellites also shows that they are consistent with being randomly drawn. The theoretical CDM satellite population thus shows a significantly different orbital and spatial distribution than the MW satellites, most probably indicating that the majority of the latter are of tidal origin rather than being DM dominated sub-structures. A statistic is presented that can be used to test a possible correlation of satellite galaxy orbits with their spatial distribution.

  10. Bottom interacting sound at 50 km range in a deep ocean environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of acoustic methods in many applications. In this paper acoustic bottom interaction in the deep water LongBottom interacting sound at 50 km range in a deep ocean environment Ilya A. Udovydchenkova) Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole

  11. Aalborg Universitet Full Scale Test on a 100km, 150kV AC Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    wind farm Horns Rev 2, located in Denmark west coast, to Denmark's 400 kV transmission network from the electrical measurements on a 99.7 km, 150 kV three-phase AC cable, connecting 215 MW offshore

  12. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01

    The half-life of (38)K(m) has been measured to be 924.46(14) ms, a result that is a factor of two more precise than any of the five previous measurements of this quantity. The previous results are not consistent with one another, but our result...

  13. A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Note A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data Ralph D a b s t r a c t Some 20% of Titan's surface is covered in large linear dunes that resemble parameter limiting the growth of giant dunes, namely the boundary layer thickness (Andreotti et al., 2009

  14. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Avgitas, T; Balasi, K; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Barrios, J; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Biagioni, A; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouché, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Boutonnet, C; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Château, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Coleiro, A; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Di Capua, F; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajanana, D; Gal, T; Galatà, S; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; GraciaRuiz, R; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestädt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hößl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C W; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leismüller, K P; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; LindseyClark, M; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Löhner, H; Lonardo, A; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Mari?, O; Markou, C; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Melis, K W; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C M; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; P?v?la?, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Pikounis, K; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Pühlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sciacca, V; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Stavropoulos, G; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tézier, D; Théraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Vicini, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2015-01-01

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is...

  15. ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OG 6.3-3 ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 EV OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2 ARRAY M, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152, Japan . Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica these showers, 60 of them are initiated by primaries with energies larger than 1019 eV. The energy spectrum

  16. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  17. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  18. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    other cra- tonic settings, such as the Illinois, Paris, and North Sea basins (Heidlauf et al., 1986ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more corrections and estimates of paleo- bathymetry, we recognize four different styles of subsidence in the basin

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT SATELLITES AROUND CENTRAL GALAXIES IN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. Y.; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the radial number density profile and the abundance distribution of faint satellites around central galaxies in the low-redshift universe using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey. We consider three samples of central galaxies with magnitudes of M {sub r} = -21, -22, and -23 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalog of Yang et al. The satellite distribution around these central galaxies is obtained by cross-correlating these galaxies with the photometric catalog of the CFHT Legacy Survey. The projected radial number density of the satellites obeys a power-law form with the best-fit logarithmic slope of -1.05, independent of both the central galaxy luminosity and the satellite luminosity. The projected cross-correlation function between central and satellite galaxies exhibits a non-monotonic trend with satellite luminosity. It is most pronounced for central galaxies with M {sub r} = -21, where the decreasing trend of clustering amplitude with satellite luminosity is reversed when satellites are fainter than central galaxies by more than 2 mag. A comparison with the satellite luminosity functions in the Milky Way (MW) and M31 shows that the MW/M31 system has about twice as many satellites as around a typical central galaxy of similar luminosity. The implications for theoretical models are briefly discussed.

  20. Atmospheric structure determined from satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Keith Shelburne

    1978-01-01

    Subject: Meteorology ATM)SPHERIC STRUCTURE DETEiUIINED FRDM SATELLITE DATA A Thesis XEITH SHELBURNE KNIGHT Approved as to style and content. hyi (Chairman of Cor ' iee) C. (Head of Department) (Miemher) ABSTRACT Atmospheric Structure Determined... from Satellite Data. (August 1978) Keith Shelburne Knight, B. A. , University of California at Los Angeles Chairman of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. James R. Scoggins The capabilities of the Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data for use in synoptic analysis...

  1. Satellites of the largest Kuiper belt objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Brown; M. A. van Dam; A. H. Bouchez; D. Le Mignant; R. D. Campbell; J. C. Y. Chin; A. Conrad; S. K. Hartman; E. M. Johansson; R. E. Lafon; D. L. Rabinowitz; P. J. Stomski, Jr.; D. M. Summers; C. A. Trujillo; P. L. Wizinowich

    2005-10-03

    We have searched the four brightest objects in the Kuiper belt for the presence of satellites using the newly commissioned Keck Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. Satellites are seen around three of the four objects: Pluto (whose satellite Charon is well-known), 2003 EL61, and 2003 UB313. The object 2005 FY9, the brightest Kuiper belt object after Pluto, does not have a satellite detectable within 0.4 arcseconds with a brightness of more than 0.5% of the primary. The presence of satellites to 3 of the 4 brightest Kuiper belt objects is inconsistent with the fraction of satellites in the Kuiper belt at large at the 99.1% confidence level, suggesting a different formation mechanism for these largest KBO satellites. The satellites of 2003 EL61 and 2003 UB313, with fractional brightnesses of 5% and 2% of their primaries, respectively, are significantly fainter relative to their primaries than other known Kuiper belt object satellites, again pointing to possible differences in their origin.

  2. Toshiba recommends Windows 7 Satellite L750-12T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Toshiba recommends Windows 7 Model: i Satellite L750-12T 2nd Generation Intel® CoreTM i3-2350M processor­ 2.3 GHz, Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium, 15.6" HD LCD, 4GB DDR3, 640GB HDD S-ATA, DVD Super and Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep® Technology Operating System Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium Key Features Toshiba

  3. Orbital perturbations of the Galilean satellites during planetary encounters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Nesvorný, David [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Yokoyama, Tadashi, E-mail: rogerio.deienno@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    The Nice model of the dynamical instability and migration of the giant planets can explain many properties of the present solar system, and can be used to constrain its early architecture. In the jumping-Jupiter version of the Nice model, required from the terrestrial planet constraint and dynamical structure of the asteroid belt, Jupiter has encounters with an ice giant. Here, we study the survival of the Galilean satellites in the jumping-Jupiter model. This is an important concern because the ice-giant encounters, if deep enough, could dynamically perturb the orbits of the Galilean satellites and lead to implausible results. We performed numerical integrations where we tracked the effect of planetary encounters on the Galilean moons. We considered three instability cases from Nesvorný and Morbidelli that differed in the number and distribution of encounters. We found that in one case, where the number of close encounters was relatively small, the Galilean satellite orbits were not significantly affected. In the other two, the orbital eccentricities of all moons were excited by encounters, Callisto's semimajor axis changed, and, in a large fraction of trials, the Laplace resonance of the inner three moons was disrupted. The subsequent evolution by tides damps eccentricities and can recapture the moons in the Laplace resonance. A more important constraint is represented by the orbital inclinations of the moons, which can be excited during the encounters and not appreciably damped by tides. We find that one instability case taken from Nesvorný and Morbidelli clearly does not meet this constraint. This shows how the regular satellites of Jupiter can be used to set limits on the properties of encounters in the jumping-Jupiter model, and help us to better understand how the early solar system evolved.

  4. Teleporting independent qubits through a 97 km free-space channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Juan; Ren, Ji-Gang; Cao, Yuan; Yong, Hai-Lin; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Chang; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Xin-Dong; Xu, Ping; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    With the help of quantum entanglement, quantum communication can be achieved between arbitrarily distant places without passing through intermediate locations by quantum teleportation. In the laboratory, quantum teleportation has been demonstrated over short distance by photonic and atomic qubits. Using fiber links, quantum teleportation has been achieved over kilometer distances. Long distance quantum teleportation is of particular interest and has been one of the holy grails of practical quantum communication. Most recently, quantum teleportation over 16 km free-space link was demonstrated. However, a major restriction in this experiment is that the unknown quantum state cannot directly come from outside. Here, based on an ultra-bright multi-photon entanglement source, we demonstrate quantum teleportation, closely following the original scheme, for any unknown state created outside, between two optical free-space links separated by 97 km. Over a 35-53 dB high-loss quantum channel, an average fidelity of 80....

  5. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KM3NeT Collaboration; S. Adrián-Martínez; M. Ageron; F. Aharonian; S. Aiello; A. Albert; F. Ameli; E. G. Anassontzis; M. Anghinolfi; G. Anton; S. Anvar; M. Ardid; T. Avgitas; K. Balasi; H. Band; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; B. Baret; S. Baron; J. Barrios; A. Belias; E. Berbee; A. M. van den Berg; A. Berkien; V. Bertin; S. Beurthey; V. van Beveren; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; A. Biagioni; S. Bianucci; M. Billault; A. Birbas; H. Boer Rookhuizen; R. Bormuth; V. Bouché; B. Bouhadef; G. Bourlis; C. Boutonnet; M. Bouwhuis; C. Bozza; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; G. Cacopardo; L. Caillat; M. Calamai; D. Calvo; A. Capone; L. Caramete; F. Caruso; S. Cecchini; A. Ceres; R. Cereseto; C. Champion; F. Château; T. Chiarusi; B. Christopoulou; M. Circella; L. Classen; R. Cocimano; A. Coleiro; S. Colonges; R. Coniglione; A. Cosquer; M. Costa; P. Coyle; A. Creusot; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; G. De Rosa; N. Deniskina; J. -J. Destelle; C. Distefano; F. Di Capua; C. Donzaud; D. Dornic; Q. Dorosti-Hasankiadeh; E. Drakopoulou; D. Drouhin; L. Drury; D. Durand; T. Eberl; D. Elsaesser; A. Enzenhöfer; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; D. Gajanana; T. Gal; S. Galatà; F. Garufi; M. Gebyehu; V. Giordano; N. Gizani; R. GraciaRuiz; K. Graf; R. Grasso; G. Grella; A. Grmek; R. Habel; H. van Haren; T. Heid; A. Heijboer; E. Heine; S. Henry; J. J. Hernández-Rey; B. Herold; M. A. Hevinga; M. van der Hoek; J. Hofestädt; J. Hogenbirk; C. Hugon; J. Hößl; M. Imbesi; C. W. James; P. Jansweijer; J. Jochum; M. de Jong; M. Jongen; M. Kadler; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; E. Kappos; U. Katz; O. Kavatsyuk; P. Keller; G. Kieft; E. Koffeman; H. Kok; P. Kooijman; J. Koopstra; A. Korporaal; A. Kouchner; I. Kreykenbohm; V. Kulikovskiy; R. Lahmann; P. Lamare; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; H. Le Provost; K. P. Leismüller; A. Leisos; D. Lenis; E. Leonora; M. LindseyClark; C. D. Llorens Alvarez; H. Löhner; A. Lonardo; S. Loucatos; F. Louis; E. Maccioni; K. Mannheim; K. Manolopoulos; A. Margiotta; O. Mari?; C. Markou; J. A. Martínez-Mora; A. Martini; R. Masullo; K. W. Melis; T. Michael; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; S. Mos; Y. Moudden; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. Nicolaou; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; A. Orzelli; A. Papaikonomou; R. Papaleo; G. E. P?v?la?; H. Peek; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; K. Pikounis; V. Popa; Th. Pradier; M. Priede; G. Pühlhofer; S. Pulvirenti; C. Racca; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; P. A. Rapidis; P. Razis; D. Real; L. Resvanis; J. Reubelt; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Saldaña; D. F. E. Samtleben; M. Sanguineti; A. Santangelo; P. Sapienza; J. Schmelling; J. Schnabel; V. Sciacca; M. Sedita; T. Seitz; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; G. Stavropoulos; J. Steijger; T. Stolarczyk; D. Stransky; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; D. Tézier; S. Théraube; L. F. Thompson; P. Timmer; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; M. Tselengidou; A. Tsirigotis; S. Tzamarias; E. Tzamariudaki; B. Vallage; V. Van Elewyck; J. Vermeulen; P. Vernin; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo; P. Werneke; L. Wiggers; J. Wilms; E. de Wolf; R. H. L. van Wooning; E. Zonca; J. D. Zornoza; J. Zúñiga; A. Zwart

    2015-10-06

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is described. This procedure is based on the measured coincidences produced in the sea by the 40K background light and can easily be expanded to a detector with several thousands of optical modules. The time offsets between the different optical modules are obtained using LED nanobeacons mounted inside them. A set of data corresponding to 600 hours of livetime was analysed. The results show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the expected optical background and the signal from atmospheric muons. An almost background-free sample of muons was selected by filtering the time correlated signals on all the three optical modules. The zenith angle of the selected muons was reconstructed with a precision of about 3{\\deg}.

  6. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  7. The KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margiotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will complement IceCube in its field of view and exceed it substantially in sensitivity. Its main goal is the detection of high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. The detector will have a modular structure with six building blocks, each consisting of about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared offshore Toulon, France and offshore Capo Passero on Sicily, Italy. The technological solutions for the neutrino detector of KM3NeT and the expected performance of the neutrino telescope are present...

  8. AbstractThe satellite-borne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    , the contributions from the vertical components of wind vectors are small and can therefore be ignoredAbstract­The satellite-borne Scanning for a Satellite Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) RK Moore, B. Beh Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is a proposed radar capable of measuring wind alofi using Doppler shifts

  9. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2014-12-02

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12 month, 12 km horizontal resolution air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a Volatility Basis Set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary models used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12% and anmore »annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of ?1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations, and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations, with better performance at predicting average daytime and daily peak O3 concentrations. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 65%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = ?110%) and organic carbon (MFB = ?65%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  10. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-04-07

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12-month, 12 km horizontal resolution year 2005 air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a volatility basis set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary modeling efforts used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12%more »and an annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of ?1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations. Performance is better at predicting daytime-average and daily peak O3 concentrations, which are more relevant for regulatory and health effects analyses relative to annual average values. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 36%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = ?110%) and organic carbon (MFB = ?29%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  11. Anisotropy in the distribution of satellites around primary galaxies in the 2dFGRS: the Holmberg effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Sales; Diego G. Lambas

    2003-11-18

    We have analysed a sample of satellite and primary galaxies in the 2dF galaxy redshift survey. In our study we find a strong statistical evidence of the Holmberg effect (that is a tendency for satellites to avoid regions along the line defined by the primary plane) within 500 kpc of projected distance to the primary. This effect is present only when we restrict to objects with radial velocity relative to the primary $|\\Delta v|<160$ km/s which correspond approximately to the mean of the distribution. We explore the dependence of this anisotropy on spectral type ($\\eta$), colours, and luminosities of both primaries and satellites, finding that objects with a low present-day star formation rate present the most significant effect.

  12. Thermal design of the fast-on-orbit recording of transient events (FORTE) satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akau, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whitaker, R.

    1994-10-01

    Analytical tools were used to design a thermal control system for the FORTE satellite. An overall spacecraft thermal model was developed to provide boundary temperatures for detailed thermal models of the FORTE instruments. The thermal design will be presented and thermal model results discussed.

  13. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, A. J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Jacob, D. J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wecht, K. J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Maasakkers, J. D. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Lundgren, E. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Andrews, A. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017697933X); Boesch, H. [Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Bowman, K. W. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Deutscher, N. M. [Univ. of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Dubey, M. K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griffith, D. W. T. [Univ. of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Hase, F. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany). IMK-ASF; Kuze, A. [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba (Japan)] (ORCID:0000000154153377); Notholt, J. [Univ. of Bremen (Germany); Ohyama, H. [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba (Japan); Parker, R. [Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Payne, V. H. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Sussmann, R. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany). IMK-IFU; Sweeney, C. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany). IMK-IFU; Velazco, V. A. [Univ. of Wollongong, NSW (Australia)] (ORCID:000000021376438X); Warneke, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wennberg, P. O. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Wunch, D. [Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    2015-01-01

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a?1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a-1.

  14. Results from the northern New Mexico satellite-beacon radio interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos, R.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Wu, G.

    1994-09-01

    An interferometer described in the Boston, 1992, meeting of the Beacon Satellite Symposium has been in full operation for over a year now. It consists of four autonomous stations; three are in a triangle 70 km on a side and one is in the center. The stations receive the VHF beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES-2 and ATS-3. The phases of the beacons are tracked at each station by referring them to an extremely stable rubidium oscillator. The studies of the two satellites are virtually separate experiments. The received phase of the beacon is retarded by the increased Total-Electron-Content of the dense regions of waves in the ionosphere. By comparing the phase history at four spatially separated stations, the authors can determine the two-dimensional propagation vector of the waves. This array is optimal for wavelengths of 70--300 km (periods of 300--3,000 seconds). Since the measurement is of the phase of the signal rather than the difference between the O-mode and X-mode phases, and since the beacons are in the VHF rather than in the L-band of GPS beacons, the array is very sensitive. It has a noise level of 10{sup 13} electrons/m{sup 2}, or 10{sup {minus}4} of the normal daytime TEC. This has been verified by operating two stations in the same location, so that they saw the same ionosphere. The first interesting results from a year`s study is that the authors do not see the same TID`s when looking at the two satellites. One conclusion they draw is that they do not see evidence of ionospheric winds.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites...

  16. Studies on Replication of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Satellite RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Soon Ho

    2011-01-01

    of the satellite of peanut stunt virus reveals structuralrepresenting two subgroups of peanut stunt virus strains:the satellite RNA of peanut stunt virus ( PSV) nucleotide

  17. THE 3 ?m SPECTRUM OF JUPITER's IRREGULAR SATELLITE HIMALIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rhoden, A. R., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu, E-mail: Alyssa.Rhoden@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We present a medium resolution spectrum of Jupiter's irregular satellite Himalia covering the critical 3 ?m spectral region. The spectrum shows no evidence for aqueously altered phyllosilicates, as had been suggested from the tentative detection of a 0.7 ?m absorption, but instead shows a spectrum strikingly similar to the C/CF type asteroid 52 Europa. 52 Europa is the prototype of a class of asteroids generally situated in the outer asteroid belt between less distant asteroids which show evidence for aqueous alteration and more distant asteroids which show evidence for water ice. The spectral match between Himalia and this group of asteroids is surprising and difficult to reconcile with models of the origin of the irregular satellites.

  18. KM3NeT: A Next Generation Neutrino Telescope in the Mediterranean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kappes; for the KM3NeT Consortium

    2007-11-05

    To complement the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under construction at the South Pole, the three Mediterranean neutrino telescope projects ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR have joined forces to develop, construct and operate a km^3-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Since February 2006, the technical specifications and performance of such a detector are studied in the framework of a 3-year EU-funded Design Study. In 2009 a technical design report will be released laying the foundations for the construction of the detector. In the following, the current status of the Design Study is presented and examples of solutions for the technical challenges are discussed.

  19. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Mayer, Benjamin W [ORNL; Wilhelmi, Nate [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  20. Equatorial hydrology studies by satellite telemetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robison, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-12-30

    We are using a geostationary satellite functioning as a transponder to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Enewetak and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely measure net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water-flux model predicted wet season plant-transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6- to 7-mm/d evaporation-pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. From the microclimate data we estimated a 1:3 and 1:20 /sup 137/Cs dry-matter concentration ratio, which was later confirmed by radioisotopic analysis. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  1. Emerging trends in the satellite industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Vagn Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    Risk aversion in the satellite industry has fostered long development cycles and low rates of innovation in the past. Emerging trends in propulsion technology development and spacecraft architecture design could lead to ...

  2. Simulation Methodologies for Satellite Solar Array Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenizadeh, Navid

    2010-07-16

    The purpose of the present thesis is to furnish diverse studies on the dynamic response of satellite solar arrays. The term flexible structure or, briefly, structure has different interpretations and definitions, depending ...

  3. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  4. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry with 3 satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Wallace D. (Wallace Dazheng)

    2005-01-01

    Our study investigates interferometric SAR (InSAR) post-processing height retrieval techniques. We explore the possible improvements by adding a third satellite to the two already in orbit, and examine some potential uses ...

  5. MFR PAPER 1230 Finding Fish With Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, fishing vessels , spotter pilots, research vessels, and offshore oil platforms were used Investigation? A. It is an attempt to find out if satellites can help fishermen find fish. Our assumption

  6. Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

    2011-01-01

    from meteorological satellite data. Solar Energy 37, 31–39.specific irradiance data. Solar Energy 60, 89–96. Perez R. ,16 independent data banks. Solar Energy 80, 468–478 Kasten

  7. Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

    2011-01-01

    1995). In National Solar Radiation Data Base—Final Technicalobtained from the Solar Radiation Data Service (WR7). 4.3.3global solar radiation from meteorological satellite data.

  8. A THOUSAND SHADOWS OF ANDROMEDA: ROTATING PLANES OF SATELLITES IN THE MILLENNIUM-II COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Neil G.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-03-20

    In a recent contribution, Bahl and Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation and concluded that vast, thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in ?-cold dark matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness, and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the angular momentum properties of the co-planar satellites, and find that the median of the specific angular momentum derived from the line-of-sight velocities in the real M31 structure (1.3 × 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} kpc) is very high compared to systems drawn from the simulations. This analysis confirms that it is highly unlikely that the observed structure around the Andromeda galaxy is due to a chance occurrence. Interestingly, the few extreme systems that are similar to M31 arise from the accretion of a massive sub-halo with its own spatially concentrated entourage of orphan satellites.

