National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for km kilometers km

  1. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Matthias Fink; Johannes Handsteiner; Bernhard Wittmann; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-02-06

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g. for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e. entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 standard deviations beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Since our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our assay to lay the ground for a fully-fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  2. Pblico -Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id: 1038362 #12;Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id: 1038350.768,80 EUR #12;Público - Principal Meteorologia captou rajadas de 220 km/hora Autor: Lurdes Ferreira Id

  3. Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

  4. Status of the KM3NeT project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margiotta, A

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will be installed at three sites: KM3NeT-Fr, offshore Toulon, France, KM3NeT-It, offshore Portopalo di Capo Passero, Sicily (Italy) and KM3NeT-Gr, offshore Pylos, Peloponnese, Greece. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will search for Galactic and extra-Galactic sources of neutrinos, complementing IceCube in its field of view. The detector will have a modular structure and consists of six building blocks, each including about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared in France near Toulon and in Italy, near Capo Passero in Sicily....

  5. The European Optical Module for Paris, KM-3 electronics meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    V) Tref optical link single mode (500 Mbd) Control, Ocean cable (30km) String-Controller(SC) Data (Ocean bottom) Sea water return #12;Why 2 di erent OMs in DUMAND II ? JOM and EOM are complementary Currents Voltages HighVoltage #12;The EOM Scintillator Electrical penetrator 432 mm 345 mm Philips XP2600

  6. Teleporting independent qubits through a 97 km free-space channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Juan; Ren, Ji-Gang; Cao, Yuan; Yong, Hai-Lin; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Chang; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Xin-Dong; Xu, Ping; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    With the help of quantum entanglement, quantum communication can be achieved between arbitrarily distant places without passing through intermediate locations by quantum teleportation. In the laboratory, quantum teleportation has been demonstrated over short distance by photonic and atomic qubits. Using fiber links, quantum teleportation has been achieved over kilometer distances. Long distance quantum teleportation is of particular interest and has been one of the holy grails of practical quantum communication. Most recently, quantum teleportation over 16 km free-space link was demonstrated. However, a major restriction in this experiment is that the unknown quantum state cannot directly come from outside. Here, based on an ultra-bright multi-photon entanglement source, we demonstrate quantum teleportation, closely following the original scheme, for any unknown state created outside, between two optical free-space links separated by 97 km. Over a 35-53 dB high-loss quantum channel, an average fidelity of 80....

  7. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  8. High rate, long-distance quantum key distribution over 250km of ultra low loss fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stucki; N. Walenta; F. Vannel; R. T. Thew; N. Gisin; H. Zbinden; S. Gray; C. R. Towery; S. Ten

    2009-03-23

    We present a fully automated quantum key distribution prototype running at 625 MHz clock rate. Taking advantage of ultra low loss fibres and low-noise superconducting detectors, we can distribute 6,000 secret bits per second over 100 km and 15 bits per second over 250km.

  9. Simulation for KM3NeT using ANTARES-Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kuch

    2006-06-21

    The KM3NeT project is a common European effort for the design of a km3-scale deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean. For the upcoming Design Study simulations have been done using modified ANTARES software. Several concepts and ideas have been tested for their merits and feasibility.

  10. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  11. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  12. Bottom interacting sound at 50 km range in a deep ocean environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of acoustic methods in many applications. In this paper acoustic bottom interaction in the deep water LongBottom interacting sound at 50 km range in a deep ocean environment Ilya A. Udovydchenkova) Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole

  13. Aalborg Universitet Full Scale Test on a 100km, 150kV AC Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    wind farm Horns Rev 2, located in Denmark west coast, to Denmark's 400 kV transmission network from the electrical measurements on a 99.7 km, 150 kV three-phase AC cable, connecting 215 MW offshore

  14. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01

    The half-life of (38)K(m) has been measured to be 924.46(14) ms, a result that is a factor of two more precise than any of the five previous measurements of this quantity. The previous results are not consistent with one another, but our result...

  15. A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Note A 3 km atmospheric boundary layer on Titan indicated by dune spacing and Huygens data Ralph D a b s t r a c t Some 20% of Titan's surface is covered in large linear dunes that resemble parameter limiting the growth of giant dunes, namely the boundary layer thickness (Andreotti et al., 2009

  16. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Avgitas, T; Balasi, K; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Barrios, J; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Biagioni, A; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouché, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Boutonnet, C; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Château, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Coleiro, A; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Di Capua, F; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajanana, D; Gal, T; Galatà, S; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; GraciaRuiz, R; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestädt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hößl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C W; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leismüller, K P; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; LindseyClark, M; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Löhner, H; Lonardo, A; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Mari?, O; Markou, C; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Melis, K W; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C M; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; P?v?la?, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Pikounis, K; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Pühlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sciacca, V; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Stavropoulos, G; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tézier, D; Théraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Vicini, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2015-01-01

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is...

  17. ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OG 6.3-3 ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 EV OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2 ARRAY M, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152, Japan . Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica these showers, 60 of them are initiated by primaries with energies larger than 1019 eV. The energy spectrum

  18. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  19. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  20. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    other cra- tonic settings, such as the Illinois, Paris, and North Sea basins (Heidlauf et al., 1986ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more corrections and estimates of paleo- bathymetry, we recognize four different styles of subsidence in the basin

  1. The prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KM3NeT Collaboration; S. Adrián-Martínez; M. Ageron; F. Aharonian; S. Aiello; A. Albert; F. Ameli; E. G. Anassontzis; M. Anghinolfi; G. Anton; S. Anvar; M. Ardid; T. Avgitas; K. Balasi; H. Band; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; B. Baret; S. Baron; J. Barrios; A. Belias; E. Berbee; A. M. van den Berg; A. Berkien; V. Bertin; S. Beurthey; V. van Beveren; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; A. Biagioni; S. Bianucci; M. Billault; A. Birbas; H. Boer Rookhuizen; R. Bormuth; V. Bouché; B. Bouhadef; G. Bourlis; C. Boutonnet; M. Bouwhuis; C. Bozza; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; G. Cacopardo; L. Caillat; M. Calamai; D. Calvo; A. Capone; L. Caramete; F. Caruso; S. Cecchini; A. Ceres; R. Cereseto; C. Champion; F. Château; T. Chiarusi; B. Christopoulou; M. Circella; L. Classen; R. Cocimano; A. Coleiro; S. Colonges; R. Coniglione; A. Cosquer; M. Costa; P. Coyle; A. Creusot; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; G. De Rosa; N. Deniskina; J. -J. Destelle; C. Distefano; F. Di Capua; C. Donzaud; D. Dornic; Q. Dorosti-Hasankiadeh; E. Drakopoulou; D. Drouhin; L. Drury; D. Durand; T. Eberl; D. Elsaesser; A. Enzenhöfer; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; D. Gajanana; T. Gal; S. Galatà; F. Garufi; M. Gebyehu; V. Giordano; N. Gizani; R. GraciaRuiz; K. Graf; R. Grasso; G. Grella; A. Grmek; R. Habel; H. van Haren; T. Heid; A. Heijboer; E. Heine; S. Henry; J. J. Hernández-Rey; B. Herold; M. A. Hevinga; M. van der Hoek; J. Hofestädt; J. Hogenbirk; C. Hugon; J. Hößl; M. Imbesi; C. W. James; P. Jansweijer; J. Jochum; M. de Jong; M. Jongen; M. Kadler; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; E. Kappos; U. Katz; O. Kavatsyuk; P. Keller; G. Kieft; E. Koffeman; H. Kok; P. Kooijman; J. Koopstra; A. Korporaal; A. Kouchner; I. Kreykenbohm; V. Kulikovskiy; R. Lahmann; P. Lamare; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; H. Le Provost; K. P. Leismüller; A. Leisos; D. Lenis; E. Leonora; M. LindseyClark; C. D. Llorens Alvarez; H. Löhner; A. Lonardo; S. Loucatos; F. Louis; E. Maccioni; K. Mannheim; K. Manolopoulos; A. Margiotta; O. Mari?; C. Markou; J. A. Martínez-Mora; A. Martini; R. Masullo; K. W. Melis; T. Michael; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; S. Mos; Y. Moudden; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. Nicolaou; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; A. Orzelli; A. Papaikonomou; R. Papaleo; G. E. P?v?la?; H. Peek; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; K. Pikounis; V. Popa; Th. Pradier; M. Priede; G. Pühlhofer; S. Pulvirenti; C. Racca; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; P. A. Rapidis; P. Razis; D. Real; L. Resvanis; J. Reubelt; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Saldaña; D. F. E. Samtleben; M. Sanguineti; A. Santangelo; P. Sapienza; J. Schmelling; J. Schnabel; V. Sciacca; M. Sedita; T. Seitz; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; G. Stavropoulos; J. Steijger; T. Stolarczyk; D. Stransky; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; D. Tézier; S. Théraube; L. F. Thompson; P. Timmer; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; M. Tselengidou; A. Tsirigotis; S. Tzamarias; E. Tzamariudaki; B. Vallage; V. Van Elewyck; J. Vermeulen; P. Vernin; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo; P. Werneke; L. Wiggers; J. Wilms; E. de Wolf; R. H. L. van Wooning; E. Zonca; J. D. Zornoza; J. Zúñiga; A. Zwart

    2015-10-06

    A prototype detection unit of the KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope has been installed at 3500m depth 80km offshore the Italian coast. KM3NeT in its final configuration will contain several hundreds of detection units. Each detection unit is a mechanical structure anchored to the sea floor, held vertical by a submerged buoy and supporting optical modules for the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by charged secondary particles emerging from neutrino interactions. This prototype string implements three optical modules with 31 photomultiplier tubes each. These optical modules were developed by the KM3NeT Collaboration to enhance the detection capability of neutrino interactions. The prototype detection unit was operated since its deployment in May 2014 until its decommissioning in July 2015. Reconstruction of the particle trajectories from the data requires a nanosecond accuracy in the time calibration. A procedure for relative time calibration of the photomultiplier tubes contained in each optical module is described. This procedure is based on the measured coincidences produced in the sea by the 40K background light and can easily be expanded to a detector with several thousands of optical modules. The time offsets between the different optical modules are obtained using LED nanobeacons mounted inside them. A set of data corresponding to 600 hours of livetime was analysed. The results show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the expected optical background and the signal from atmospheric muons. An almost background-free sample of muons was selected by filtering the time correlated signals on all the three optical modules. The zenith angle of the selected muons was reconstructed with a precision of about 3{\\deg}.

  2. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  3. The KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margiotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will complement IceCube in its field of view and exceed it substantially in sensitivity. Its main goal is the detection of high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. The detector will have a modular structure with six building blocks, each consisting of about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared offshore Toulon, France and offshore Capo Passero on Sicily, Italy. The technological solutions for the neutrino detector of KM3NeT and the expected performance of the neutrino telescope are present...

  4. Mean zonal acceleration and heating of the 70- to 100-km region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyahara, S.; Portnyagin, Yu.I.; Forbes, J.M. (Boston Univ., MA (USA)); Solovjeva, T.V. (Inst. for Experimental Meteorology, Obninsk (USSR))

    1991-02-01

    The dynamical interactions which occur in the atmospheric region around the mesopause ({approximately} 90 km) determine the boundary characteristics for the thermospheric region above. In the present work, using an empirical model of Eulerian-mean meridional motions based on monthly climatological winds from these radar data, the net vertical motions in this atmospheric regime are derived from the continuity equation. Assuming empirical prescriptions of the mean density and temperature fields, mean heat flux divergences and momentum flux divergences are estimated which exhibit very specific characteristics in the height versus latitude domain for winter, summer, and equinox conditions in both hemispheres. A numerical circulation model including gravity wave/mean flow and tide/mean flow interactions is utilized to examine possible origins of these heat and acceleration sources. At low latitudes ({le}30{degree}), it is evident that atmospheric tides represent the primary wave source contribution to zonal mean acceleration and heating of this region of the atmosphere; similarly, at middle and high latitudes ({ge}30{degree}) below about 90 km, dissipation of vertically propagating gravity waves appears to provide the dominant momentum source for the mean zonal circulation. However, above approximately 90 km and between about 40{degree} and 70{degree} latitude, very significant regions of mean heating and acceleration exist which are not accounted for by the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves and tides. The possible origins of these effects are examined. The authors suggest that the two most likely candidates to explain these observed features are (1) obliquely propagating gravity waves and/or (2) planetary scale waves.

  5. KM3NeT: A Next Generation Neutrino Telescope in the Mediterranean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kappes; for the KM3NeT Consortium

    2007-11-05

    To complement the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under construction at the South Pole, the three Mediterranean neutrino telescope projects ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR have joined forces to develop, construct and operate a km^3-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Since February 2006, the technical specifications and performance of such a detector are studied in the framework of a 3-year EU-funded Design Study. In 2009 a technical design report will be released laying the foundations for the construction of the detector. In the following, the current status of the Design Study is presented and examples of solutions for the technical challenges are discussed.

  6. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Mayer, Benjamin W [ORNL; Wilhelmi, Nate [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  7. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  8. Sensitivity and noise analysis of 4 km laser interferometric gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, Rana, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Around the world, efforts are underway to commission several kilometer-scale laser interferometers to detect gravitational radiation. In the United States, there are two collocated interferometers in Hanford, Washington ...

  9. Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

  10. Proposal of a new generation of Laser Beacon for time calibration in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Real, Diego [IFIC, Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT collaboration aims at the construction of a multi-km3 high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea consisting of a matrix of pressure resistant glass spheres holding each a set (31) of small area photomultipliers. The main motivation of the telescope is to observe cosmic neutrinos through the Cherenkov light induced in sea water by charged particles produced in neutrino interactions with the surrounding medium. A relative time calibration between photomultipliers of the order of 1 ns is required to achieve an optimal performance. To this end, several time calibration subsystems have been developed. In this article, the proposal of a last generation Laser Beacon, to be used in KM3NeT and developed to measure and monitor the relative time offsets between photomultipliers, is presented.

  11. Indirect Detection of Dark Matter in km-size Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Joakim Edsjo; Paolo Gondolo

    1999-06-02

    Neutrino telescopes of kilometer size are currently being planned. They will be two or three orders of magnitude larger than presently operating detectors, but they will have a much higher muon energy threshold. We discuss the trade-off between area and energy threshold for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter captured in the Sun and in the Earth and annihilating into high energy neutrinos. We also study the effect of a higher threshold on the complementarity of different searches for supersymmetric dark matter.

  12. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater Xabier Angulo.angulo@io.cfmac.csic.es; phone +34 915618806 ext.:222 ABSTRACT In this paper we combine the use of optical pulse coding and seeded second-order Raman amplification to extend the sensing distance of Brillouin optical time

  13. Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a , M architecture relies upon the use of Directed Aerial Robot Explorers (DAREs), which essentially are long. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Scientific ballooning; Direct Aerial Robot

  14. Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland Z. Du; accepted 19 September 2005 Available online 22 November 2005 Editor: R.D. van der Hilst Abstract Iceland discontinuity beneath central Iceland is shallow relative to peripheral regions and this was interpreted

  15. Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long Microwave Earth but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent on solar illumination. Despite the high University's Microwave Earth Remote Sensing (MERS) Laboratory. These floating glacial ice fragments

  16. Equation of State Measurements of Materials Using a Three-Stage Gun to Impact Velocities of 11km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REINHART,WILLIAM D.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; CARROLL,DANIEL E.; THORNHILL,T.G.; WINFREE,N.A.

    2000-09-26

    Understanding high pressure behavior of homogeneous as well as heterogeneous materials is necessary in order to address the physical processes associated with hypervelocity impact events related to space science applications including orbital debris impact and impact lethality. At very high impact velocities, material properties will be subjugated to phase-changes, such as melting and vaporization. These phase states cannot be obtained through conventional gun technology. These processes need to be represented accurately in hydrodynamic codes to allow credible computational analysis of impact events resulting from hypervelocity impact. In this paper, techniques that are being developed and implemented to obtain the needed shock loading parameters (Hugoniot states) for material characterization studies, namely shock velocity and particle velocity, will be described at impact velocities up to 11 km/s. What is new in this report is that these techniques are being implemented for use at engagement velocities never before attained utilizing two-stage light-gas gun technology.

  17. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 km^3 of Sea Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Kurahashi; Justin Vandenbroucke; Giorgio Gratta

    2010-07-30

    An underwater acoustic sensor array spanning ~1500 km^3 is used to search for cosmic-ray neutrinos of ultra-high energies (UHE, E > 10^18 eV). Approximately 328 million triggers accumulated over an integrated 130 days of data taking are analysed. The sensitivity of the experiment is determined from a Monte Carlo simulation of the array using recorded noise conditions and expected waveforms. Two events are found to have properties compatible with showers in the energy range 10^24 to 5x10^24 eV and 10^22 to 5x10^22 eV. Since the understanding of impulsive backgrounds is limited, a flux upper limit is set providing the most sensitive limit on UHE neutrinos using the acoustic technique.

  18. Intelligent scraping experience using ultrasonics in two 60in./56in. dual diameter 100 km seawater transmission pipelines in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, A.F.; Chu, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Saudi ARAMCO`s two 60in./56in. (1524/1422 mm) diameter Seawater Injection Pipelines used for secondary oil recovery stretch from the Seawater Treatment Plant across the Arabian Desert for a distance of approximately 100 kilometers. Both lines were put into operation in mid 1978 using over the ditch Plicoflex tape wrap as a means of protection against external corrosion. A significant portion of both pipelines (32 km of each line) runs through Subkha (salty moist) areas. A series of test hole evaluations in 1989 indicated moderate to sever external corrosion particularly in Subkha which necessitated sleeving and external coating application. In 1991 a series of leaks, four (4) in total over a period of two (2) months occurred in Pipeline {number_sign}2 due to external corrosion. This suggested that the line(s) were in urgent need of at least partial replacement or major rehabilitation. Prior to making a final decision on partial replacement it was decided to run an Intelligent Scraper in both pipelines to ascertain both internal and external pipeline conditions. An Ultrasonic Scraper the largest of it`s kind in the world, similar to what was used in the Alyeska Pipeline was developed and successfully run in both pipelines in February 1993. This paper discusses the pipeline history, test hole evaluations, Intelligent Scraping experiences, field evaluation for anomaly verification, and repair of approximately 120 locations as identified by the Intelligent Scraping run. The Intelligent Scraping evaluation played a major role in the cancellation of partial pipeline replacement with cost savings estimated $30 MM.

  19. Design of the high-speed framing, FEC, and interleaving hardware used in a 5.4km free-space optical communication experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Joseph Anthony, Jr.

    The forward error correction (FEC) and interleaver realizations used in a 5.4 km horizontal-path link experiment incorporated several unique elements that were specifically tailored to address turbulence-induced fading. ...

  20. Location of the M 2.0 Earthquake on 08/22/2010 that Occurred 25 km North of West Valley, New York.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Location of the M 2.0 Earthquake on 08/22/2010 that Occurred 25 km North of West Valley, New York at 16:41:47 (UTC) about 25 km north of West Valley, New York. There were no felt reports by residents and their distribution is plotted in Figure 2. 22 August 2010, Md 2.0 Earthquake 15 miles north of West Valley, NY -78

  1. Extension of the operating parameters of the two stage light gas gun to velocities below 2 km/sec.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoe, R S

    2007-08-28

    The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Facility (JASPER) located in area 27 at the Nevada Test Site Has been tasked with providing high accuracy information on the Equation Of State (EOS) and other dynamic properties of weapons grade plutonium and other actinides important to the stockpile stewardship program. In the past 5 years this facility has provided dozens of experimental data points for the accurate determination of pressure density relationship for these materials over a broad pressure range. In order to complete this survey it is necessary to extend the low pressure region to include projectile velocities below 2 km/s. For most gas gun facilities this would present not too great a difficulty, one could simply decrease the amount of propellant along with a decrease in the strength of the petal valve, However JASPER requires that the piston be securely embedded in the Acceleration Reservoir (AR) as part of the containment system. The projectile must remain flat and undistorted. This requirement makes the attainment of slow velocities problematic. This talk will discuss the JASPER Facility, A finite difference code developed to give predictive capability for two stage gas guns, and a set of experiments performed to demonstrate this capability.

  2. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  3. A nonsteady one-dimensional theoretical model of Mars' neutral atmospheric composition between 30 and 200 km

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigo, R.; Garcia-Alvarez, E.; Lopez-Gonzalez, M.J.; Lopez-Moreno, J.J. (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada (Spain))

    1990-08-30

    There has been a big advance in the knowledge of the composition of the atmosphere of the planet Mars since its exploration by different missions in the 1970s, and this will be deeply increased in the following years as the upcoming programs to Mars develop. In this context, the authors have elaborated a model of the Mars' neutral atmosphere including the following compounds: O({sup 3}P), O({sup 1}D), O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, H, H{sub 2}, OH, H{sub 2}O, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}, between 30 and 200 km of altitude. The model is carried out for middle latitudes in equinox conditions and with moderate solar activity and provides the day-to-night evolution of the atmosphere. The scarcity of observations corresponding to the nightside of the planet has made it necessary to calculate the atmospheric temperature profile based on the available observations and on theoretical estimations. The model includes a detailed treatment of both the photochemical and the dynamical processes. In this sense, the most recent values of the reaction rates and photodissociation cross sections have been used, and a new height profile of the eddy diffusion coefficient has been computed which is able to explain the vertical distribution of carbon monoxide. The concentration profiles obtained show, in general, a very good agreement with the available experimental measurements.

  4. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  5. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2014-12-02

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12 month, 12 km horizontal resolution air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a Volatility Basis Set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary models used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12% and anmore »annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of ?1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations, and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations, with better performance at predicting average daytime and daily peak O3 concentrations. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 65%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = ?110%) and organic carbon (MFB = ?65%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  6. Experimental loophole-free violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electron spins separated by 1.3 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hensen; H. Bernien; A. E. Dréau; A. Reiserer; N. Kalb; M. S. Blok; J. Ruitenberg; R. F. L. Vermeulen; R. N. Schouten; C. Abellán; W. Amaya; V. Pruneri; M. W. Mitchell; M. Markham; D. J. Twitchen; D. Elkouss; S. Wehner; T. H. Taminiau; R. Hanson

    2015-08-24

    For more than 80 years, the counterintuitive predictions of quantum theory have stimulated debate about the nature of reality. In his seminal work, John Bell proved that no theory of nature that obeys locality and realism can reproduce all the predictions of quantum theory. Bell showed that in any local realist theory the correlations between distant measurements satisfy an inequality and, moreover, that this inequality can be violated according to quantum theory. This provided a recipe for experimental tests of the fundamental principles underlying the laws of nature. In the past decades, numerous ingenious Bell inequality tests have been reported. However, because of experimental limitations, all experiments to date required additional assumptions to obtain a contradiction with local realism, resulting in loopholes. Here we report on a Bell experiment that is free of any such additional assumption and thus directly tests the principles underlying Bell's inequality. We employ an event-ready scheme that enables the generation of high-fidelity entanglement between distant electron spins. Efficient spin readout avoids the fair sampling assumption (detection loophole), while the use of fast random basis selection and readout combined with a spatial separation of 1.3 km ensure the required locality conditions. We perform 245 trials testing the CHSH-Bell inequality $S \\leq 2$ and find $S = 2.42 \\pm 0.20$. A null hypothesis test yields a probability of $p = 0.039$ that a local-realist model for space-like separated sites produces data with a violation at least as large as observed, even when allowing for memory in the devices. This result rules out large classes of local realist theories, and paves the way for implementing device-independent quantum-secure communication and randomness certification.

  7. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-04-07

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12-month, 12 km horizontal resolution year 2005 air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a volatility basis set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary modeling efforts used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12%more »and an annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of ?1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations. Performance is better at predicting daytime-average and daily peak O3 concentrations, which are more relevant for regulatory and health effects analyses relative to annual average values. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 36%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = ?110%) and organic carbon (MFB = ?29%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  8. Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aszodi, Attila; Yamaji, Bogdan [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Silye, Judit [Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Safety Directorate, H-1539 Budapest, P.O. Box 676 (Hungary); Pazmandi, Tamas [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of using nuclear energy. In addition in November 2005 Hungary's parliament approved plans to extend the lifetime of the country's four-unit nuclear power plant. In order to have the crucial public support for nuclear energy it is very important to dispel unrealistic dismay and misbelieves regarding these questions. Thus it is extremely beneficial to have a film on this topic created by nuclear professionals especially for the public audience. In 2005 a book on the Chernobyl accident was published in Hungary that covers this expedition in a full chapter [2]. We plan to present the film to the audience of the conference. (authors)

  9. Fig.3. Seismicity plots showing the depths and epicenters on Galapagos Is-lands. Note how the earthquakes are clustered at 10 km depth, probably contro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    Bolivar). LAT LONG Fig.6. The GV01-GV04 baseline has recorded vertical uplift since the 2005 eruption with the vertical bars: Red = 2005 Sierra Negra, Blue= 2006 and Orange= 2007. The shallow and cluster seismicity= 2006 and Orange= 2007. A GV01GV07 2 km 0 Deep magma source B Sill magma Chamber body GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM

  10. PSR B0329+54: Substructure in the scatter-broadened image discovered with RadioAstron on baselines of up to 235,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, M V; Bartel, N; Gwinn, C R; Johnson, M D; Joshi, B C; Kardashev, N S; Karuppusamy, R; Kovalev, Y Y; Kramer, M; Rudnitskii, A G; Safutdinov, E R; Shishov, V I; Smirnova, T V; Soglasnov, V A; Zensus, J A; Zhuravlev, V I

    2015-01-01

    We studied scattering properties of the pulsar PSR B0329+54 with a ground-space radio interferometer RadioAstron which included the 10-m Space Radio Telescope, the 110-m Green Bank Telescope, the 14x25-m Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and the 64-m Kalyazin Radio Telescope. The observations were performed at 324 MHz on baselines of up to 235,000 km in November 2012 and January 2014. At short ground-space baselines of less than about 20,000 km, the visibility amplitude decreases with the projected baseline length, providing a direct measurement of the diameter of the scattering disk of 4.7$\\pm$0.9 mas. The size of the diffraction spot near Earth is 15,000$\\pm$3,000 km. At longer baselines of up to 235,000 km, where no interferometric detection of the scattering disk would be expected, significant visibilities were observed with amplitudes scattered around a constant value. These detections result in a discovery of a substructure in the completely resolved scatter-broadened image of the pointlike source, ...

  11. Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA/AVHRR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, P.O. Box 8089, Missoula, MT 59807, United States g NOAA forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. While forest fires in North America (NA) have

  12. 1154 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 19, NO. 15, AUGUST 1, 2007 10 10 Gb/s DWDM Transmission Through 2.2-km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Joseph M.

    Transmission Through 2.2-km Multimode Fiber Using Adaptive Optics Rahul A. Panicker, Jeffrey P. Wilde, Joseph M. Kahn, David F. Welch, and Ilya Lyubomirsky Abstract--Transmitter-based adaptive optics and receiver-crystal spatial light modulator controls the launched field pattern for ten 10-Gb/s nonreturn-to-zero channels

  13. The Era of Kilometer-Scale Neutrino Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Halzen, Francis; Katz, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. KM3NeT, an instrument that aims to exploit several cubic kilometers of the deep Mediterranean sea as its detector medium, is in its final design stages. The scientific missions of these instruments include searching for sources of cosmic rays and for dark matter, observing Galactic supernova explosions, and studying the neutrinos themselves. Identifying the accelerators that produce Galacticmore »and extragalactic cosmic rays has been a priority mission of several generations of high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino telescopes; success has been elusive so far. Detecting the gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes associated with cosmic rays reaches a new watershed with the completion of IceCube, the first neutrino detector with sensitivity to the anticipated fluxes. In this paper, we will first revisit the rationale for constructing kilometer-scale neutrino detectors. We will subsequently recall the methods for determining the arrival direction, energy and flavor of neutrinos, and will subsequently describe the architecture of the IceCube and KM3NeT detectors.« less

  14. A thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (time-GCM): Equinox solar cycle minimum simulations (30-500 km)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1994-03-15

    A new simulation model of the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere with coupled electrodynamics has been developed and used to calculate the global circulation, temperature and compositional structure between 30-500 km for equinox, solar cycle minimum, geomagnetic quiet conditions. The model incorporates all of the features of the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM) but the lower boundary has been extended downward from 97 to 30 km (10 mb) and it includes the physical and chemical processes appropriate for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The first simulation used Rayleigh friction to represent gravity wave drag in the middle atmosphere and although it was able to close the mesospheric jets it severely damped the diurnal tide. Reduced Rayleigh friction allowed the tide to penetrate to thermospheric heights but did not close the jets. A gravity wave parameterization developed by Fritts and Lu allows both features to exist simultaneously with the structure of tides and mean flow dependent upon the strength of the gravity wave source. The model calculates a changing dynamic structure with the mean flow and diurnal tide dominant in the mesosphere, the in-situ generated semi-diurnal tide dominating the lower thermosphere and an in-situ generated diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere. The results also show considerable interaction between dynamics and composition, especially atomic oxygen between 85 and 120 km. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  15. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  16. Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity Keyhabitatquantity Sedimentload Obstructions ChannelStability Flow Food Temperature Predation Chemicals Competition functional habitats. Within the Methow basin, the Lower Twisp, Lower Methow Mainstem, Middle Methow Mainstem

  17. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r mReducingwhistleblowerxinyufu Ames25

  18. Penetration Experiments with 6061-T6511 Aluminum Targets and Spherical-Nose Steel Projectiles at Striking Velocities Between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrestal, M.J.; Piekutowski, A.J.

    1999-02-04

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments with 7.11-mm-diameter, 74.7-mm-long, spherical-nose, 4340 steel projectiles launched into 250-mm-diameter, 6061-T6511 aluminum targets. To show the effect of projectile strength, we used projectiles that had average Rockwell harnesses of R{sub c} = 36.6, 39.5, and 46.2. A powder gun and two-stage, light-gas guns launched the 0.023 kg projectiles at striking velocities between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s. Post-test radiographs of the targets showed three response regions as striking velocities increased: (1) the projectiles remained visibly undeformed, (2) the projectiles permanently deformed without erosion, and (3) the projectiles eroded and lost mass. To show the effect of projectile strength, we compared depth-of-penetration data as a function of striking velocity for spherical-nose rods with three Rockwell harnesses at striking velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 km/s. To show the effect of nose shape, we compared penetration data for the spherical-nose projectiles with previously published data for ogive-nose projectiles.

  19. THE 300 km s{sup -1} STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frebel, Anna; Casey, Andrew R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lunnan, Ragnhild [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Norris, John E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyse, Rosemary F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 300 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilmore, Gerard [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s{sup -1} stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.46 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.23 (random and systematic uncertainties) for star 300S-1, and find an abundance pattern similar to typical halo stars at this metallicity. Comparing our stellar parameters to theoretical isochrones, we estimate a distance of 18 {+-} 7 kpc. Both the metallicity and distance estimates are in good agreement with what can be inferred from comparing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data of the stream stars to globular cluster sequences. While several other structures overlap with the stream in this part of the sky, the combination of kinematic, chemical, and distance information makes it unlikely that these stars are associated with either the Segue 1 galaxy, the Sagittarius Stream, or the Orphan Stream. Streams with halo-like abundance signatures, such as the 300 km s{sup -1} stream, present another observational piece for understanding the accretion history of the Galactic halo.

  20. 0.1 nm0.1 nm1 nm1 nm10 nm10 nm100 nm100 nm11 mm1010 mm100100 mm1 mm1 mm1 cm1 cm10 cm10 cm1 m1 m10 m10 m100 m100 m1 km1 kmWWAVELENGTHAVELENGTHWAVELENGTHWWAVELENGTHW 0.01K (-273C) 100K 5000K5000K5000K5000K5000K 30,000K 30,000,000K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    visible and invisible light from across the Cosmos SKA (Square Kilometre Array) SKA will be the world nuclear power ALMA E-ELT GAIAJWST XMM SKA sea level 690km 384,400km ALMA (Atacama Large Millimetre Array) ALMA is a giant array of 66 antennas observing at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths. Location

  1. 5 km/h 10 km/h 6 km/h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = 9.5 g h = 6.3 cm v g Procedure-1 Initial kinetic energy: (1/2) m v2 Initial potential energy: 0 Final kinetic energy: 0 Final potential energy: (m+M)gh The conservation of the mechanical energy + M) ] v2 Initial potential energy: 0 #12;Final kinetic energy: 0 Final potential energy: (m

  2. Measurement of Plasma Dynamics in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment K.M. Velas, C.L. Deards, P.A. Melnik, J.A Grossnickle, A.L. Hoffman, K.E. Miller, R.D. Milroy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Measurement of Plasma Dynamics in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment K.M. Velas, C.L. Deards, P.A. Melnik, J.A Grossnickle, A.L. Hoffman, K.E. Miller, R.D. Milroy Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Washington Detailed magnetic measurements of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRC) from

  3. y 1000km of high resolution sleeve-gun array transects on the North Sza Fan, located at tbe mouth orwegian Channel, reveal three domina tyles of sedimentation within a thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    y 1000km of high resolution sleeve-gun array transects on the North Sza Fan, located at tbe mouth the lution data across the fan other than conventional he seismic source was an arra nstruments 40 in3 sleeve-guns along the fan axis. These data were shot with the same sleeve-gun array but recorded digitally via a 144

  4. We present HI observations of the environment of three nearby (~ 2000-2500 km s-1 ) Ly-absorbers. The absorbers are located along the sight lines towards Markarian 817, Markarian 509 and VII Zwicky 118. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    ABSTRACT We present HI observations of the environment of three nearby (~ 2000-2500 km s-1 ) Ly. We thus find, by comparing to the HI mass function, that there is 4 to 5 times more HI around Ly- absorbers than on average in the sky. The HI Environment of Nearby Ly-alpha Absorbers INTRODUCTION Numerical

  5. Makarere University glacialarealextent(km2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Glacier fig. (c) 29 52'Eo glacial extent (1955) glacial extent (1990) lake / river (a) (b) 022'N o 023'N o considered to be rising air temperatures which have amplified ice losses by evaporation and melting. Field prominent as warming continues in the 21st century. The projected loss of the glacial ice, Nzururu

  6. Along channel distance [km] Salinity [psu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at estuaries that have already seen the effects of tectonically induced sea level rise, scientists have been -- that is the upper intertidal mudflats and salt marsh edge -- while the decreased drag on the channel bed leads

  7. KM_C364e-20170629133124

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducingJobs2015Administration shows off theKIVA

  8. KM_C654e-20150324133840

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducingJobs2015Administration shows off theKIVA

  9. The Case for a Kilometer-Scale High-Energy Neutrino Detector: 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1996-05-02

    The objective of neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, is to build instruments which reach throughout and far beyond our Galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology, astrophysics, cosmic-ray and particle physics. These telescopes will push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than $10^{-14}$~cm by mapping the sky in high-energy neutrinos instead of high-energy photons to which the Universe is partially opaque. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building neutrino detectors with effective area in excess of 0.01~km$^2$, we show here that the science dictates 1~km$^2$, or a 1~km$^3$ instrumented volume, as the natural scale of a high-energy neutrino telescope. The construction of a high-energy neutrino telescope therefore requires a huge volume of very transparent, deeply buried material such as ocean water or ice, which acts as the medium for detecting the particles. We will speculate on its architecture. The field is immersed in technology in the domain of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. With several thousand optical modules the scope of constructing a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan.

  10. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  11. The Case for a Kilometer-Scale High Energy Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1994-10-26

    Doing astronomy with photons of energies in excess of a GeV has turned out to be extremely challenging. Efforts are underway to develop instruments that may push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than $10^{-14}$~cm by mapping the sky in high energy neutrinos instead. Neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, will reach outside the galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology. The field is immersed in technology in the domains of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. To mind come the search for neutrino mass, cold dark matter (supersymmetric particles?) and the monopoles of the Standard Model. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building telescopes with effective area in excess of 0.01~km$^2$, we show here that the natural scale of a high energy neutrino telescope is 1~km$^2$. With several thousand optical modules and a price tag unlikely to exceed 100 million dollars, the scope of a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan.

  12. MEASURING THE ABUNDANCE OF SUB-KILOMETER-SIZED KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [Department of Earth and Space Science, UCLA, 595 Charles East Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sari, Re'em [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Nelan, Edmund P.; Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wenz, Michael [Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Muirhead, Philip [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 130-33, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Javanfar, Nikta, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics, Physics Engineering and Astronomy, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-12-20

    We present here the analysis of about 19,500 new star hours of low ecliptic latitude observations (|b| {<=} 20 Degree-Sign ) obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope's Fine Guidance Sensors over a time span of more than nine years, which is in addition to the {approx}12, 000 star hours previously analyzed by Schlichting et al. Our search for stellar occultations by small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) yielded one new candidate event corresponding to a body with a 530 {+-} 70 m radius at a distance of about 40 AU. Using bootstrap simulations, we estimate a probability of Almost-Equal-To 5% that this event is due to random statistical fluctuations within the new data set. Combining this new event with the single KBO occultation reported by Schlichting et al. we arrive at the following results: (1) the ecliptic latitudes of 6. Degree-Sign 6 and 14. Degree-Sign 4 of the two events are consistent with the observed inclination distribution of larger, 100-km-sized KBOs. (2) Assuming that small, sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have the same ecliptic latitude distribution as their larger counterparts, we find an ecliptic surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of N(r > 250 m) = 1.1{sup +1.5}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} deg{sup -2}; if sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have instead a uniform ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign then N(r > 250 m) = 4.4{sup +5.8}{sub -2.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2}. This is the best measurement of the surface density of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs to date. (3) Assuming the KBO size distribution can be well described by a single power law given by N(> r){proportional_to}r{sup 1-q}, where N(> r) is the number of KBOs with radii greater than r, and q is the power-law index, we find q = 3.8 {+-} 0.2 and q = 3.6 {+-} 0.2 for a KBO ecliptic latitude distribution that follows the observed distribution for larger, 100-km-sized KBOs and a uniform KBO ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign , respectively. (4) Regardless of the exact power law, our results suggest that small KBOs are numerous enough to satisfy the required supply rate for the Jupiter family comets. (5) We can rule out a single power law below the break with q > 4.0 at 2{sigma}, confirming a strong deficit of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs compared to a population extrapolated from objects with r > 45 km. This suggests that small KBOs are undergoing collisional erosion and that the Kuiper Belt is a true analog to the dust producing debris disks observed around other stars.

  13. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor

    2012-01-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics of the SKA and some innovation approaches on thermal solar energy Integration with SKA prototypes.

  14. IceCube: A Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, S.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector The IceCube CollaborationA Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector Spencer R. Klein, forlarge detector is to search for optical Cherenkov radiation

  15. Abul K.M. Azad Northern Illinois University, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with online laboratories, pedagogical design, system architectures for remote laboratories, future trends A Cataloguing in Publication record for this book is available from the British Library. All work contributed of the trademark or registered trademark. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data #12;254 Copyright

  16. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flare in Megaton and km^3 detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion; Paola Di Giacomo

    2009-01-21

    To foresee a solar flare neutrino signal we infer its upper and lower bound. The upper bound was derived since a few years by general energy equipartition arguments on observed solar particle flare. The lower bound, the most compelling one for any guarantee neutrino signal, is derived by most recent records of hard Gamma bump due to solar flare on January 2005 (by neutral pion decay).The observed gamma flux reflects into a corresponding one for the neutrinos, almost one to one. Therefore we obtain minimal bounds already at the edge of present but quite within near future Megaton neutrino detectors. Such detectors are considered mostly to reveal cosmic supernova background or rare Local Group (few Mpc) Supernovas events. However Megaton or even inner ten Megaton Ice Cube detector at ten GeV threshold may also reveal traces of solar neutrino in hardest energy of solar flares. Icecube, marginally, too. Solar neutrino flavors may shine light on neutrino mixing angles.

  17. 0.3 km/s for events within 2 km; and 7.9 0.1 km/s for events more than 2 km below the reflector. See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arblaster, Julie

    greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols. However, most of the observed warming from 1900 to 1949 was likely due to natural climate variation. Most of the observed global-scale warming over the last 50 years is believed to have been due to the increase in atmospheric green- house gas concentrations (1). Here, we inves

  18. Change of Paradigm in KM Towards Collaborative Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlen, Rainer

    Chair in Communications Department of Computer & Information Science University of Konstanz, Germany as a means of having better control over the production and usage of explicit and implicit knowledge. ·Human Genome project - A 13-year effort coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National

  19. Accelerated Aging Effects on Kevlar KM2 Fiber Survivability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Tony

    2013-04-12

    good replacement for single filament tests and estimation techniques can determine the bundle Weibull parameters. Furthermore, the survival function for treated fibers is better if the bundle is lubricated. The accelerated aging experiments show...

  20. Zentralpanama 5 km stl. vom Kanal, tropisches Klima, Tonbden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    vorherigen Landnutzung · für Unterschiede zwischen den Vegetationen Ausblick: bessere Aussagen bei Messung zu

  1. Microsoft Word - China_10km_solar_documentation.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi Corp Jump to:VII,China

  2. Microsoft Word - Ethiopia_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi Corp JumpEthiopia Final

  3. Microsoft Word - Ghana_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi Corp

  4. Microsoft Word - Kenya_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya Final country

  5. Microsoft Word - Nepal_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya FinalNepal

  6. ALMA Observations of Asteroid 3 Juno at 60 Kilometer Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership, ALMA; Kneissl, R; Moullet, A; Brogan, C L; Fomalont, E B; Vlahakis, C; Asaki, Y; Barkats, D; Dent, W R F; Hills, R; Hirota, A; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Liuzzo, E; Lucas, R; Marcelino, N; Matsushita, S; Nakanishi, K; Perez, L M; Phillips, N; Richards, A M S; Toledo, I; Aladro, R; Broguiere, D; Cortes, J R; Cortes, P C; Dhawan, V; Espada, D; Galarza, F; Garcia-Appadoo, D; Guzman-Ramirez, L; Hales, A S; Humphreys, E M; Jung, T; Kameno, S; Laing, R A; Leon, S; Marconi, G; Nikolic, B; Nyman, L -A; Radiszcz, M; Remijan, A; Rodon, J A; Sawada, T; Takahashi, S; Tilanus, R P J; Vilaro, B Vila; Watson, L C; Wiklind, T; de Gregorio, I; Di Francesco, J; Mangum, J; Francke, H; Gallardo, J; Garcia, J; Gonzalez, S; Hill, T; Kaminski, T; Kurono, Y; Lopez, C; Morales, F; Plarre, K; Randall, S; van kempen, T; Videla, L; Villard, E; Andreani, P; Hibbard, J E; Tatematsu, K

    2015-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum images of the asteroid 3 Juno obtained with an angular resolution of 0.042 arcseconds (60 km at 1.97 AU). The data were obtained over a single 4.4 hr interval, which covers 60% of the 7.2 hr rotation period, approximately centered on local transit. A sequence of ten consecutive images reveals continuous changes in the asteroid's profile and apparent shape, in good agreement with the sky projection of the three-dimensional model of the Database of Asteroid Models from Inversion Techniques. We measure a geometric mean diameter of 259pm4 km, in good agreement with past estimates from a variety of techniques and wavelengths. Due to the viewing angle and inclination of the rotational pole, the southern hemisphere dominates all of the images. The median peak brightness temperature is 215pm13 K, while the median over the whole surface is 197pm15 K. With the unprecedented resolution of ALMA, we find that the brightness temperature varies ...