  9. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  10. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson,Cathy; Rowland,Joel; Gangodagamage,Chandana

    2013-12-08

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  11. Modelling TOVS radiances of synoptic systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coe, Thomas Eddy

    1992-01-01

    compared against observed satellite radiances by ~ing the analyzed variables into synthetic radiances using a radiative transfer model (~) . Gtme~ 'IOVS satellite radiances are used as a grourd truth, since they are the only scurce of continuous... information similar to the satellite observations. ~ is often too noisy, producing features not verified by the satellite; NMC is often too smooth. NMC more closely resembles the TOVS contours. Modelled water vapor channel analyses resemble observed monthly...

  12. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  13. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  14. Satellite Transport Protocol (STP): An SSCOPbased Transport Protocol for Datagram Satellite Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 Satellite Transport Protocol (STP): An SSCOP­based Transport Protocol for Datagram Satellite Networks Thomas R. Henderson * and Randy H. Katz University of California at Berkeley {tomh­based protocol, the Service Specific Connection Oriented Protocol (SSCOP), for use as a transport protocol

  15. A Time Lag Model to Estimate Rainfall Rate Based on GOES Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    . ­ The maximum horizontal range is 462 km, · Polar satellite ­ Altitude: 870 km ­ Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) ­ Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) ­ Observations every 12 hours · Geostationary for cloud at temperature T · S is the solar irradiance of GOES 12 8 Albedo from October 27, 2008 (18:35 UTC

  16. Using the Milky Way satellites to study interactions between cold dark matter and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Boehm; J. A. Schewtschenko; R. J. Wilkinson; C. M. Baugh; S. Pascoli

    2014-08-19

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model faces persistent challenges on small scales. In particular, taken at face value, the model significantly overestimates the number of satellite galaxies around the Milky Way. Attempts to solve this problem remain open to debate and have even led some to abandon CDM altogether. However, current simulations are limited by the assumption that dark matter feels only gravity. Here, we show that including interactions between CDM and radiation (photons or neutrinos) leads to a dramatic reduction in the number of satellite galaxies, alleviating the Milky Way satellite problem and indicating that physics beyond gravity may be essential to make accurate predictions of structure formation on small scales. The methodology introduced here gives constraints on dark matter interactions that are significantly improved over those from the cosmic microwave background.

  17. Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

  18. The Plane Truth: Andromeda analog thin Planes of Satellites are not kinematical coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Tobias; Macciò, Andrea V

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting the Andromeda galaxy are surprisingly aligned in a thin, extended and seemingly kinematically coherent planar structure. Such a structure is not easily found in simulations based on the Cold Dark Matter model. Using 21 high resolution cosmological simulations based on this model we analyze in detail the kinematical structure of planes of satellites resembling the one observed around Andromeda when co-rotation is characterized by the line-of-sight velocity. At the same time, when co-rotation is inferred by the angular momenta of the satellites, the planes are in excellent agreement with the plane around the Milky Way. Furthermore, we find such planes to be common in our simulations. Investigation of the kinematics of the satellites in the plane reveals that the number of co-rotating satellites varies by 2 to 5 out of ~12 depending on the viewing angle. These variations are consistent with that obtained from a sample with random velocities. Using instead...

  19. THE ORBITS OF NEPTUNE'S OUTER SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozovic, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A.; Sheppard, Scott S. E-mail: raj@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-04-15

    In 2009, we used the Subaru telescope to observe all the faint irregular satellites of Neptune for the first time since 2004. These observations extend the data arcs for Halimede, Psamathe, Sao, Laomedeia, and Neso from a few years to nearly a decade. We also report on a search for unknown Neptune satellites in a half-square degree of sky and a limiting magnitude of 26.2 in the R band. No new satellites of Neptune were found. We numerically integrate the orbits for the five irregulars and summarize the results of the orbital fits in terms of the state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. Sao and Neso are confirmed to be Kozai librators, while Psamathe is a 'reverse circulator'. Halimede and Laomedeia do not seem to experience any strong resonant effects.

  20. Saturn's inner satellites: Orbits, masses, and the chaotic motion of atlas from new Cassini imaging observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D.; Renner, S.; Evans, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present numerically derived orbits and mass estimates for the inner Saturnian satellites, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus from a fit to 2580 new Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem astrometric observations spanning 2004 February to 2013 August. The observations are provided as machine-readable and Virtual Observatory tables. We estimate GM{sub Atlas} = (0.384 ± 0.001) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, a value 13% smaller than the previously published estimate but with an order of magnitude reduction in the uncertainty. We also find GM{sub Prometheus} = (10.677 ± 0.006) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Pandora} = (9.133 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Janus} = (126.51 ± 0.03) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, and GM{sub Epimetheus} = (35.110 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, consistent with previously published values, but also with significant reductions in uncertainties. We show that Atlas is currently librating in both the 54:53 co-rotation-eccentricity resonance (CER) and the 54:53 inner Lindblad (ILR) resonance with Prometheus, making it the latest example of a coupled CER-ILR system, in common with the Saturnian satellites Anthe, Aegaeon, and Methone, and possibly Neptune's ring arcs. We further demonstrate that Atlas's orbit is chaotic, with a Lyapunov time of ?10 years, and show that its chaotic behavior is a direct consequence of the coupled resonant interaction with Prometheus, rather than being an indirect effect of the known chaotic interaction between Prometheus and Pandora. We provide an updated analysis of the second-order resonant perturbations involving Prometheus, Pandora, and Epimetheus based on the new observations, showing that these resonant arguments are librating only when Epimetheus is the innermost of the co-orbital pair, Janus and Epimetheus. We also find evidence that the known chaotic changes in the orbits of Prometheus and Pandora are not confined to times of apse anti-alignment.

  1. Soviet satellite communications science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, J.N.; Campanella, S.J.; Gordon, G.D.; McElroy, D.R.; Pritchard, W.L.; Stamminger, R.

    1991-08-01

    This is a report by six US scientists and engineers concerning the current state of the art and projections of future Soviet satellite communications technologies. The panel members are experts in satellite stabilization, spacecraft environments, space power generation, launch systems, spacecraft communications sciences and technologies, onboard processing, ground stations, and other technologies that impact communications. The panel assessed the Soviet ability to support high-data-rate space missions at 128 Mbps by evaluating current and projected Soviet satellite communications technologies. A variety of space missions were considered, including Earth-to-Earth communications via satellites in geostationary or highly elliptical orbits, those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a direct path and those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a relay satellite. Soviet satellite communications capability, in most cases, is 10 years behind that of the United States and other industrialized nations. However, based upon an analysis of communications links needed to support these missions using current Soviet capabilities, it is well within the current Soviet technology to support certain space missions outlined above at rates of 128 Mbps or higher, although published literature clearly shows that the Soviet Union has not exceeded 60 Mbps in its current space system. These analyses are necessary but not sufficient to determine mission data rates, and other technologies such as onboard processing and storage could limit the mission data rate well below that which could actually be supported via the communications links. Presently, the Soviet Union appears to be content with data rates in the low-Earth-orbit relay via geostationary mode of 12 Mbps. This limit is a direct result of power amplifier limits, spacecraft antenna size, and the utilization of K{sub u}-band frequencies. 91 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Fingers-of-God effect of infalling satellite galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hikage, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nonlinear property of redshift-space distortion, i.e., Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect, is important for the redshift-space distortion studies to test gravity models. FoG effect has been usually attributed to the random motion of galaxies inside the clusters. In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of the coherent infalling motion of satellite galaxies toward the cluster center. We analytically derive the satellite velocity distribution due to the infall motion together with the random motion and show that the velocity distribution becomes far from Maxwellian when the infalling motion is dominant. We use simulated subhalo catalogs to find that the contribution of infall motion is important for massive subhalos and that their velocity distribution has top-hat like shape as expected from our analytic model.We also study the FoG effect due to infall motion on the redshift-space power spectrum. Using the simulated subhalo catalogs based on the halo occupation distribution of luminous red galaxi...

  3. Experimental loophole-free violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electron spins separated by 1.3 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hensen; H. Bernien; A. E. Dréau; A. Reiserer; N. Kalb; M. S. Blok; J. Ruitenberg; R. F. L. Vermeulen; R. N. Schouten; C. Abellán; W. Amaya; V. Pruneri; M. W. Mitchell; M. Markham; D. J. Twitchen; D. Elkouss; S. Wehner; T. H. Taminiau; R. Hanson

    2015-08-24

    For more than 80 years, the counterintuitive predictions of quantum theory have stimulated debate about the nature of reality. In his seminal work, John Bell proved that no theory of nature that obeys locality and realism can reproduce all the predictions of quantum theory. Bell showed that in any local realist theory the correlations between distant measurements satisfy an inequality and, moreover, that this inequality can be violated according to quantum theory. This provided a recipe for experimental tests of the fundamental principles underlying the laws of nature. In the past decades, numerous ingenious Bell inequality tests have been reported. However, because of experimental limitations, all experiments to date required additional assumptions to obtain a contradiction with local realism, resulting in loopholes. Here we report on a Bell experiment that is free of any such additional assumption and thus directly tests the principles underlying Bell's inequality. We employ an event-ready scheme that enables the generation of high-fidelity entanglement between distant electron spins. Efficient spin readout avoids the fair sampling assumption (detection loophole), while the use of fast random basis selection and readout combined with a spatial separation of 1.3 km ensure the required locality conditions. We perform 245 trials testing the CHSH-Bell inequality $S \\leq 2$ and find $S = 2.42 \\pm 0.20$. A null hypothesis test yields a probability of $p = 0.039$ that a local-realist model for space-like separated sites produces data with a violation at least as large as observed, even when allowing for memory in the devices. This result rules out large classes of local realist theories, and paves the way for implementing device-independent quantum-secure communication and randomness certification.

  4. Satellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries E. Chassot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of information for ecosystem modelling, a key tool for implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries managementSatellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries management E. Chassot1 *, S and it is a promising tool for conservation issues. In the context of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management

  5. Satellite-based estimates of groundwater storage variations in large drainage basins with extensive floodplains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite-based estimates of groundwater storage variations in large drainage basins with extensive, US ESPACE, Montpellier, France h LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Paris, France a b s t r a c ta r modeling This study presents monthly estimates of groundwater anomalies in a large river basin dominated

  6. Building technological capability within satellite programs in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Danielle Renee

    2012-01-01

    Global participation in space activity is growing as satellite technology matures and spreads. Countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America are creating or reinvigorating national satellite programs. These countries are ...

  7. Regional Navigation System Using Geosynchronous Satellites and Stratospheric Airships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    - 1 - Regional Navigation System Using Geosynchronous Satellites and Stratospheric Airships Chang navigation system using geosynchronous satellites and stratospheric airships. One important factor and stratospheric airships for the urban areas. In the beginning stage, the system would augment the existing GPS

  8. Achieving broad access to satellite control research with zero robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jacob G

    2013-01-01

    Since operations began in 2006, the SPHERES facility, including three satellites aboard the International Space Station (ISS), has demonstrated many future satellite technologies in a true microgravity environment and ...

  9. Title: Geoeye Satellite Image of North York, Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Geoeye Satellite Image of North York, Ontario Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Geo, Ontario; North York, Ontario; York University, Ontario Keywords (Subject): Satellite Imagery, Aerial Scene, North York Ontario, September 1, 2009". Thorton Colorado:, Geoeye Inc., 2009. Vendor Link: http

  10. Satellite Navigation in Vietnam & The NAVIS Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Satellite Navigation in Vietnam & The NAVIS Centre TA HAI TUNG (PhD) NAVIS CentreKme predefined incidents occurring; or each 30 s #12;"The mission of Navis is to boost, in South-East Asia." hcp://navis.hust.edu.vn #12;(Source: Mul,-GNSS Asia) #12;Milestones

  11. NASA Launches Next-Generation Communications Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    NASA Launches Next-Generation Communications Satellite Pg 3 Triumph Over Tragedy: Columbia's Last Mission Pg 6 Goddard Day of Remembrance Pg 9 National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov Volume 9 Issue 1 February 2013 #12;T he first of NASA's three next-generation Tracking and Data Relay

  12. NASA Launches Next-Generation Communications Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    .nasa.gov Volume 9 Issue 1 February 2013 #12;T he first of NASA's three next-generation Tracking and Data Relay Space Launch Complex-41. After a three-month test phase, NASA will accept the spacecraft for additional rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-41 with NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS

  13. DISASTER RECOVERY APPLICATIONS FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruse, Hans

    in the ACTS system. Finally, we project possible applications for satellite based data communication services and possibly cooling systems) are backed up with in-house standby systems. Critical data bases are backed up Young, Chris Washburn J. Warren McClure School of Communication Systems Management Don Flournoy School

  14. NOAA/NMFS Developments Tracked By Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Department of Energy to install a solar power heating and water heating system. The Grant is one of four- mitter. Electronic engineer Robert Timko of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service laboratory in Gal near Washington, D. C. , where they were processed by com- puter. Satellite tracking of turtles

  15. Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

  16. Global Electrical Conductivity Magnetic Satellite Induction Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    CHAMPMeeting, September2003 c S.Constable SCRIPPSINST ITUTION OF OCE ANOGRAPHY UCSD #12;Contents: · Background: Earth conductivity · Background: EM induction · Some satellite results 2ndCHAMPMeeting, September2003 c SCHAMPMeeting, September2003 c S.Constable SCRIPPSINST ITUTION OF OCE ANOGRAPHY UCSD #12;Conductivity of Earth materials

  17. Proposal of a new generation of Laser Beacon for time calibration in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Real, Diego [IFIC, Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT collaboration aims at the construction of a multi-km3 high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea consisting of a matrix of pressure resistant glass spheres holding each a set (31) of small area photomultipliers. The main motivation of the telescope is to observe cosmic neutrinos through the Cherenkov light induced in sea water by charged particles produced in neutrino interactions with the surrounding medium. A relative time calibration between photomultipliers of the order of 1 ns is required to achieve an optimal performance. To this end, several time calibration subsystems have been developed. In this article, the proposal of a last generation Laser Beacon, to be used in KM3NeT and developed to measure and monitor the relative time offsets between photomultipliers, is presented.

  18. On identifying the specular reflection of sunlight in earth-monitoring satellite data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelsen, James M., Jr.; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Jackson, Dale Clayton; Longenbaugh, Randolph S.

    2009-03-01

    Among the background signals commonly seen by Earth-monitoring satellites is the specular reflection of sunlight off of Earth's surface, commonly referred to as a glint. This phenomenon, involving liquid or ice surfaces, can result in the brief, intense illumination of satellite sensors appearing from the satellite perspective to be of terrestrial origin. These glints are important background signals to be able to identify with confidence, particularly in the context of analyzing data from satellites monitoring for transient surface or atmospheric events. Here we describe methods for identifying glints based on the physical processes involved in their production, including spectral fitting and polarization measurements. We then describe a tool that, using the WGS84 spheroidal Earth model, finds the latitude and longitude on Earth where a reflection of this type could be produced, given input Sun and satellite coordinates. This tool enables the user to determine if the surface at the solution latitude and longitude is in fact reflective, thus identifying the sensor response as a true glint or an event requiring further analysis.

  19. Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Lebreton, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace (LPC2E), CNRS-Université d'Orléans, Orléans Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace (LPC2E), CNRS-Université d'Orléans, Orléans Cedex (France)

    2013-05-15

    We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed characteristics and their angular anisotropy with the DEMETER measurements, as simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the measurements.

  20. Surface reflectance retrieval from satellite and aircraft sensors: Results of sensor and algorithm comparisons during FIFE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markham, B.L. ); Halthore, R.N.; Goetz, S.J. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on comparison of measurement systems which were deployed to measure surface reflectance factors, from aircraft or satellites. These instruments look over the general range of 0.4 to 2.5[mu]m. Instruments studied include Landsat 5 thematic mapper (TM), the SPOT 1 high-resolution visible sensor (HRV) 1, the NS001 thematic mapper simulator, and the modular multispectral radiometers (MMRs). The study looked at the radiometric consistency of the different instruments, and the adequacy of the atmospheric correction routines applied to data analysis.

  1. NASA ACTS SATELLITE: A DISASTER RECOVERY TEST Dr. Hans Kruse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruse, Hans

    NASA ACTS SATELLITE: A DISASTER RECOVERY TEST Dr. Hans Kruse School of Communications Systems In September 1993, NASA launched its long- awaited Advanced Communication Technology (ACTS) satellite. ACTS and opening of the Ka frequency band. Among the earliest of the tests on the new satellite was a NASA

  2. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weather satellite and information service · Center to protect electric grids and communications assets to support operational space weather monitoring and forecasting. NOAA Satellites Serve the Nation · NOAA satellites enable timely and accurate weather forecasts, watches, and warnings used by Federal, State

  3. Embedding planning technology into satellite systems David Kortenkamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortenkamp, David

    Embedding planning technology into satellite systems David Kortenkamp Pete Bonasso TRACLabs Inc. This paper describes an on-board planning and execution system for satellites that schedules system tasks mission, and an executive that takes the resulting plan and commands the satellite subsystems. A state

  4. Ris-R-1479(EN) Satellite information for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1479(EN) Satellite information for wind energy applications Morten Nielsen, Poul Astrup Title: Satellite information for wind energy applications Department: Wind Energy Department Risø-R-1479.): An introduction to satellite information relevant for wind energy applications is given. It includes digital

  5. Orbits and photometry of Pluto's satellites: Charon, S/2005 P1 and S/2005 P2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Buie; W. M. Grundy; E. F. Young; L. A. Young; S. A. Stern

    2006-03-18

    We present new astrometry of Pluto's three satellites from images taken of the Pluto system during 2002-3 with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) mode of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations were designed to produce an albedo map of Pluto but they also contain images of Charon and the two recently discovered satellites, S/2005 P1 and S/2005 P2. Orbits fitted to all three satellites are nearly co-planar and, for Charon and P2, have eccentricities consistent with zero. The orbit of the outermost satellite, P1, has a significant eccentricity of 0.0052 +/- 0.0011. Orbital periods of P1, P2, and Charon are 38.2065 +/- 0.0014, 24.8562 +/- 00013, and 6.3872304 +/- 0.0000011 days, respectively. The total system mass based on Charon's orbit is 1.4570 +/- 0.0009 x 10^22 kg. We confirm previous results that orbital periods are close to the ratio of 6:4:1 (P1:P2:Charon) indicative of mean-motion resonances, but our results formally preclude precise integer period ratios. The orbits of P1 and P2, being about the barycenter rather than Pluto, enable us to measure the Charon/Pluto mass ratio as 0.1165 +/- 0.0055. This new mass ratio implies a density of 1.65 +/- 0.06 g cm^-3 for Charon (603.6 km radius) and 2.03 +/- 0.06 g cm^-3 for Pluto (1153 km radius) thus adding confirmation that Charon is significantly less dense than Pluto. Finally, by stacking all images, we can extract globally averaged photometry. P1 has a mean opposition magnitude of V=24.39 +/- 0.09 and color of (B-V) = 0.64 +/- 0.12. P2 has a mean opposition magnitude of V=24.55 +/- 0.10 and color of (B-V) = 0.91 +/- 0.15.

  6. Learning Scene Categories from High Resolution Satellite Image for Aerial Video Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic scene categorization can benefit various aerial video processing applications. This paper addresses the problem of predicting the scene category from aerial video frames using a prior model learned from satellite imagery. We show that local and global features in the form of line statistics and 2-D power spectrum parameters respectively can characterize the aerial scene well. The line feature statistics and spatial frequency parameters are useful cues to distinguish between different urban scene categories. We learn the scene prediction model from highresolution satellite imagery to test the model on the Columbus Surrogate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CSUAV) dataset ollected by high-altitude wide area UAV sensor platform. e compare the proposed features with the popular Scale nvariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. Our experimental results show that proposed approach outperforms te SIFT model when the training and testing are conducted n disparate data sources.

  7. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater Xabier Angulo.angulo@io.cfmac.csic.es; phone +34 915618806 ext.:222 ABSTRACT In this paper we combine the use of optical pulse coding and seeded second-order Raman amplification to extend the sensing distance of Brillouin optical time

  8. Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a , M architecture relies upon the use of Directed Aerial Robot Explorers (DAREs), which essentially are long. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Scientific ballooning; Direct Aerial Robot

  9. Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland Z. Du; accepted 19 September 2005 Available online 22 November 2005 Editor: R.D. van der Hilst Abstract Iceland discontinuity beneath central Iceland is shallow relative to peripheral regions and this was interpreted

  10. Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long Microwave Earth but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent on solar illumination. Despite the high University's Microwave Earth Remote Sensing (MERS) Laboratory. These floating glacial ice fragments

  11. Thermodynamic model for mineral solubility in aqueous fluids: theory, calibration and application to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    show a steady increase in solubility along constant geothermal gradients or water isochores, at a geothermal gradient of 20°C km)1 . For subduction zones, modeled by a geotherm of 7°C km)1 , the required

  12. On the use of satellite-based estimates of rainfall temporal distribution to simulate the potential for malaria transmission in rural Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamana, Teresa K.

    [1] This paper describes the use of satellite-based estimates of rainfall to force the Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS), a hydrology-based mechanistic model of malaria transmission. We ...

  13. Stereo Satellite Imagery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereo Satellite Imagery Jump to: navigation, search

  14. Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery...