  7. ABSTRACT: This study examines NEXRAD Stage III product (hourly, cell size 4 km by 4 km) for its ability in estimating precipitation in cen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    ability in estimating precipitation in cen- tral New Mexico, a semiarid area. A comparison between Stage III and a network of gauge precipitation estimates during 1995 to 2001 indi- cates that Stage III (1) overestimates the hourly conditional mean (CM) precipitation by 33 percent in the monsoon season and 55 per

  8. High strain-rate deformation fabrics characterize a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.

    in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina Steven J. Whitmeyer*, Carol Simpson Department of Earth´rdoba, central Argentina. The NNW-striking, east-dipping `Tres Arboles' fault zone extends for at least 250 km

  9. ExaScale High Performance Computing in the Square Kilometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nieuwpoort, Rob V.

    ExaScale High Performance Computing in the Square Kilometer Array P. Chris Broekema, broekema project requires active and intensive involve- ment from both the high performance computing researchScale Computing, Square Kilometer Array, High Performance Computing, Streaming Computing 1. INTRODUCTION

  10. Fiber-Level Modeling of Dynamic Strength KM2 Ballistic Fabric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    .g., as reinforcements in rigid polymer matrix composites (PMCs) for lightweight vehicle- armor systems). Flexible agile, and more mobile so that they can be quickly transported to operations conducted throughout-amide) fabric and an E-glass fiber/ethyl cellulose composite in body-armor systems can be linked to the Korean

  11. 1000 2000 3000 4000 x [km] -150 -100 -50 0 50 100 150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiments with Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Atmosphere C. Nutto1, O. Steiner1, W. Schaffenberger2, M. Steffen3 Motivation Numerical Set-up Results Conclusions Outlook References Longitudinal Transversal

  12. Cathodoluminescence petrography and isotope geochemistry of KT impact ejecta deposited 360 km from the Chicxulub crater,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    ** and ALFRED G. FISCHER *Department of Geology, University of Illinois, 245 Natural History Building, 1301 W Barton Creek Formation dolomitized marine limestone overlain by 16 m of dolomitized Albion Formation impact ejecta. The Albion Formation consists of a lower fine- grained »1-m-thick spheroid bed

  13. Spatial variability of arsenic in 6000 tube wells in a 25 km2 of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    [van Geen et al., 2002]. A comparison of the cost of installing such a well ($US$50 for a typical 50-ft well) with the per capita GNP of Bangladesh of US$1400, after adjusting for purchasing power [World

  14. New Agroforestry Site: Kotumachigi village About 20 Km from the town of Gadag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    rainwater harvesting. #12;The farmer was seriously concerned about planting trees let alone 2500 seedlings and cities. Need to install weather stations to generate interest in the environment. Water harvesting

  15. Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castoe, Todd A.

    College, Box 555, 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0555, USA 2 Department of Biology, University

  16. Why Lean ?y ( QC TQC 5-7 KPI Competency HA-SHA KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    ­ Jidoka) 4. (Kaizen ­ Continuous Improvement) etc. #12;Why lean Thinking in Healthcare ? 1. 80 : 80

  17. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    three areas of difference are discussed in detail. These three areas are critical for EGS resource evaluation yet they are quite different between the two maps. The data in...

  18. Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weather and first flush flows from pump station facilities to publicly owned treatment works (POTWs questions and to help BASMAA with a preliminary ranking of pump station watersheds to focus on in response such as coldwater fish rearing and habitat for other native or endangered species Landscape irrigation (reducing

  19. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERTAZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Zunits METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis...

  20. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spatial Reference Information (Beg) ***** Projection Parameters Coordinate System: LambertAzimuthalEqualArea FalseEasting: 0.000000 FalseNorthing: 0.000000...

  1. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERTAZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Z-units METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis...

  2. CURRICULUM VITAE OF K.M. ARIFUL KABIR ADDRESS OF PRESENT INSTITUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Robert J.

    cycle driven by solar collector. Title of M.S Thesis: Estimation of energies for ground state, Singlet Morphology), Fluid Dynamics and Solar cooling systems, Thermal Engineering RECOGNITIONS Life Member Numerical Analysis, Computational Mathematics, Quantum Mechanics, Thermal Engineering, and Fluid Dynamics

  3. I?raak Nuke, NXOO Leaa Km&l, NY00

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V. Andolina:I * .z-y:c* -7 i!W.

  4. File:NREL-afg-10km-dir.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdfMmpa 2007.pdf Jump to:ModifyBioMap.pdf

  5. File:NREL-afg-10km-glo.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdfMmpa 2007.pdf Jump

  6. File:NREL-afg-10km-tilt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdfMmpa 2007.pdf Jumptilt.pdf Jump to:

  7. Microsoft Word - Sri_Lanka_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickey HotMicrosemi CorpKenya

  8. Single-Column Modeling D. A. Randall and K.-M. Xu Colorado State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vapor andParticle DatabaseC.J.AC.

  9. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColoradoBiomassPlus JumpQinghai Dangshun*Prepared

  10. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km^3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTechsaturatedcrystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connectof

  11. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km^3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTechsaturatedcrystals (Journal Article) | SciTech Connectofof

  12. Microsoft Word - 802.11i Rec Practices _KM-BL final edit ver 10_.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May 28MarEnergyDanielJune 14, 2011Securing WLANs

  13. Johnson(-like)-Noise-Kirchhoff-Loop Based Secure Classical Communicator Characteristics, for Ranges of Two to Two Thousand Kilometers, via Model-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Mingesz; Zoltan Gingl; Laszlo B. Kish

    2012-03-14

    A pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line performance characteristics were obtained for ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance of the exchanged raw key bits. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation and sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for corresponding copper wire diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system significantly outperforms raw-bit quantum security. Current injection breaking tests show zero bit eavesdropping ability without triggering the alarm signal, therefore no multiple measurements are needed to build an error statistics to detect the eavesdropping as in quantum communication. Wire resistance based breaking tests of Bergou-Scheuer-Yariv type give an upper limit of eavesdropped raw bit ratio of 0.19 % and this limit is inversely proportional to the sixth power of cable diameter. Hao's breaking method yields zero (below measurement resolution) eavesdropping information.

  14. Square Kilometer Array Telescope - Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, B; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with one square kilometer collecting area. Besides its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing the cosmic dawn and cradle of life, SKA also demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, with ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas being one of them. In this report, aimed at applications to SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference synchronization and dissemination scheme with the phase noise compensation function placed at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, the 100 MHz reference signal from a Hydrogen maser clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. Phase noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincides with that of the hydrogen-maser source and satisfies SKA requirement.

  15. Mesoscale Systems: weather associated with circulation systems of horizontal scales of 5 to 1,000 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    . Urban heat island induced circulations (city-country side circulation) 4. Mountain-valley winds in winter #12;Urban Heat Island Urban heat island intensity: DTu-r = Turban - Trural Max DTu-r usually at night Intensity of urban heat island depends on many factors · Size of city · Geographical location

  16. 2 Bernd Freytag, Hartmut Holweger, Matthias Steffen, HansGunter Ludwig log 10 (H p0 /km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    granules because efficient radiative exchange tends to favour larger cells. Other depth scales are less.R.G. 1 Stellar surface structure: size of granules Improvements in observational methods have opened on the Sun to those stars: First he compared the typical horizontal size of a solar granule x gran (his

  17. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0.2 0.4 Velocity (km/s) Poisson's Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Timothy J.

    pressure anomalies). As a result, tidal stresses lead to spatial variations in pore pressure that can this hypothesis. First, we used a one-dimensional model of pore pressure based on Biot's poroelastic theory velocity field. The flow pattern is very sensitive to the inflow pressure gradient, and for these models

  18. [Km 100 to 1000 mM (17)] and to S. cerevisiae hexose transporters' apparent affinity for glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severson, David

    , and British Petroleum Technology Ventures (through the Energy Biosciences Institute) have submitted a patent

  19. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 9, 2009 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55.5 Dilworth Y Parkinson 30-39 men 1 6 10:59.9 Justin Paul Ishida -39 women 1 65 13:57.5 Kang Wei Chou

  20. LBL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 1997 Place Time Name Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9:45.0 Etien, Robert Paul 30-39 1 3 10:04.8 Farias, Leonel 30-39 2 4:06.6 Volfbeyn, Paul , Jens 30-39 28 63 13:18.8 Lewis, Keith 40-49 5 64 13:19.1 Chou, Peter

  1. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 8, 2010 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -49 men 12 58 13:23.1 Nicholas S Norberg 30-39 men 15 59 13:25.4 Sergi Molins Rafa 30-39 men 16 60 13

  2. Multiphase Flow Metering: An Overview Manoj Kumar KM, Senior Scientist, Non-destructive Evaluation Lab, GE Global Research,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMove dataKiel7Multimodal ImagingMultiphase

  3. km on Lake Tanganyika (Fig. 2C). Single airguns or multigun arrays in the size range of40 to 140 cubic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    these rift sediments to be Cenozoic in age. 10. Sequence boundaries are the unconformities and their correlative conformities that define deposition- al sequences. A review of the concepts of sequence stratigraphy is presented in C. E. Payton, Ed., Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol. Mem. 26 (1977). 11. T. J. Dunkelman, J. A

  4. Himalayan orogen, so much so that the locus of deep exhumation has been maintained nearly 100 km northwards of the Himalayan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Modeling mountain building and the seismic cycle in the Himalaya of Nepal. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 13389. Seismotectonics of the Nepal Himalaya from a local seismic network. J. Asian Earth Sci. 17, 703­712 (1999). 8 from two perspectives. GSA Bull. 112, 324­350 (2000). 12. DeCelles, P. G. et al. Stratigraphy

  5. The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: Evaluation of cloud properties and surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg K.; Vogelmann A.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbec, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties and surface precipitation to assumptions regarding the size distributions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a one-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Three sensitivity experiments were applied to two composites of 15 convective and 15 frontal stratiform intense precipitation events observed in a coastal midlatitude region (Belgium), which were evaluated against satellite-retrieved cloud properties and radar-rain-gauge derived surface precipitation. It is found that the cloud optical thickness distribution was well captured by all experiments, although a significant underestimation of cloudiness occurred in the convective composite. The cloud-top-pressure distribution was improved most by more realistic snow size distributions (including a temperature-dependent intercept parameter and non-spherical snow for the calculation of the slope parameter), due to increased snow depositional growth at high altitudes. Surface precipitation was far less sensitive to whether graupel or hail was chosen as the rimed ice species, as compared to previous idealized experiments. This smaller difference in sensitivity could be explained by the stronger updraught velocities and higher freezing levels in the idealized experiments compared to typical coastal midlatitude environmental conditions.

  6. Evaluation of moist processes during intense precipitation in km-scale NWP models using remote sensing and in-situ data: Impact of microphysics size distribution assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg, K.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of moist processes and surface precipitation during three extreme precipitation events over Belgium to the representation of rain, snow and hail size distributions in a bulk one-moment microphysics parameterisation scheme. Sensitivities included the use of empirically derived relations to calculate the slope parameter and diagnose the intercept parameter of the exponential snow and rain size distributions and sensitivities to the treatment of hail/graupel. A detailed evaluation of the experiments against various high temporal resolution and spatially distributed observational data was performed to understand how moist processes responded to the implemented size distribution modifications. Net vapor consumption by microphysical processes was found to be unaffected by snow or rain size distribution modifications, while it was reduced replacing formulations for hail by those typical for graupel, mainly due to intense sublimation of graupel. Cloud optical thickness was overestimated in all experiments and all cases, likely due to overestimated snow amounts. The overestimation slightly deteriorated by modifying the rain and snow size distributions due to increased snow depositional growth, while it was reduced by including graupel. The latter was mainly due to enhanced cloud water collection by graupel and reduced snow depositional growth. Radar reflectivity and cloud optical thickness could only be realistically represented by inclusion of graupel during a stratiform case, while hail was found indispensable to simulate the vertical reflectivity profile and the surface precipitation structure. Precipitation amount was not much altered by any of the modifications made and the general overestimation was only decreased slightly during a supercell convective case.

  7. ShoreZone in the Arctic 8,000 km of Coastal Habitat Mapping Cathy Coon, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, catherine.coon@boem.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @coastalandoceans.com Cindy Hartmann Moore, NOAA/NMFS, cindy.hartmann@noaa.gov Tahzay Jones, National Park Service, Tahzay Resources Inc., john@coastalandoceans.com Cindy Hartmann Moore | NOAA/NMFS, cindy.hartmann@noaa.gov Tahzay

  8. Development and evolution of detachment faulting along 50 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 16.5ºN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Dick, Henry; Cann, Joe; Salters, Vincent; Marschall, Horst R.; Ji, Fuwu; Yoerger, Dana; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Parnell-Turner, Ross; Palmiotto, Camilla; Zheleznov, Alexei; Bai, Hailong; Junkin, Will; Urann, Ben; Dick, Spencer; Sulanowska, Margaret; Lemmond, Peter; Curry, Scott

    2014-12-05

    [Smith et al., 2003] yielding a 119 6 remarkable average of about one earthquake (roughly > magnitude 2.5-3.0), every three days. 120 Based on seismicity rate and their interpretation of the morphology, Escartín et al. [2008] 121 concluded... to the volcanic axis, was interpreted as a newly emerging normal fault 101 forming a rafted block on top of the older West Ridge detachment fault. Seafloor photographs 102 from a camera tow near the top of East Ridge show steep fault scarps cutting pillow lavas...

  9. Generating carbon flux model parameters and drivers via space/time geostatistics As we know, our best moderate scale (1-10 Km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to parameterise and drive models with ground based data from sparse measurement networks. One characteristic the ecology, management, etc. Remotely sensed data offers a unique, large area data source to constrain models models: Kriging allows us to more objectively interpolate our data over the domain of interest

  10. Figure S1. Comparison of modelled PM2.5 (27 km resolution) with measurements at Harwell2 (UK) in January 2006.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    m-3 ) between two2 simulations with a 15% emission reduction of either NOx or NH3 in January 2006 for the3 European domain. Aerosol formation is more sensitive to NOx emissions in blue regions and4 more concentration (µg m-3 ) between two2 simulations with a 15% emission reduction of either NOx or NH3 in June 2006

  11. OVERVIEW OF DT RESULTS FROM TFTR M.G. BELL, K.M. McGUIRE, V. ARUNASALAM, C.W. BARNES', S.H. BATHA2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. lo TRINITI, Moscow, Russia. University of California, Irvine, California, USA Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia. " Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project transport coefficients from helium gas puffing experiments. The loss of energetic alpha particles

  12. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1 ~(3JlpVSecretaryNV/13609-53

  13. EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This...

  14. Southern California Edison's Evaluation of California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Publicly Available Publications and Data 5.2 Personal Communication 6.0 GLOSSARY APPENDIX, approximately 80 kilometers (km) northwest of the City of San Diego and 97 km southeast of Los Angeles Base (Base) near the northwest end of the Base's shoreline. Figure 11 also shows

  15. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Construction, Inc.) for providing the drainage volumes from the Solid Waste Landfill Lysimeter. We wish the significant contributions of Randy Kirkham (Hydrology Group) to the conceptual design and construction-activity waste in. inch(es) km kilometer(s) m meter(s) mm millimeter(s) P+I precipitation plus irrigation PNNL

  16. Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE): Evaluation of a new method to look at high resolution spatial/temporal distributions of carbon over key sub km sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Perninit, Timothy; McGregor, Doug; Botos, Chris; Dobeck, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Recently a new laser based approach for measuring area with potential for producing 2D estimates of the concentration spatial distribution has been developed through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy and Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Exelis Inc. and AER Inc. The new approach is based on a pair of continuous wave intensity modulated laser absorption spectrometer transceivers, combined with a series of retro reflectors located around the perimeter of the area being monitored. The main goal of this cooperative agreement is monitoring, reporting and verification for ground carbon capture and storage projects. The system was recently tested at the Zero Emission Research and Technology site in Bozeman, MT, with underground leak rates ranging from 0.1 – 0.3 metric ton per day (T/d), as well as a 0.8 T/d surface release. Over 200 hours of data were collected over a rectangular grid 180m x 200m between August 18th and September 9th. In addition, multiple days of in situ data were acquired for the same site, using a Licor gas analyzer systems. Initial comparisons between the laser-based system and the in situ agree very well. The system is designed to operate remotely and transmit the data via a 3G/4G connection along with weather data for the site. An all web-based system ingests the data, populates a database, performs the inversion to ppm CO2 using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), and displays plots and statistics for the retrieved data. We will present an overview of the GreenLITE measurement system, outline the retrieval and reconstruction approach, and discuss results from extensive field testing.

  17. The research project GLOWA-Danube (www.glowa-danube.de) investigates Global Change effects on the water cycle of the Upper Danube river basin (Germany, ~80.0000 km) involving 11 different disciplines from natural and social sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    in the simulation system DANUBIA. A primary scope of DANUBIA is to evaluate consequences of IPCC derived climate, treatment and distribution. It acts as a link between the natural 'supply side', simulated by a groundwater it for showering, toilet flush, laundry etc. The wastewater is passed through virtual clarification plants

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 63916408, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/6391/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    , such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur compounds, and particulate mat- ter kilometers. This activity emitted substantial amounts of fossil-fuel combustion prod- ucts within the upper latitudes, and 74.6% was burned above 7 km. This activity led to 162.25 Tg of carbon from CO2 emitted glob

  19. Units and unit conversions important for ENES 100 Handout prepared by Prof. Sheryl Ehrman, Fall 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Bruce

    Units and unit conversions important for ENES 100 Handout prepared by Prof. Sheryl Ehrman, Fall 2008 The objective of this handout is to review the topic of units and unit conversions. Measured combine units. 100 kilometers = 200 km 0.5 h h Unit Conversions: The equivalence between two expressions

  20. Please cite this article in press as: Kam KM, et al. On assessing spatial uniformity of particle distributions in quality control of manufacturing processes. J Manuf Syst (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmsy.2012.07.018

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    , in the metal matrix nanocomposite (MMNC) fabrication processes where nano-sized ceramic particles are embedded strengthen the metal matrix, and the more uniformly the nanoparticles disperse, the bet- ter the composite matrix nanocomposite (MMNC) Tissue-engineered scaffolds a b s t r a c t There are many situations

  1. Topology of neutral hydrogen distribution with the Square Kilometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yougang; Wu, Fengquan; Chen, Xuelei; Wang, Xin; Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    Morphology of the complex HI gas distribution can be quantified by statistics like the Minkowski functionals, and can provide a way to statistically study the large scale structure in the HI maps both at low redshifts, and during the epoch of reionization (EoR). At low redshifts, the 21cm emission traces the underlying matter distribution. Topology of the HI gas distribution, as measured by the genus, could be used as a "standard ruler". This enables the determination of distance-redshift relation and also the discrimination of various models of dark energy and of modified gravity. The topological analysis is also sensitive to certain primordial non-Gaussian features. Compared with two-point statistics, the topological statistics are more robust against the nonlinear gravitational evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortion. The HI intensity map observation naturally avoids the sparse sampling distortion, which is an important systematic in optical galaxy survey. The large cosmic volume accessible to SKA w...

  2. 0 25 50 Miles 25 50 Kilometers0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cedar R. Lake Washington SnoqualmieR. Skykomish R. Stillaguamish R. Skagit R. Lake Whatcom Baker Lake

  3. Morphology and seismic stratigraphy of the Toyama deep sea fan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Barton

    1990-01-01

    with a surface area greater than 108, 000 square kilometers. Deposits of this Quaternary turbidite system range in thickness from less than 150 m to more than 750 m. The meandering Toyama Deep Sea Channel extends northward from the central coast.... The Toyama Deep Sea Channel is a remarkable feature, extending 550 km in a northerly direction from the central coast of Honshu. Seismic and bathymetry data collected over the past two decades are used to provide the most accurate description to date...

  4. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  5. WORD PROBLEMS 1. Suppose your car gets 25 miles per gallon of gasoline and the price of gas is $3.50 per gallon. Write

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koban, Nic

    on the other side of the river and 8 kilometers down stream (see figure 2). The man can run 5 km/hr and can and then run to B in terms of x. 3 8 A B C Figure 2: Point C is directly across the river from point A. Point B of fence are to be used to enclose a rectangular field next to a straight river. The river acts as one side

  6. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  7. Nanotechnology for Teachers Dr. John S. Hutchinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering? Nanobots? Science Fiction! #12;"Nano": How small is that, really? Mountain 1 km 1000 m 0.001 km

  8. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  9. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  10. Arguments for a "U.S. Kamioka": SNOLab and its Implications for North American Underground Science Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton; K. A. Philpott; Robert Holtz; Philip Long; J. F. Wilkerson

    2006-10-06

    We argue for a cost-effective, long-term North American underground science strategy based on partnership with Canada and initial construction of a modest U.S. Stage I laboratory designed to complement SNOLab. We show, by reviewing the requirements of detectors now in the R&D phase, that SNOLab and a properly designed U.S. Stage I facility would be capable of meeting the needs of North America's next wave of underground experiments. We discuss one opportunity for creating a Stage I laboratory, the Pioneer tunnel in Washington State, a site that could be developed to provide dedicated, clean, horizontal access. This unused tunnel, part of the deepest (1040 m) tunnel system in the U.S., would allow the U.S. to establish, at low risk and low cost, a laboratory at a depth (2.12 km.w.e., or kilometers of water equivalent) quite similar to that of the Japanese laboratory Kamioka (2.04 km.w.e.). We describe studies of cosmic ray attenuation important to properly locating such a laboratory, and the tunnel improvements that would be required to produce an optimal Stage I facility. We also discuss possibilities for far-future Stage II (3.62 km.w.e.) and Stage III (5.00 km.w.e.) developments at the Pioneer tunnel, should future North American needs for deep space exceed that available at SNOLab.

  11. Min Zhou,and Gerard T.Schuster,University of Utah ComparisonbetweenReducedTimeMigrationandInterferometricMigrationofCDPData

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5 km/s Depth(km) Offset (km) True velocity model Depth(km) Offset (km) Migration velocity model Figure 2. Kirchhoff depth migration image (a), RTM depth image (b), and IM depth imageReducedTimeMigrationandInterferometricMigrationofCDPData ABSTRACT One of the difficulties in seeing beneath salt is that the migration velocity in the salt

  12. Isomer-Specific Biodegradation and Chemical Oxidation of Nonylphenol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhijiang

    2014-01-01

    at 3 sites (near the rivermouth, 7 km offshore, and12 km offshore) in the Ariake Sea, Japan. As expected, thefrom the rivermouth to 7 km offshore while the concentration

  13. Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations - Recent Results and Open Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    crustal conditions of a geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km andwater in a normal geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km with ais held in a normal geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km and is

  14. Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Current Stack Voltage Drive Cycle (atm. ) (A) (V) (km/Hr)Current Stack Voltage Drive Cycle (atm. ) ( )A) (V) (km/Hr)Current Battery Voltage Drive Cycle (A) (V) (km/Hr) and load

  15. Adaptive Selective Learning for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Martian terrain characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate and present geological processes and provide the only tool for measuring rela- tive ages of observed geologic. Geologic stratigraphy based on manually collected databases has coarse spatial resolutions. Finer spatial

  16. Semi-supervised based Active Class Selection for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed about the past and present geological processes and provide the only tool to measuring relative ages of observed geologic formations. The size distribution of craters conforms to the power-law as large craters

  17. The ASNA formula : a new concept -- cost per passenger mile (kilometer)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasr, Asad

    1978-01-01

    The demand for air transport is affected by the usual extraneous factors, demographic, social and economic, as well as those falling properly within the sphere of the industry itself such as the quality of service, safety, ...

  18. Deformation processes involve systems of tens to hundreds of kilometers moving at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    presentations were threefold: to list the state-of-the-art image analysis tech- niques used in the laboratory-button "black boxes." Second, the group agreed to write a meth- odological review paper listing the main image for funding support. --kaRen leeveR,GeoForschungsZentrum,Pots- dam,Germany; olivieR galland,Physics of Geo

  19. Solar Radiation Map of the U.S. - Annual (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Maps that provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size.

  20. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  1. Adjusted proof of Theorem 4.19 from the book "Complex-Valued Neural Networks with Multi-Valued Neurons by Igor Aizenberg", Springer 2011. The proof is adjusted by the author.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenberg, Igor

    neurons: 0 0 1 , 1 1 1 ; ( 1) ; 1,..., . ( 1) km km km km m km km km i i km i m m m C w w N C w w Y i N N,..., ; 2,..., 1. kjkj kj kj j kj kjkj kj i i kj i j j kj j C w w N z C w w Y N z i N j m k k k k k k i i k i k C w w n z C w w x i n n z = + + =+ = + (4.136) where jN is the number

  2. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    respectively, and a geothermal gradient of 30 ?C per km thatwater in a normal geothermal gradient of 30 ?C/km with a

  3. Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    well [ o C] G g = geothermal gradient [ o C/km] T res =injection well) and a geothermal gradient of 25 o C/km [ 8],

  4. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson,Cathy; Rowland,Joel; Gangodagamage,Chandana

    2013-12-08

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  5. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  6. Neutrino telescopes in the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernenwein, J.-P.

    2007-01-12

    Neutrino astronomy has rapidly developed these last years, being the only way to get specific and reliable information about astrophysical objects still poorly understood.Currently two neutrino telescopes are operational in the World: BAIKAL, in the lake of the same name in Siberia, and AMANDA, in the ices of the South Pole. Two telescopes of the same type are under construction in the Mediterranean Sea: ANTARES and NESTOR. All these telescopes belong to a first generation, with an instrumented volume smaller or equal to 0.02 km3. Also in the Mediterranean Sea, the NEMO project is just in its stag phase, within the framework of a cubic kilometer size neutrino telescope study. Lastly, the ICECUBE detector, with a volume reaching about 1 km3, is under construction on the site of AMANDA experiment, while an extension of the BAIKAL detector toward km3 is under study. We will present here the characteristics of these experiments, as well as the results of their observations.

  7. Evaluation of hypotheses for the cause of the 1886 Charleston earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.M.; Long, L.T. (Law Environmental, Inc., Kennesaw, GA (USA); Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    This report describes a geophysical/geological investigation of the earth's crust at seismogenic depths in the Charleston, South Carolina area. This investigation was made for the purpose of narrowing the range of theories that have been used to explain the historic 1886 Charleston earthquake. Since a number of these theories are based on only a portion of the available data, we have established a comprehensive data set in order to allow these hypotheses to be subjected to the entire data set. Specifically, we combined existing and new gravity, magnetic and topographic data in grids of 128 km, 256 km and 1028 km on a side centered on Charleston. Seismic, geologic and drilling data were collected and summarized. A magnetotelluric survey consisting of 12 soundings interpreted to depths of over 40 kilometers defined the bottom of the rigid crust with assistance from seismic reflection and other data. A geologic model of the crust in the area of Charleston was constructed and it defined the locations of Triassic/Jurassic basins Paleozoic plutons in greater detail than has previously been achieved. 102 refs., 75 figs.

  8. REVISITING JOVIAN-RESONANCE INDUCED CHONDRULE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasawa, M. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, K. K.; Tanaka, H. [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-19, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Nakamoto, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Miura, H. [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Yamanohata, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Yamamoto, T., E-mail: nagasawa.m.ad@m.titech.ac.jp [Center for Planetary Science, Kobe University, 7-1-48 Minamimachi, Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    It is proposed that planetesimals perturbed by Jovian mean-motion resonances are the source of shock waves that form chondrules. It is considered that this shock-induced chondrule formation requires the velocity of the planetesimal relative to the gas disk to be on the order of ? 7 km s{sup –1} at 1 AU. In previous studies on planetesimal excitation, the effects of Jovian mean-motion resonance together with the gas drag were investigated, but the velocities obtained were at most 8 km s{sup –1} in the asteroid belt, which is insufficient to account for the ubiquitous existence of chondrules. In this paper, we reexamine the effect of Jovian resonances and take into account the secular resonance in the asteroid belt caused by the gravity of the gas disk. We find that the velocities relative to the gas disk of planetesimals a few hundred kilometers in size exceed 12 km s{sup –1}, and that this is achieved around the 3:1 mean-motion resonance. The heating region is restricted to a relatively narrowband between 1.5 AU and 3.5 AU. Our results suggest that chondrules were produced effectively in the asteroid region after Jovian formation. We also find that many planetesimals are scattered far beyond Neptune. Our findings can explain the presence of crystalline silicate in comets if the scattered planetesimals include silicate dust processed by shock heating.

  9. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  10. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 13 (2002) 644652 PII: S0957-4484(02)35105-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste, Italy 2 NNL (National Nanotecnology Laboratory), INFM, Universit

  11. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 7 January 5, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    ) ­­­­­ CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands b­u­­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic

  12. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 10 February 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Indian Ocean) ­­­­­ CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands B­u­­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic

  13. Kode Dansk English AD Andorra ANDORRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KENYA KG Kirgisistan KYRGYZSTAN KH Cambodia CAMBODIA KI Kiribati KIRIBATI KM Comorerne COMOROS KN Sankt

  14. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 16 June 15, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    ) Islands Iu­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­­ CG Congo

  15. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 8 April 15, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­u­­ CG Congo (Republic of the) ­­­­­ CK

  16. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 13 February 15, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­U­ CG Congo (Republic of the

  17. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 9 August 1, 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Indian Ocean) ­­­­­ CC Cocos (Keeling) Islands B­u­­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic

  18. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 12 November 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Keeling) Islands BIu­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­u­ CG

  19. Energy Management in Microgrids: Algorithms and System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    1.5MW 0.3MW 1.9km wind 3000kW 0.3MW diesel 0.2km 1000kW1.5MW 0.3MW 1.9km wind 3000kW 0.3MW diesel 0.2km 1000kW

  20. WILDLAND WEEDS 19 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Sharon Ewe Mei

    " (small fruit orchards) were examined. Ewe and her partners traveled approximately 600 km in the urban

  1. 1. Introduction There exists a belief that addition of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Sustentable (CIQS), Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Km. 12 de la carretera

  2. Middle Pleistocene climate and habitat change at Zhoukoudian, China, from the carbon and oxygen isotopic record from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Paleoecology Introduction Zhoukoudian, located about 50 km to the southwest of Beijing (see Fig. 1

  3. University of Hawai`i at Mnoa INFORMASI UNTUK MAHASISWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    riset kelautan sendiri yang bernama Coconut Island (Pulau Kelapa), terletak 24 km di lepas pantai timur

  4. Journal of species lists and distribution Chec ListNotesoNGeoGraphicDistributioN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    Litoral, Facultad de Ingenieria Marítima, Ciencias Biológicas Oceánicas y Recursos Naturales. Km 30.5 Via

  5. Supp. Info of Aiken et al. (2010) Page 1 of 15 Supplementary Information for Aiken et al. "Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Supp. Info of Aiken et al. (2010) Page 1 of 15 Supplementary Information for Aiken et al. "Mexico Supersite (T0). Part 2: Analysis of the Biomass Burning Contribution and the Modern Carbon Fraction." #12 MODIS fire counts from March to April of 2006 for each radius: (c) 60 km, 120 km, 250 km, (d) 500 km

  6. Fabric Analysis of Survivor Clasts in the Southwest Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Three Kilometers Depth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loftin, Aileen

    2014-09-24

    The mechanisms responsible for aseismic creep along the central section of the San Andreas Fault are not well understood. Evidence for both pressure- and chemical-dependent microprocesses of creep have been reported. Here, the kinematics...

  7. Prograde rotation of protoplanets by accretion of pebbles in a gaseous environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We perform computer simulations of the accretion of pebbles and rocks onto protoplanets of a few hundred kilometers in radius, including two-way drag force coupling between particles and the protoplanetary disc gas. Particle streams interacting with the gas far out in the Hill sphere of the protoplanet spiral into a prograde circumplanetary disc. Material is accreted onto the protoplanet due to stirring by the turbulent surroundings. We speculate that the trend for prograde rotation among the largest asteroids is primordial and that protoplanets accreted 10%-50% of their mass from pebbles and rocks during the gaseous solar nebula phase. Our model offers an explanation for the narrow range of spin periods observed among the largest bodies in the asteroid and trans-Neptunian belts, and predicts that the 1000 km-scale Kuiper belt objects should preferentially spin in the prograde direction.

  8. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  10. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interaction with electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1984-08-01

    A high altitude nuclear burst, detonated at a height of 50 km or more, causes two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) - high altitude EMP (HEMP) and magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD-EMP). This high altitude EMP scenario is of principal concern when assessing the effects of EMP on electric power systems, because the total United States can be simultaneously illuminated by HEMP and MHD-EMP can cover a large area of up to several hundred kilometers in diameter. The purpose of this project was first to define typical electrical power system characteristics for EMP analysis, and second, to determine reasonable worst case EMP induced surges on overhead electric power system transmission and distribution lines for reasonable assumptions, using unclassified HEMP and MHD-EMP electric field waveforms.

  11. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in north-central Box Elder County, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.C.; Kolesar, P.T.

    1984-12-01

    The low-temperature geothermal resources of north-central Box Elder County, Utah were assessed. Exploration techniques used included chemical analyses of water from wells and springs, temperature surveys, and temperature-depth measurements in unused wells within the study area. The highest water temperatures (31/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, and 29/sup 0/C) recorded in this research were located in three separate geographic regions, suggesting that no single warm water occurrence dominates the study area. Total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations ranged from 294 to 11,590 mg/l. Areas of warm water occurrences generally had TDS values of greater than 1100 mg/l. Reservoir temperatures were estimated using chemical geothermometers. Calculated temperatures ranged between 50/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C. Temperature-depth measurements were logged in 16 unused wells. Thermal gradients calculated from the profiles ranged from isothermal to 267/sup 0/C/km. The background gradient for the study area appears to be slightly above the average Basin and Range gradient of 35/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradients were calculated for the area approximately eight kilometers west of Snowville, Utah, which is also an area of warm water. 61 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. A POSSIBLE DIVOT IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE KUIPER BELT'S SCATTERING OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankman, C.; Gladman, B. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agriculture Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaib, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queens University (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Petit, J. M. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (France)

    2013-02-10

    Via joint analysis of a calibrated telescopic survey, which found scattering Kuiper Belt objects, and models of their expected orbital distribution, we explore the scattering-object (SO) size distribution. Although for D > 100 km the number of objects quickly rise as diameters decrease, we find a relative lack of smaller objects, ruling out a single power law at greater than 99% confidence. After studying traditional ''knees'' in the size distribution, we explore other formulations and find that, surprisingly, our analysis is consistent with a very sudden decrease (a divot) in the number distribution as diameters decrease below 100 km, which then rises again as a power law. Motivated by other dynamically hot populations and the Centaurs, we argue for a divot size distribution where the number of smaller objects rises again as expected via collisional equilibrium. Extrapolation yields enough kilometer-scale SOs to supply the nearby Jupiter-family comets. Our interpretation is that this divot feature is a preserved relic of the size distribution made by planetesimal formation, now ''frozen in'' to portions of the Kuiper Belt sharing a ''hot'' orbital inclination distribution, explaining several puzzles in Kuiper Belt science. Additionally, we show that to match today's SO inclination distribution, the supply source that was scattered outward must have already been vertically heated to the of order 10 Degree-Sign .

  13. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-15

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  14. Circumbinary planet formation in the Kepler-16 system. II. A toy model for in situ planet formation within a debris belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meschiari, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@astro.as.utexas.edu [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    Recent simulations have shown that the formation of planets in circumbinary configurations (such as those recently discovered by Kepler) is dramatically hindered at the planetesimal accretion stage. The combined action of the binary and the protoplanetary disk acts to raise impact velocities between kilometer-sized planetesimals beyond their destruction threshold, halting planet formation within at least 10 AU from the binary. It has been proposed that a primordial population of 'large' planetesimals (100 km or more in size), as produced by turbulent concentration mechanisms, would be able to bypass this bottleneck; however, it is not clear whether these processes are viable in the highly perturbed circumbinary environments. We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamical and N-body simulations to show that kilometer-sized planetesimals and collisional debris can drift and be trapped in a belt close to the central binary. Within this belt, planetesimals could initially grow by accreting debris, ultimately becoming 'indestructible' seeds that can accrete other planetesimals in situ despite the large impact speeds. We find that large, indestructible planetesimals can be formed close to the central binary within 10{sup 5} yr, therefore showing that even a primordial population of 'small' planetesimals can feasibly form a planet.

  15. Geographic resolution issues in RAM transportation risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLS,G. SCOTT; NEUHAUSER,SIEGLINDE

    2000-04-12

    Over the years that radioactive material (RAM) transportation risk estimates have been calculated using the RADTRAN code, demand for improved geographic resolution of route characteristics, especially density of population neighboring route segments, has led to code improvements that provide more specific route definition. With the advent of geographic information systems (GISs), the achievable resolution of route characteristics is theoretically very high. The authors have compiled population-density data in 1-kilometer increments for routes extending over hundreds of kilometers without impractical expenditures of time. Achievable resolution of analysis is limited, however, by the resolution of available data. U.S. Census data typically have 1-km or better resolution within densely-populated portions of metropolitan areas but census blocks are much larger in rural areas. Geographic resolution of accident-rate data, especially for heavy/combination trucks, are typically tabulated on a statewide basis. These practical realities cause one to ask what level(s) of resolution may be necessary for meaningful risk analysis of transportation actions on a state or interstate scale.

  16. Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site: Geological Database - 13300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Jan Richard; Mrugalla, Sabine; Dresbach, Christian; Hammer, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    The Gorleben salt dome is 4 km wide and nearly 15 km long. It is composed of different salt rock types of the Zechstein (Upper Permian) series and extends to the Zechstein basis in a depth of more than 3 km. In the course of the salt dome formation the salt was moved several kilometers. During the uplift of the salt the initially plane-bedded strata of the Zechstein series were extensively folded. In this process anhydrite as a competent layer was broken to isolated blocks. In the core of the salt dome the Hauptsalz, which is characterized by a particularly high creeping capacity, forms a homogeneous halite body with a volume of several cubic kilometres. The Hauptsalz contains gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons in separated zones of decimeter to meter dimensions. The overall hydrocarbon content is far below 0.01 %. At the flanks the salt dome consists of salt rocks with lower creeping capacities. Brine reservoirs with fluid volumes in the range of liters to hundreds of cubic meters exist in certain regions of this part of the salt dome. The water content of the Hauptsalz is below 0.02 %. Interconnected pores do not exist in the salt rock outside of fluid bearing or fractured areas, i.e. the salt rock is impermeable. The exploration of the Gorleben site as a potential site for a HLW-repository started in 1979 and is still in progress. To date no scientific findings contest the suitability of the site for a safe HLW-repository. (authors)

  17. HIGH ECLIPTIC LATITUDE SURVEY FOR SMALL MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terai, Tsuyoshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takahashi, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi, E-mail: tsuyoshi.terai@nao.ac.jp [Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Main-belt asteroids have been continuously colliding with one another since they were formed. Their size distribution is primarily determined by the size dependence of asteroid strength against catastrophic impacts. The strength scaling law as a function of body size could depend on collision velocity, but the relationship remains unknown, especially under hypervelocity collisions comparable to 10 km s{sup –1}. We present a wide-field imaging survey at an ecliptic latitude of about 25° for investigating the size distribution of small main-belt asteroids that have highly inclined orbits. The analysis technique allowing for efficient asteroid detections and high-accuracy photometric measurements provides sufficient sample data to estimate the size distribution of sub-kilometer asteroids with inclinations larger than 14°. The best-fit power-law slopes of the cumulative size distribution are 1.25 ± 0.03 in the diameter range of 0.6-1.0 km and 1.84 ± 0.27 in 1.0-3.0 km. We provide a simple size distribution model that takes into consideration the oscillations of the power-law slope due to the transition from the gravity-scaled regime to the strength-scaled regime. We find that the high-inclination population has a shallow slope of the primary components of the size distribution compared to the low-inclination populations. The asteroid population exposed to hypervelocity impacts undergoes collisional processes where large bodies have a higher disruptive strength and longer lifespan relative to tiny bodies than the ecliptic asteroids.

  18. The Precursors and Outcomes of Goal Choice and Attainment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimson, Tierra Starr

    2009-01-01

    Russell Sage Foundation. Elliot A.J. , & Sheldon, K.M. (Psychology, 73, 171-185. Elliot, A.J. , Sheldon, K.M. , &471-491. Sheldon, K. M. , & Elliot, A. J. (1998). Not all

  19. Radiative conductivity in the Earth's lower mantle Alexander F. Goncharov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    . The lower mantle extends from the 660-km seismic discontinuity to the core­mantle boundary at 2,900 km depth,10 . Thermal conductivity in metals is dominated by electron transport, whereas heat conduction in insulators

  20. Surface deformation of Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, recorded by GPS: The eruptions from 2005 to 2010 and long-term, long-wavelength subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    . The network-wide subsidence cannot be explained by tectonic deformation related to the build to about 0.023 km3 /yr of ba- salt, (Fedotov et al., 2010)) about 10 km to the north

  1. Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    an area approximately 10 km by 15 km. The deformation is most likely the result of subsidence in an area around the Coso geothermal field. The deformation signal has a...

  2. GEOMETRIC ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF MSG-SEVIRI LEVEL 1.5 Sultan Kocaman Aksakal, Emmanuel Baltsavias, Konrad Schindler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    -Resolution Visible (HRV) band with 1-km Ground Sample Distance (GSD) and several multispectral (MS) bands with 3-km and absolute accuracy of the HRV images and band-to-band registration (BBR) accuracy between the HRV and 6 MS

  3. Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Max Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Offshore Togo, West Africa provides exciting potential for hydrocarbon exploration. Previous exploration is limited to four wells, drilled prior to 1986 in shallow water. This investigation focuses on a 625 km² section of 3100 km² of high quality...