  15. Satellite remote sounding of mid-tropospheric CO 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    are available in the HTML. doi:10.1029/ 2008GL035022. L17807are available in the HTML. L17807 CHAHINE ET AL. : SATELLITE

  16. Satellite Television Industry Meeting Regarding DOE Set-Top Box...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    at the Forestall Building to discuss matters of concern to the U.S. satellite television industry regarding the pending DOE rulemaking to establish energy conservation standards...

  17. Systematic and random error components in satellite precipitation data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir; Mehran, Ali; Norouzi, Hamidreza; Behrangi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    in satellite-based precipitation estimates, J. Geophys.Evaluating high-resolution precipitation products, Bull. Am.retrieved extreme precipitation rates across the central

  18. High-altitude gravity waves in the Martian thermosphere observed by MAVEN/NGIMS and modeled by a gravity wave scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi?it, Erdal; Liu, Guiping; Medvedev, Alexander S; Mahaffy, Paul R; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jakosky, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    First high-altitude observations of gravity wave (GW)-induced CO$_2$ density perturbations in the Martian thermosphere retrieved from NASA's NGIMS instrument on board the MAVEN satellite are presented and interpreted using the extended GW parameterization of Yi\\u{g}it et al. [2008] and the Mars Climate Database as an input. Observed relative density perturbations between 180-220 km of 20-40 % demonstrate appreciable local time, latitude, and altitude variations. Modeling for the spatiotemporal conditions of the MAVEN observations suggests that GWs can directly propagate from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere, produce appreciable dynamical effects, and likely contribute to the observed fluctuations. Modeled effects are somewhat smaller than the observed but their highly variable nature is in qualitative agreement with observations. Possible reasons for discrepancies between modeling and measurements are discussed.

  19. Stimulated Radiative Molecular Association in the Early Solar System: Orbital Radii of Satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, James C

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation relates the orbital radii of regular satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn to photon energies in the spectra of atomic and molecular hydrogen. To explain these observations a model is developed involving stimulated radiative molecular association (SRMA) reactions among the photons and atoms in the protosatellite disks of the planets. In this model thermal energy is extracted from each disk due to a resonance at radii where there is a match between the temperature in the disk and a photon energy. Matter accumulates at these radii, and satellites and rings are ultimately formed. Orbital radii of satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, and Neptune are related to photon energies ($E_{PM}$ values) in the spectrum of molecular hydrogen. Orbital radii of satellites of Saturn are related to photon energies ($E_{PA}$ values) in the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. The first hint that such relationships exist is found in the linearity of the graphs of orbital radii of uranian satellites vs. or...

  20. Hints on the nature of dark matter from the properties of Milky Way satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderhalden, Donnino; Diemand, Juerg [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Schneider, Aurel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Macciò, Andrea V. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bertone, Gianfranco, E-mail: donninoa@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: aurel.schneider@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: maccio@mpia.de, E-mail: diemand@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    The nature of dark matter is still unknown and one of the most fundamental scientific mysteries. Although successfully describing large scales, the standard cold dark matter model (CDM) exhibits possible shortcomings on galactic and sub-galactic scales. It is exactly at these highly non-linear scales where strong astrophysical constraints can be set on the nature of the dark matter particle. While observations of the Lyman-? forest probe the matter power spectrum in the mildly non-linear regime, satellite galaxies of the Milky Way provide an excellent laboratory as a test of the underlying cosmology on much smaller scales. Here we present results from a set of high resolution simulations of a Milky Way sized dark matter halo in eight distinct cosmologies: CDM, warm dark matter (WDM) with a particle mass of 2 keV and six different cold plus warm dark matter (C+WDM) models, varying the fraction, f{sub wdm}, and the mass, m{sub wdm}, of the warm component. We used three different observational tests based on Milky Way satellite observations: the total satellite abundance, their radial distribution and their mass profile. We show that the requirement of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints sets very strong limits on the nature of dark matter. This shows the power of a multi-dimensional small scale approach in ruling out models which would be still allowed by large scale observations.

  1. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  2. Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysisRisø-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore Wind Speed Maps to In-Situ Data, Microscale project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind

  3. Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    the spatial extent of the wake behind large offshore wind farms. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, LtdQuantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic

  4. Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data Mark R. DrinkwaterWinds on QuikScat (QSCAT) satellite instruments are used to illustrate spatiotemporal variability in snow in backscatter, B, in the range 20 ­60 are compared with historical snow accumulation data and recent

  5. Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated to be chemically hazardous and shall be kept in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The safety coordinator will keep a list of all SAA's in the division and must be notified before an accumulation area

  6. Heuristics for Robust Resource Allocation of Satellite Weather Data Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    --This work considers the satellite data processing portion of a space-based weather monitoring systemHeuristics for Robust Resource Allocation of Satellite Weather Data Processing on a Heterogeneous INTRODUCTION THE space-based weather monitoring system considered in this work consists of two major components

  7. Title: IKONOS Satellite Image of North York, Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: IKONOS Satellite Image of North York, Ontario Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Geo.313 degrees Index Map: N/A Keywords (Place): Toronto, Ontario Keywords (Subject): Satellite Imagery, Aerial/Panchromatic Orthorectified Scene, Toronto Ontario, July 3, 2007". Thorton Colorado:, Geoeye Inc., 2007. Vendor Link: http

  8. First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol Reinhard Beer,1 Mark W) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have. Citation: Beer, R., et al. (2008), First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

  9. Tropospheric Ozone Satellite Retrievals in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Tropospheric Ozone Satellite Retrievals in the Pacific Northwest Jacqueline Costello1, Farren: Tropospheric ozone is difficult to retrieve from satellites because of the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere. Tropospheric ozone has become a significant environmental issue and can be exacerbated by UT

  10. Ris National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind ressource mapping: possibilities is to quantify the regional offshore wind climate for wind energy application based on satellite SAR ·Study of 85SAR(m/s) Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps

  11. Validation of satellite ozone profile retrievals using Beijing ozonesonde data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Laura

    , the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA Aqua satellite and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS in the stratosphere and troposphere. Stratospheric ozone forms a protective layer that absorbs enough solar) on the NASA Aqua satellite [Aumann et al., 2003] and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the NASA Aura

  12. Title: Satellite Streetview: Prince Edward Island Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Satellite Streetview: Prince Edward Island Data Creator / Copyright Owner: DMTI Spatial Inc: N/A Abstract: Satellite images generated for cities and/or regions in Prince Edward Island.. Areas: N/A Keywords (Place): Canada; Prince Edward Island; Charlottetown Keywords (Subject): Aerial Images

  13. Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    ` Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet is the relationship between below cloud base cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and satellite retrievals of cloud droplet cloud effective radius; however, satellites can not measure cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

  14. Symmetric Satellite Swarms and Choreographic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham Boyle; Jun Yong Khoo; Kendrick Smith

    2014-07-22

    In this paper, we introduce a natural dynamical analogue of crystalline order, which we call choreographic order. In an ordinary (static) crystal, a high degree of symmetry may be achieved through a careful arrangement of the fundamental repeated elements. In the dynamical analogue, a high degree of symmetry may be achieved by having the fundamental elements perform a carefully choreographed dance. For starters, we show how to construct and classify all symmetric satellite constellations. Then we explain how to generalize these ideas to construct and classify choreographic crystals more broadly. We introduce a quantity, called the "choreography" of a given configuration. We discuss the possibility that some (naturally occurring or artificial) many-body or condensed-matter systems may exhibit choreographic order, and suggest natural experimental signatures that could be used to identify and characterize such systems.

  15. Laser power beaming for satellite applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H.W.

    1993-09-22

    A serious consideration of laser power beaming for satellite applications appears to have grown out of a NASA mission analysis for transmitting power to lunar bases during the two week dark period. System analyses showed that laser power beaming to the moon in conjunction with efficient, large area solar cell collection panels, were an attractive alternative to other schemes such as battery storage and nuclear generators, largely because of the high space transportation costs. The primary difficulty with this scheme is the need for very high average power visible lasers. One system study indicated that lasers in excess of 10 MW at a wavelength of approximately 850 nm were required. Although such lasers systems have received much attention for military applications, their realization is still a long term goal.

  16. Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    with meteorological observations and a heat flux model. South of the island, we compare the ULS and thermalObservations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite, this paper examines the behavior of the Bering Sea St. Lawrence Island polynya using a combination

  17. JOURNAL OF LATEX CLASS FILES, VOL. 1, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2002 1 Long-term Comparisons between Two Way Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    to prevent Manuscript received X; revised Y. TABLE I MODELS AND ESTIMATED PARAMETERS. Parameter Estimation are summarized in Table I. For GPS satellite orbits, the final (precise) orbits provided by the International GPS coordinates of one site (USNO), also defined in ITRF 2000. All other station coordinates are estimated

  18. SATELLITES program is designed to introduce in-service teachers and K-12 students to basic geographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    , tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report information) (Na geographic concepts, geospatial technology (e.g., remote sensing, GIS, GPS, and digital elevation modeling extensive SATELLITES training in a one-week summer institute in 2006, integrated concepts and technologies

  19. Mesoscale variability in time series data: Satellite-based estimates for the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale variability in time series data: Satellite-based estimates for the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda TOPEX/Poseidon­ERS-1/2) are used to characterize, statistically, the mesoscale variability about the U to better understand the contribution of mesoscale eddies to the time series record and the model- data

  20. History of NOAA Satellite Programs--Updated October 2009 Page 1 History of the NOAA Satellite Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    soundings, atmospheric temperature and moisture data in all weather situations. During those 46 years, NOAA than four decades developing and applying space based Earth remote sensing for NOAA's National Weather have evolved from weather satellites to environmental satellites. Data is used for applications related

  1. History of NOAA Satellite Programs--Updated June 2011 Page 1 History of the NOAA Satellite Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    soundings, atmospheric temperature and moisture data in all weather situations. During those 46 years, NOAA and applying space based Earth remote sensing for NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts. The NWS from weather satellites to environmental satellites. Data is used for applications related

  2. Heat Transfer -1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with dimensions and properties given below. (a) Calculate the solar heat flux (W/m2 is at a distance where the solar heat flux (as defined above) is 500 W/m2 , and the flat plate is oriented

  3. Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with ground-based leveling observations. Two main subsidence areas are observed in the geothermal field, with maximum vertical and horizontal deformation rates of up to 30 mm...

  4. Adaptive thermal modeling architecture for small satellite applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, John Anger

    2010-01-01

    The United States Air Force and commercial aerospace industry recognize the importance of moving towards smaller, better, and cheaper spacecraft to support the nation's increasing dependence on space-based technologies. ...

  5. Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005MinnehahaElectric Coop,Mithril GmbHMobiusSalton Sea

  6. CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy Resources JumpCIA-The WorldISES- 2003 CROSS

  7. LES Modeling of High Resolution Satellite Cloud Spatial and Thermal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating3ledp/ The listing

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING OF CLOUDS AND RADIATION USING ARM DATA, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnis, Patrick

    2013-06-28

    During the period, March 1997 – February 2006, the Principal Investigator and his research team co-authored 47 peer-reviewed papers and presented, at least, 138 papers at conferences, meetings, and workshops that were supported either in whole or in part by this agreement. We developed a state-of-the-art satellite cloud processing system that generates cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) surface sites and surrounding domains in near-real time and outputs the results on the world wide web in image and digital formats. When the products are quality controlled, they are sent to the ARM archive for further dissemination. These products and raw satellite images can be accessed at http://cloudsgate2.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/site/showdoc?docid=4&cmd=field-experiment-homepage&exp=ARM and are used by many in the ARM science community. The algorithms used in this system to generate cloud properties were validated and improved by the research conducted under this agreement. The team supported, at least, 11 ARM-related or supported field experiments by providing near-real time satellite imagery, cloud products, model results, and interactive analyses for mission planning, execution, and post-experiment scientific analyses. Comparisons of cloud properties derived from satellite, aircraft, and surface measurements were used to evaluate uncertainties in the cloud properties. Multiple-angle satellite retrievals were used to determine the influence of cloud structural and microphysical properties on the exiting radiation field.

  9. Equation of State Measurements of Materials Using a Three-Stage Gun to Impact Velocities of 11km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REINHART,WILLIAM D.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; CARROLL,DANIEL E.; THORNHILL,T.G.; WINFREE,N.A.

    2000-09-26

    Understanding high pressure behavior of homogeneous as well as heterogeneous materials is necessary in order to address the physical processes associated with hypervelocity impact events related to space science applications including orbital debris impact and impact lethality. At very high impact velocities, material properties will be subjugated to phase-changes, such as melting and vaporization. These phase states cannot be obtained through conventional gun technology. These processes need to be represented accurately in hydrodynamic codes to allow credible computational analysis of impact events resulting from hypervelocity impact. In this paper, techniques that are being developed and implemented to obtain the needed shock loading parameters (Hugoniot states) for material characterization studies, namely shock velocity and particle velocity, will be described at impact velocities up to 11 km/s. What is new in this report is that these techniques are being implemented for use at engagement velocities never before attained utilizing two-stage light-gas gun technology.

  10. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 km^3 of Sea Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Kurahashi; Justin Vandenbroucke; Giorgio Gratta

    2010-07-30

    An underwater acoustic sensor array spanning ~1500 km^3 is used to search for cosmic-ray neutrinos of ultra-high energies (UHE, E > 10^18 eV). Approximately 328 million triggers accumulated over an integrated 130 days of data taking are analysed. The sensitivity of the experiment is determined from a Monte Carlo simulation of the array using recorded noise conditions and expected waveforms. Two events are found to have properties compatible with showers in the energy range 10^24 to 5x10^24 eV and 10^22 to 5x10^22 eV. Since the understanding of impulsive backgrounds is limited, a flux upper limit is set providing the most sensitive limit on UHE neutrinos using the acoustic technique.

  11. A survey of satellite galaxies around NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Meghin; Loebman, Sarah; Yoachim, Peter

    2014-06-20

    We conduct a survey of satellite galaxies around the nearby spiral NGC 4258 by combining spectroscopic observations from the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. New spectroscopy is obtained for 15 galaxies. Of the 47 observed objects, we categorize 8 of them as probable satellites, 8 as possible satellites, and 17 as unlikely to be satellites. We do not speculate on the membership of the remaining 14 galaxies due to a lack of velocity and distance information. Radially integrating our best-fit NFW profile for NGC 4258 yields a total mass of 1.8 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ?} within 200 kpc. We find that the angular distribution of the satellites appears to be random, and not preferentially aligned with the disk of NGC 4258. In addition, many of the probable satellite galaxies have blue u–r colors and appear to be star-forming irregulars in SDSS images; this stands in contrast to the low number of blue satellites in the Milky Way and M31 systems at comparable distances.

  12. ALBEDO PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS BASED ON THE ALL-SKY SURVEY OF THE INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE AKARI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsuhara, Hideo [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata-cho, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)] [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata-cho, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Mueller, Thomas G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ootsubo, Takafumi, E-mail: usui@ir.isas.jaxa.jp [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)] [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids (MBAs) detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the standard thermal model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes measured at optical wavelengths. MBAs, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06-3.27 AU, except for the near-Earth asteroids. AcuA provides a complete data set of all MBAs brighter than the absolute magnitude of H < 10.3, which corresponds to the diameter of d > 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the MBAs is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. The bimodal distribution in each group consists of low-albedo components in C-type asteroids and high-albedo components in S-type asteroids. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-types, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-types, which are the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the abundance of P-types increases beyond 3 AU. This distribution is similar to that of C- or D-types.

  13. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.; MacKenzie, E.

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authrs examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B(sub z). A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations.

  14. Hardware demonstration of high-speed networks for satellite applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, Jonathon W.; Lee, David S.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents the implementation results of a hardware demonstration utilizing the Serial RapidIO{trademark} and SpaceWire protocols that was funded by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL's) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) office. This demonstration was one of the activities in the Modeling and Design of High-Speed Networks for Satellite Applications LDRD. This effort has demonstrated the transport of application layer packets across both RapidIO and SpaceWire networks to a common downlink destination using small topologies comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf and custom devices. The RapidFET and NEX-SRIO debug and verification tools were instrumental in the successful implementation of the RapidIO hardware demonstration. The SpaceWire hardware demonstration successfully demonstrated the transfer and routing of application data packets between multiple nodes and also was able reprogram remote nodes using configuration bitfiles transmitted over the network, a key feature proposed in node-based architectures (NBAs). Although a much larger network (at least 18 to 27 nodes) would be required to fully verify the design for use in a real-world application, this demonstration has shown that both RapidIO and SpaceWire are capable of routing application packets across a network to a common downlink node, illustrating their potential use in real-world NBAs.

  15. Risk management of student-run small satellite programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deems, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Carolina)

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for failure mode identification in university-affiliated, small satellite programs. These small programs have a unique set of risks due to many factors, including a typically inexperienced ...

  16. 'Dark' Milky Way Satellite Uncovered - NERSC SCience News March...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and location of both of the known satellite galaxies. When she applied this analysis to radio observations of our own Milky Way, the analysis revealed a potential dwarf galaxy,...

  17. The use of satellite-based technology in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Danielle Renee

    2007-01-01

    Satellite technology in the areas of remote sensing, communication, and navigation can provide valuable information in a number of areas from business to disaster management to agriculture. There is great potential for ...

  18. Satellite constellation design for mid-course ballistic missile intercept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sauter, Luke Michael, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis will establish a conceptual approach to the design of constellations for satellite-based mid-course missile defense. The ballistic missile intercept problem leads to a new paradigm of coverage where interceptor ...

  19. Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 · Satellite Attitude Control System Design Using Reaction Wheels Bhanu Gouda Brian Fast Dan Simon #12;2Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation;3Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 ADCS ·ADCS: Attitude Determination and Control

  20. On the use of Satellite Television in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Taylor; David O. Williams

    1998-10-24

    This paper assesses the feasibility of exploiting commercial satellite television technologies to broadcast video signals and data from major High Energy Physics facilities to collaborating institutes throughout the world.

  1. Plasma-satellite interaction driven magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed-ur-Rehman, E-mail: surehman@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Marchand, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Marchand@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    We report the first fully kinetic quantitative estimate of magnetic field perturbations caused by the interaction of a spacecraft with space environment. Such perturbations could affect measurements of geophysical magnetic fields made with very sensitive magnetometers on-board satellites. Our approach is illustrated with a calculation of perturbed magnetic fields near the recently launched Swarm satellites. In this case, magnetic field perturbations do not exceed 20 pT, and they are below the sensitivity threshold of the on-board magnetometers. Anticipating future missions in which satellites and instruments would be subject to more intense solar UV radiation, however, it appears that magnetic field perturbations associated with satellite interaction with space environment, might approach or exceed instruments' sensitivity thresholds.

  2. HTTPEP: a HTTP Performance Enhancing Proxy for Satellite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    , Cork, Ireland. p.davern@cs.ucc.ie Ahmed Zahran1 , Department of Electronics and Electrical Communications, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. azahran@eecu.cu.edu.eg Broadband satellites enable Internet

  3. Magnetic attitude control for satellites Jan Tommy Gravdahl,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    Magnetic attitude control for satellites Jan Tommy Gravdahl, Department of Engineering Cybernetics Norwegian University of Science and Technology N-7491 TRONDHEIM, Norway Abstract-- In this paper College, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Agricultural University of Norway

  4. A small satellite preliminary thermal control and heat shield analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melani Barreiro, Diego A

    2008-01-01

    As part of a student owned small satellite project, a preliminary thermal control and heat shield analysis was developed to verify acceptable performance requirements for the system. For the thermal control section, the ...

  5. Design of the high-speed framing, FEC, and interleaving hardware used in a 5.4km free-space optical communication experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Joseph Anthony, Jr.

    The forward error correction (FEC) and interleaver realizations used in a 5.4 km horizontal-path link experiment incorporated several unique elements that were specifically tailored to address turbulence-induced fading. ...

  6. Determination of wind from Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carle, William Everett

    1979-01-01

    DETERMINATION OF WIND FROM NIMBUS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis by WILLIAM EVERETT CARLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil!. ment of the requirement for the deg. . ec of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Meteorology DETEIQ&INATION OE WIND PROS1 NINEDS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis WILLIA11 EVERETT CARLE Aporoved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi tee) Nember) (Head of Department) December 1979...

  7. Satellite-viewed cloud signatures associated with extratropical cyclogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapierre, Robert Lucien

    1973-01-01

    SATELLITE-VIEWED CLOUD SIGNATURES ASSOCIATED WITH EXTRATROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS A Thesis by ROBERT LUCIEN LAPIERRE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Meteorology SATELLITE-VIENED CLOUD SIGNATURES ASSOCIATED WITH EXTRATROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS A Thesis by ROBERT LUCIEN LAPIERRE Appi"o ed as to st~le and content by: n llcgrceo~& (C ai rman of Conmi t te~ YemberI Hay...

  8. A mathematical simulation of earth satellite explosion debris orbital elements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mabrey, Wayne Edward

    1970-01-01

    A MATHEMATICAL SIKJLATION OF EARTH SATELLITE EXPLOSION DEBRIS ORBITAI ELEMENTS A Thesis WAYNE EDWARD NABREY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE... Nay 1970 Major Subject Nathematics A MATHEMATICAL SlmZATION OZ EARTH SATELLITE EXPLOSION DEBRIS ORBITAL ELEMENTS A Thesis WAI? EDWARD MABREY Approved as to style and content by: haxrman o ommi tee Head o epartment mber Member May 1...

  9. Location of the M 2.0 Earthquake on 08/22/2010 that Occurred 25 km North of West Valley, New York.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Location of the M 2.0 Earthquake on 08/22/2010 that Occurred 25 km North of West Valley, New York at 16:41:47 (UTC) about 25 km north of West Valley, New York. There were no felt reports by residents and their distribution is plotted in Figure 2. 22 August 2010, Md 2.0 Earthquake 15 miles north of West Valley, NY -78

  10. Preface to the special issue of PSS on ``Surfaces and atmospheres of the outer planets, their satellites and ring systems: Part V''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    and models on the atmospheres and surfaces of the giant planets and their satellites. Particular attention, several of papers in this issue discuss results from laboratory experiments and models. Zuchowski et al. present a new parametrization scheme of Jovian moist convection based on a heat engine arguments

  11. The Effect of Lunar-like Satellites on the Orbital Infrared Light Curves of Earth-analog Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas A. Moskovitz; Eric Gaidos; Darren Williams

    2008-10-17

    We investigate the influence of lunar-like satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extra-solar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet. We use an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of the Earth while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g. via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean) only the largest (approximately Mars-size) lunar-like satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e. one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise of 10-20 at infrared wavelengths). Non-detection of a lunar-like satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established then the presence of a lunar-like satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, thus demonstrating that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study of extra-solar Earth-like planets.

  12. Stimulated Radiative Molecular Association in the Early Solar System. II. Orbital Radii of the Planets and Other Satellites of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, James C

    2015-01-01

    In a previous investigation, the orbital radii of regular satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn are shown to be directly related to photon energies in the spectra of atomic and molecular hydrogen. To explain these observations a model was developed involving stimulated radiative molecular association (SRMA) reactions among photons and atoms in the protosatellite disks of the planets. In the present investigation, the previously developed model is applied to the planets and important satellites of the Sun. A key component of the model involves resonance associated with SRMA. Through this resonance, thermal energy is extracted from the protosun's protoplanetary disk at specific distances from the protosun wherever there is a match between the local thermal energy of the disk and the energy of photons impinging on the disk. Orbital radii of the planets and satellites are related to photon energies ($E_P$ values) in the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. An expression determined previously is used to relat...

  13. THE MASSIVE SATELLITE POPULATION OF MILKY-WAY-SIZED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv, E-mail: apuebla@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-20

    Several occupational distributions for satellite galaxies more massive than m{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} around Milky-Way (MW)-sized hosts are presented and used to predict the internal dynamics of these satellites as a function of m{sub *}. For the analysis, a large galaxy group mock catalog is constructed on the basis of (sub)halo-to-stellar mass relations fully constrained with currently available observations, namely the galaxy stellar mass function decomposed into centrals and satellites, and the two-point correlation functions at different masses. We find that 6.6% of MW-sized galaxies host two satellites in the mass range of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively). The probabilities of the MW-sized galaxies having one satellite equal to or larger than the LMC, two satellites equal to or larger than the SMC, or three satellites equal to or larger than Sagittarius (Sgr) are Almost-Equal-To 0.26, 0.14, and 0.14, respectively. The cumulative satellite mass function of the MW, N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) , down to the mass of the Fornax dwarf is within the 1{sigma} distribution of all the MW-sized galaxies. We find that MW-sized hosts with three satellites more massive than Sgr (as the MW) are among the most common cases. However, the most and second most massive satellites in these systems are smaller than the LMC and SMC by roughly 0.7 and 0.8 dex, respectively. We conclude that the distribution N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) for MW-sized galaxies is quite broad, the particular case of the MW being of low frequency but not an outlier. The halo mass of MW-sized galaxies correlates only weakly with N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}). Then, it is not possible to accurately determine the MW halo mass by means of its N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}); from our catalog, we constrain a lower limit of 1.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at the 1{sigma} level. Our analysis strongly suggests that the abundance of massive subhalos should agree with the abundance of massive satellites in all MW-sized hosts, i.e., there is not a missing (massive) satellite problem for the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. However, we confirm that the maximum circular velocity, v{sub max}, of the subhalos of satellites smaller than m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is systematically larger than the v{sub max} inferred from current observational studies of the MW bright dwarf satellites; different from previous works, this conclusion is based on an analysis of the overall population of MW-sized galaxies. Some pieces of evidence suggest that the issue could refer only to satellite dwarfs but not to central dwarfs, then environmental processes associated with dwarfs inside host halos combined with supernova-driven core expansion should be on the basis of the lowering of v{sub max}.

  14. Extension of the operating parameters of the two stage light gas gun to velocities below 2 km/sec.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoe, R S

    2007-08-28

    The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Facility (JASPER) located in area 27 at the Nevada Test Site Has been tasked with providing high accuracy information on the Equation Of State (EOS) and other dynamic properties of weapons grade plutonium and other actinides important to the stockpile stewardship program. In the past 5 years this facility has provided dozens of experimental data points for the accurate determination of pressure density relationship for these materials over a broad pressure range. In order to complete this survey it is necessary to extend the low pressure region to include projectile velocities below 2 km/s. For most gas gun facilities this would present not too great a difficulty, one could simply decrease the amount of propellant along with a decrease in the strength of the petal valve, However JASPER requires that the piston be securely embedded in the Acceleration Reservoir (AR) as part of the containment system. The projectile must remain flat and undistorted. This requirement makes the attainment of slow velocities problematic. This talk will discuss the JASPER Facility, A finite difference code developed to give predictive capability for two stage gas guns, and a set of experiments performed to demonstrate this capability.

  15. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  16. Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Heliosat procedure for irradiance Estimates from Satellitethe pro duction of solar irradiance and daylight illuminancesatellite based solar irradiance modelling - The SOLIS clear

  17. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    pressure anomalies). As a result, tidal stresses lead to spatial variations in pore pressure that can this hypothesis. First, we used a one-dimensional model of pore pressure based on Biot's poroelastic theory velocity field. The flow pattern is very sensitive to the inflow pressure gradient, and for these models

  18. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  19. Satellite System Safety Analysis Using STPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Nicholas Connor

    2013-01-01

    Traditional hazard analysis techniques based on failure models of accident causality, such as the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) method currently used at NASA, are inadequate for analyzing safety at the system level. ...

  20. Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

  1. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States); Basu, S. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States)] [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States); Sojka, J.J. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)] [and others] [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); and others

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authors examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B{sub z}. A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations. This ability to bridge between macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations provides a natural framework for the modeling of mesoscale structures themselves. This mesoscale modeling, in turn, can be utilized in a variety of radar and communication systems applications in the polar region. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Tracking target objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Vries, Willem H; Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J

    2014-10-14

    A system for tracking objects that are in earth orbit via a constellation or network of satellites having imaging devices is provided. An object tracking system includes a ground controller and, for each satellite in the constellation, an onboard controller. The ground controller receives ephemeris information for a target object and directs that ephemeris information be transmitted to the satellites. Each onboard controller receives ephemeris information for a target object, collects images of the target object based on the expected location of the target object at an expected time, identifies actual locations of the target object from the collected images, and identifies a next expected location at a next expected time based on the identified actual locations of the target object. The onboard controller processes the collected image to identify the actual location of the target object and transmits the actual location information to the ground controller.

  3. An analysis of the properties of VAS satellite soundings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Robert Charles

    1984-01-01

    participating in AVE/VAS II (6-7 March 1982). Rawinsonde sounding in AVE/VAS format . Locations of available satellite soundings (dark circles) in comoarison with rawinsonde network (open circles) for 6 March 1982 at 2100 GMT. Mesoscale rawi nsonde stations... ~ ~ ~ ~ p ~ ~ 0 L) 1 / I I I 0 'I I I ~ ~ ~ Fig. 3. Locations of available satellite soundings (dark circles) in comparison with rawinsonde network (open circles) for 6 March 1982 at 2100 GMT. Mesoscaie rawinsonde stations are not shown. of the 16...

  4. Deriving Atmospheric Density Estimates Using Satellite Precision Orbit Ephemerides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Andrew Timothy

    2009-01-01

    due to atmospheric drag m/s2 ap geomagnetic 3-hourly planetary equivalent amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 A satellite cross-sectional area m2 Ap geomagnetic daily planetary amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 B B? estimated... due to atmospheric drag m/s2 ap geomagnetic 3-hourly planetary equivalent amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 A satellite cross-sectional area m2 Ap geomagnetic daily planetary amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 B B? estimated...

  5. Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-10-24

    This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

  6. Meltwater flux and runoff modeling in the abalation area of jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Steffen, Konrad [UNIV OF COLORADO

    2009-01-01

    The temporal variability in surface snow and glacier melt flux and runoff were investigated for the ablation area of lakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland. High-resolution meteorological observations both on and outside the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were used as model input. Realistic descriptions of snow accumulation, snow and glacier-ice melt, and runoff are essential to understand trends in ice sheet surface properties and processes. SnowModel, a physically based, spatially distributed meteorological and snow-evolution modeling system was used to simulate the temporal variability of lakobshavn Isbrre accumulation and ablation processes for 2000/01-2006/07. Winter snow-depth observations and MODIS satellite-derived summer melt observations were used for model validation of accumulation and ablation. Simulations agreed well with observed values. Simulated annual surface melt varied from as low as 3.83 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to as high as 8.64 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05). Modeled surface melt occurred at elevations reaching 1,870 m a.s.l. for 2004/05, while the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) fluctuated from 990 to 1,210 m a.s.l. during the simulation period. The SnowModel meltwater retention and refreezing routines considerably reduce the amount of meltwater available as ice sheet runoff; without these routines the lakobshavn surface runoff would be overestimated by an average of 80%. From September/October through May/June no runoff events were simulated. The modeled interannual runoff variability varied from 1.81 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to 5.21 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05), yielding a cumulative runoff at the Jakobshavn glacier terminus of {approx}2.25 m w.eq. to {approx}4.5 m w.eq., respectively. The average modeled lakobshavn runoff of {approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} was merged with previous estimates of Jakobshavn ice discharge to quantify the freshwater flux to Illulissat Icefiord. For both runoff and ice discharge the average trends are similar, indicating increasing (insignificant) influx of freshwater to the Illulissat Icefiord for the period 2000/01-2006/07. This study suggests that surface runoff forms a minor part of the overall Jakobshavn freshwater flux to the fiord: around 7% ({approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1}) of the average annual freshwater flux of {approx}51.0 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} originates from the surface runoff.

  7. The metallicity distribution of the halo and the satellites of the Milky way in the hierarchical merging paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikos Prantzos

    2008-07-09

    To account for the observed differential metallicity distribution (DMD) of the Milky Way halo, a semi-analytical model is presented in the framework of the hierarchical merging paradigm for structure formation. It is assumed that the Milky Way halo is composed of a number of sub-haloes with properties either as observed in the dwarf satellite galaxies of the Local group (shape of metallicity distribution, effective yield) or derived from calculations of structure formation (sub-halo distribution function). With reasonable assumptions for the parameters involved, we find that the overall shape and effective yield of the Galactic halo DMD can be reproduced in the framework of such a simple model. The low metallicity tail of the DMD presents a defficiency of stars with respect to the simple model predictions (akin to the G-dwarf problem in the solar neighborhood); it is suggested that an early infall phase can account for that problem, as well as for the observed DMDs of dwarf satellite galaxies.Accretion of galaxies similar (but not identical) to the progenitors of present day dwarf satellites of the Milky Way may well have formed the Galactic halo.

  8. National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes weather warnings or forecasts, tsunami and flood alerts, space weather, fire and drought reports-tagged Dolphin DART Tsunami Buoy Coral Reef Watch El Nino signature Search & Rescue Harmful Algal Bloom Ozone information for predictive environmental and atmospheric modeling systems and space-based distress alert

  9. Fig.3. Seismicity plots showing the depths and epicenters on Galapagos Is-lands. Note how the earthquakes are clustered at 10 km depth, probably contro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    Bolivar). LAT LONG Fig.6. The GV01-GV04 baseline has recorded vertical uplift since the 2005 eruption with the vertical bars: Red = 2005 Sierra Negra, Blue= 2006 and Orange= 2007. The shallow and cluster seismicity= 2006 and Orange= 2007. A GV01GV07 2 km 0 Deep magma source B Sill magma Chamber body GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM

  10. PSR B0329+54: Substructure in the scatter-broadened image discovered with RadioAstron on baselines of up to 235,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, M V; Bartel, N; Gwinn, C R; Johnson, M D; Joshi, B C; Kardashev, N S; Karuppusamy, R; Kovalev, Y Y; Kramer, M; Rudnitskii, A G; Safutdinov, E R; Shishov, V I; Smirnova, T V; Soglasnov, V A; Zensus, J A; Zhuravlev, V I

    2015-01-01

    We studied scattering properties of the pulsar PSR B0329+54 with a ground-space radio interferometer RadioAstron which included the 10-m Space Radio Telescope, the 110-m Green Bank Telescope, the 14x25-m Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and the 64-m Kalyazin Radio Telescope. The observations were performed at 324 MHz on baselines of up to 235,000 km in November 2012 and January 2014. At short ground-space baselines of less than about 20,000 km, the visibility amplitude decreases with the projected baseline length, providing a direct measurement of the diameter of the scattering disk of 4.7$\\pm$0.9 mas. The size of the diffraction spot near Earth is 15,000$\\pm$3,000 km. At longer baselines of up to 235,000 km, where no interferometric detection of the scattering disk would be expected, significant visibilities were observed with amplitudes scattered around a constant value. These detections result in a discovery of a substructure in the completely resolved scatter-broadened image of the pointlike source, ...

  11. Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA/AVHRR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, P.O. Box 8089, Missoula, MT 59807, United States g NOAA forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. While forest fires in North America (NA) have

  12. 1154 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 19, NO. 15, AUGUST 1, 2007 10 10 Gb/s DWDM Transmission Through 2.2-km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Joseph M.

    Transmission Through 2.2-km Multimode Fiber Using Adaptive Optics Rahul A. Panicker, Jeffrey P. Wilde, Joseph M. Kahn, David F. Welch, and Ilya Lyubomirsky Abstract--Transmitter-based adaptive optics and receiver-crystal spatial light modulator controls the launched field pattern for ten 10-Gb/s nonreturn-to-zero channels

  13. Synchronization of system-of-systems interfaces in military satellite communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark J. (Mark Jeffrey)

    2008-01-01

    Military systems continue to become more complex and nearly all are now part of one or more system of systems (SoS). Military satellite communications programs have expanded over the last decade from three distinct satellite ...

  14. Interactions between TCP and link layer protocols on mobile satellite links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Edward A., 1980-

    2004-01-01

    High speed satellite-based data networks are highly desirable for a variety of mobile applications. In order to inter-operate with existing networks, satellite-based systems must support TCP/IP traffic. However, TCP performs ...

  15. Science Background for the Reprocessing and Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Science Background for the Reprocessing and Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, MD 20771 USA #12;2 Science Background for the Reprocessing and Goddard Satellite-based Surface

  16. Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    :on alone contains 54% of the sea's oil reserves and 45% of its gasSea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View Maurizio, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;Outline Introduc:on Sea oil fields Synthe:c Aperture

  17. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of longer-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Here, we analyse spectrally resolved measurements of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  18. Because of its excellence in satellite-based research,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    winds, which show their mixing power and driving force for ocean currents, as well as the strength heights, which show currents in the upper ocean, along with significant wave heights. · MicrowaveStudying the Ocean from Space Because of its excellence in satellite-based research, the College

  19. AEROSOL ABSORPTION IN CLOUDY SCENES USING PASSIVE SATELLITE INSTRUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    AEROSOL ABSORPTION IN CLOUDY SCENES USING PASSIVE SATELLITE INSTRUMENTS M. de Graaf, L.G. Tilstra information has become available from active space-based sensors and some dedicated field campaigns on aerosol-absorption, is the Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI), which can indicate absorbing aerosols overlying clouds. The AAI is available

  20. Using satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (no wind) Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Blaavandshuk Met. mast N #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from · Wake near large offshore wind farms is quantified in space and time · Software for usersUsing satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete

  1. Tropospheric carbon monoxide: satellite observations and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCallum, Stuart Neil

    2008-01-01

    of greenhouse gases such as CH4 and O3. Consequently, CO has an atmospheric lifetime of 1-3 months, making it a good tracer for studying the long range transport of pollution. Satellite observations present a valuable tool to investigate tropospheric CO...

  2. A Review of Impending Small Satellite Formation Flying Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Soon-Jo

    A Review of Impending Small Satellite Formation Flying Missions Saptarshi Bandyopadhyay , Giri P. Subramanian , Rebecca Foust , Daniel Morgan§ , Soon-Jo Chung¶ , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, 61801, USA and Fred Y. Hadaegh Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute

  3. 50 Years of Treaty Verification from Space Operational Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the universe. The Vela satellites discovered bursts of gamma- ray energy emanating from beyond the solar system gamma-ray burst measured with Vela (Credit: R. Klebesadel, I. Strong & R. Olson (LANL) NASA Swift Spacecraft devoted to the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (Credit: NASA/GSFC) The U.S. Nuclear Detonation

  4. Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Charge Optimization of Lithium-Ion Batteries in Small Satellites Saurabh Jain, Dan Simon Department and batteries at the same time. To overcome these problems we have developed and adopted a power management involves scheduling of loads (various subsystem operations, payload experimentation, battery charging, etc

  5. Fifth Annual RECOMB Satellite Workshop on Comparative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Fifth Annual RECOMB Satellite Workshop on Comparative Genomics September 16-18, 2007 First RECOMB Oliver A. Ryder (Zoological Society of San Diego) Genomics and Bioinformatics: Applications) Accelerated and Biased Nucleotide Evolution in the Human Genome Rick Wilson (Washington University, St. Louis

  6. IP ROUTING ISSUES IN SATELLITE CONSTELLATION NETWORKS A. CLERGET,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Lloyd

    constellation networks; Internet Protocol (IP); routing; tunnelling; Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS); Border Gateway Protocol (BGP); Quality of Service (QoS); multicast. 1 INTRODUCTION Satellite; in conjunction with its terrestrial gateway stations it forms an autonomous system (AS). Over the same period

  7. Cognitive Vision for Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Docking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    with the challenge of effec- tively combining low-level vision with artificial intelli- gence. Some of the earliestCognitive Vision for Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Docking Faisal Z. Qureshi and Demetri MDRobotics Limited, Brampton, ON L6S 4J3, Canada Abstract We present a cognitively-controlled vision system

  8. A Lagrangian Heuristic for Satellite Range Scheduling with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-24

    A distributed constellation is flexible and robust: it can provide ... Force Satellite Control Network [2] and also by the engineers of Telespazio S.p.A. 1 in a preliminary study .... Transmission and reception are regarded as being simultaneous. In fact, trans- ...... http://europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/energy transport/

  9. RNS Implementation of High Performance Filters for Satellite Demultiplexing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    RNS Implementation of High Performance Filters for Satellite Demultiplexing G.C. Cardarilli, A. Del we present a Residue Number System (RNS) implementation of digital filters to be used for space applications. The RNS is particularly attractive because of the reduced power dissipation with respect

  10. AIAA 2004-3150 ARCHITECTING A COMMUNICATION SATELLITE PRODUCT LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    ABSTRACT Current unfavorable market conditions have shifted the preference of commercial communication cycles, and reduce market risk by catering to a number of market segments. This paper formulates of commercial communication satellites. NOMENCLATURE SAA solar array area radiatorA thermal radiator area c

  11. Distributed Load-Aware Routing in LEO Satellite Evangelos Papapetrou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papapetrou, Evaggelos

    with terrestrial infrastructure. However, over the last years the interest in LEO systems has been renewed algorithm to compute the optimal path for any pair of satellites. In the case of traffic adaptive routing. This reduces the ability of the algorithm to adapt to traffic. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm

  12. Satellite and Radar Meteorology Dr. Oleksandr Karabanov (Aleks)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Robert X.

    Scattering; Clouds; Reflection; Solar radiation Thursday, November 01, 2012 21 Geostationary satellites using these data #12;Syllabus Date Class # Class topic (tentative) Tuesday, August 21, 2012 1 Tuesday, August 28, 2012 3 Electromagnetic radiation Thursday, August 30, 2012 4 Propagation of EM waves

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Comparing land surface phenology derived from satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    ORIGINAL PAPER Comparing land surface phenology derived from satellite and GPS network microwave, a normalized mi- crowave reflectance index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive, and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites to investigate VOD and NMRI

  14. X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    United States Language: English Subject: 74; ANISOTROPY; DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS; ELECTRONS; KINETICS; LASERS; PLASMA; POLARIZATION; PULSES; SATELLITES; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY...