  4. Nocturnal temperature structure in the mesopause region over the Arecibo Observatory (18.35N, 66.75W): Seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xinzhao

    around equinoxes, particularly late autumn when it is near 195 K, while the spring mesopause temperature in summer ($100 km), a medium altitude in late autumn and winter ($96 km), and a low altitude in early

  5. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident: the Risk Policy Aftermath 3 #12;Personal experience in March 2011 Tsukuba 170km Tokyo 230km Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power

  6. Mantle structure beneath the western United States and its implications for convection processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    River Plain (ESRP) and the High Lava Plains, and a deep low velocity anomaly (>600 km) beneath the ESRP and dips toward the northwest; (3) shallow low velocity anomalies (upper 200 km) beneath the eastern Snake

  7. vec l'hritage de deux grands foyers de peu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    140 km2 , soit une densité moyenne de 658 habitants/km2 . Les deux États de l'extrême sud, le Kerala démographiques différenciées. Les quatre États du sud - Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pra- desh et Karnataka ­ ont

  8. Magma Flow through Elastic-Walled Dikes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Mountain · · · · · Yucca Mountain ~300 m ~200 m ~ 10 km ~ 1 m~ 3 km Repository tunnels Magma dike Magma.g., frozen dike Eppelsberg #12;Eiffel 2002 boccas? #12;Ship Rock U.S.A. #12;Proposed repository site at Yucca

  9. Thermodynamic model for mineral solubility in aqueous fluids: theory, calibration and application to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    show a steady increase in solubility along constant geothermal gradients or water isochores, at a geothermal gradient of 20°C km)1 . For subduction zones, modeled by a geotherm of 7°C km)1 , the required

  10. Mineralogy and Petrology (2007) 91: 1124 DOI 10.1007/s00710-007-0183-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartigny, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    to 90 km along a cold geothermal gradient (8 C=km). Unmetamor- phosed and HP metasediments show is available for mafic rocks and metasediments sub- ducted along warm geothermal gradients (Moran et al., 1992

  11. LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    m at 45°C, with a geothermal gradient of 25°C per km and abut with the same geothermal gradient of 25°C per km. While

  12. A FEMTOSECOND-LEVEL FIBER-OPTICS TIMING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM USING FREQUENCY-OFFSET INTERFEROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Figure 3: 2.8 km SLAC klystron gallery phase variation (km ?ber loop in the SLAC klystron gallery, exposed to fullperturbation of the klystron modulators. Mea- surement were

  13. Identification and analysis of residues contained on b fi a loops of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fülöp, Vilmos

    Nacional de Geno´ mica para la Biodiversidad (Langebio), CINVESTAV-IPN, Km 9.6 Libramiento Norte, Carretera Diversity Laboratory, Laboratorio Nacional de Geno´ mica para la Biodiversidad (Langebio), CINVESTAV-IPN, Km

  14. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    at Yuzovska in the eastern Dniepr-Donets Basin covers an area of 7,886 km 2 and assigns oil and gas rights to all strata to a depth of 10 km, including tight and basin-centered...

  15. Towards Developing a Calibrated EGS Exploration Methodology Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the following three principal EGS parameters of interest: temperature, rock type, and stress, at depths from +1km to -4km above sea level. Trust maps provide a data reliability...

  16. The Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff, Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volume of 316 km3. Assuming approximately equal caldera fill, outflow, and distal ash volumes in large ignimbrites to the Otowi Member yields a value of 474 km3 DRE for the...

  17. A Comparative Study of Estimation Models for Satellite Relative Motion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Uri

    2013-01-31

    The problem of relative spacecraft motion estimation is considered with application to various reference and relative orbits. Mean circular and elliptic orbits are analyzed, with relative orbits ranging in size from 1 km to 10 km. Estimators...

  18. An intercomparison of lidar-derived aerosol optical properties with airborne measurements near Tokyo during ACE-Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    and 6 km over Sagami Bay southwest of Tokyo. The C-130 observation package included a tracking Sun extinction coefficients (sa $ 0.03 kmÀ1 ) derived from the airborne tracking Sun photometer, in situ optical

  19. Coordinated avifaunal roadCounts (Car) Animal Demography Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ". Agriculture List types of agriculture practised along the route, if possible in this form: "From km 10 to km features Mention other features of the route which are relevant or interesting, e.g. wetlands, dams

  20. Setting Metsovo the navel of touristic development of Pindos T.D. Papazissis, Civil Engineer N.T.U.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    , Meteora in Thessalia (which are just 75 km. away), Kastoria in Macedonia (122 km) and the island the capital of Macedonia, Salonica, the time will be shortened to 2 hours and 15 min- utes. So mountain lovers

  1. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30

    piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber...

  2. PHOTONIC TEXTILES: OVERVIEW OF THE TECHNOLOGY, APPLICATIONS AND COMMERCIALISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    . Distributed sensing (T, P, ...) over 1m-1km X 1m-1km areas without any point sensors 2. Electrically passive structures such as bridges, houses, etc. for long term structural integrity monitoring with minimal servicing

  3. CHALLENGE TO ARM AND ASP Determine aerosol radiative forcings at ARM site(s).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    aerosol optical thickness is 0.1: 3 W m-2 cooling. ~50 km Drone Radiometers AMF DIRECT DETERMINATION

  4. Translating peter.e.clark@boeing.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifschitz, Vladimir

    represents the function that turns every Volkswagen into its electric sys­ tem. In KM, it turns into a slot

  5. INTERNATIONAL CONNECTIVITY Version 14 June 15, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    (Keeling) Islands bIu­ CO Colombia (Republic of) ­­­­ KM Comoros (Islamic Federal Republic of the) ­­U­ CG

  6. Research and Development Facility at Black Rock Hills Utah for a next

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the sites. 13 km to the west, the US department of Fish and Wildlife operates the Fish Springs Wildlife

  7. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicot, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    geothermal gradient is 30°C/km; vertical lines represent possible water density profiles in a borehole:

  8. Demography in an increasingly variable world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisz, Susan

    mesoscale (2­2000 km) temperature and precipitation to disturbances such as hurricanes [11,12]. Glossary

  9. Ageostrophic, anticyclonic instability of a geostrophic, barotropic boundary current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavneh, Irad

    -called atmospheric mesoscale (with L between about 1 and 1000 km) and oceanic mesoscale and "submesoscale" (with L

  10. The 1 April 2014 Iquique, Chile, M w 8.1 earthquake rupture sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lay, Thorne; Yue, Han; Brodsky, Emily E; An, Chao

    2014-01-01

    zones. Improved onshore and offshore geodetic and seismican ~100 km long region offshore of southeastern Peru just

  11. Morphological and Genetic Divergence of Hoplias microlepis (Characiformes: Erythrinidae) in Rivers and Artificial Impoundments of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    drainage primarily for the generation of hydroelectric power. It has a surface area of 270 km2 , contains

  12. Data from CREL, from the SHEBA experiment, western Arctic How to define it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    - summer 2005, no replenishment of MY ice - Fram Strait export 40% of MY ice loss (rest = melting) #12;But in the game? ASSUME 1m thick ~ 2 x 1012 m3 (extra volume lost) (i.e. 2 x 103 km3) Energy needed for melt 106 km2 2006 ~ 0.16 x 106 km2 2007 ~ 0.28 x 106 km2 Ice export only ~ 15% of sea ice retreat Extra

  13. A STUDY OF REGIONAL TEMPERATURE AND THERMOHYDROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR WASTES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    geothermal gradient of 30°C/km is assumed. By imposing a constant pressure boundary condition in equation (

  14. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01

    Energy Balance ALgorithm (SEBAL) run using 250 m and 1 km observations with automatic pixel selec- tion, dynamic wind

  15. Facing the Coastal Challenge: Modeling Coastal Erosion in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Douglas L.; Masters, Patricia M.; Jenkins, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    vertical exaggeration 23x seabed paleo wave-cut platform Distance, km Figure 2. Generalized seismic profile

  16. Hydrographisches Amt der autonomen Provinz Bozen -Sdtirol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerschner, Hanns

    -3.16 >3.16-7.51 area classes (km2 ) numberofglaciers 1km2 There were 259 glaciers in 1997, covering 109 km 2 Area-altitude distribution 2100 2300 2500 2700 2900 3100 3300 3500 3700 3900 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 km2 Most of the area is concentrated around 2800 - 3300 m. Areas above 3400 m are small

  17. MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY S a c k v i l l e , N e w B r u n s w i c k , C a n a d a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    , are both within two hours of Sackville, and beautiful Prince Edward Island is just 65km (40 miles) away

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Regionally accentuated reversible brain grey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaser, Christian

    . It was the second European transcontinental multistage ultra marathon race and covered 4487 km (2788 miles) from

  19. Migration velocity analysis using multifocusing/CRS attributes based on paraxial raytracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    , Keydar, Gelchinsky, Pajchel) 2001-present - Fugro-Jason #12;1. Prestack depth migration 2. Multifocusing;1. Prestack depth migration Diffraction stack (A unified approach to 3-D seismic reflection imaging, Part II(km) 0 1 2 3 depth(km) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 distance(km) #12;Marmousi prestack depth migrated image 0 1 2

  20. The geoarchaeology of Buttermilk Creek, Bell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Brandy Deanne

    1997-01-01

    was conducted. Buttermilk Creek is a 13 km stream incised into limestone bedrock with a drainage basin size of 43 kM2 , a stream gradient of 8.5 m/km, and a sinuosity of 1.26. This project was undertaken with two objectives in mind-, to create a...

  1. Field observations and theoretical studies relevant to enhanced in situ carbonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    similar in size are in Papua New Guinea (~ 10,000 km 2 in outcrop), New Caledonia (~ 6000 km 2 ) and along the east coast of the Adriatic Sea (several ~ 4000 km 2 massifs). Proposed exothermic self of chemical potential energy. Fyfe (1974) proposed that exothermic hydration of olivine to form the hydrous

  2. An Improvement to Mathon's Cyclotomic Ramsey Colorings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    An Improvement to Mathon's Cyclotomic Ramsey Colorings Xiaodong Xu Guangxi Academy of Sciences, . . . , km)- and (k1, . . . , km; n)-colorings, respectively. The Ramsey number R(k1, . . . , km) is defined will use simpler notation Rm(k) and Rm(k; n) for sets of colorings, and Rm(k) for the Ramsey numbers

  3. JPL D-26226 GREAT LAKES WINTER EXPERIMENT 2002 (GLAWEX 2002)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huron, and Lake Erie - have frozen over for the first time in nearly a decade [CNN/Reuters, 2003,000 km2 with a drainage basin extending 1110 km north-south and 1390 km east-west, the ice cover

  4. Excitements and Challenges for Future Light Sources Based on X-Ray FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray Laser Laboratory #12;LLINACINAC CCOHERENTOHERENT LLIGHTIGHT SSOURCEOURCE 2 Km 0 Km 3 Km #12;LCLS brightness of the LCLS and other facilities operating or under construction LEUTL TTF FEL LCLS Spontaneous)(B. Faatz) UCLAUCLA #12;LCLS - The First Experiments Team Leaders: AbsorptionResonanceRaman t0 t1 t2 t3 t4 t

  5. The Ross Sea Response to Evolving Ocean-Ice Interactions in a Changing Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederwohl, Christina 1980-

    2012-12-03

    decade (1994–2007) mostly (50%) from larger melt water inputs from the Pine Island (17.7 km^3 per decade) and Dotson (14.8 km^3 per decade) glaciers. Two decades of steady (1978-2000) strengthening of sea ice productivity (200 km^3 per decade) within...

  6. Agreements --Asia 51 52 Atlas of International Freshwater Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    Agreements -- Asia 51 ASIA #12;52 Atlas of International Freshwater Agreements Amur River. Photo credit: Mikhail A. Yatskov. Amur* Total area: 2,085,900 km2 Area of Basin in Country Countries km2 and the Upper Amur River #12;Agreements -- Asia 53 An Nahr Al Kabir Total area: 1,300 km2 Area of Basin

  7. Government of Malawi Department of Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bay Fisheries Bulletin No. 51 Department of Fisheries P.O. Box 593 Lilongwe 2001 #12;1 Table. .........................................15 #12;2 Introduction Lake Chiuta is a permanent lake (Tweddle, 1983) covering a mean area of 199km2 , oscillating between a minimum area of 93km2 and a maximum of 304km2 according to season and rainfall

  8. Ferry-Based Linear Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Networks Existing wireless sensor network research Assumption that the network used for sensors does of oil, gas, and water pipeline infrastructure using wireless sensor networks. #12;IEEE Globecom 2013 UAE (2006): 2,580 Km of gas pipelines 2,950 Km of oil pipelines 156 Km of refined products

  9. Risk division Semi-analytical model of brine leakage through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Canada: 508 wells in a 30km x 30 km area. from Bachu and Celia, 2009 hal-00658780,version1-18Jun2012 #12. (Pruess, 2006, for geothermal wells) · = > Thermal equilibrium (Oldenburg & Rinaldi 2011) > 8 Mt/y for 50 years > D=6.7 km from the injection to the abandonned well > Cement plug: 10 m high, weak

  10. Volcano-tectonic modelling of magma chambers, ring-faults, unrest, and eruptions in the Tianchi Volcano, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    this range to AD938-946), produced between 96 and 172 km3 of deposits, or around 30 km3 of dense magma, and is one of the largest eruptions on Earth during the past 1100 years. A 5-km-diameter collapse caldera, indicating that the shallow magma chamber and/or an associated geothermal system beneath the volcano

  11. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 10, EGU2008-A-10672, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    volcano on January 8, 1933 with the volume 0.4 km3. The failure generated tsunami up to 20 m high with 2-10672 EGU General Assembly 2008 © Author(s) 2008 Large scale failures and debris avalanche deposits volumes of the failures - around 1 km3. Three largest 3 to 4 km-across scars (which were formed

  12. The Coleopterists Bulletin, 54(1):90119. 2000. ARBOREAL BEETLES OF NEOTROPICAL FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    air km SW Puerto Maldonado, Rio Tambopata Res., 12 50 S, 69 20 W); A. aeris new species, (PERU, Madre, Ama- zonas, Tefe´ (Ega), 3 22 S, 64 42 W); A. servatorum new species, (PERU, Loreto, 1km SW Boca del, 30 air km SW Puerto Maldonado, Rio Tambopata Res., 12 50 S, 69 20 W); A. lilu new species, (BRAZIL

  13. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 44674483, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/4467/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    with a fog and low wind speeds. Three air quality models (50-km EMEP model, 10-km EMEP4HR model and 1-km CAMx closure mesoscale meteorological model (WRF), the wind regimes and thermo-dynamical structure of the lower conditions are often con- nected with the occurrence of high pollution episodes es- pecially in urban

  14. EFFECTIVENESS OF QUIKSCAT'S ULTRA-HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES IN DETERMINING TROPICAL CYCLONE EYE LOCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    459 Clyde Building, Provo, UT 84602, USA ABSTRACT The 25km resolution standard wind products (L2B) are available op- erationally in near-real time from SeaWinds on QuikSCAT. This rel- atively low resolution can, for a given year and basin, mean error distance as small as 15km with a 9km standard deviation. The use

  15. 4000 2000 0 DE413+PLU017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Leslie A.

    SAAO 4000 2000 0 ­2000 ­4000 E (km) ­4000 ­2000 0 2000 4000 N (km) DE­413 Plu017 + ( 0.0, 0.0) mas:40:07 23:51:48 Mean 23:45:58 #12; SAAO 4000 2000 0 ­2000 ­4000 E (km) ­4000 ­2000 0 2000 4000 N (km) DE­413:39:20 23:44:25 23:36:32 23:49:12 Mean 23:42:52 23:41:25 23:44:19 #12; SAAO 4000 2000 0 ­2000 ­4000 E (km

  16. 4000 2000 0 -2000 -4000 DE-413 Plu017 + ( 0.0, 0.0) mas DE-413+PLU-017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Leslie A.

    SAAO 4000 2000 0 -2000 -4000 E (km) -4000 -2000 0 2000 4000 N(km) DE-413 Plu017 + ( 0.0, 0.0) mas:51:48 Mean 23:45:58 #12;SAAO 4000 2000 0 -2000 -4000 E (km) -4000 -2000 0 2000 4000 N(km) DE-413 Plu017:39:20 23:44:25 23:36:32 23:49:12 Mean 23:42:52 23:41:25 23:44:19 #12;SAAO 4000 2000 0 -2000 -4000 E (km

  17. A l u m n i C a m p u sE N E R G I E (89 Kilometer nordwestlich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    und 15 Insti- Einleitung Ziel der Bundesregierung ist es, bis zum Jahr 2030 Offshore- Windparks mit- wicklung fiel im Herbst 2008 mit dem Bau des Umspann- werks für das Offshore-Test- feld alpha ventus- tioniert ist (Bild 2). Ab Frühjahr 2009 startet hier der Bau von sechs Offshore- Windenergieanlagen (OWEA

  18. Neotectonics, geodesy, and seismic hazard in the Northern Walker Lane of Western North America: Thirty kilometers of crustal shear and no strike-slip?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States b Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 89557, United States c Nevada Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno 89557, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 January 2012 Received in revised

  19. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

  20. Results from two years of resistivity monitoring at Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Dipole-dipole resistivity measurements for the combined purposes of reservoir delineation and resistivity monitoring were first made at Cerro Prieto in 1978 and have continued on an annual basis since then. Two 20 km long dipole-dipole lines with permanently emplaced electrodes at one kilometer spacings were established over the field area; one of these lines is remeasured annually. Resistivity measurements are taken using a 25 kW generator capable of up to 80A output and a microprocessor controlled signal averaging receiver; this high power-low noise system is capable of highly accurate measurements even at large transmitter-receiver separations. Standard error calculations for collected data indicate errors less than 5% for all points, but 95% confidence intervals show error limits about 2 to 4 times higher. Analysis of collected data indicate little change in the apparent resistivity of the upper 300 m over the field production zone and that in this section measurements are relatively insensitive to the annual rainfall cycle. Apparent resistivity increases were observed over the older producing zone at Cerro Prieto at depths of 1 km and greater. Large zones of decreasing apparent resistivity were observed flanking the zone of increases on both sides. The increase in apparent resistivity in the production region may be due to an increasing fraction of steam in the reservoir resulting from a production related decline in reservoir pressure. Alternatively the increases may be the result of fresh water influx from the Colorado River. The zone of declining resistivity flanking the area of increase may be due to the movement of saline waters into the reservoir region as a result of the pressure decline. Quantitative modeling of observed changes is impractical owing to the high uncertainty in estimating apparent resistivity changes and the nonuniqueness of models.

  1. Aplicaciones de Arc GISAplicaciones de Arc GIS en Recursos de Aguaen Recursos de Agua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Aplicaciones de Arc GISAplicaciones de Arc GIS en Recursos de Aguaen Recursos de Agua Alejandra 14: 440 personas/km2 vrs India y Japón 338vrs India y Japón 338 perper/km2./km2. El uso del agua se ha incrementado un 1.6% de 1970 aEl uso del agua se ha incrementado un 1.6% de 1970 a 1995 con 2

  2. cPIES sites Q: Downstream of SFZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    from PF core [km] North (downstream) South (upstream) 5958.55857.557 0 50 100 150 Latitude of max() N cPIES sites Q: Downstream of SFZ Neutraldensity[kg/m 3 ] Distance from PF core [km] -100-50050100 27.2 27.4 27.6 27.8 28 28.2 Q: Upstream of SFZ Distance from PF core [km] -100

  3. Samuel Sandoval Solis, PhD Assistant Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Samuel Sandoval Solis, PhD Assistant Professor University of California, Davis Department of Land of 10 #12;Hoover Dam 158 m 35.2 Km3 4.2 bill. KWh $49M - 1936 Oroville Dam 230 m 4.4 Km3 2.2 bill. KWh Shasta Dam 159 m 5.6 Km3 1.8 bill. KWh $36M - 1945 #12;· Masonry - Arch Dams · Gravity Dams · Embankment

  4. Conditions during syntectonic vein formation in the footwall of the Absaroka thrust fault of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah fold and thrust belt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, George Randall

    1993-01-01

    Results. . Isotope Thermometry . FRACTURE MECHANICS . Analysis Procedure and Results DISCUSSION . Thrust Faulting and Overburden Temperatures. Geothermal Gradient Constraints. Twtn Creek Formation Fluid Flow? Closed system. Open System. . tv vt...C. The lithostatic and hydrostatic thermobartc gradients were calculated using a 26 MPa/km hthostatic gradient, a 10 MPa/km hydrostatic gradient and a 25oC/km geothermal gradient. The present mean surface temperature in this portion of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah fold...

  5. M O bit L Alti t D tMars Orbiter Laser Altimetry Data From "Geoblemes"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurdy, Donna M.

    Dark, wind deposits Rampart, complex V04333003 V07252002 #12;#12;b Craters with Concentric Ridges a 5, ~161-242 m ~9.2 km crater at 33.1° N, 81.1° E (section from V1908101) Web-like pattern perpendicularWeb with associated vents #12;Thermokarst-related? a b A A A B B 5 km V10457016 Dark deposit: long axis 7.4 km

  6. Physics Potential of the gamma=100,100 Beta Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mezzetto

    2005-11-02

    The physics potential of a Beta Beam fired from CERN to a 440 kton water Cerenkov detector at a distance of 130 Km is computed.

  7. A study of fractionating inlet systems for the dichotomous air sampler 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ripps, Gerald Joseph

    1979-01-01

    um particles at 2 km/hr. At a wind speed of 8 km/hr. the cutpoint was 15. 1 um and at a wind speed of 24 km/hr. it was 13. 8 um. This fractionating inlet system has a narrow slit inlet to efficiently sample particles at wind speeds less than 24 km.../hr. An impaction fractionator effectively prevents passage of all particles larger than 25 um. The inlet cutpoint variation and wind effects are reduced in comparison with the bell-shaped inlet originally used with the dichotomous sampler. Several variations...

  8. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrentine, Tameka C.; Kennedy, Bryan C.; Saba, Anthony W.; Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Schneider, Julia Teresa; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Baldonado, Esther

    2008-03-01

    In 2004, the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment department embarked upon a partnership with the Systems Engineering and Analysis knowledge management (KM) team to develop knowledge management systems for the neutron generator (NG) community. This partnership continues today. The most recent challenge was to improve the current KM system (KMS) development approach by identifying a process that will allow staff members to capture knowledge as they learn it. This 'as-you-go' approach will lead to a sustainable KM process for the NG community. This paper presents a historical overview of NG KMSs, as well as research conducted to move toward sustainable KM.