  15. RING EDGE WAVES AND THE MASSES OF NEARBY SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, John W.; Porco, Carolyn C. [CICLOPS/Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Tiscareno, Matthew S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Moons embedded in gaps within Saturn's main rings generate waves on the gap edges due to their gravitational disturbances. These edge waves can serve as diagnostics for the masses and, in some cases, orbital characteristics of the embedded moons. Although N-body simulations of the edges are far better in inferring masses from edge morphology, the long run-times of this technique often make it impractical. In this paper, we describe a faster approach to narrow the range of masses to explore with N-body simulations, to explore the multidimensional parameter space of edge/moon interactions, and to guide the planning of spacecraft observations. Using numerical, test-particle models and neglecting particle-particle interactions, we demonstrate that the simple analytic theory of the edge waves applies well to Pan in the Encke Gap but breaks down for smaller moons/gaps like Daphnis in the Keeler Gap. Fitting an analytic model to our simulation results allows us to suggest an improved relationship between moon-mass and edge wave amplitude. Numerical methods also grant freedom to explore a wider range of moon and ring orbits than the circular, coplanar case considered by analytic theory. We examine how pre-encounter inclinations and eccentricities affect the properties of the edge waves. In the case where the moon or ring-edge particle orbits initially have eccentric radial variations that are large compared to the gap width, there is considerable variation in edge wave amplitude depending on the orbital phase of the encounter. Inclined moons also affect the edge wave amplitude, potentially significantly, as well as generate vertical waves on the gap-edges. Recent Cassini images acquired as Saturn approaches equinox and the Sun's elevation on the ringplane is extremely low have revealed long shadows associated with the Keeler gap edge waves created by the embedded moon Daphnis. We interpret these as being cast by {approx}1 km high vertical structure in the waves created by Daphnis' out-of-plane perturbations on the ring particles.

  16. As reprinted from InternationalJournal of Satellite Communications, Vol. 8, 79-93 (1990) Helmut Eyssele and Heinz Gockler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göckler, Heinz G.

    1990-01-01

    FOR MOBILE SCPC SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS HELMUT EYSSELE A N D HEINZ GOCKLER ANT Ncrclrr dernultiplexer Sini~rlation Hierarchical niultistage method Tree structure SCPC satellite com

  17. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16

    in the last 10 years or so. We proposed geological descriptions of these two Basins. The key characteristics of the two models are the presence of channels and pinch-outs for depths of between 1 km and 2 km (these values are rescaled for our numerical purposes...

  18. FPGA Implementation of a Satellite Attitude Control using Variable Structure Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboelaze, Mokhtar

    is assumed to control the satellite position and attitude with minimum interfering from ground control the weight and power consumption of the satellite. Failure to properly control the satellite can lead to disastrous results. NASA's earth orbiting Lewis Spacecraft lost contact with ground control within few days

  19. Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections SAM PULLEN and PER ENGE constellation are not expected to violate this assumption. A study of unscheduled GPS satellite outages from. In addition, satellites that have recently experienced unscheduled outages are more likely to suffer

  20. P5.60B DERIVATION OF DAYLIGHT AND SOLAR IRRADIANCE DATA FROM SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    P5.60B DERIVATION OF DAYLIGHT AND SOLAR IRRADIANCE DATA FROM SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS A. Hammer, D of the downward surface shortwave irradiance from satellite observations has been subject to numerous project SATELLIGHT an attempt is made to use satellite methods to derive daylight and solar irradiance

  1. SOLAR COOKER UTILIZING SATELLITE DISH TECHNOLOGY Mechanical Engineering Department , Philadelphia University, Amman Jordan, e-mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR COOKER UTILIZING SATELLITE DISH TECHNOLOGY A. Saleh1 A. Badran2 1 Mechanical Engineering dish­type solar cooker was built and tested utilizing satellite dish technology. A common satellite-TV dish was utilized as a solar cooker after covering it with a highly­reflective aluminum foil, which

  2. Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS -FS 2013 The aims of this course are threefold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Programme Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS - FS 2013 Aims The aims of this course are threefold of satellite remote sensing, often in relation to GIS, in different disciplines with invited speakers from about what is happening with satellite remote sensing in Switzerland and how it works in professional

  3. Satellite remote sensing of surface air quality Randall V. Martin a,b,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    Review Satellite remote sensing of surface air quality Randall V. Martin a,b,* a Department 2007 Received in revised form 26 June 2008 Accepted 2 July 2008 Keywords: Remote sensing Air quality Satellite Pollution Emissions a b s t r a c t Satellite remote sensing of air quality has evolved

  4. Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS -FS 2011 The aims of this course are threefold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Programme Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS - FS 2011 Aims The aims of this course are threefold of satellite remote sensing, often in relation to GIS, in different disciplines with invited speakers from about what is happening with satellite remote sensing in Switzerland and how it works in professional

  5. Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS -FS 2012 The aims of this course are threefold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Programme Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS - FS 2012 Aims The aims of this course are threefold of satellite remote sensing, often in relation to GIS, in different disciplines with invited speakers from about what is happening with satellite remote sensing in Switzerland and how it works in professional

  6. Capabilities of satellite precipitation datasets to estimate heavy precipitation rates at different temporal accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    Capabilities of satellite precipitation datasets to estimate heavy precipitation rates at different as alternative sources of precipitation information has been argued in numerous studies. Future developments in satellite precipitation algorithms as well as utilization of satellite data in operational applications rely

  7. Measuring Phased-Array Antenna Beampatterns with High Dynamic Range for the Murchison Widefield Array using 137 MHz ORBCOMM Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neben, A R; Hewitt, J N; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the fluctuations in 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch of Reionization in thousand hour integrations poses stringent requirements on calibration and image quality, both of which necessitate accurate primary beam models. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) uses phased array antenna elements which maximize collecting area at the cost of complexity. To quantify their performance, we have developed a novel beam measurement system using the 137 MHz ORBCOMM satellite constellation and a reference dipole antenna. Using power ratio measurements, we measure the {\\it in situ} beampattern of the MWA antenna tile relative to that of the reference antenna, canceling the variation of satellite flux or polarization with time. We employ angular averaging to mitigate multipath effects (ground scattering), and assess environmental systematics with a null experiment in which the MWA tile is replaced with a second reference dipole. We achieve beam measurements over 30 dB dynamic range in beam...

  8. SWOT: The Surface Water & Ocean Topography Satellite Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center School of Earth Sciences The Ohio State University Funded By: Funded By: #12;with many-Boundary Issues: ex: Tigris & Euphrates Disputes Slide courtesy Frank Schwartz n Water Usage: n 98.5% water energy of the ocean. For example, the cross-stream scale of the Gulf Stream is 100 km, which is not fully

  9. Evaluation of moist processes during intense precipitation in km-scale NWP models using remote sensing and in-situ data: Impact of microphysics size distribution assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg, K.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of moist processes and surface precipitation during three extreme precipitation events over Belgium to the representation of rain, snow and hail size distributions in a bulk one-moment microphysics parameterisation scheme. Sensitivities included the use of empirically derived relations to calculate the slope parameter and diagnose the intercept parameter of the exponential snow and rain size distributions and sensitivities to the treatment of hail/graupel. A detailed evaluation of the experiments against various high temporal resolution and spatially distributed observational data was performed to understand how moist processes responded to the implemented size distribution modifications. Net vapor consumption by microphysical processes was found to be unaffected by snow or rain size distribution modifications, while it was reduced replacing formulations for hail by those typical for graupel, mainly due to intense sublimation of graupel. Cloud optical thickness was overestimated in all experiments and all cases, likely due to overestimated snow amounts. The overestimation slightly deteriorated by modifying the rain and snow size distributions due to increased snow depositional growth, while it was reduced by including graupel. The latter was mainly due to enhanced cloud water collection by graupel and reduced snow depositional growth. Radar reflectivity and cloud optical thickness could only be realistically represented by inclusion of graupel during a stratiform case, while hail was found indispensable to simulate the vertical reflectivity profile and the surface precipitation structure. Precipitation amount was not much altered by any of the modifications made and the general overestimation was only decreased slightly during a supercell convective case.

  10. Figure S1. Comparison of modelled PM2.5 (27 km resolution) with measurements at Harwell2 (UK) in January 2006.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    m-3 ) between two2 simulations with a 15% emission reduction of either NOx or NH3 in January 2006 for the3 European domain. Aerosol formation is more sensitive to NOx emissions in blue regions and4 more concentration (µg m-3 ) between two2 simulations with a 15% emission reduction of either NOx or NH3 in June 2006

  11. Statistical modeling of in situ hiss amplitudes using ground measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical modeling of in situ hiss amplitudes using ground measurements D. I. Golden,1 M to the maintenance of the slot region between the inner and outer electron belt. Traditionally, in situ satellite-lived and very few satellite receivers remain operational for an entire 11-year solar cycle. Ground stations

  12. EVIDENCE THAT GAMMA-RAY BURST 130702A EXPLODED IN A DWARF SATELLITE OF A MASSIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.; Zheng Weikang; Clubb, Kelsey I., E-mail: pkelly@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    GRB 130702A is a nearby long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) discovered by the Fermi satellite whose associated afterglow was detected by the Palomar Transient Factory. Subsequent photometric and spectroscopic monitoring has identified a coincident broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN), and nebular emission detected near the explosion site is consistent with a redshift of z = 0.145. The SN-GRB exploded at an offset of {approx}7.''6 from the center of an inclined r = 18.1 mag red disk-dominated galaxy, and {approx}0.''6 from the center of a much fainter r = 23 mag object. We obtained Keck-II DEIMOS spectra of the two objects and find a 2{sigma} upper limit on their line-of-sight velocity offset of {approx}<60 km s{sup -1}. If we calculate the inclination angle of the massive red galaxy from its axis ratio and assume that its light is dominated by a very thin disk, the explosion would have a {approx}60 kpc central offset, or {approx}9 times the galaxy's half-light radius. A significant bulge or a thicker disk would imply a higher inclination angle and greater central offset. The substantial offset suggests that the faint source is a separate dwarf galaxy. The star-formation rate of the dwarf galaxy is {approx}0.05 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and we place an upper limit on its oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) < 8.16 dex. The identification of an LGRB in a dwarf satellite of a massive, metal-rich primary galaxy suggests that recent detections of LGRBs spatially coincident with metal-rich galaxies may be, in some cases, superpositions.

  13. Multicolor Photometry of the Uranus Irregular Satellites Sycorax and Caliban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Maris; Giovanni Carraro; Gabriele Cremonese; Marco Fulle

    2001-01-27

    We report on accurate BVRI photometry for the two Uranus irregular satellites Sycorax and Caliban. We derive colours, showing that Sycorax is bluer than Caliban. Our data allows us to detect a significant variability in the Caliban's light-curve, which suggests an estimated period of about 3 hours. Despite it is the brighter of the two bodies, Sycorax does not display a strong statistically significant variability. However our data seem to suggest a period of about 4 hours

  14. AN ARSCL-BASED CLOUD TYPE CLIMATOLOGY FROM RETRIEVALS AND IT'S USE IN MODEL EVALUATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ARSCL-BASED CLOUD TYPE CLIMATOLOGY FROM RETRIEVALS AND IT'S USE IN MODEL EVALUATION STUDIES Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT A climatology of cloud types is developed using long in tandem with satellite observations for model cloud layering and property evaluation. Therefore, satellite

  15. Comparison of satellite-derived and in-situ observations of ice and snow surface temperatures over Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Comparison of satellite-derived and in-situ observations of ice and snow surface temperatures over temperature in the data-sparse cryosphere is by satellite remote sensing. The uncertainties in satellite-derived) records needed for climate studies. In this work we assess satellite-derived "clear-sky" LST products from

  16. A Numerical Model For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a topographic barrier located more than 16 km from the source. Two initial solid volumetric fractions are modeled. For both cases, some of the structures located more distant...

  17. The NASA Aura satellite houses four instruments to study atmospheric ozone. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the satellite provides global total column ozone (TCO) and in combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    iii ABSTRACT The NASA Aura satellite houses four instruments to study atmospheric ozone. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the satellite provides global total column ozone (TCO) and in combination with other instruments tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) can be derived. In this study, the trajectory

  18. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  19. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulations of Macho Parallaxes From a Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Boutreux; Andrew Gould

    1995-07-25

    Three ongoing microlensing experiments have found more candidate events than expected from the known stars. These experiments measure only one parameter of the massive compact halo objects (machos), the magnification time scale of the events. More information is required to understand the nature of the machos. A satellite experiment has been proposed to measure their projected transverse speed $\\tilde{v} = v/(1-z)$, where $v$ is the macho transverse speed and $z$ its distance divided by the distance of the source. Measurement of $\\tilde{v}$ would determine whether the machos were in the Galactic disk, Galactic halo, or in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We simulate events observed toward the LMC by the Earth and by a satellite in an Earth like heliocentric orbit. To leading order, such an experiment determines $\\tilde{v}$ up to a two fold degeneracy. More precise measurements break the degeneracy. We show that with photometric precisions of 3\\% to 4\\% and approximately 1 observation per day, $\\tilde{v}$ can be measured with a maximum error of 20\\% for 70\\% to 90\\% of events similar to the ones reported by the EROS and MACHO collaborations. The projected transverse velocity is known with the same maximum error for 60\\% to 75\\% of these events. This 20\\% maximum error is not a 1 $\\sigma$ error but is mostly due to degeneracy between two possible solutions, each one being localized to much better than 20\\%. These results are obtained with an Earth-satellite separation of 1 AU, and are improved by a larger separation.

  1. Assessment of a satellite power system and six alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolsko, T.; Whitfield, R.; Samsa, M.; Habegger, L.S.; Levine, E.; Tanzman, E.

    1981-04-01

    The satellite power system is assessed in comparison to six alternative technologies. The alternatives are: central-station terrestrial photovoltaic systems, conventional coal-fired power plants, coal-gasification/combined-cycle power plants, light water reactor power plants, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, and fusion. The comparison is made regarding issues of cost and performance, health and safety, environmental effects, resources, socio-economic factors, and insitutional issues. The criteria for selecting the issues and the alternative technologies are given, and the methodology of the comparison is discussed. Brief descriptions of each of the technologies considered are included. (LEW)

  2. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael

    2011-01-18

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  3. Production process for advanced space satellite system cables/interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Luis A.

    2007-12-01

    This production process was generated for the satellite system program cables/interconnects group, which in essences had no well defined production process. The driver for the development of a formalized process was based on the set backs, problem areas, challenges, and need improvements faced from within the program at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, the formal production process was developed from the Master's program of Engineering Management for New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro New Mexico and submitted as a thesis to meet the institute's graduating requirements.

  4. Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

    2006-01-24

    We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

  5. Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity Keyhabitatquantity Sedimentload Obstructions ChannelStability Flow Food Temperature Predation Chemicals Competition functional habitats. Within the Methow basin, the Lower Twisp, Lower Methow Mainstem, Middle Methow Mainstem

  6. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r mReducingwhistleblowerxinyufu Ames25

  7. Penetration Experiments with 6061-T6511 Aluminum Targets and Spherical-Nose Steel Projectiles at Striking Velocities Between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrestal, M.J.; Piekutowski, A.J.

    1999-02-04

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments with 7.11-mm-diameter, 74.7-mm-long, spherical-nose, 4340 steel projectiles launched into 250-mm-diameter, 6061-T6511 aluminum targets. To show the effect of projectile strength, we used projectiles that had average Rockwell harnesses of R{sub c} = 36.6, 39.5, and 46.2. A powder gun and two-stage, light-gas guns launched the 0.023 kg projectiles at striking velocities between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s. Post-test radiographs of the targets showed three response regions as striking velocities increased: (1) the projectiles remained visibly undeformed, (2) the projectiles permanently deformed without erosion, and (3) the projectiles eroded and lost mass. To show the effect of projectile strength, we compared depth-of-penetration data as a function of striking velocity for spherical-nose rods with three Rockwell harnesses at striking velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 km/s. To show the effect of nose shape, we compared penetration data for the spherical-nose projectiles with previously published data for ogive-nose projectiles.

  8. ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance), 4/30/13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's management of hazardous and mixed wastes in satellite accumulation areas.  The Facility Representative...

  9. Dynamics of Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroid Systems: A Study Based on Radar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    characterization of Binary Near-Earth Asteroid (185851) 20003 Near-Earth Asteroid Satellite Spins Under Spin-Orbitlibration amplitudes for synchronous near-Earth as- teroid

  10. Molecular Analysis of Replication and Packaging Mechanism of Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    RH, Symons RH. Cucumber mosaic virus contains a functionallycowpea chlorotic mottle viruses exhibit neutral effects inof satellite tobacco mosaic virus and its helper virus in

  11. An analysis of long-term agreements with suppliers in Lockheed Martin's commercial satellite systems division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Hem

    2009-01-01

    Lockheed Martin designs and builds commercial satellites to customers' specifications. The customers, such as telecommunications companies and weather forecasters, are very price sensitive and, usually, award contracts to ...

  12. The metallicity distribution of the halo and the satellites of the Milky way in the hierarchical merging paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    To account for the observed differential metallicity distribution (DMD) of the Milky Way halo, a semi-analytical model is presented in the framework of the hierarchical merging paradigm for structure formation. It is assumed that the Milky Way halo is composed of a number of sub-haloes with properties either as observed in the dwarf satellite galaxies of the Local group (shape of metallicity distribution, effective yield) or derived from calculations of structure formation (sub-halo distribution function). With reasonable assumptions for the parameters involved, we find that the overall shape and effective yield of the Galactic halo DMD can be reproduced in the framework of such a simple model. The low metallicity tail of the DMD presents a defficiency of stars with respect to the simple model predictions (akin to the G-dwarf problem in the solar neighborhood); it is suggested that an early infall phase can account for that problem, as well as for the observed DMDs of dwarf satellite galaxies.Accretion of gal...

  13. Gravity modeling of Cenozoic extensional basins, offshore Vietnam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauri, Steven Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Integrating Bouguer gravity and satellite-derived free-air gravity data with published geological and geophysical data allows modeling crustal structure and estimating crustal extension for the hydrocarbon bearing Mekong and Song Hong - Yinggehai...

  14. 0.1 nm0.1 nm1 nm1 nm10 nm10 nm100 nm100 nm11 mm1010 mm100100 mm1 mm1 mm1 cm1 cm10 cm10 cm1 m1 m10 m10 m100 m100 m1 km1 kmWWAVELENGTHAVELENGTHWAVELENGTHWWAVELENGTHW 0.01K (-273C) 100K 5000K5000K5000K5000K5000K 30,000K 30,000,000K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    visible and invisible light from across the Cosmos SKA (Square Kilometre Array) SKA will be the world nuclear power ALMA E-ELT GAIAJWST XMM SKA sea level 690km 384,400km ALMA (Atacama Large Millimetre Array) ALMA is a giant array of 66 antennas observing at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths. Location

  15. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  16. 5 km/h 10 km/h 6 km/h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = 9.5 g h = 6.3 cm v g Procedure-1 Initial kinetic energy: (1/2) m v2 Initial potential energy: 0 Final kinetic energy: 0 Final potential energy: (m+M)gh The conservation of the mechanical energy + M) ] v2 Initial potential energy: 0 #12;Final kinetic energy: 0 Final potential energy: (m

  17. Feasibility study of extracting runoff data from satellite altimetry over continental surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    the feasibility of extracting runoff data using satellite altimetry over all possible continental surface waters- ered algorithm for extracting runoff from the satellite altimetry is based on making water level. not feasible be- cause of bad quality of extracted water level time series class 4. impossible. Computed runoff

  18. Pitch angle distribution analysis of radiation belt electrons based on Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    Pitch angle distribution analysis of radiation belt electrons based on Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite Medium Electrons A data J. L. Gannon,1 X. Li,1 and D. Heynderickx2 Received 13 the Medium Electrons A instrument on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), a survey

  19. Risk Management of Student-Run Small Satellite Programs Elizabeth Deems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management of Student-Run Small Satellite Programs by Elizabeth Deems Submitted;3 Risk Management of Student-Run Small Satellite Programs by Elizabeth Deems Submitted to the Department are also discussed. Additionally, several risk management strategies are explored, and the advantages

  20. Level I Guidance Documentation Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    "Hazardous Waste", (2) the container's contents written out (e.g. "WASTE OIL, no formulas, no abbreviations(10/28/03) Level I ­ Guidance Documentation Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA) 1. Is all hazardous waste stored in the satellite accumulation area (SAA)? 2

  1. Diurnal variability of upper ocean temperatures from microwave satellite measurements and Argo profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    measurements. [3] Satellites measure SST at the surface of the ocean. Infrared satellite sensors measure. Data pairs with time separations of up to Æ3 h are used to evaluate systematic differences between a net impact on the climate sys- tem. The objective of this study is to evaluate the character

  2. PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontoyiannis, Ioannis

    directly on remote sensing data in the compressed domain. 2. PRELIMINARIES We investigate both blockPROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES1 Vittorio, such as multispectral satellite scenes, com- pressed with wavelet-based or block-transform-based trans- formations

  3. PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontoyiannis, Ioannis

    PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES 1 Vittorio, such as multispectral satellite scenes, com­ pressed with wavelet­based or block­transform­based trans­ formations to a homo­ geneous block of pixels in the original image or to a hetero­ geneous block. In the first case

  4. Using CO2 spatial variability to quantify representation errors of satellite CO2 retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    global data of column- averaged CO2 dry-air mole fraction (XCO2) at high spatial resolutions. These dataUsing CO2 spatial variability to quantify representation errors of satellite CO2 retrievals A. A 2008; published 29 August 2008. [1] Satellite measurements of column-averaged CO2 dry- air mole

  5. Removal and mixing of the coronal gas from satellites in galaxy groups: cooling the intragoup gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogh, Michael L.