  9. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.

    2012-01-01

    produced water from production of crude oil, natural gas,combined U.S. production rate of crude oil (0.3 km 3 ) and

  10. Complex fabric development revealed by englacial seismic reflectivity: Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horgan, H. J.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Alley, R. B.; Peters, L. E.; Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Voigt, D. E.; Winberry, J. P.

    2008-05-21

    profiles, 10 km and 6 km long, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the flow of the glacier, respectively (Figure 1). The seismic sources were provided by the detonation of 500 g of PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) at a depth of 10 m below the surface... profiles, 10 km and 6 km long, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the flow of the glacier, respectively (Figure 1). The seismic sources were provided by the detonation of 500 g of PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) at a depth of 10 m below the surface...

  11. A numerical study of frictional entrainment in a cyclonic gulf stream ring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Paul Denton

    1977-01-01

    over horizontal surfaces. 19. Scaled str amfunction, g , for C = 0. 01; r is ln k. . an z in m. 49 20. Scaled streamfunction, g , for C = 10; r is in km and z in m. 50 21. Scaled screamfunction, ~(~ & for C = 100; r is in km and z in m. 51 22.... Contours of 1/(1+5, , Ri) x 10; r is in km and z in m. Contour interval i' 50 above 100 and 25 belo;" 100. 53 23. Scaled streamfunction, q, for variable K v C = 0. 01; r is in km and z in m. 55 Scaled streamfunction, tj, ', for variable K v C = 0. 1...

  12. Phytologia (April 2012) 94(1) 3 GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN THE LEAF ESSENTIAL OILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    ., 20 km w of Jct. with US 395, 35º 54.003'N, 118º 02.078'W, 2059 m, Tulare Co., CA; Adams 11989- 11993

  13. ETH ZurichEngineering Geodesy -Prof. Dr. H. Ingensand Overview of Current Indoor PositioningOverview of Current Indoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments: indoors: household, office & factory outdoors: urban & rural dynamic Positioning Requirements, outdoor, urban, rural, remote) Active / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry, surveying

  14. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

  15. Variability in detection and quantification of interferon beta-1b-induced neutralizing antibodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients treated with1b in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 8.KM, Bendtzen K, Danish Multiple Sclerosis Study Group:

  16. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-2-2015_CSIL_BroadImpacts.final.20150219...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 15 Figure 4: Annual density of commercial vessels per 4.77 x 4.77 km grid cell in the Gulf of Mexico. ......

  17. Outage Performance of Double Stratospheric Platforms Diversity Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    /stratospheric platforms (HAPs) are either airships or planes that operate in the stratosphere, 17-22km above the ground [1

  18. Preschool Participation and the Cognitive and Social Development of Language Minority Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumberger, Russell W.; Tran, Loan

    2006-01-01

    K.M. (2001). Early childhood education: A meta-analyticJ. (2005). Early childhood care and education: Effects onand “early childhood care and education. ” We recommend it

  19. A prototype station for ARIANNA: a detector for cosmic neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerhardt, L.

    2010-01-01

    the shelf reflects radio waves, giving ARIANNA sensitivityof 35,000 km, looking for radio waves emitted by neutrinothis interface reflects radio waves from downward-going

  20. Kathleen M. Smits, Ph.D., P.E. Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . *Kirby, E., K.M. Smits and W.J. Massman, 2014. The effect of forest fires on the thermal properties

  1. Building Scale DC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2013-01-01

    however, DC was less amenable to transmission over longtransmission 32 km to Buffalo, even though the loads at that time were entirely DC.

  2. Relationships in Areal Variability: The Ross Sea Polynya and Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jason Michael

    2014-01-01

    wind intensity, the offshore winds are better able to advectimpact offshore propagation of katabatic wind, and thereforeKatabatic winds normally reach 10 to 20 km offshore (Kurtz

  3. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    to about 600km offshore, beyond which wind stress curla shifted maximum wind stress offshore when compare to Fig.strengthening winds while extending offshore. A seasonal

  4. Normal mode Rossby waves and their effects on chemical composition in the late summer stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pendlebury, D.; Shepherd, T. G.; Pritchard, M. S.; McLandress, C.

    2008-01-01

    configurations. Part II: Equinox and solstice conditions, J.about 50 km. During equinox, the amplitudes are symmetricthe 5-day wave. During equinox the amplitude is symmetric

  5. Earth Science Mission Profile 1997 -2004 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OrbView-2 8/1/97 705 km 98.2° 12:00 PKM · SeaWiFS Earth Science Mission Profile 1997 - 2004 1 9 9 7 by NASA but is a data buy. Landsat 7 4/15/99 705 km 98.2° 10:05 AM · ETM+ QuikSCAT 6/19/99 803 km 98.6° 6/EO-1 11/21/00 705 km 98.2° 10:01 AM · ALI · Hyperion · LAC 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 Jason-1

  6. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    salt beds; 2 preliminary boreholes for the shafts Gorleben I and Gorleben 2; 156 km of seismic profiles; 145 investigation drillings

  7. Zigmond: Kawaiisu Mythology, An Oral Tradition of South-Central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Helen

    1982-01-01

    along the 29-km. Bear Mountain segment of the Pacific CrestSierra Nevada: The Bear Mountain Seg- ment of the Pacific

  8. A Landscape Ecology Approach to Informing the Ecology and Management of Coastal Marine Species and Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Mary Alida

    2014-01-01

    computation limitations. The offshore extent of the modelapproximately 20 km offshore along the entire Californiaare stratified from the offshore to onshore margins of the

  9. 1) Corr, J.M. 2) Rowell, G.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .J. 36) Merfeld, D. 37) Barnett, J. 38) Gilland, J.H. 39) Lue, K.M. 40) Myers, R. 41) Chamberlain, F

  10. A Strategically Timed Verbal Task Improves Performance and Neurophysiological Alertness During Fatiguing Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atchley, Paul; Chan, Mark; Gregersen, Sabrina

    2013-08-06

    , fatigue inducing, drives which are more typical for motor carrier operators, military operations, or long-distance recreational drives. Second, improved performance was measured primarily by lateral vehicle control. While maintaining a stable lane... sounded if driving speed exceeded 125.53 km/h. Data collection began at the 0.600 km mark and ended at the 177.600 km mark. Data was divided into 9 blocks of 19.733 km. Braking events occurred in the first, fourth, seventh and ninth block of the drive...

  11. Science Teachers Aboard Research Ships (STARS); A Hawaii Ocean Times Series By Kimberlee Stuart, Kapa'a High School Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's colored Styrofoam cup at a depth of 3 km? Myself and two colleagues aboard the Kilo Moana Rain at Station

  12. Networked Robotic Sensor Platform Deployments for use in Coastal Environmental Assessment in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Sensing Networked Robotic Sensor Platform Deployments forGaurav S. Sukhatme 1 Robotic Embedded Systems Laboratory,~4 wks) Collaborative robotic sensing Slow moving (<1km/hr)

  13. Scientific Prospectus Figure 14. Track line for Leg 194 seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -feldspar mafic metasediment #12;W E 1 km Two-waytraveltime(s) Site CS-10A Line MAR-15 CDP 7050 Water Depth = 431

  14. Combination of Indoor and Outdoor PositioningOutdoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (indoor, outdoor, urban, rural, remote) Active / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry of various building materials (L1 = 1500 MHz) Indoors: Positioning Requirements Overview of Systems GNSS

  15. Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison of non-hysteretic chracteristic curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01

    temperature to keep the geothermal gradient on the gas sidethus remains close to the geothermal gradient. Leakage fromtemperature follows the geothermal gradient of 30 o C/km,

  16. Transform faults and lithospheric structure : insights from numerical models and shipboard and geodetic observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    upper mantle, typical geothermal gradients, and far-fieldto a conductive geothermal gradient of 20 C/km, typical ofand realistic geothermal gradients. As expected, stresses

  17. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicot, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    constant salinity; geothermal gradient is 30°C/km; verticalwith depth and on the geothermal gradient, respectively. 4.maintains its salinity; geothermal gradient is at the origin

  18. Mantle helium along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone, Los Angeles basin, California-A leaking paleo-subduction zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boles, J. R; Garven, G.; Camacho, H.; Lupton, J. E

    2015-01-01

    emplacement or high geothermal gradients, and is modeled asaverage crustal geothermal gradient of about 32°C/km [Priceas a result, anomalous geothermal gradients develop and hot

  19. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  20. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hules, John A.

    2008-01-01

    to the level of the jet stream (about 11 km or 36,000 ftor sea level to the jet stream. 1 This discovery makes it

  1. Impacts of sea level rise and climate change on coastal plant species in the central California coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    sea level rise and climate change on coastal plant specieskm) Habitat Change due to Climate Change (C) (sq km) Habitatdistribution models for climate change studies: variable

  2. Universit degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza" CF 80209930587 PI 02133771002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    e diritto allo studio Servizi agli studenti Internazionalizzazione Contabilità, finanza e che fanno parte del sistema Carta Verde. Il costo complessivo per KM percorso è pari ad 0

  3. Stress tensor and focal mechanisms along the Dead Sea fault and related structural elements based on seismological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, Yann

    of the longest active strike­slip faults of the world. The DSF, about 1200 km long, connects the Taurus­Zagros

  4. Technology and social process : oscillations in Iron Age copper production and power in Southern Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yosef, Erez

    2010-01-01

    the Taurides, along the Zagros Mountains in Iran and Oman.over 1200 km form the Zagros- Tauros subduction zone in

  5. Case History An audio-magnetotelluric investigation of the Otjiwarongo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    covering an area that ex- ceeds 1,000,000 km2 (Jones et al., 2009b). The consortium mem- bers that formed

  6. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be...

  7. Equipa de Formula Student do IST apresenta novo FST 05e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    engenharia e segundo lugar em Custo e Sustentabilidade. O novo FST 05e acelere dos 0 aos 100 Km/h em apenas 2

  8. A Numerical Model For The Dynamics Of Pyroclastic Flows At Galeras...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a topographic barrier located more than 16 km from the source. Two initial solid volumetric fractions are modeled. For both cases, some of the structures located more distant...

  9. Siting solar energy development to minimize biological impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoms, DM; Dashiell, SL; Davis, FW

    2013-01-01

    Areas of high solar energy potential are often in fragileby 20 km to ensure that potential solar energy sites weresolar development from the perspective of minimizing potential

  10. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fromthe valley floor) separated by a thick sequence (about4 km) of clastic sediments derived from the adjacentranges, and a relatively permeable, high angle faultthat functions...

  11. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Landfill disposal site were conducted. The purpose of these studies was basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies, such as analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards, used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-kilometer (km) (40-mile) radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters. The scope of work performed included the following: Compilation and analysis of previous published and unpublished geologic literature and maps. Review of historical and instrumental earthquake data. Review of site-specific subsurface geologic data, including lithologic and geophysical logs of exploratory boreholes advanced in the site area. Photogeologic interpretations of existing conventional aerial photographs. Ground reconnaissance and mapping of the site region.

  12. Magnetic field gradients in solar wind plasma and geophysics periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2006-11-16

    Using recent data obtained by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) the pumping scale of the magnetic field gradients of the solar wind plasma has been calculated. This pumping scale is found to be equal to 24h $\\pm$ 2h. The ACE spacecraft orbits at the L1 libration point which is a point of Earth-Sun gravitational equilibrium about 1.5 million km from Earth. Since the Earth's magnetosphere extends into the vacuum of space from approximately 80 to 60,000 kilometers on the side toward the Sun the pumping scale cannot be a consequence of the 24h-period of the Earth's rotation. Vise versa, a speculation is suggested that for the very long time of the coexistence of Earth and of the solar wind the weak interaction between the solar wind and Earth could lead to stochastic synchronization between the Earth's rotation and the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients. This synchronization could transform an original period of the Earth's rotation to the period close to the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients.

  13. Socioeconomic impact of photovoltaic power at Schuchulik, Arizona. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahr, D.; Garrett, B.G.; Chrisman, C.

    1980-10-01

    Schuchuli, a small remote village on the Papago Indian Reservation in southwest Arizona, is 27 kilometers (17 miles) from the nearest available utility power. In some respects, Schuchuli resembles many of the rural villages in other parts of the world. For example, it's relatively small in size (about 60 residents), composed of a number of extended family groupings, and remotely situated relative to major population centers (190 km, or 120 miles, from Tucson). Its lack of conventional power is due to the prohibitive cost of supplying a small electrical load with a long-distance distribution line. Furthermore, alternate energy sources are expensive and place a burden on the resources of the villagers. On December 16, 1978, as part of a federally funded project, a solar cell power system was put into operation at Schuchuli. The system powers the village water pump, lighting for homes ad other village buildings, family refrigerators and a communal washing machine and sewing machine. The project, managed for the US Department of Energy by the NASA Lewis Research Center, provided for a one-year socio-economic study to assess the impact of a relatively small amount of electricity on the basic living environment of the villagers. The results of that study are presented, including village history, group life, energy use in general and the use of the photovoltaic-powered appliances. No significant impacts due to the photovoltaic power system were observed.

  14. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Joseph [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida, United States

    2010-01-08

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  15. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Appendix B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small town of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated UMTRA sites at Slick Rock, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The UC site is approximately 1 mile (mi) [2 kilometers (km)] downstream of the NC site. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres (ac) [22 hectares (ha)] at the UC site and 12 ac (4.9 ha) at the NC site. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 620, 000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [470,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3})]. In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, four vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into groundwater.

  16. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal sits, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)) to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal sits would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  17. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium Processing Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contain measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect groundwater quality. Remedial action at the Naturita site must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Colorado. The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to either the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast, or a licensed non-DOE disposal facility capable of handling RRM. At either disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed Dry Flats disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This report discusses environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action.

  19. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

    1986-08-01

    We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

  20. Cheap Method for Shielding a City from Rocket and Nuclear Warhead Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-01-10

    The author suggests a cheap closed AB-Dome which protects the densely populated cities from nuclear, chemical, biological weapon (bombs) delivered by warheads, strategic missiles, rockets, and various incarnations of aviation technology. The offered AB-Dome is also very useful in peacetime because it shields a city from exterior weather and creates a fine climate within the AB-Dome. The hemispherical AB-Dome is the inflatable, thin transparent film, located at altitude up to as much as 15 km, which converts the city into a closed-loop system. The film may be armored the stones which destroy the rockets and nuclear warhead. AB-Dome protects the city in case the World nuclear war and total poisoning the Earth atmosphere by radioactive fallout (gases and dust). Construction of the AB-Dome is easy; the enclosure film is spread upon the ground, the air pump is turned on, and the cover rises to its planned altitude and supported by a small air over-pressure. The offered method is cheaper by thousand times than protection of city by current anti-rocket systems. The AB-Dome may be also used (height up to 15 and more kilometers) for TV, communication, telescope, long distance location, tourism, high placed windmills (energy), illumination and entertainments. The author developed theory of AB-Dome, made estimation, computation and computed a typical project. Discussion and results are in the end of article.

  1. Climatology of Mid-latitude Ionospheric Disturbances from the Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmboldt, J F; Cotton, W D

    2012-01-01

    The results of a climatological study of ionospheric disturbances derived from observations of cosmic sources from the Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) are presented. We have used the ionospheric corrections applied to the 74 MHz interferometric data within the VLSS imaging process to obtain fluctuation spectra for the total electron content (TEC) gradient on spatial scales from a few to hundreds of kilometers and temporal scales from less than one minute to nearly an hour. The observations sample nearly all times of day and all seasons. They also span latitudes and longitudes from 28 deg. N to 40 deg. N and 95 deg. W to 114 deg. W, respectively. We have binned and averaged the fluctuation spectra according to time of day, season, and geomagnetic (Kp index) and solar (F10.7) activity. These spectra provide a detailed, multi-scale account of seasonal and intraday variations in ionospheric activity with wavelike structures detected at wavelengths between about 35 and 250 km. In some cases,...

  2. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study. Phase II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Tameka B.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Cole, Benjamin Holland, II; Baldonado, Esther

    2010-08-01

    This report documents the second phase of work under the Sustainable Knowledge Management (SKM) project for the Neutron Generator organization at Sandia National Laboratories. Previous work under this project is documented in SAND2008-1777, Sustaining Knowledge in the Neutron Generator Community and Benchmarking Study. Knowledge management (KM) systems are necessary to preserve critical knowledge within organizations. A successful KM program should focus on people and the process for sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The Neutron Generator organization is developing KM systems to ensure knowledge is not lost. A benchmarking study involving site visits to outside industry plus additional resource research was conducted during this phase of the SKM project. The findings presented in this report are recommendations for making an SKM program successful. The recommendations are activities that promote sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The benchmarking effort, including the site visits to Toyota and Halliburton, provided valuable information on how the SEA KM team could incorporate a KM solution for not just the neutron generators (NG) community but the entire laboratory. The laboratory needs a KM program that allows members of the workforce to access, share, analyze, manage, and apply knowledge. KM activities, such as communities of practice (COP) and sharing best practices, provide a solution towards creating an enabling environment for KM. As more and more people leave organizations through retirement and job transfer, the need to preserve knowledge is essential. Creating an environment for the effective use of knowledge is vital to achieving the laboratory's mission.

  3. Imaging the mantle beneath Iceland using integrated seismological techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    head, this study presents a tomographic image of the mantle structure beneath Iceland to 400 km depth of the body wave and surface wave information reveals a predominantly horizontal low-velocity anomaly extending from the Moho down to $250 km depth, interpreted as a plume head. Below the plume head a near

  4. IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 27, NO. 2, APRIL 2002 155 Very High-Frequency Radar Mapping of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Weisberg, P. Edgar An, Alexander Soloviev, and Mark Luther Abstract--An ocean surface current radar (OSCR coastal ocean currents over a 7.5 km 8 km domain with a horizontal resolution of 250 m at 700 grid points at the SFOMC. Index Terms--ADCP, coastal ocean circulation, current profiles, surface currents, VHF radar

  5. Missouri DOT 1) Briefly summarize your current pavement smoothness requirements.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tables: Table I - 45 mph or greater Profile Index, Percent of Inches Per Mile (mm/km) Contract Price 10 or less. Table II - Under 45 mph International Roughness Index, Percent of Inches Per Mile Contract Price After correction to 25.0 inches per mile (395 mm/km) or less. #12;Table II - Under 45 mph Profile Index

  6. Multiscale electrodynamics of the ionosphere-magnetosphere system A. V. Streltsov and W. Lotko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA Received 2 March 2004 electric fields and currents with a perpendicular size of 10­20 km at 120 km altitude can be generated Ionosphere: Electric fields (2712); 2437 Ionosphere: Ionospheric dynamics; KEYWORDS: magnetosphere

  7. VALIDATION AND EVALUATION OF QUIKSCAT ULTRA-HIGH RESOLUTION WIND RETRIEVAL IN THE GULF OF MAINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    . M. Plagge , D. C. Vandemark University of New Hampshire Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory E-mail: amanda.plagge@unh.edu D. G. Long Brigham Young University Electrical Engineering Department ABSTRACT product from the QuikSCAT scatterometer. This product adds to the standard 25 km and new 12.5 km

  8. March 2012 Vol. 5 Issue 1 pages 1 -120 Mongabay.com Open Access Journal -Tropical Conservation Science Vol.5 (1):12-24, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    algunas medidas de perturbación del dosel derivadas de imágenes satelitales durante un periodo de tres décadas a partir de 1980, con aquellas derivadas de una campaña de vuelos con LiDAR llevada a cabo en 2009 del dosel detectadas con LiDAR, se adentran 1 km más en Belice (hasta 3.5 km) que aquellas derivadas

  9. Can primordial helium survive in diamonds on geologic time scales? Rebecca Granot and Roi Baer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Roi

    in the past to provide bounds and clues on the formation of the solar system, the planets and Earth. Yet-binding models. Various results of these models compare well to known experimental data. We find helium re- sides billion years.1 They can be used to sample varying depths of earth's mantle, ranging from 150 km to 600 km

  10. Potential for meeting the EU new passenger car CO? emissions targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Kandarp

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the European Parliament agreed to limit the CO2 emissions from new passenger cars sold in the European Union to an average of 130g/km by 2015. Further, a probable longer-term CO2 emissions target of 95g/km is ...