    Removal and mixing of the coronal gas from satellites in galaxy groups: cooling the intragoup gas 10 August 2012 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Removal and mixing of the coronal gas from satellites in galaxy groups: cooling the intragoup gas Jes´us Zavala1,2 , Michael L. Balogh1 , Niayesh Afshordi2

  6. Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 21 - Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, Meteorology Program, VEA-118 Abstract Satellite remote sensing of ocean wind fields from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations

  7. Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Using Outage History to Exclude High-Risk Satellites from GBAS Corrections Sam Pullen and Per Enge this assumption. A study of unscheduled GPS satellite outages from 1999 to present shows that, as expected, older experienced unscheduled outages are more likely to suffer additional unscheduled outages. Combining these two

  8. 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Review of satellite-based surface solar irradiation databases for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    2013 ISES Solar World Congress Review of satellite-based surface solar irradiation databases explores the possibilities provided by satellite-based surface solar irradiation databases of solar dataset or time-series is addressed with the example of the French national meteorological network

  9. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth the satellite measure- ments, the common objective is prediction of Aerosol Opti- cal Depth (AOD). An important

  10. Observational Datasets We use two different satellite soil moisture datasets, one derived from the Advanced Microwave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guichard, Francoise

    the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Earth Observing system (AMSRE) on the Aqua satellite and another from overpasses of satellites with passive microwave sensors onboard as a starting point is done by using motionvectors derived from geostationary data to propagate the microwave rainfall

  11. COMBINING SOLAR IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS AND VARIOUS SATELLITE-DERIVED PRODUCTS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    COMBINING SOLAR IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS AND VARIOUS SATELLITE-DERIVED PRODUCTS TO A SITE power plants depend strongly on the availability of beam irradiance. Direct solar irradiance is highly-series. In this paper, a satellite- retrieval for beam irradiance from the new generation is introduced and inter

  12. Validation of satellite observed thermal emission with in-situ measurements over an urban surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunderle, Stefan

    Validation of satellite observed thermal emission with in-situ measurements over an urban surface: Meteorology applied to urban pollution problems). Besides very detailed field measurements of the structure and validations of thermal satellite imagery are conducted in rural, mostly homogeneous areas (Sobrino et al

  13. EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES AND THEIR CONNECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 dataset exhibits a 2.6% per decade decrease in the global all-cloud cloud

  14. Constraints on surface NOx emissions by assimilating satellite observations of multiple species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constraints on surface NOx emissions by assimilating satellite observations of multiple species; published 6 September 2013. [1] Surface NOx emissions are estimated by a combined assimilation of satellite for species other than NO2 provides additional constraints on the NOx emissions by adjusting

  15. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including Earth system monitoring, performs official assessments of the environment, and conducts related prepare for tsunami and other dangerous coastal flooding events. Weather Improved satellite data has from NOAA satellites to issue air quality warnings to residents. Millions of dollars are saved each

  16. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  17. SUPPORTING GROUP APPLICATIONS VIA SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS WITH MULTICAST L. Wood, H. Cruickshank, Z. Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Lloyd

    SUPPORTING GROUP APPLICATIONS VIA SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS WITH MULTICAST L. Wood, H. Cruickshank) to low-altitude low earth orbit (LEO). However, support for low-latency group applications Teledesic satellite has eight intersatellite links, in the 60GHz band, to its two nearest neighbours in each

  18. A Satellite Study of Tropical Moist Convection and Environmental Variability: A Moisture and Thermal Budget Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masunaga, Hirohiko

    of a variety of satellite sensors including radars, an infrared and microwave sounder unit, and a microwave including air temperature, water vapor, cumulus cloud cover, and surface wind are composited with respect of moisture and dry static energy and their vertical flux at cloud base from satellite observations alone

  19. Estimation of 3D rotation for a satellite from Sun sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of 3D rotation for a satellite from Sun sensors L. Magnis N. Petit MINES Paris: This paper exposes a method to estimate the rotation of a satellite by means of simple Sun sensors located of the Sun. The method is a 3D generalization of an approach originally proposed, using the same setup

  20. Quantifying the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    satellite observations of the formaldehyde column Paul I. Palmer,1,2 Dorian S. Abbot,1 Tzung-May Fu,1 Daniel isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors) to quantify the time-dependent HCHO production from isoprene, a- and b-pinenes, and methylbutenol and show

  1. Multi-grid-cell validation of satellite aerosol property retrievals in INTEX/ITCT/ICARTT 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-grid-cell validation of satellite aerosol property retrievals in INTEX/ITCT/ICARTT 2004 P. B 5 December 2006; published 8 May 2007. [1] Aerosol transport off the US Northeast coast during) provided comparisons of AATS AOD spectra to retrievals for 90 grid cells of the satellite radiometers MODIS

  2. 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Page 1 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003. Effect)) School of Computer Science University of Oklahoma. Email: atiq@ieee.org Web: www.cs.ou.edu/~atiq 12th over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003. Introduction TCP is the main transport

  3. Diurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from geostationary satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinnikov, Konstantin

    Surface Temperature (SST) monitoring using infrared observations from NOAA satellites is relatively easy temperature from a satellite is possible only for cloudless sky, such monitoring is an important componentDiurnal-seasonal and weather-related variations of land surface temperature observed from

  4. Building Finder: A System to Automatically Identify Buildings in Satellite Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    1 Building Finder: A System to Automatically Identify Buildings in Satellite Imagery Ching with these applications is to accurately and automatically identify objects, such as roads or buildings, in the satellite researchers have been working on trying to identify features, such as roads, buildings, and other features

  5. A History of the Improvement of Internet Protocols Over Satellites Using ACTS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruse, Hans

    A History of the Improvement of Internet Protocols Over Satellites Using ACTS \\Lambda Mark Allman of ACTS experiments on the efficacy of using standard Internet pro­ tocols over long­delay satellite­delay networks with non­zero bit­error rates on the performance of the suite of Internet protocols. In par

  6. A History of the Improvement of Internet Protocols Over Satellites Mark Allman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruse, Hans

    A History of the Improvement of Internet Protocols Over Satellites Using ACTS Mark Allman NASA GRC on the efficacy of using standard Internet pro- tocols over long-delay satellite channels. These experi- ments-error rates on the performance of the suite of Internet protocols. In par- ticular, we have focused

  7. Satellite number density profiles of primary galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Sales; Diego G. Lambas

    2004-10-21

    We analyse the projected radial distribution of satellites around bright primary galaxies in the 2dFGRS. We have considered several primary-satellite subsamples to search for dependences of the satellite number density profile, \\rho(r_p), on properties of satellites and primaries. We find significant differences of the behaviour of \\rho(r_p) depending on primary characteristics. In star-forming primaries, the satellite number density profile is consistent with power laws within projected distance 20100 kpc), the density profiles of all primaries is well described by power laws, although we notice that for red, early spectral type primaries, the outer slope obtained is steeper than that corresponding to blue, late spectral type ones. We have tested our results by control samples of galaxies identical to the samples of satellites in apparent magnitude and projected distance to the primary, but with a large relative velocity. This sample of unphysical primary-galaxy pairs shows a flat radial density beyond r_p=20 kpc indicating that our results are not biased toward a decrease of the true number of objects due to catalogue selection effects. Our results can be understood in terms of dynamical friction and tidal stripping on satellites in the primary haloes. These processes can effectively transfer energy to the dark matter, flattening the central steep profiles of the satellite distribution in evolved systems.

  8. Satellite-Based Techniques for the Retrieval of Solar Radiation Data A Review of Current European

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    . In addition, the potential of satellite data for short-term forecasting of solar irradiance is briefly for surface solar irradiance estiumation is not new Largely applied for climate research, global radiativeSatellite-Based Techniques for the Retrieval of Solar Radiation Data ­ A Review of Current European

  9. 5/8/12 9:21 AMLights Out for Research Satellites? -NYTimes.com Page 2 of 12http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/02/lights-out-for-research-satellites/#more-139839

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    allows researchers to keep an eye on climate change and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, helping of satellites. Weather satellites also pick up emergency beacons used by those who venture into remote areas

  10. / free-slip / free-slip Numerical models of slab deformation in the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    of the plate. Model: Model domain: Results: Effect of decoupling mechanism 410 km 660 km oceánska doska nadlozná doska Results: Effect of boundary condition Effect of yield stress Plate velocity Kinematic, crust.s 1020 Pa.s 1021 Pa.s Free-slip, crust = 1020 Pas, y = 108 Pa Kinematic, crust = 1020 Pas, y = 109 Pa

  11. An Image-Based Sensor System for Autonomous Rendez-Vous with Uncooperative Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miravet, Carlos; Krouch, Eloise; del Cura, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper are described the image processing algorithms developed by SENER, Ingenieria y Sistemas to cope with the problem of image-based, autonomous rendez-vous (RV) with an orbiting satellite. The methods developed have a direct application in the OLEV (Orbital Life Extension Extension Vehicle) mission. OLEV is a commercial mission under development by a consortium formed by Swedish Space Corporation, Kayser-Threde and SENER, aimed to extend the operational life of geostationary telecommunication satellites by supplying them control, navigation and guidance services. OLEV is planned to use a set of cameras to determine the angular position and distance to the client satellite during the complete phases of rendez-vous and docking, thus enabling the operation with satellites not equipped with any specific navigational aid to provide support during the approach. The ability to operate with un-equipped client satellites significantly expands the range of applicability of the system under development, compar...

  12. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND DARK SATELLITE GALAXIES THROUGH THE STREAM VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh, E-mail: snaoz@astro.ucla.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    The formation of purely baryonic globular clusters with no gravitationally bound dark matter is still a theoretical challenge. We show that these objects might form naturally whenever there is a relative stream velocity between baryons and dark matter. The stream velocity causes a phase shift between linear modes of baryonic and dark matter perturbations, which translates to a spatial offset between the two components when they collapse. For a 2? (3?) density fluctuation, baryonic clumps with masses in the range 10{sup 5}-2.5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ?} (10{sup 5}-4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}) collapse outside the virial radii of their counterpart dark matter halos. These objects could survive as long-lived, dark-matter-free objects and might conceivably become globular clusters. In addition, their dark matter counterparts, which were deprived of gas, might become dark satellite galaxies.

  13. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  14. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH-ALTITUDE CLOUDS OCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH, F-91761 Palaiseau, France, email : karine.caillault@onera.fr KEYWORDS: sensor performance require optronic sensors, onboard satellite or airborne platform. Performances limitation of these sensors

  15. Assessing the technical, economic and policy-centered feasibility of a proposed satellite communication system for the developing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuels, Ayanna Terehas

    2005-01-01

    Satellite communication systems remain one of the most under utilized development mediums in less industrialized countries. This research proposes to establish a low cost satellite communications system tailored specifically ...

  16. The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: Evaluation of cloud properties and surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg K.; Vogelmann A.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbec, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties and surface precipitation to assumptions regarding the size distributions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a one-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Three sensitivity experiments were applied to two composites of 15 convective and 15 frontal stratiform intense precipitation events observed in a coastal midlatitude region (Belgium), which were evaluated against satellite-retrieved cloud properties and radar-rain-gauge derived surface precipitation. It is found that the cloud optical thickness distribution was well captured by all experiments, although a significant underestimation of cloudiness occurred in the convective composite. The cloud-top-pressure distribution was improved most by more realistic snow size distributions (including a temperature-dependent intercept parameter and non-spherical snow for the calculation of the slope parameter), due to increased snow depositional growth at high altitudes. Surface precipitation was far less sensitive to whether graupel or hail was chosen as the rimed ice species, as compared to previous idealized experiments. This smaller difference in sensitivity could be explained by the stronger updraught velocities and higher freezing levels in the idealized experiments compared to typical coastal midlatitude environmental conditions.

  17. Radiometric Correctionradiometric correction Radiometric correction is important to ensure that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coburn, Craig

    that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor systems are calibrated to a common physical--to the entrance aperture of the satellite sensor imaging Earth, with five main pathways and associated: Schematic of photon pathways from the sun to the entrance aperture of the satellite sensor: (1) direct solar

  18. A statistical analysis of systematic errors in temperature and ram velocity estimates from satellite-borne retarding potential analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R. [William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Rd. WT15, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The use of biased grids as energy filters for charged particles is common in satellite-borne instruments such as a planar retarding potential analyzer (RPA). Planar RPAs are currently flown on missions such as the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System and the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program to obtain estimates of geophysical parameters including ion velocity and temperature. It has been shown previously that the use of biased grids in such instruments creates a nonuniform potential in the grid plane, which leads to inherent errors in the inferred parameters. A simulation of ion interactions with various configurations of biased grids has been developed using a commercial finite-element analysis software package. Using a statistical approach, the simulation calculates collected flux from Maxwellian ion distributions with three-dimensional drift relative to the instrument. Perturbations in the performance of flight instrumentation relative to expectations from the idealized RPA flux equation are discussed. Both single grid and dual-grid systems are modeled to investigate design considerations. Relative errors in the inferred parameters for each geometry are characterized as functions of ion temperature and drift velocity.

  19. Sub-Hour Solar Data for Power System Modeling From Static Spatial Variability Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.

    2012-12-01

    High penetration renewable integration studies need high quality solar power data with spatial-temporal correlations that are representative of a real system. This paper will summarize the research relating sequential point-source sub-hour global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values to static, spatially distributed GHI values. This research led to the development of an algorithm for generating coherent sub-hour datasets that span distances ranging from 10 km to 4,000 km. The algorithm, in brief, generates synthetic GHI values at an interval of one-minute, for a specific location, using SUNY/Clean Power Research, satellite-derived, hourly irradiance values for the nearest grid cell to that location and grid cells within 40 km.

  20. Satellite Characterization of four candidate sites for the Cherenkov Telescope Array telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavazzani, S; Bulik, T; Ortolani, S

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we have evaluated the amount of available telescope time at four sites which are candidate to host the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). We use the GOES 12 data for the years 2008 and 2009. We use a homogeneous methodology presented in several previous papers to classify the nights as clear (completely cloud-free), mixed (partially cloud-covered), and covered. Additionally, for the clear nights, we have evaluated the amount of satellite stable nights which correspond to the amount of ground based photometric nights, and the clear nights corresponding to the spectroscopic nights. We have applied this model to two sites in the Northern Hemisphere (San Pedro Martir (SPM), Mexico; Izana, Canary Islands) and to two sites in the Southern Hemisphere (El Leoncito, Argentine; San Antonio de Los Cobres (SAC), Argentine). We have obtained, from the two years considered, a mean amount of cloud free nights of 68.6% at Izana, 76.0% at SPM, 70.6% at Leoncito and 70.0% at SAC. We have evaluated, among the...

  1. Preliminary materials assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeter, R.R.; Jamieson, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Presently, there are two SPS reference design concepts (one using silicon solar cells; the other using gallium arsenide solar cells). A materials assessment of both systems was performed based on the materials lists set forth in the DOE/NASA SPS Reference System Report: Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This listing identified 22 materials (plus miscellaneous and organics) used in the SPS. Tracing the production processes for these 22 materials, a total demand for over 20 different bulk materials (copper, silicon, sulfuric acid, etc.) and nealy 30 raw materials (copper ore, sand, sulfur ore, etc.) was revealed. Assessment of these SPS material requirements produced a number of potential material supply problems. The more serious problems are those associated with the solar cell materials (gallium, gallium arsenide, sapphire, and solar grade silicon), and the graphite fiber required for the satellite structure and space construction facilities. In general, the gallium arsenide SPS option exhibits more serious problems than the silicon option, possibly because gallium arsenide technology is not as well developed as that for silicon. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

  2. Probing baryonic processes and gastrophysics in the formation of the Milky Way dwarf satellites. I. Metallicity distribution properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Jun; Yu, Qingjuan [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lu, Youjun, E-mail: yuqj@pku.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-08-10

    The Milky Way (MW) dwarf satellites, as the smallest galaxies discovered in the present-day universe, are potentially powerful probes to various baryonic processes in galaxy formation occurring in the early universe. In this paper, we study the chemical properties of the stars in the dwarf satellites around the MW-like host galaxies, and explore the possible effects of several baryonic processes, including supernova (SN) feedback, the reionization of the universe, and H{sub 2} cooling, and how current and future observations may put some constraints on these processes. We use a semianalytical model to generate MW-like galaxies, for which a fiducial model can reproduce the luminosity function and the stellar metallicity-stellar mass correlation of the MW dwarfs. Using the simulated MW-like galaxies, we focus on investigating three metallicity properties of their dwarfs: the stellar metallicity-stellar mass correlation of the dwarf population, and the metal-poor and metal-rich tails of the stellar metallicity distribution in individual dwarfs. We find that (1) the slope of the stellar metallicity-stellar mass correlation is sensitive to the SN feedback strength and the reionization epoch; (2) the extension of the metal-rich tails is mainly sensitive to the SN feedback strength; (3) the extension of the metal-poor tails is mainly sensitive to the reionization epoch; (4) none of the three chemical properties are sensitive to the H{sub 2} cooling process; and (5) a comparison of our model results with the current observational slope of the stellar metallicity-stellar mass relation suggests that the local universe is reionized earlier than the cosmic average, local sources may have a significant contribution to the reionization in the local region, and an intermediate to strong SN feedback strength is preferred. Future observations of metal-rich and metal-poor tails of stellar metallicity distributions will put further constraints on the SN feedback and the reionization processes.

  3. Intelligent scraping experience using ultrasonics in two 60in./56in. dual diameter 100 km seawater transmission pipelines in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, A.F.; Chu, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Saudi ARAMCO`s two 60in./56in. (1524/1422 mm) diameter Seawater Injection Pipelines used for secondary oil recovery stretch from the Seawater Treatment Plant across the Arabian Desert for a distance of approximately 100 kilometers. Both lines were put into operation in mid 1978 using over the ditch Plicoflex tape wrap as a means of protection against external corrosion. A significant portion of both pipelines (32 km of each line) runs through Subkha (salty moist) areas. A series of test hole evaluations in 1989 indicated moderate to sever external corrosion particularly in Subkha which necessitated sleeving and external coating application. In 1991 a series of leaks, four (4) in total over a period of two (2) months occurred in Pipeline {number_sign}2 due to external corrosion. This suggested that the line(s) were in urgent need of at least partial replacement or major rehabilitation. Prior to making a final decision on partial replacement it was decided to run an Intelligent Scraper in both pipelines to ascertain both internal and external pipeline conditions. An Ultrasonic Scraper the largest of it`s kind in the world, similar to what was used in the Alyeska Pipeline was developed and successfully run in both pipelines in February 1993. This paper discusses the pipeline history, test hole evaluations, Intelligent Scraping experiences, field evaluation for anomaly verification, and repair of approximately 120 locations as identified by the Intelligent Scraping run. The Intelligent Scraping evaluation played a major role in the cancellation of partial pipeline replacement with cost savings estimated $30 MM.

  4. Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227­243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance at many ground stations, the total daily solar irradiance (Rs) received at the earth's surface to measured solar irradiance. In a global comparison for the year 1987, VP-RAD-estimated and satellite

  5. Importance of satellite cells in recovery from eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbone, Christopher Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the elimination of satellite cell proliferation with []-irradiation would inhibit normal force recovery following eccentric contraction-induced injury. Adult female ICR mice were implanted with a...

  6. Dynamic power allocation and routing for satellite and wireless networks with time varying channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Michael J. (Michael James), 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Satellite and wireless networks operate over time varying channels that depend on attenuation conditions, power allocation decisions, and inter-channel interference. In order to reliably integrate these systems into a high ...

  7. Causal relationships between solar proton events and single event upsets for communication satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohmeyer, Whitney Quinne

    In this work, we analyze a historical archive of single event upsets (SEUs) maintained by Inmarsat, one of the world's leading providers of global mobile satellite communications services. Inmarsat has operated its ...

  8. SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS IN THE BALTIC SEA DERIVED FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    -sensor, algae blooms, surface currents, optical flow ABSTRACT: Mesoscale dynamic sea surface features demonstrate the use of multi- sensor / multi-channel satellite images for the computation of mesoscale surface

  9. Compressed Air System Optimization Improves Production and saves energy at a Satellite Manufacturer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-05-01

    In 2001, a compressed air improvement project was implemented following an audit on the compressed air system at Boeing Satellite Systems (formerly Hughes Space & Communications Company) in Los Angeles, California.

  10. Aerosol loading in the Southeastern United States: reconciling surface and satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, B.

    We investigate the seasonality in aerosols over the Southeastern United States using observations from several satellite instruments (MODIS, MISR, CALIOP) and surface network sites (IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET). We find that ...

  11. Virus vector gene inserts are stabilized in the presence of satellite panicum mosaic virus coat protein 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, Anthany Laurence

    2009-05-15

    The coat protein of satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) was used to stabilize viral vector gene inserts in planta. A Potato virus X (PVX) vector carrying the SPMV capsid protein (CP) gene was successfully stabilized through three serial passages...

  12. In Vitro Secondary Structure of the Genomic RNA of Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    . Athavale1. , J. Jared Gossett1,3. , Jessica C. Bowman2 , Nicholas V. Hud2 , Loren Dean Williams2 , Stephen, Hud NV, Williams LD, et al. (2013) In Vitro Secondary Structure of the Genomic RNA of Satellite

  13. The European Satellite Navigation Program : policy analysis and recommendations for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escudero San José, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The European Satellite Navigation Program is a case study that combines Technical / Public / Private aspects in an integrative way. Therefore, it is a sound case for a TPP thesis candidate. This thesis analyzes the European ...

  14. On the tidal radius of satellites on prograde and retrograde orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajda, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A tidal radius is a distance from a satellite orbiting in a host potential beyond which its material is stripped by the tidal force. We derive a revised expression for the tidal radius of a rotating satellite which properly takes into account the possibility of prograde and retrograde orbits of stars. Besides the eccentricity of the satellite orbit, the tidal radius depends also on the ratio of the satellite internal angular velocity to the orbital angular velocity. We compare our formula to the results of two $N$-body simulations of dwarf galaxies orbiting a Milky Way-like host on a prograde and retrograde orbit. The tidal radius for the retrograde case is larger than for the prograde. We introduce a kinematic radius separating stars still orbiting the dwarf galaxy from those already stripped and following the potential of the host galaxy. We find that the tidal radius matches very well the kinematic radius.

  15. Using satellite remote sensing to quantify woody cover and biomass across Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchard, Edward Thomas Alexander

    2012-06-25

    The goal of quantifying the woody cover and biomass of tropical savannas, woodlands and forests using satellite data is becoming increasingly important, but limitations in current scientific understanding reduce the ...

  16. Development and analysis of a small satellite attitude determination and control system testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowell, Corey Whitcomb

    2011-01-01

    Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) are critical to the operation of satellites that require attitude knowledge and/or attitude control to achieve mission success. Furthermore, ADCS systems only operate as ...

  17. Development of resource-constrained sensors and actuators for in-space satellite docking and servicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Duncan Lee

    2015-01-01

    Most satellites on-orbit today are not intended to physically approach or interact with other spacecraft. However, the robotic servicing of orbiting assets will be an economically desirable (and often scientifically ...

  18. Formaldehyde distribution over North America: Implications for satellite retrievals of formaldehyde columns and isoprene emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Formaldehyde distribution over North America: Implications for satellite retrievals of formaldehyde; published 8 September 2006. [1] Formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured from space provide constraints measurements. Citation: Millet, D. B., et al. (2006), Formaldehyde distribution over North America

  19. THE TRANSITING EXOPLANET SURVEY SATELLITE: SIMULATIONS OF PLANET DETECTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Peter W.

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA-sponsored Explorer mission that will perform a wide-field survey for planets that transit bright host stars. Here, we predict the properties of the transiting ...

  20. DIRECT NORMAL IRRADIANCE FOR CSP BASED ON SATELLITE IMAGES OF METEOSAT SECOND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    DIRECT NORMAL IRRADIANCE FOR CSP BASED ON SATELLITE IMAGES OF METEOSAT SECOND GENERATION A. Hammer1). As for concentrating solar power (CSP) the frequency distribution of DNI is of special importance, special attention

  1. Thermospheric density variations: Observability using precision satellite orbits and effects on orbit propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechtenberg, Travis; McLaughlin, Craig A.; Locke, Travis; Krishna, Dhaval Mysore

    2013-01-28

    This paper examines atmospheric density estimated using precision orbit ephemerides (POE) from the CHAMP and GRACE satellites during short periods of greater atmospheric density variability. The results of the calibration ...

  2. Satellite investigations of ice-ocean interactions in the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Malcolm John

    2012-06-25

    This thesis analyses satellite-based radar data to improve our understanding of the interactions between the Antarctic Ice Sheet and the ocean in the Amundsen Sea Sector of West Antarctica. Over the last two decades, the ...

  3. Data management of geostationary communication satellite telemetry and correlation to space weather observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohmeyer, Whitney Quinne

    2013-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the effects of space weather on the performance of geostationary communications satellites, we analyze sixteen years of archived telemetry data from Inmarsat, the UK-based telecommunications ...

  4. A software package for the graphical simulation of the Global Positioning System's satellite orbits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Lopez, Eugenio

    1981-01-01

    A SOFTWARE PACKAGE FOR THE GRAPHICAL SIMULATION OF THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM'S SATELLITE ORBITS A Thesis by EUGENIO MARTINEZ-LOPEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Ma)or Subject: Electrical Engineering Copyright by Eugenio Martinez-Lopez, 1979 A SOFTWARE PACKAGE FOR THE GRAPHICAL SIMULATION OF THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM&S SATELLITE ORBITS A Thesis by Eugenio...

  5. Interactions of tropical synoptic-scale features as viewed from satellite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winton, Susan Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    INTERACTIONS OF TROPICAL SYNOPTIC-SCALE FEATURES AS VIEWED FROM SATELLITE Thesis by SUSAN ELIZABETH WINTON Submitted to tbe Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Meteorology INTERACTIONS QF TROPICAL SYNOPTIC-SCALE FEATURES AS VIEWED FROM SATELLITE A Thesis by SUSAN ELIZABETH WINTON Approved as to style and content by: James P. McGuirk (Chair of Committee...

  6. A synoptic-scale evaluation of cyclogenesis using satellite radiation data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Jerry Ray

    1976-01-01

    May 1976 Major Subject: Meteorology A SYNOPTIC-SCALE EVALUATION OF CYCLOGENESIS USING SATELLITE RADIATION DATA A Thesis by JERRY RAY MlLLS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) May 1976 440344... ABSTRACT A Synoptic-Scale Evaluation of Cyclogenesis Using Satellite Rad ia t ion Data. (May 1976) Jerry Ray Mills, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. H. Thompson Through the study and evaluation of the formation...

  7. An investigation of extratropical cyclogenesis in the Gulf of Mexico using geosynchronous satellite information 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckman, Brian Eugene

    1978-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF EXTRATROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN 'IHE GULF OF MEXICO USlNG GEOSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE INFORJ'JATION A Thesis by BRIAN EUGENF. HECKMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAJ! University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the u . gree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1978 Major Subject: FJeteorology AN INVESTIGATION OF EXTHATROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN TYE GULF OF NEXICO USING GEOSYNCNRONOUS SATELLITE INFORMATION A Thesis by BRIAIS EUGENE HECKNAN Approved...

  8. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01

    DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONARY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDFRSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May I979 Ma jor Subject: Meteorology DIGITAL METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA COMPARED WITH DIGITAL INFRARED DATA FROM A GEOSTATIONAFY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE A Thesis by RODNEY STUART HENDERSON Approved...

  9. Time changes in a subtropical cloud and weather system as revealed by meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, Darryl

    1962-01-01

    TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1962 Ma)or Sub]ect: METEOROLOGY TIME CHANGES IN A SUBTROPICAL CLOUD AND WEATHER SYSTEM AS REVEALED BY METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DATA A Thesis By DARRYL RANDERSON Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Comparisons between Nimbus 6 satellite and rawinsonde soundings for several geographical areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Nine-Min

    1979-01-01

    COMPARISONS BETWEEN NIMBUS 6 SATELLITE AND RAWINSONDE SOUNDINGS FOR SEVERAL GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS A Thesis by NINE-MIN CHOU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Meteorology COMPARISONS BETWEEN NIMBUS 6 SATELLITE AND RAWINSONDE SOUNDINGS FOR SEVERAL GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS A Thesis by NINE-MIN CHOU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member...

  11. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  12. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  13. Outer irregular satellites of the planets and their relationship with asteroids, comets and Kuiper Belt objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott S. Sheppard

    2006-05-01

    Outer satellites of the planets have distant, eccentric orbits that can be highly inclined or even retrograde relative to the equatorial planes of their planets. These irregular orbits cannot have formed by circumplanetary accretion and are likely products of early capture from heliocentric orbit. The irregular satellites may be the only small bodies remaining which are still relatively near their formation locations within the giant planet region. The study of the irregular satellites provides a unique window on processes operating in the young solar system and allows us to probe possible planet formation mechanisms and the composition of the solar nebula between the rocky objects in the main asteroid belt and the very volatile rich objects in the Kuiper Belt. The gas and ice giant planets all appear to have very similar irregular satellite systems irrespective of their mass or formation timescales and mechanisms. Water ice has been detected on some of the outer satellites of Saturn and Neptune whereas none has been observed on Jupiter's outer satellites.

  14. Satellite Dwarf Galaxies in a Hierarchical Universe: Infall Histories, Group Preprocessing, and Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Andrew R; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2015-01-01

    In the Local Group, almost all satellite dwarf galaxies that are within the virial radius of the Milky Way (MW) and M31 exhibit strong environmental influence. The orbital histories of these satellites provide the key to understanding the role of the MW/M31 halo, lower-mass groups, and cosmic reionization on the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We examine the virial-infall histories of satellites with M_star = 10 ^ {3 - 9} M_sun using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of 48 MW/M31-like halos. Satellites at z = 0 fell into the MW/M31 halos typically 5 - 8 Gyr ago at z = 0.5 - 1. However, they first fell into any host halo typically 7 - 10 Gyr ago at z = 0.7 - 1.5. This difference arises because many satellites experienced "group preprocessing" in another host halo, typically of M_vir ~ 10 ^ {10 - 12} M_sun, before falling into the MW/M31 halos. Satellites with lower-mass and/or those closer to the MW/M31 fell in earlier and are more likely to have experienced group preprocessing; ...

  15. Satellites of LMCs: Close Friendships Ruined by Milky Way Mass Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deason, Alis J; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Belokurov, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of several dwarf galaxies near the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we study the accretion of massive satellites onto Milky Way (MW)/M31-like halos using the ELVIS suite of N-body simulations. We identify 25 surviving subhalos near the expected mass of the LMC, and investigate the lower-mass satellites that were associated with these subhalos before they fell into the MW/M31 halos. Typically, 7% of the overall z=0 satellite population of MW/M31 halos were in a surviving LMC-group prior to falling into the MW/M31 halo. This fraction, however, can vary between 1% and 25%, being higher for groups with higher-mass and/or more recent infall times. Groups of satellites disperse rapidly in phase space after infall, and their distances and velocities relative to the group center become statistically similar to the overall satellite population after 4-8 Gyr. We quantify the likelihood that satellites were associated with an LMC-mass group as a function of both distance and velocity relat...

  16. Optimization of satellite coverage in observing cause and effect changes in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and solar wind. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveless, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    Disturbances in the ionosphere sometimes cause adverse effects to communications systems, power grids, etc. on the earth. Currently, very little, if any, lead time is given to warn of an impending problem. If a forecast could be made of ionospheric occurrences, some lead time may be given to appropriate agencies and equipment may be saved. Most changes that occur in the ionosphere are a result of interaction of energy, currents, etc. between the magnetosphere and/or solar wind. Before a forecast can be made, however, improvement of ionospheric models currently in use need to be made. The models currently depict features in various regions of the ionosphere but not always where these features are actually observed. So an improvement to the model is needed to create an accurate baseline condition, or in other words an accurate depiction of the current ionosphere. Models could be improved by inputting real-time data from the ionosphere into the model. This data would come from satellites and/or ground-based stations.

  17. Satellite-observed US power plant NOx emission reductions and their impact on air quality - article no. L22812

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.W.; Heckel, A.; McKeen, S.A.; Frost, G.J.; Hsie, E.Y.; Trainer, M.K.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J.P.; Peckham, S.E.; Grell, G.A.

    2006-11-29

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions resulting from fossil fuel combustion lead to unhealthy levels of near-surface ozone (O{sub 3}). One of the largest U.S. sources, electric power generation, represented about 25% of the U.S. anthropogenic NOx emissions in 1999. Here we show that space-based instruments observed declining regional NOx levels between 1999 and 2005 in response to the recent implementation of pollution controls by utility companies in the eastern U.S. Satellite-retrieved summertime nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) columns and bottom-up emission estimates show larger decreases in the Ohio River Valley, where power plants dominate NOx emissions, than in the northeast U.S. urban corridor. Model simulations predict lower O{sub 3} across much of the eastern U.S. in response to these emission reductions.

  18. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS): Development for Parallel Processing Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    on the mesoscale (horizontal scales from 2 km to 2000 km) for purposes ranging from operational weather forecasting and simulating convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, cirrus clouds, and precipitating weather systems models that had a great deal of overlap, the CSU cloud/mesoscale mode (Tripoli and Cotton, 1982

  19. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  20. Incorporation of time-dependent thermodynamic models and radiation propagation models into JR 3-D synthetic image generation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    images representing what an airborne or satellite thermal infrared imaging sensor would record. The scene sensors to a point where the model can be usedas a research tool to evaluate the limitations in our infrared (TIR) imagery generated by midwave (3-5 Rm) and longwave (8-14 pm) sensors is being increasingly

  1. Measurement of Plasma Dynamics in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment K.M. Velas, C.L. Deards, P.A. Melnik, J.A Grossnickle, A.L. Hoffman, K.E. Miller, R.D. Milroy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Measurement of Plasma Dynamics in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment K.M. Velas, C.L. Deards, P.A. Melnik, J.A Grossnickle, A.L. Hoffman, K.E. Miller, R.D. Milroy Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Washington Detailed magnetic measurements of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRC) from

  2. y 1000km of high resolution sleeve-gun array transects on the North Sza Fan, located at tbe mouth orwegian Channel, reveal three domina tyles of sedimentation within a thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    y 1000km of high resolution sleeve-gun array transects on the North Sza Fan, located at tbe mouth the lution data across the fan other than conventional he seismic source was an arra nstruments 40 in3 sleeve-guns along the fan axis. These data were shot with the same sleeve-gun array but recorded digitally via a 144

  3. We present HI observations of the environment of three nearby (~ 2000-2500 km s-1 ) Ly-absorbers. The absorbers are located along the sight lines towards Markarian 817, Markarian 509 and VII Zwicky 118. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    ABSTRACT We present HI observations of the environment of three nearby (~ 2000-2500 km s-1 ) Ly. We thus find, by comparing to the HI mass function, that there is 4 to 5 times more HI around Ly- absorbers than on average in the sky. The HI Environment of Nearby Ly-alpha Absorbers INTRODUCTION Numerical

  4. Himalayan orogen, so much so that the locus of deep exhumation has been maintained nearly 100 km northwards of the Himalayan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Modeling mountain building and the seismic cycle in the Himalaya of Nepal. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 13389. Seismotectonics of the Nepal Himalaya from a local seismic network. J. Asian Earth Sci. 17, 703­712 (1999). 8 from two perspectives. GSA Bull. 112, 324­350 (2000). 12. DeCelles, P. G. et al. Stratigraphy

  5. The Programming Model and Practice Technical Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    -Grbovic Software Engineer Tutorials, June 19th 2009 #12;Yet another MapReduce tutorial? Some tutorials you might for popular queries, e.g. Google Trend Processing of satellite imagery data Language model processing in a new GMail cluster Similar servers running GMail elsware not affected Same version of the software

  6. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1999); P. 17481755, 7 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Stacked global satellite gravity profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    ) of Geosat/ERM (up to 62 cy- cles), ERS-1/2 (up to 43 cycles), and Topex (up to 142 cycles) satellite

  7. Spatial distribution of isoprene emissions from North America derived from formaldehyde column measurements by the OMI satellite sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Temperature-dependent formaldehyde cross-sections in theSatellite observations of formaldehyde over North AmericaAppli- cation to formaldehyde retrievals from the Global

  8. Quantifying the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde over North Americasatellites: Application to formaldehyde retrievals from theNorth America using formaldehyde column observations from

  9. Interannual variations of river water storage from a multiple satellite approach: A case study for the Rio Negro River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frappart, Frédéric; Papa, Fabrice; Famiglietti, James S; Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B; Seyler, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    satellite track runs along the river. As T/P cross track (orthe T/P tracks run parallel to the river. In these cases,

  10. Satellite Remote Sensing -Introduction definition for this class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    of atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor, and wind velocity. · Oceanography - measuring sea surface. · Topography and cartography - improving digital elevation models · Agriculture, forestry, and botany, monitoring deforestation, monitoring urban land use. · Oil and mineral exploration - locating natural oil

  11. Improving Surface Radiation in a Satellite-Based Physical Model (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-10-01

    This poster provides an overview of the solar resource assessment work needed to achieve high penetrations of concentrating solar power or photovoltaics on the grid.

  12. Continental-scale comparisons of terrestrial carbon sinks estimated from satellite data and ecosystem modeling 19821998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Carbon dioxide; Ecosystems; Remote sensing; Ocean climate 1. Introduction Less than 50% of the carbon emitted). This is the so-called ``missing sink'' for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2

  13. High-latitude ionospheric convection models derived from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program ion drift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    the relationships to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) for three seasons: summer, winter, and equinox to the average solar wind (i.e., the ``quasi-viscous'' interaction) and to changes in the IMF By, Bz 0, and Bz wind (SW) plasma that carries the ``frozen-in'' interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). This results

  14. A comparison of model-generated and satellite-observed radiances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Donna Ellen Woolley

    1989-01-01

    and sensitivity for January time period for observed and synthetic radiance set. Channel Observed mean 'C Synthetic mean 'C SYN-OBS t' statistic Observed Synthetic SYN-OBS mean C Std Dev. 'C Std Dev. C Normalized 24 03 23 04 16 12 05 11 15 22 06 07... 52. 4 -26. 8 50. 6 3. 0 1. 8 1. 4 1. 3 2. 2 6. 5 1. 8 5. 1 2. 5 2. 5 2. 1 2. 1 2. 5 2. 7 2. 9 4. 1 5. 3 3. 6 0. 9 0. 4 1. 2 1. '2 1. 6 7. 1 1. 8 6. 4 2. 9 2. 9 2. 4 2. 9 3. 9 3. 6 4. 0 5. 1 4. 8 6. 7 4. 4 -0. 7 -0. 8 -0. 1 -0...

  15. Cosmological-model-parameter determination from satellite-acquired type Ia and IIP Supernova Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podariu, Silviu; Nugent, Peter; Ratra, Bharat

    2000-01-01

    Since the B i g B a n g : Supernovae a n d G a m m a - R a ythe universe—space vehicles—supernovae: general Introductionbased on T y p e l a supernovae (hereafter S N e la) have

  16. Satellite-based modeling of gross primary production in a seasonally moist tropical evergreen forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA c Centro de Energia Nuclear

  17. Analysis of Precipitation Using Satellite Observations and Comparisons with Global Climate Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthi, Aditya

    2011-08-08

    In this study, the space-time relationship of precipitation fields is examined by testing the Taylor's "frozen field" hypothesis (TH). Specifically, the hypothesis supposes that if a spatio-temporal precipitation field ...

  18. Improved Modeling of Evapotranspiration using Satellite Remote Sensing at Varying Spatial and Temporal Scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Di

    2012-10-19

    Iowa, U.S., on three Landsat TM/ETM imagery acquisition dates in 2002. Results show the EF and latent heat flux (LE) estimates with a mean absolute percentage difference (MAPD) of 6.7 percent and 8.7 percent, respectively, relative to eddy covariance...

  19. Posters A Comparison of Model-Simulated Relative Humidity with Satellite-Derived Cloudiness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters Posters

  20. A NEW OPERATIONAL MODEL FOR SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES DESCRIPTION AND VALIDATION

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | OpenEnergyEvaluation |Island, Azores | OpenAndin

  1. Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales Ruth Doherty, Massimo Vieno, Ian Mac) EMEP2009 (less complex) Observations Modelling regional air pollution #12;Nested regions: 50 to 5 to 1 km2 O3 concentration (ppb) NO2 concentration (µg m-3) #12;Modelling Urban air pollution Regional

  2. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vutha, Amar C

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

  3. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amar C. Vutha

    2015-06-24

    Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

  4. On the neutral gas content of nine new Milky Way satellite galaxy candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westmeier, T; Calabretta, M; Jurek, R; Koribalski, B S; Meyer, M; Popping, A; Wong, O I

    2015-01-01

    We use a new, improved version of the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey to search for HI emission from nine new, ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxy candidates recently discovered in data from the Dark Energy Survey. None of the candidates is detected in HI, implying upper limits for their HI masses of typically several hundred to a few thousand solar masses. The resulting upper limits on M_HI / L_V and M_HI / M_star suggest that at least some of the new galaxy candidates are HI deficient. This finding is consistent with the general HI deficiency of satellite galaxies located within the Milky Way's virial radius and supports the hypothesis that gas is being removed from satellites by tidal and ram-pressure forces during perigalactic passages. In addition, some of the objects may be embedded in, and interacting with, the extended neutral and ionised gas filaments of the Magellanic Stream.

  5. Astrometric positions for 18 irregular satellites of giant planets from 23 years of observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes-Júnior, A R; Vieira-Martins, R; Arlot, J -E; Camargo, J I B; Braga-Ribas, F; Neto, D N da Silva; Andrei, A H; Dias-Oliveira, A; Morgado, B E; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Duchemin, Y; Desmars, J; Lainey, V; Thuillot, W

    2015-01-01

    The irregular satellites of the giant planets are believed to have been captured during the evolution of the solar system. Knowing their physical parameters, such as size, density, and albedo is important for constraining where they came from and how they were captured. The best way to obtain these parameters are observations in situ by spacecrafts or from stellar occultations by the objects. Both techniques demand that the orbits are well known. We aimed to obtain good astrometric positions of irregular satellites to improve their orbits and ephemeris. We identified and reduced observations of several irregular satellites from three databases containing more than 8000 images obtained between 1992 and 2014 at three sites (Observat\\'orio do Pico dos Dias, Observatoire de Haute-Provence, and European Southern Observatory - La Silla). We used the software PRAIA (Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically) to make the astrometric reduction of the CCD frames. The UCAC4 catalog represented the Inte...