  11. Evidence for Deep Magma Injection Beneath Lake Tahoe,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    , and the consequent eastward collapse of the competent Sierra Nevada block. Paleozoic and Mesozoic roof pendants ( 1 and 2) compressive stresses (4, 5). The base of the seismogenic zone in the region varies locally from about 15 to 18 km (6). In the Lake Tahoe area, no crustal earth- quakes deeper than 20 km can

  12. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballinger TW Moon BG Fritz JM Becker HT Tilden EA Raney GA Stoetzel MA Chamness JM Barnett KM Mendez J Su-Coker Stoetzel MA Chamness JM Barnett KM Mendez J Su-Coker September 2013 Prepared for the U.S. Department PNNL's responsibility (e.g., a permitted waste storage and treatment unit on the Hanford Site

  13. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS): Development for Parallel Processing Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    on the mesoscale (horizontal scales from 2 km to 2000 km) for purposes ranging from operational weather forecasting and simulating convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, cirrus clouds, and precipitating weather systems models that had a great deal of overlap, the CSU cloud/mesoscale mode (Tripoli and Cotton, 1982

  14. Estimating text legibility of a mobile display on the basis of translational vibration caused by walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkkonen, Maria

    Estimating text legibility of a mobile display on the basis of translational vibration caused by walking Maria Olkkonen Terhi Mustonen Abstract -- In this study, the effect of vibration on mobile km/hour, and an indi- vidually defined speed (3.9 km/hour on average). Vibration was measured

  15. glacial-scale enrichment would result in an air-to-sea flux of about 4.6 mol C m 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an area of 225 km2 . Iron infusions in the north patch of 631 kg and 450 kg were repeated on 16 January, with repeated infusions on 29 January, 1 February, and 5 Feb- ruary. Each infusion involved 315 kg spread over a 225 km2 area. For both patches, initial iron infusions were supple- mented with infusions of SF6 and 3

  16. Upper crustal evolution across the Juan de Fuca ridge flanks Mladen R. Nedimovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nedimoviæ, Mladen R.

    as a thermal insulator, has been proposed to further accelerate layer 2A evolution by enhancing mineral ridge multichannel seismic data to determine upper crustal structure at $3 km intervals along 300 km with increasing crustal age or sediment blanketing but persists as a relatively low seismic velocity layer capping

  17. / free-slip / free-slip Numerical models of slab deformation in the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    of the plate. Model: Model domain: Results: Effect of decoupling mechanism 410 km 660 km oceánska doska nadlozná doska Results: Effect of boundary condition Effect of yield stress Plate velocity Kinematic, crust.s 1020 Pa.s 1021 Pa.s Free-slip, crust = 1020 Pas, y = 108 Pa Kinematic, crust = 1020 Pas, y = 109 Pa

  18. Eine Langzeitklimatologie nordatlantischer Polar Lows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    · Without nudging the large scale, the formation of Polar Lows is subject to considerable ensemble;77 Ensemble simulations for three polar low cases in climate mode NCEP (~200 km) CLM (~50 km) Oct. 1993 (Dec. 1993, Jan. 1998) Initialised: approx. 2 week prior to PL formation With spectral Nudging (4x

  19. Development of a Long-term Climatology of North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    of pressure minima ·Without nudging the large scale, the formation of Polar Lows is subject to considerable. 700 km) Ensemble simulations (2x4) with CLM ( ~50km ) in climate mode for polar low cases Oct. 1993 can be reproduced with CLM run in climate mode ·Though, there may be deviations in location and amount

  20. Development of a longterm climatology of North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    , the formation of Polar Lows is subject to considerable ensemble variability a long-term trend in polar low in Climate Mode NCEP/NCAR re1 (~200 km) CLM 2.4.6 (~50 km) Oct 1993, Dec 1993, Jan 1998 Initialised: approx. 2 week prior to polar low formation With spectral Nudging (4x) and without (4x) (v. Storch et al

  1. Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais -Laboratrio Associado de Plasma 1 Project ELISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Associado de Plasma 7 Radiation Shielding World map of the AE-8 MAX integral electron flux >1 MeV at 500 km Pesquisas Espaciais - Laboratório Associado de Plasma 6 Radiation Shielding Penetration Range in Aluminum altitude. World map of the AP-8 MAX integral proton flux >10 MeV at 500 km altitude. Estimates by Abdu et

  2. BRYAN SINKUNAS SISMICITE POSTGLACIAIRE ET MOUVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be identified and indicate an important postglacial seismic activity in the area. Six stratigraphie units have-Kamouraska seismic zone, the most active seismic zone in eastern Canada. This fjord-like lake is 39 km long, 2 km-glacial and postglacial seismic events. Various features associated with mass-movements such as slope failure scars

  3. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  4. Fates of Eroded Soil Organic Carbon: Mississippi Basin Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. V.; Sleezer, R. O.; Renwick, W. H.; Buddemeier, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a mass balance analysis of organic carbon (OC) across the five major river subsystems of the Mississippi (MS) Basin (an area of 3.2 3 106 km2). This largely agricultural landscape undergoes a bulk soil erosion rate of ;480 t·km22...

  5. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Position Control of a Flexible Joint 11.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer = 2.6 · Km: one of the motor torque constants. Km = 0.00767 · Kg: gear ratio of the motor

  6. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL SUPPLEMENT SERIES, 131 249271, 2000 November 2000. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    Master University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1, Canada ; gregersen=welles.physics.mcmaster.ca Received 1999 September 15 is not unique (Butner et al. 1991 ; MenÏshchikov & Henning 1997). Observing the spatial intensity distribution Arrray (SCUBA) (Holland et al. 1999) at wave­ lengths of 1.3 mm, 850 km, and 450 km. By mapping

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 96, NO. C8, PAGES 14,707-14,730, AUGUST 15, 1991 The Structure of the Transition Zone Between Coastal Waters and the Open Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    region between 60 km and 150 km offshore. The spring transition, as seen in coastalsea level and winds The Structure of the Transition Zone Between Coastal Waters and the Open Ocean off Northern California, Winter the boundary between low steric sea level inshore and high steric sea level offshore, dominated both

  8. Joule heating and nitric oxide in the thermosphere, 2 Charles A. Barth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Scott

    . The heating leads to an increase in the density of nitric oxide at 140 km in the thermosphere. On some lead to increases in nitric oxide density at 110 km at the equator. [4] One of the reasons for studyingJoule heating and nitric oxide in the thermosphere, 2 Charles A. Barth1 Received 14 April 2010

  9. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 28332840, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/2833/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Resolution Visible, HRV). This combines the advantages of a fine spatial resolution and of the geosta in this image. Section 2 introduces the presented phenomenon in images of the HRV channel and of infrared resolution" (1 km×1 km at nadir) channel (HRV). The normal resolution channels me

  10. Diagnosis of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy Tracer Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    Diagnosis of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy Tracer Fluxes Baylor Fox-Kemper U. Colorado-Boulder, with Scott - 10,000 km, yrs->centuries) => resolved · Mesoscale variability (10 - 100 km, mo -> yrs) => resolved) => parameterized Boundary Layer Models Mesoscale resolving models Climate models Submesoscale variability Coupling

  11. Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot David Fee and Ken ± 1.6 km, with 36­40 km of peak to peak topography. This topography is spatially uncorrelated, providing no evidence for a lower mantle plume currently beneath the hotspot. The topography suggests

  12. Seismic Ground Motions from a Bolide Shock Wave Charles A. Langston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langston, Charles A.

    -surface layer with low P wave (~0.25 km/s) and S wave (~0.125 km/s) velocities consistent with previously published profiling results in unconsolidated Mississippi embayment sediments. Ground motions are generally/04/2003 ~3:50 UT). Some observers also reported that the bolide was accompanied by a sonic boom and residents

  13. Remote sensing lower thermosphere wind profiles using non-specular meteor echoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, Meers

    , this technique should produce high resolution images of lower thermospheric winds as they change in both altitude describes a new method of measuring wind velocity profiles between 93 km and 110 km altitude by tracking non 2007. Details about meteor observations with this high-power large-aperture (HPLA) radar are given by

  14. Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids Impact Hazard to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Throop, Henry

    Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids and the Impact Hazard to Earth Henry Throop! Physics on Earth Potchefstroom Parys Sasolburg 20 km #12;Parys 3 km #12;Vredefort Impact Crater Looking from outer Impactor? · Origin: One of several million Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) · a = 1.6 AU; e = 0.5; i = 4

  15. A spectral comparison of (379) Huenna and its satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMeo, Francesca E.

    We present near-infrared spectral measurements of Themis family Asteroid (379) Huenna (D ? 98 km) and its 6 km satellite using SpeX on the NASA IRTF. The companion was farther than 1.5? from the primary at the time of ...

  16. 75Radiation Dose and Distance This iconic photo was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on March 15, a few days after the Japan 2011 earthquake, which caused severe damage to the Fukushima Press/Kyodo News) The devastating Japan 2011 earthquake damaged the nuclear reactors in Fukushima, which: Date Distance (km) Location Dose Rate (microSeiverts/hr) March 15 1 km Fukushima #2 plant 8,200 March

  17. 3128 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E Mesoscale Disturbance and Ecological Response to Decadal Climatic Variability in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3128 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E Mesoscale Disturbance and Ecological Response ( 102 km2 ) to mesoscale (104 ­106 km2 ). Climate­disturbance relations are more variable and complex than previously assumed. During the past three centuries, mesoscale outbreaks of the western spruce

  18. Geophys. J. Int. (2012) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05370.x GJIGeodynamicsandtectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2012-01-01

    interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS, reveal a slowly deforming region within the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Owyhee­Oregon Plateau with the very low strain rate within the 125 km × 650 km region of the Snake River Plain and Owyhee

  19. Provided for non-commercial research and education use. Not for reproduction, distribution or commercial use.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    nuclear power plant led to a nuclear crisis that is still unfolding. The Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of Japan ruptured a 300 km long by 200 km wide portion of the subduction zone megathrust fault movement caused by the faulting generated a huge tsunami that devastated communities along the entire

  20. Site Name : Tololo permanent station Author : Morvan + Decamps Site Code :T O L O date : year 2007 month 05 day 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    . ACCESS Access from road La Serena to Vicuna. After 55 km turn right (it's 5 km after the tunnel "EmbalseDeleting. Ethernet MAC Address: 00:60:35:03:5B:70 IP Address: 139.229.13.15 (static) Netmask: 255.255.255.128 Gateway

  1. Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

  2. www.vadosezonejournal.org Vol. 8, No. 2, May 2009 510 Y M is being studied extensively to deter-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    surrounding Yucca Mountain (Robinson and Bussod, 2000). Experiments have been performed at the pro- posed to access within Yucca Mountain (Bechtel SAIC Company, 2004a,b). The Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test Site, approxi- mately 160 km northwest of Las Vegas, NV, and 8 km southeast of Yucca Mountain

  3. Thermal structure of continental upper mantle inferred from S-wave velocity and surface heat ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    ; geothermal gradient 1. Introduction Oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled by mantle convection geotherms differ most at depths of 60^120 km with variations of up to 900³C. Below 230 km, differences do not exceed 300³C. These geotherms agree well with one-dimensional conductive geotherms for the observed range

  4. Hillebrand 1 A comparison of tectonics of the eastern Sierra Nevada, CA in the vicinity of Mt. Whitney and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    thought to show a low Cenozoic geothermal gradient of ~6 °C/km, but (U-T)/He data from House et al. (1997) shows that a moderate geotherm of ~25 °C/km is required for their age-elevation profile. Brady et al

  5. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2012-01-01

    corresponding to a geothermal gradient of 30 o C/km andwater in a typical geothermal gradient, as shown in Figs. 1-o C, 1.013x10 5 Pa) in a geothermal gradient of 30 o C/km to

  6. Geological Society of America Special Paper 358

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kuo-Fong

    that crustal thickening causes a decrease in the geothermal gradient and the temperature. Erosion causes an increase in the geothermal gradient and the temperature. Through modeling, we derived the optimum geotherm geothermal gradient of 17 C/km and a temperature of 210­550 C at a depth of 10­30 km. The uncertainties

  7. Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wei

    2007-01-01

    20-40 mm/yr and the geothermal gradient is high, ~110°C/km,is 85 mm/yr and the geothermal gradient is ~10°C/km (TableRica subduction zone, the geothermal gradient is low and

  8. www.landcare2020.dewww.landcare2020.de TP 2.1 Klimadatenbank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindau, Ralf

    & Anne Pätzold, GKSS, Geestacht Clemens Simmer & Ralf Lindau, Universität Bonn Bonn, 8. April 2008 TP 2 mit 5 km Auflösung mit CLM (SGA Basis) TP 2.3 Dynamische Regionalisierung (Uni Bonn, Lindau/Simmer wie LandCare DSS (1 km²) TP 2.3 Dynamische Regionalisierung (Uni Bonn, Lindau/Simmer) Zeitreihen und

  9. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 154 (2006) 196207 Lower mantle dynamics with the post-perovskite phase change,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    2006-01-01

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 154 (2006) 196­207 Lower mantle dynamics with the post-perovskite; accepted 9 October 2005 Abstract The new post-perovskite phase near the core­mantle boundary has important change at 670 km depth and an exothermic post-perovskite transition at 2650 km depth. The phase

  10. Effects of a perovskite-post perovskite phase change near core-mantle boundary in compressible mantle convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    Effects of a perovskite-post perovskite phase change near core-mantle boundary in compressible mantle convection are used to investigate the effect of the perovskite to post-perovskite phase of the mantle. The usual phase transitions at 410 km (olivine-spinel) and 660 km (spinel-perovskite) are also

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY POST OFFICE BOX 2 GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA 24944-0002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Library ER Library Library Downtown VIA Library R. Lacasse IR Library Library Mountain P. Napier R. Weimer the last couple of years working with optical fibers. Fibers Two types of fiber are used on site. Both. A Fiber type 50/125 graded index - multimode. 6 6 dB/km attenuation. Bandwidth - 200 MHz - km. Wavelength

  12. ATOC 3500/CHEM 3151 Spring 2014 Stratospheric Ozone Destruction in the "Ozone Hole"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    ATOC 3500/CHEM 3151 Spring 2014 Problem 15 Stratospheric Ozone Destruction in the "Ozone Hole" The figure below shows typical observations of the total amount of ozone in a layer of air 8 km thick between 12 and 20 km over the South Pole (recall that we like to express the `thickness of ozone

  13. An Eclipsing Binary through the double looking glass of Kepler and Keck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    variations on the light curve, and to compare these methods of finding masses. We found... F5 + G8 F5 (92 km/s) G8 (-140 km/s) Mg triplet We found a reasonably good library spectrum to fit the primary (by eye) and estimated the temperature ratio from the light curve to derive a G8 secondary. We cross

  14. Forecas(ng ash-fall Impacts from a Yellowstone Supererup(on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    ) magma Tephra deposit1 1Scollo et al., 2007, JVGR, 160:147-164 a 1 km A sphere a normal ver(cal erup(on (9 AM-6 PM) Plume height of 13-17 km 9 hour dura and Mud, Univ. Washington Press, Searle, pp 1089-1116 1:40 PM 2:40 PM 3:40 PM

  15. A thin layer of phytoplankton observed in the Philippine Sea with a synthetic moored array of autonomous gliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fratantoni, David

    A thin layer of phytoplankton observed in the Philippine Sea with a synthetic moored array and phytoplankton distribution in a 100 km  100 km domain in the Philippine Sea east of Luzon Strait for 10 days), A thin layer of phytoplankton observed in the Philippine Sea with a synthetic moored array of autonomous

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SOLID EARTH, VOL. 118, 38993916, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50318, 2013 Multiphased tectonic evolution of the Central Algerian margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    penetration seismic profiles allow us to image the sedimentary sequence in the Algerian basin and the crustal structure at the continent-ocean boundary. Modeling of the wide-angle data shows thinning of the basement, from more than 15 km in the continental upper margin to only 5­6 km of oceanic-type basement

  17. Assessment of Ionospheric Impact on LAAS Using WAAS Supertruth Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    wave front anomaly scenario in the range domain and the position domain. Based on the results to date in the region of the upper atmosphere between about 50 km to about 1000 km above the earth [1]. The radiation electron content. The state of the ionosphere is a function of intensity of the solar activity, magnetic

  18. A collaborative program for earthquake fault hazard characterization and community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    profiles 10.5 km nees@UTexas minivib I #12;Truckee River Profiles W E Vertical exaggeration 2:1 #12;Truckee River Profiles W E Vertical exaggeration 2:1 #12;Manzanita Lane Profile E E W W Vertical exaggeration 2:1 #12;U. of Nevada - BSU Collaboration March 2010 5 high-resolution seismic profiles 3.5 km

  19. Constraints from Moho geometry and crustal thickness on the geodynamic origin of the Vrancea Seismogenic Zone (Romania)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, Camelia Cristina

    of industry deep seismic reflection data (Ramnicu Sarat and Braila profiles) from the SE Carpathian foreland of the orogen. These two deep (20s) seismic reflection profiles (70km length across the foreland) reveal (1 narrow (30�70�200km3 ) near vertical zone atypical for a Wadati­Benioff plane, located in front

  20. Seismic imaging of deep low-velocity zone beneath the Dead Sea basin and transform fault: Implications for strain localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    consisted of two wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction profiles: a 280-km-long profile along vertical 4.5 Hz geophone, buried, and placed at intervals of 0.65­0.75 km along the profile. The data wereSeismic imaging of deep low-velocity zone beneath the Dead Sea basin and transform fault

  1. Photo by M Brandon Multidisciplinary measurements with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    message on cell phone #12;Marine Chemistry: Manganese distribution Special sensor needed: `fast' response Primary cell battery #12;Summary: Missions 1 -263 Group Missions No. of missions km travelled Average km cytometer o pH o High frequency incoherent & coherent Doppler sonars #12;Autosub radiated noise at 3 kt 40

  2. Published in `The Journal of Canada's Avalanche Community, vol. 99, 50-51. What if you know what's next? On snow cover simulation in data sparse areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    Published in `The Journal of Canada's Avalanche Community, vol. 99, 50-51. What if you know what's next? On snow cover simulation in data sparse areas regions range from 200 km2 to over 50 000 km2 covering a total area

  3. A Time Lag Model to Estimate Rainfall Rate Based on GOES Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    . ­ The maximum horizontal range is 462 km, · Polar satellite ­ Altitude: 870 km ­ Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) ­ Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) ­ Observations every 12 hours · Geostationary for cloud at temperature T · S is the solar irradiance of GOES 12 8 Albedo from October 27, 2008 (18:35 UTC

  4. Examining Commuting Times and Jobs-housing Imbalance in Seoul: An Empirical Analysis of Urban Spatial Structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Sun Mi

    2012-10-19

    ......................................................................... 26 3.2 Methodology: Stratified Sampling and Multiple Regression Models ............................................................................... 28 4. RESULTS... and an additional fare is charged for each 5 km after an initial 10 km. The fare collection system for both the bus and subway has been through a smart card since 2009. Accordingly, the fare structure includes transfers, which guarantees free boarding within 30...

  5. Development of Design Guidelines for Soil Embedded Post Systems Using Wide-flange I-beam to Contain Truck Impact 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Seok Gyu

    2012-07-16

    /h, 65 km/h, and 50 km/h. The design guidelines presented here are based on 10 medium scale pendulum impact tests, 2 medium scale bogie impact tests, 1 full scale impact test on a single post, 1 full scale impact test on a group of 8 side by side posts...

  6. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16

    in the last 10 years or so. We proposed geological descriptions of these two Basins. The key characteristics of the two models are the presence of channels and pinch-outs for depths of between 1 km and 2 km (these values are rescaled for our numerical purposes...

  7. ApJ, in press November 3, 2013 The density of mid-sized Kuiper belt object 2002 UX25 and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    ApJ, in press November 3, 2013 The density of mid-sized Kuiper belt object 2002 UX25 in the Kuiper belt, with measured den- sities of 1.5 g cm-3 and higher, from the coagulation of small bodies for diameters larger than 350 km. In the Kuiper belt, no density measurements have been made between 350 km

  8. S, Afr, ,J, Alltarct, Res" Val, 8, 1978 The mammals of IVIarion Island: a revie,v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    schedules and intra and interspecific relationships had to be obtained, Marion and Prince Edward islands (4635 CVS S, Afr, ,J, Alltarct, Res" Val, 8, 1978 The mammals of IVIarion Island: a revie,v J is typical for sub-Antarctic islands. Marion Island, the larger of the two, is approximately 19 km by 14 km

  9. Structure and kinematics of the Suzume fault, Okitsu melange, Shimanto accretionary complex, Japan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanaya, Takamasa

    2007-04-25

    zone of fractured basalt, and likely records 2+ km displacement along the thrust. The footwall consists of decimeter-thick ultracataclasite bounded by a 20-m-thick zone of ductile shear in flattened sedimentary host rock, and likely records 30+ km...

  10. Ordinary kriging for on-demand average wind interpolation of in-situ wind sensor data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middleton, Stuart E.

    1 Ordinary kriging for on-demand average wind interpolation of in-situ wind sensor data Zlatko comes from wind in-situ observation stations in an area approximately 200km by 125km. We provide on-demand average wind interpolation maps. These spatial estimates can then be compared with the results of other

  11. Mar Biol (2007) 152:905918 DOI 10.1007/s00227-007-0741-x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    2007-01-01

    and held at the river mouth and adjacent areas for 7­9 days before enter- ing the river. Summer-run­3 days. Once in river, similar patterns were observed: Late-run populations migrated at »28 km day¡1 and Summer-run populations at »40 km day¡1 . From point of release to the river mouth, males migrated faster

  12. HAS 222d Introduction to Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun Water as Commons 28.v.09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HAS 222d Introduction to Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun Water as Commons 28.v.09 developed and yet uses only 969 liters water daily per person. For 6.7B people, this much water is 6700 km3/year. ­ global water cycle ~ evaporation and precipitation =0.5x106 = 0.5M km3/yr ~ 16 Sverdrups

  13. Stratigraphy and geochronology of the Comondu Group near Loreto, Baja California sur, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorsey, Becky

    Stratigraphy and geochronology of the Comondu Group near Loreto, Baja California sur, Mexico Paul d Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2453 Ridge Road, Berkeley, CA, California 94709, USA Received 5, stratigraphic analysis, and geochronology in a 10±20-km-wide and 70-km-long belt from the gulf escarpment

  14. SCIENTIFIC NOTE Phloeoxena signata (Dejean): Northern range extensions to Maryland and Tennessee, U.S.A.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    the Tennessee River; same data except ``3 Km SE Childers Hill at Leigh Creek, 25 March 2002, R. Ward'' (1 and accompanying notes are as follows: ``Tennessee: Hamilton County, Harrison State Park, 19 March 2003, R. D. Ward, 5 Km W Southside, Chambers Creek, 30 Oct. 2004, R. Ward'' (1), forested bottom lands, inland from

  15. DOI: 10.1126/science.1118152 , 990 (2006);311Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    2006-01-01

    average conditions in 1960 to 1990. These models yield 265 T 26 km3 ice/year runoff and 573 T 50 km3 ice to enhanced surface meltwater production penetrating to the bed to lubricate its motion (20), and ice-shelf removal (13), ice-front retreat, and glacier ungrounding (21, 22) that reduce resistance to flow

  16. Permanent shadow in simple craters near the lunar poles D. Ben J. Bussey,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudis, Paul D.