  6. A BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAPPED PARTICLES IN A SURFACE POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vignal, Marie-Hélène

    A BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAPPED PARTICLES IN A SURFACE POTENTIAL PIERRE DEGOND, C´ELINE PARZANI particles in a surface potential. The potential confines particles close to the surface increasing the charged particle model with some numerical simulations of a gas discharge on a satellite solar array. We

  7. Steady state estimation of soil organic carbon using satellite-derived canopy leaf area index

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, Yilin; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Maoyi; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-12-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a key role in the global carbon cycle that is important for decadal-to-century climate prediction. Estimation of soil organic carbon stock using model-based methods typically requires spin-up (time marching transient simulation) of the carbon-nitrogen (CN) models by performing hundreds to thousands years long simulations until the carbon-nitrogen pools reach dynamic steady-state. This has become a bottleneck for global modeling and analysis, especially when testing new physical and/or chemical mechanisms and evaluating parameter sensitivity. Here we report a new numerical approach to estimate global soil carbon stock that can avoid the long term spin-up of themore »CN model. The approach uses canopy leaf area index (LAI) from satellite data and takes advantage of a reaction-based biogeochemical module NGBGC (Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module) that was recently developed and incorporated in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Although NGBGC uses the same CN mechanisms as used in CLM4CN, it can be easily configured to run prognostic or steady state simulations. In this approach, monthly LAI from the multi-year Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was used to calculate potential annual average gross primary production (GPP) and leaf carbon for the period of the atmospheric forcing. The calculated potential annual average GPP and leaf C are then used by NGBGC to calculate the steady-state distributions of carbon and nitrogen in different vegetation and soil pools by solving the steady-state reaction-network in NGBGC using the Newton-Raphson method. The new approach was applied at point and global scales and compared with SOC derived from long spin-up by running NGBGC in prognostic mode, and SOC from the empirical data of the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). The steady-state solution is comparable to the spin-up value when the MODIS LAI is close to the LAI from the spin-up solution, and largely captured the variability of the HWSD SOC across the different dominant plant functional types (PFTs) at global scale. The numerical correlation between the calculated and HWSD SOC was, however, weak at both point and global scales, suggesting that the models used in describing biogeochemical processes in CLM needs improvements and/or HWSD needs updating as suggested by other studies. Besides SOC, the steady state solution also includes all other state variables simulated by a spin-up run, such as NPP, GPP, total vegetation C etc., which makes the developed approach a promising tool to efficiently estimate global SOC distribution and evaluate and compare different aspects simulated by different CN mechanisms in the model.« less

  8. Comparison of heavy ion-induced K? x-ray satellite spectra from gases and solids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demarest, John Allen

    1977-01-01

    COMPARISON OF HEAVY ION-INDUCED IQX X-RAY SATELLITE SPECTRA FROM GASES AND SOLIDS A Thesis by JOHN ALLEN DEMAREST Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1977 Ma)or Subject: Chemistry COMPARISON OF HEAVY ION-INDUCED Ks X-RAY SATELLITE SPECTRA FROM GASES AND SOLIDS A Thesis by JOHN ALLEN DEMAREST Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) 7&F~. ~MA (Head...

  9. Comparison of Precision Orbit Derived Density Estimates for CHAMP and GRACE Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattig, Eric

    2011-04-21

    NOMENCLATURE Symbol Definition Units draga acceleration vector due to atmospheric drag m/s 2 ap geomagnetic 3-hourly planetary equivalent amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 A satellite cross-sectional area m2 Ap geomagnetic daily planetary... amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 BB estimated ballistic coefficient correction ~ BC ballistic coefficient m2/kg Dc satellite drag coefficient ~ d cross correlation delay F10.7 daily solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelength SFU 10.7F...

  10. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Xiao; Wenxi Penga; Huanyu Wang; Xingzhu Cui; Dongya Guo

    2015-02-02

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  11. Workshop on Satellite Power Systems (SPS) effects on optical and radio astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, G.M.; Ekstrom, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    The impacts of the SPS on astronomy were concluded to be: increased sky brightness, reducing the effective aperture of terrestrial telescopes; microwave leakage radiation causing erroneous radioastronomical signals; direct overload of radioastronomical receivers at centimeter wavelengths; and unintentional radio emissions associated with massive amounts of microwave power or with the presence of large, warm structures in orbit causing the satellites to appear as individual stationary radio sources; finally, the fixed location of the geostationary satellite orbits would result in fixed regions of the sky being unusable for observations. (GHT)

  12. Neutrino Solar Flare detection for a saving alert system of satellites and astronauts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2011-06-19

    Largest Solar Neutrino Flare may be soon detectable by Deep Core neutrino detector immediately and comunicate to satellites or astronauts. Its detection is the fastest manifestation of a later (tens minutes,hours) dangerous cosmic shower. The precursor trigger maybe saving satellites and even long flight astronauts lives. We shall suggest how. Moreover their detection may probe the inner solar flare acceleration place as well as the neutrino flavor mixing in a new different parameter windows. We show the updated expected rate and signature of neutrinos and antineutrinos in largest solar flare for present tens Megaton Deep Core telescope at tens Gev range. Speculation for additional Icecube gigaton array signals are also considered.

  13. Satellite Observations of Tropospheric Chemistry: Retrievals and Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    tests both the retrieval and the NOx emission inventory used in GEOS-CHEM. Monthly mean retrieved NO2 columns over the United States, where NOx emissions are particularly well known, are 20% higher than GEOS in the NOx emission inventory. Retrieved columns are up to a factor of 2 lower than modeled columns over

  14. A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G-378-6586 browncg@salt.ee.byii.edu Abstract-Traditional satellite scatterometer wind retrieval algorithms consist of point-wise wind estimation and point- wise ambiguity removal. Point-wise estimation yields mul- tiple

  15. Ozone air quality measurement requirements for a geostationary satellite mission Peter Zoogman a,*, Daniel J. Jacob a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Ozone air quality measurement requirements for a geostationary satellite mission Peter Zoogman a Accepted 23 May 2011 Keywords: Air quality Ozone Kalman filter Assimilation Remote sensing a b s t r a c satellite measurements of ozone in different spectral regions to constrain surface ozone concentrations

  16. Satellite Attitude Control Using Statistical Game Theory Jong-Ha Lee, Ronald W. Diersing and Chang-Hee Won

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    Satellite Attitude Control Using Statistical Game Theory Jong-Ha Lee, Ronald W. Diersing and Chang sensing satellite attitude control. Statistical game theory is a generalization of mixed H2/H control-Hee Won Abstract-- We consider the application of multi-objective sta- tistical game theory to a remote

  17. Satellite data for high resolution offshore wind resource mapping: A data fusion approach M.B. Ben Ticha a,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Satellite data for high resolution offshore wind resource mapping: A data fusion approach M.B. Ben accurate high spatial and temporal resolutions wind measurements. Offshore, satellite data are an accurate radar, scatterometer, data fusion, offshore wind energy resource assessment. 1. INTRODUCTION Since

  18. Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland), with reference to simultaneous data obtained by a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories. The aurora simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories, J. Geophys. Res., 109

  19. Land surface skin temperatures from a combined analysis of microwave and infrared satellite observations for an all-weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    Land surface skin temperatures from a combined analysis of microwave and infrared satellite Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. In the absence all the expected variations with solar flux, soil characteristics, and cloudiness. During daytime

  20. Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

  1. Satellite observations of thought experiments close to a black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Chakrabarti

    2000-07-18

    Since black holes are `black', methods of their identification must necessarily be indirect. Due to very special boundary condition on the horizon, the advective flow behaves in a particular way, which includes formation of centrifugal pressure dominated boundary layer or CENBOL where much of the infall energy is released and outflows are generated. The observational aspects of black holes must depend on the steady and time-dependent properties of this boundary layer. Several observational results are written down in this review which seem to support the predictions of thought experiments based on this advective accretion/outflow model. In future, when gravitational waves are detected, some other predictions of this model could be tested as well.

  2. Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLIMS HIGH ICE Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent is an international consortium of 23 regional centers ·Coordinated by U.S. Geological Survey - Flagstaff #12.S. National Research Applications: · Energy Forecasting: Energy for U.S. Northwest derived partly from

  3. Using Satellite Fire Detection to Calibrate Components of the Fire Weather Index System in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Robert

    Using Satellite Fire Detection to Calibrate Components of the Fire Weather Index System in Malaysia, Indonesia ABSTRACT / Vegetation fires have become an increasing problem in tropical environments as a consequence of socioeconomic pressures and subsequent land-use change. In response, fire management systems

  4. Diurnal temperature range over the United States: A satellite view Donglian Sun,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Diurnal temperature range over the United States: A satellite view Donglian Sun,1 Rachel T. Pinker; published 4 March 2006. [1] Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important climate change index. Information on this parameter comes primarily from sparse and unevenly distributed observations of shelter air

  5. Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite Charlotte Bay Hasager to quantify the wake effect at two large offshore wind farms in Denmark. It is found that the wake velocity further. There is fast progress on planning and installation of offshore wind farms in the European waters

  6. Satellite image compression by post-transforms in the wavelet domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoras, .Romulus

    Satellite image compression by post-transforms in the wavelet domain X. Delaunay a,Ã, M. Chabert b application a b s t r a c t This paper proposes a novel compression scheme with a tunable complexity-rate- distortion trade-off. As images increase in size and resolution, more efficient compression schemes with low

  7. First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over;Severe smog episodes over China in January 2013 received worldwide at- tention. This air pollution. The largest sources of air pollutants in China are coal combustion and motor vehicle exhausts [He et al., 2002

  8. Validation of an UV inversion algorithm using satellite and surface measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    Validation of an UV inversion algorithm using satellite and surface measurements Pucai Wang UV-B radiation using both spectral and broadband measurements [Webb et al., 1997; Bigelow et al et al., 1995]. Ground-based instruments provide in situ measurements of current and historical UV

  9. Cloud patterns lee of Hawaii Island: A synthesis of satellite observations and numerical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Cloud patterns lee of Hawaii Island: A synthesis of satellite observations and numerical simulation; accepted 29 April 2008; published 15 August 2008. [1] Standing well above the trade wind inversion, Hawaii. To illustrate the circulation effect, lee cloud formation is compared between tall Hawaii and short Kauai

  10. Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen, Risoe National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, DTU, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde-real-time calculated to wind maps using CMOD functions using the ANSWRS software from the Johns Hopkins University

  11. The pop-up satellite archival tag (PSAT) was developed in the late 1990s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is determined by the Argos satellites that in turn transmit the data to a relay station. The earli- est uses's swimming behavior. Experiences with the first-generation tags led to the Quantification of drag and lift-time tracking from a research vessel or the availability of fixed lis- tening stations. Dagorn et al. (2001

  12. The ozone response to ENSO in Aura satellite measurements and a chemistry-climate simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    The ozone response to ENSO in Aura satellite measurements and a chemistry-climate simulation Luke D impact on tropospheric circulation causes significant changes to the distribution of ozone. Here we derive the lower tropospheric to lower stratospheric ozone response to ENSO from observations

  13. Bouquet: a Satellite Constellation Visualization Program for Walkers and Lattice Flower Constellations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enkh, Mandakh

    2011-10-21

    CONSTELLATION VISUALIZATION PROGRAM FOR WALKERS AND LATTICE FLOWER CONSTELLATIONS A Thesis by MANDAKH ENKH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2011 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering Bouquet: A Satellite Constellation Visualization Program for Walkers and Lattice Flower Constellations Copyright 2011 Mandakh Enkh...

  14. The Impact of Satellite-Derived Land Cover Uncertainty on Carbon Cycle Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hagan, Tony

    plays a central role in the Earth's carbon cycle. Globally, anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is that it represents a net imbalance between uptake of carbon by growth processes and emissions of carbon due1 The Impact of Satellite-Derived Land Cover Uncertainty on Carbon Cycle Calculations Keith Harris

  15. SATELLITE MEASUREMENTS OF MIDDLE ATMOSPHERIC IMPACTS BY SOLAR PROTON EVENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    SATELLITE MEASUREMENTS OF MIDDLE ATMOSPHERIC IMPACTS BY SOLAR PROTON EVENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23 C. H) Abstract. Solar cycle 23 was extremely active with seven of the largest twelve solar proton events (SPEs for several months past the solar events in the winter polar regions because of the enhanced NOy. Keywords

  16. SHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    for this systems. Depending on the application, prediction of solar irradiance is beneficial on different timeSHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS Annette Solar World Congress. This portion of the paper is the abstract. The abstract should not exceed 250

  17. Satellite and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Satellite and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991, Philippines. The observed phenomena included deep convection resulting from (1) lower level eruptions, (2 and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991, J. Geophys. Res., 110

  18. An event-driven phytoplankton bloom in southern Lake Michigan observed by satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, Jonathan

    's annual gross offshore algal primary production. By combining the satellite imagery with in situ measurements of water temperature and wind velocity we show that the bloom was triggered by a brief wind event effects on primary production in the oceans [Franks and Walstad, 1997; Anderson and Prieur, 2000; Levy et

  19. Variability in satellite winds over the Benguela upwelling system during 19992000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Variability in satellite winds over the Benguela upwelling system during 1999­­2000 C. M. Risien,1, Rondebosch, South Africa D. B. Chelton College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University March 2004. [1] Wind stress variability over the Benguela upwelling system is considered using 16 months

  20. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: atmospheric effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rote, D.M.; Brubaker, K.L.; Lee, J.L.

    1980-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a preliminary, three-year program to investigate the impacts of the construction and operation of a satellite power system, of unprecedented scale. The Department of Energy's program, titled The Concept Development and Evaluation Program, focused its investigations on a Reference System description that calls for the use of either silicon (Si) or gallium aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) photovoltaic cells on 60 satellites to be constructed in GEO over a 30-yr period. Rectennas would be constructed on the ground to receive microwave energy from the satellites. Each satellite-rectenna pair is designed to produce 5 GW of power on an essentially continuous basis for use as a baseload power source for an electric power distribution system. The environmental assessment part of the program was divided into five interdependent task areas. The present document constitutes the final technical report on one of the five task areas, the Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects, and as such presents an in-depth summary of work performed during the assessment program. The issues associated with SPS activities in the troposphere are examined. These include tropospheric weather modification related to rectenna operations and rocket launches, and air quality impacts related to rocketlaunch ground clouds. Then progressing upward through the various levels of the atmosphere, the principal middle and upper atmospheric effects associated with rocket effluents are analyzed. Finally, all of the potential SPS atmospheric effects are summarized.

  1. Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations; published 16 March 2010. [1] Enhanced mesoscale eddy activity northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago by 5° longitude subregions revealed the dominant mesoscale periods ranging from 90 days near 18°N

  2. Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data , B. Seppke b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data M. Gade a , B. Seppke b of mesoscale surface currents in the southestern Baltic Sea (Southern Baltic Proper). Marine surface films of the two-dimensional data sets may therefore allow for the calculation of mesoscale ocean current fields

  3. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  4. Sensitivity of satellite microwave and infrared observations to soil moisture at a global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    Sensitivity of satellite microwave and infrared observations to soil moisture at a global scale observations include passive microwave emissivities, active microwave scatterometer data, and infrared. For example, we show that the passive microwave polarization differences at 19 GHz and above are essentially

  5. WIND ENERGY STUDIES OFFSHORE USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING MERETE BRUUN CHRISTIANSEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WIND ENERGY STUDIES OFFSHORE USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING MERETE BRUUN CHRISTIANSEN Wind Energy Dept., Risø National Laboratory Denmark Abstract The wind provides a rich energy source, which can be exploited further in order to reach the energy goals of accessibility, availability and acceptability set up

  6. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE A Unique Satellite Perspective of the 1314 January 2004 Record Cold Outbreak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    moved eastward, the coast of Maine, Cape Cod, and the Saint Lawrence River were also apparent, several minimum temperature records were broken in the New England region of the northeastern United satellite pay- loads include a radiometer that measures longwave in- frared energy between 10 and 12 m

  7. Accuracy improvement of irradiation data by combining ground and satellite measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Accuracy improvement of irradiation data by combining ground and satellite measurements Jethro-Georg.Beyer@et.hs-magdeburg.de Introduction: · Planning, monitoring and operation of PV systems require accurate irradiation data · Knowledge of the accuracy improves the value of the irradiation data · Options to obtain site-specific irradiance data: 1

  8. Laser power beaming to extend lives of GSO NiCd satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroe, D.K.

    1993-12-31

    It is proposed that a ground-based laser can beam power to commercial communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit and reduce battery depth-of-discharge during eclipses. Two laser system designs are presented which have the capability of reducing battery discharge by 100%. Both utilize a steerable beam director, with a mirror diameter of 4 meters in one case and 8 meters in the other. Both also use an adaptive optics unit within the beam train to provide real-time corrections for wavefront distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. The required system power output is in the range of 100 to 200 kW for a transmitted wavelength just under 900 nm. Laser power beaming can nearly double the remaining lifetime of a satellite that uses NiCd batteries. However, by the time such lasers become available, nearly all NiCd satellites will be replaced by NiH{sub 2} satellites, which stand to benefit much less from power beaming.

  9. MULTIBEAM SATELLITE RESOURCE ALLOCATION FOR SIMULTANEOUS TRANSFER OF INFORMATION AND POWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on energy harvesting in cellular network scenarios. In this paper, we address a problem of simultaneous network [8, 9], which consists of satellites and terrestrial subnets, can feed solar power from the space & Technology (DGIST), Korea jhchoi@dgist.ac.kr Changhee Joo School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  10. 19th Annual Conference on Small Satellites, August 8-11, 2005 Saurabh Jain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Algorithm Based Charge Optimization of Lithium-Ion Batteries in Small Satellites #12;219th Annual Conference and the tasks completion in minimum time · Eclipse - to achieve minimum depth of Li-Ion battery discharge while to autonomously optimize the battery state of charge while meeting the diverse requirements of all the subsystems

  11. INTELLIGENT PERFORMANCE CHECK OF PV SYSTEM OPERATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    INTELLIGENT PERFORMANCE CHECK OF PV SYSTEM OPERATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA A. Drews* , J. Betcke of a fully automated service for performance check and error detection for photovoltaic (PV) systems by daily surveillance. Malfunctions of a grid-connected PV system, e.g. drop out of single module strings

  12. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: GALILEAN SATELLITES: GEOLOGY AND MAPPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: GALILEAN SATELLITES: GEOLOGY AND MAPPING 6:30 p. Geissler P. Jaeger W. Becker T. Crown D. A. Schenk P. Geologic Mapping of the Polar Regions of Io [#1124] This abstract discusses our results from geologic mapping of the polar regions of Jupiter's moon Io using

  13. Tuesday, March 24, 2009 POSTER SESSION I: ICY SATELLITES: GELID GEOLOGY/GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Tuesday, March 24, 2009 POSTER SESSION I: ICY SATELLITES: GELID GEOLOGY/GEOPHYSICS 6:30 p.m. Town of recent tectonic activity on Europa logically starts with the geologically young, ridgeless surface Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009) full331.pdf #12;El Maarry M. R. Sierks H. Geological

  14. Measuring radon flux across active faults: Relevance of excavating and possibility of satellite discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, Yann

    Measuring radon flux across active faults: Relevance of excavating and possibility of satellite January 2010 Keywords: Exhalation flux Radon-222 Carbon dioxide Faults Earthquake Trench a b s t r a c on the Xidatan segment of the Kunlun Fault, Qinghai Province, China, using measurement of the radon- 222

  15. Leader/Follower synchronization of satellite attitude without angular velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    Leader/Follower synchronization of satellite attitude without angular velocity measurements Anne angular velocity measurements are not available. Nonlinear observers are used to estimate the angular law without angular velocity measurements for a single spacecraft and in [8] an output feedback

  16. Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Lisan

    1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat and the atmosphere communicate through the interfacial exchanges of heat, freshwater, and momentum. While

  17. Comparisons of emissivity observations from satellites and the ground at the CRCS Dunhuang Gobi site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Comparisons of emissivity observations from satellites and the ground at the CRCS Dunhuang Gobi resolution infrared (IR) emissivity spectra were taken from the China Radiometric Calibration Sites (CRCS of the two sets show that the daytime emissivity is smaller than the nighttime emissivity in almost

  18. Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa related to monsoon of aerosol emissions from the wet surface. 1. Introduction The main aerosol types occurring over Africa Africa can be characterized using Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from Global Ozone Monitoring

  19. The Transformational Satellite Communications System (TSAT) is the DoD's next generation geosynchronous sat-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touch, Joe

    . TSAT System Overview The TSAT system constitutes a core component of the Global Information Grid (GIG). The GIG architecture uses satellite communications (SATCOM) to achieve the goals of: real-time "sensor and Homeland Defense; and connectivity of all Global Information Grid (GIG) assets. Figure 1 illustrates

  20. SATELLITE ALTIMETRY AND KEY OBSERVATIONS: WHAT WE'VE LEARNED, AND WHAT'S POSSIBLE WITH NEW TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    -0230, USA, sgille@ucsd.edu: (9) Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University]. At present a constellation of flying satellite missions routinely provides sea level anomaly, sea winds, sea tracks [2] with wide gaps in between. Fortuitously computing power kept pace allowing basin scale