    Permanent shadow in simple craters near the lunar poles D. Ben J. Bussey,1 Paul G. Lucey,1 Donovan, 7500 km2 and 6500 km2 , for the north and south pole respectively. These values were obtained, to investigate the size and latitudinal extent of permanently shadowed regions near the lunar poles. Craters

  17. IEEE Transactions on Man, Machine, and cybernetics-Part C (SMC-C), Vol. 31, No. 4, Pages 509-517, November 2001 Stages of Autonomy Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hexmoor, Henry

    determination for software agents that manage and manipulate knowledge in organizations that house other--multiagent systems, autonomy I. INTRODUCTION Knowledge management (KM) focuses on the processes for promoting, growing, communicating, and preserving knowledge [16, 19]. In organizations, it is desirable that KM works

  18. Implementation Plan for the Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    The primary purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Knowledge Management (KM) Program is to capture, share, disseminate, and ensure the ability to apply the knowledge created by the major nuclear energy Research and Development (R&D) programs. In support of the KM program, the Implementation Plan for the Office of NE KM Program outlines the knowledge management and distributed data environment that is required for its success. In addition to enumerating some strategic goals and objectives, this document characterizes the initial program and identifies computer-based areas of investment required for increased knowledge sharing and collaboration. It identifies and addresses investments already in existence and describes how these investments can be further enhanced and implemented to support a distributed KM program. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is leading the effort to identify and address these investments through the implementation of a distributed KM program that includes participants from ten of the major DOE national laboratories.

  19. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  20. Wind measurements in Mars' middle atmosphere at equinox and solstice: IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometric CO observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, R; Encrenaz, T; Forget, F; Chassefière, E; Hourdin, F; Guilloteau, S; Guilloteau, St\\'{e}phane

    2007-01-01

    Characterizing the Martian atmosphere is an essential objective to understand its meteorology and its climate. The lower atmosphere (< 40 km) and middle atmosphere (40-80 km) of Mars appear dynamically coupled at much higher levels than in the case of the Earth. The vertical extension of the weather phenomena is considerable with for example Hadley's cells reaching the top of the neutral atmosphere (120 km). The circulation in the middle atmosphere modifies the meteorology of the lower atmosphere, affecting the transport and climatic processes Observations of the CO rotational lines at millimeter (mm) wavelengths (Clancy et al 1990) have strongly contributed in the study of the vertical distribution of this compound and the thermal profile in the atmosphere of Mars over 0-70 km. Singledish observations of the CO Doppler lineshift have allowed direct wind measurements in the martian middle atmosphere near 50 km altitude (Lellouch et al 1991), but at a low spatial resolution (12'') enabling only an essential...

  1. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  2. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E., E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations.

  3. Spatial consistency of Chinook salmon redd distribution within and among years in the Cowlitz River, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, Katherine J.; Torgersen, Christian; Henning, Julie; Murray, Christopher J.

    2013-04-28

    We investigated the spawning patterns of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha on the lower Cowlitz River, Washington (USA) using a unique set of fine- and coarse-scale 35 temporal and spatial data collected during bi-weekly aerial surveys conducted in 1991-2009 (500 m to 28 km resolution) and 2008-2009 (100-500 m resolution). Redd locations were mapped from a helicopter during 2008 and 2009 with a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) synchronized with in-flight audio recordings. We examined spatial patterns of Chinook salmon redd reoccupation among and within years in relation to segment-scale geomorphic features. Chinook salmon spawned in the same sections each year with little variation among years. On a coarse scale, five years (1993, 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2009) were compared for reoccupation. Redd locations were highly correlated among years resulting in a minimum correlation coefficient of 0.90 (adjusted P = 0.002). Comparisons on a fine scale (500 m) between 2008 and 2009 also revealed a high degree of consistency among redd locations (P < 0.001). On a finer temporal scale, we observed that salmon spawned in the same sections during the first and last week (2008: P < 0.02; and 2009: P < 0.001). Redds were clustered in both 2008 and 2009 (P < 0.001). Regression analysis with a generalized linear model at the 500-m scale indicated that river kilometer and channel bifurcation were positively associated with redd density, whereas sinuosity was negatively associated with redd density. Collecting data on specific redd locations with a GPS during aerial surveys was logistically feasible and cost effective and greatly enhanced the spatial precision of Chinook salmon spawning surveys.

  4. A new look at geothermal energy potential of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.P.; Faulder, D.D.; Jackson, S.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls (USA)); Hackett, W.R. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Passage of the Yellowstone plume beneath the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) left a wake of silicic batholiths and associated 4 to 6 Ma rhyolitic tuffs, a 1 km thick sequence of post 4 Ma basalt lava flows, and high heat flow comparable to that of the Basin-and-Range province. U.S.G.S. (United States Geological Survey) Circular 790 estimates that accessible resources are one-third larger than those of the Cascades, but geothermal exploration and research activities on the ESRP have quietly perished. The authors believe that the ESRP merits further attention as a geothermal exploration target. In this article, the first of several by their group, they identify relevant geological and geophysical features of the ESRP, the first step toward a meaningful exploration strategy. Although exploration is hindered by the heat-sapping effects of the overlying SRP aquifer, several geological features of the ESRP suggest that viable exploration targets exist beneath the aquifer: (1) the fracture zones of buried, Neogene silicic calderas; (2) Quaternary basaltic rift zones (several NW-trending ones and an axial one), which have been persistent zones of fissuring, minor faulting, and magma transport; (3) high-angle faults and fractures around the margin of the downwarped ESRP, including NW-trending basin-and-range faults and NE-trending marginal faults; and (4) fractured or brecciated zones near Pleistocene rhyolite domes and silicic intrusions. Existing geophysical data also constrain exploration targets. Aeromagnetic surveys show NW-trending highs that intersect a NE-trending axial high; rhyolite domes and youthful basaltic volcanism are localized along the highs and at intersections. Although the ESRP is remarkably aseismic, recently installed local seismic networks have identified contemporary microearthquakes that could preserve fracture permeability to depths of several kilometers.

  5. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-31

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  7. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [ 1 0 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 164 ac (66 ha) of soils, but 132 ac (53 ha) of these soils are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. Another 154 ac (62 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed. Approximately 57 ac (23 ha) of open range land would be permanently removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use. The removal of the contaminated materials would affect the 1 00-year floodplain of the San Miguel River and would result in the loss of riparian habitat along the river. The southwestern willow flycatcher, a Federal candidate species, may be affected by the remedial action, and the use of water from the San Miguel River ``may affect`` the Colorado squawfish, humpback chub, bonytail chub, and razorback sucker. Traffic levels on State Highways 90 and 141 would be increased during the remedial action, as would the noise levels along these transportation routes. Measures for mitigating the adverse environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action are discussed in Section 6.0 of this environmental assessment (EA).

  8. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  9. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  10. Evidence for a colour dependence in the size distribution of main belt asteroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Wiegert; David Balam; Andrea Moss; Christian Veillet; Martin Connors; Ian Shelton

    2006-11-09

    We present the results of a project to detect small (~1 km) main-belt asteroids with the 3.6 meter Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). We observed in 2 filters (MegaPrime g' and r') in order to compare the results in each band. Owing to the observational cadence we did not observe the same asteroids through each filter and thus do not have true colour information. However strong differences in the size distributions as seen in the two filters point to a colour-dependence at these sizes, perhaps to be expected in this regime where asteroid cohesiveness begins to be dominated by physical strength and composition rather than by gravity. The best fit slopes of the cumulative size distributions (CSDs) in both filters tend towards lower values for smaller asteroids, consistent with the results of previous studies. In addition to this trend, the size distributions seen in the two filters are distinctly different, with steeper slopes in r' than in g'. Breaking our sample up according to semimajor axis, the difference between the filters in the inner belt is found to be somewhat less pronounced than in the middle and outer belt, but the CSD of those asteroids seen in the r' filter is consistently and significantly steeper than in g' throughout. The CSD slopes also show variations with semimajor axis within a given filter, particularly in r'. We conclude that the size distribution of main belt asteroids is likely to be colour dependent at kilometer sizes and that this dependence may vary across the belt.

  11. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 301-445W, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  12. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electic Drive System Interim Report - Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.; Hsu, J.S.; Marlino, L.D.; Miller, C.W.; Ott, G.W., Jr.; Oland, C.B.; Burress, T.A.

    2007-07-31

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Both of these motive power sources are capable of providing mechanical drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak power output of 50 kW at 1300 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

  13. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  14. Variability of Photovoltaic Power in the State of Gujarat Using High Resolution Solar Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Zhang, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Parsons, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-03-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  15. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0. UPDATED WITH RECORD OF TECHNICAL CHANGE No.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DOE /NV

    1999-02-08

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  18. Systematic variations in stress state in the southern San Joaquin Valley: Inferences based on well-bore data and contemporary seismicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, D.A.; Zoback, M.D. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Analysis of stress-induced well-bore breakouts in 35 wells from 10 production fields in the southern San Joaquin Valley (SSJV) indicates systematic spatial variations in the direction of the maximum horizontal stresses at three different scales. First, the regional northeast-southwest compressional stress direction seen along the western margin of the San Joaquin Valley in the Elk Hills, Kettleman Hills, and Coalinga areas, gradually changes to approximately north-south compression over a distance of 10-20 km in the SSJV. This major excursion in the stress field seen in the Yowlumne, Yowlumne North, Paloma, and Rio Viejo production fields represents an approximately 40[degrees] counterclockwise rotation in the direction of the maximum horizontal stress (MHS). This systematic reorientation is consistent with approximately north-south convergence as seen in the local fold axes and reverse faults of Pliocene age and younger. Second, at the extreme south of the SSJV in the San Emidio, Los Lobos, Pleito, Wheeler Ridge, and North Tejon fields, another systematic, but localized, reorientation in the stress field indicates an abrupt change to an approximately east-northeast-west-southwest compression over a distance of a few kilometers. This latter reorientation of MHS stress direction, which is inconsistent with the local east-west-trending fold axes and thrust faults, represents a 40-50[degrees] clockwise rotation in the stresses; this reorientation appears to be limited to oil production fields located within the inferred hanging wall of the White Wolf fault that ruptured during the 1952 Kern County earthquake. Inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms of events located below the perturbed stress field indicates approximately north-south compression. The stress drop associated with the 1952 earthquake may have been responsible for rotating the MHS stress direction, implying that the remote horizontal stresses are comparable in magnitude. 53 refs., 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally measured during oceanographic studies are structuring coastal microbial communities.

  20. Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that mimics nuclear energy programs. Technologies need to be established to make accessing the knowledge easier for the user. Finally, knowledge needs to be used as part of a well defined work process.

  1. Crustal structure of the Ouachita Mountains region from lithosphere seismic profiles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkoros, George Fotios

    1989-01-01

    record 8. 0. Example of fitting lines to first-arrival events. 7 Raypaths and traveltime curves for s. horizontal two-layer model. 8 Raypaths and traveltime curves for a, dipping lay'er model. 9 Shotpoint 1. 3 record section. 10 Shotpoint 3. 3 record... of 2. 2 km beneath shot point 3. 3. A thin, low-velocity (2. 0 to 2. 2 km/s) surface layer, layer 1, was modeled from 20 to 30 km along the northern cross-section. This layer was inferred due to the absence of an observable first-arrival refraction...

  2. Cell, Volume 137 Supplemental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudner, David

    SUPPLEMENTAL EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Plasmid construction pKM011 [lacA::PspoIIQ-cfp (erm)] was generated by inserting PspoIIQ-cfp from pKM008 (Doan et al., 2005) into pDR183 between EcoRI and BamHI. pDR183 [lacA::erm insertions into the nonessential ywjI locus (K.A.M. and D.Z.R. unpublished). pKM186 [355°(parS*) in pMAD (erm

  3. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  4. Origin of abnormal pressures in the lower Vicksburg, McAllen Ranch field, Hidalgo County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habeck, Mark Frederick

    1982-01-01

    percent in the Frio to less than 30 percent in the Vicksburg . The geothermal gradient also changes from 1. 74'F/100 ft (31. 7'C/km) to 2. 80'F/100 ft (51 . O'C/km) . Temperatures in the Vicksburg exceed 200'F (93 'C) or that required for clay... field is summarized in Table 2. The geothermal gradient is greater than 2'P/100 ft (36. 4'C/km). The normal pressure gradient in the Gulf Coast is approximately 0 ' 465 psi/ft ( 10. 5 kPa/m); at McAllen Ranch the pressure gradient within the lower...

  5. Preliminary design for a 20 TeV Collider in a deep tunnel at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-12

    The Reference Design Study for a 20 TeV Collider demonstrated the technical and cost feasibility of a 20 TeV superconducting collider facility. Based on magnets of 3T, 5T, and 6.5T the Main Ring of the Collider would have a circumference of 164 km, 113 km, or 90 km. There would be six collision regions, of which four would be developed intially. The 5T and 6.5T rings would have twelve major refrigeration stations, while the 3T design would have 24 major refrigeration stations.

  6. Multiphoton above-threshold ionization in superintense free-electron x-ray laser fields: Beyond the dipole approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhongyuan; Chu, Shih-I

    2013-02-13

    maximum value kM , and the probability of the electron is negligible when the electron momentum is greater than kM . Thus the wave function of an electron can be calculated within a finite P space with a simple zero-boundary condition as long... as the boundary is set at a properly large kM . *zyzhou@uga.edu †sichu@ku.edu This approximation has been successfully used to study the multiphoton above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra of a hydrogen atom in longer-wavelength and shorter-pulse laser fields...

  7. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach, and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of biological and ecological metrics were used with PCA for diatoms and algae. Algal metrics included

  8. Preparing to Submit a License Application for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J. Arthur; M.D. Voegele

    2005-03-14

    In 1982, the U.S. Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, a Federal law that established U.S. policy for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Congress amended the Act in 1987, directing the Department of Energy to study only Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the site for a permanent geologic repository. As the law mandated, the Department evaluated Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as the site for a permanent geologic repository. Decades of scientific studies demonstrated that Yucca Mountain would protect workers, the public, and the environment during the time that a repository would be operating and for tens of thousands of years after closure of the repository. A repository at this remote site would also: preserve the quality of the environment; allow the environmental cleanup of Cold War weapons facilities; provide the nation with additional protection from acts of terrorism; and support a sound energy policy. Throughout the scientific evaluation of Yucca Mountain, there has been no evidence to disqualify Yucca Mountain as a suitable site for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Upon completion of site characterization, the Secretary of Energy considered the results and concluded that a repository at Yucca Mountain would perform in a manner that protects public health and safety. The Secretary recommended the site to the President in February 2002; the President agreed and recommended to Congress that the site be approved. The Governor of Nevada submitted a notice of disapproval, and both houses of Congress acted to override the disapproval. In July 2002, the President's approval allowed the Department to begin the process of submittal of a license application for Yucca Mountain as the site for the nation's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Yucca Mountain is located on federal land in Nye County in southern Nevada, an arid region of the United States, approximately 100 miles (160 kilometers) northwest of Las Vegas (Figure 1). The location is remote from population centers, and there are no permanent residents within approximately 14 miles (23 km) of the site. Overall, Nye County has a population density of about two persons per square mile (two persons per 2.5 square km); in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, it is significantly less. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-south-trending ridges extending approximately 25 miles (40 km), and consists of successive layers of fine-grained volcanic tuffs, millions of years old, underlain by older carbonate rocks. The alternating layers of welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs have differing hydrologic properties that significantly impact the manner in which water moves through the mountain. The repository horizon will be in welded tuff located in the unsaturated zone, more than 1,000 feet (300 meters) above the water table in the present-day climate, and is expected to remain well above the water table during wetter future climate conditions. Future meteorology and climatology at Yucca Mountain are important elements in understanding the amount of water available to potentially interact with the waste.

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

  10. Evaluation of solitary waves as a mechanism for oil transport in poroelastic media: A case study of the South Eugene Island field, Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Ajit; Appold, Martin S.; Nunn, Jeffrey A.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E�¢����12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E�¢����25 to 1E�¢����24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 105 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E�¢����3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fluid, or where sudden fracturing of overpressured hydrocarbon source sediments would allow the solitary waves to propagate as shock waves. Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E�¢����12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E�¢����25 to 1E�¢����24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 100,000 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E�¢����3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fl

  11. NATIONAL RESEARCH IRKUTSK STATE TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    , timber, fish, fur Mineral resources coal, oil, gas, iron, gold Climate sharp continental Time zone GMT REGION Area 768 000 sq.km Population 2,5 mln. Urban 80% Nationalities ~100 Natural resources water

  12. Last Revised 02/04/09 October 15, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    .N. Mechanical & Aero Engr Mechanical & Aero Engr 2009 Isaac, K.M. (Secretary) Mechanical & Aero Engr Mechanical & Aero Engr 2009 Nisbett, Keith Mechanical & Aero Engr Mechanical & Aero Engr 2009 DeMalade, Bill

  13. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1040510423, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/10405/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    ). Main sources of stratospheric SO2 are the conversion of carbonyl sulfide (COS) (Crutzen, 1976; Brühl et) the local maximum of SO2 at around 25­30 km al- titude, which is explained by the conversion of carbonyl sul

  14. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.

    2012-01-01

    activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressureannual volume of world oil production and the pore volumem 3 . In 2006, the world oil production was 4.3 km 3 (73.46

  15. High-Rate Quantum Key Distribution with Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spellmeyer, Neal W.

    We demonstrate the potential for 1.85 Mbit/s secure key rates over 101 km of fiber, >100 times faster than previously demonstrated, using the differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol and superconducting ...

  16. The influence of ridge geometry at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (9?-25?E) : basalt composition sensitivity to variations in source and process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standish, Jared Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Between 90-25° E on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge lie two sharply contrasting supersegments. One 630 km long supersegment erupts N-MORB that is progressively enriched in incompatible element concentrations ...

  17. HLB in Argentina: a New Disease Outbreak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Vol. 1 (2014) HLB in Argentina: a New Disease Outbreak Outi,E. 6 SENASA, Bs. As. Argentina MAGyP Bs. As INTA Montecarlo,Paraná, 300 km away from Argentina’s Northeastern border. In

  18. Impact Assessment of Climate Change on Glaciers and Runoff Using SWAT 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omani, Nina

    2014-08-08

    conditions including the Narayani (Nepal), Vakhsh (Central Asia), Rhone (Switzerland), Mendoza (Central Andes, Argentina), and Central Dry Andes (Chile) with total area of 85,000 km^(2). The results by modified snow algorithm implied slight to noticeable...

  19. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 31513173, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/3151/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    resolutions of 36 and 12 km, re- spectively, using the Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC- late matter (PM10) concentrations during the extremely pol- luted episodes. The MEIC inventory

  20. Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 prior to the construction of an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, situated approximately 15 km off

  1. Geophysical limitations on the erosion history within Arabia Terra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Alex J.

    The Arabia Terra region, an area of ~1 × 10[superscript 7] km[superscript 2] lying south of the hemispheric dichotomy boundary and centered at (25E, 5N), is a unique physiographic province with topography and crustal ...

  2. Adv. Geosci., 9, 8591, 2006 www.adv-geosci.net/9/85/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is then returned to the hydrological model. Such integration on the meso-scale brings up new problems in the meso-scale Neckar basin (14 000 km2) is dis- cussed in this paper. For smaller scales similar studies

  3. Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    and the demography of these fishes. Retentive structures are meso-scale vortices, whose size ranges from 10 km to 200 task At this stage of the study, there is no formal model for these meso-scales retentive structures

  4. Correspondence to: J. Small Ann. Geophysicae 15, 101--112 (1997) EGS --Springer-Verlag 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1997-01-01

    energy at the mesoscale (from &10--&100 km, dependent on the location). Mesoscale features include fronts are simple mathematical representa- tions of the mesoscale structure in ocean features (such as fronts

  5. Phytologia (April 1, 2015) 97(2)94 Geographic variation in the leaf essential oils of Juniperus grandis (Cupressaceae) III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    , 2059 m, Tulare Co., CA; Adams 11989-11993, 5km n Big Bear City on CA 18, 34º 17.533'N, 116º 49.153'W

  6. Optical properties of deep-earth minerals 1 Optical properties of deep-earth minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    mantle contains vast amounts of rock, extending from just beneath the 660-km seismic dis- continuity, all semiconductors, insulating enough to pro- mote convective heat transfer from the core, but heat conduction

  7. Brent C. Christner and John C. Priscu SW-1845 Page 1 of 6 Subglacial Lake Vostok (SW-1845)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christner, Brent C.

    heating and the insulation caused by the overlying ~4 km of ice, despite surface air temperatures commonly soon confirmed by seismic data, radar profiles, and satellite images made near Vostok Station

  8. ECOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE SOLAR ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, M.

    2010-01-01

    the area would be about 3-4 km 2 . B. Photovoltaic Cells l ,6,7 Photovoltaic cells are based on semiconductor materialstoxic products. Photovoltaic cells could also be used on

  9. J. Fluid Mech. (2014), vol. 745, pp. 592620. c Cambridge University Press 2014 doi:10.1017/jfm.2014.76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    , University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1UH, UK 3School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New South in Algeria, CO2 is injected roughly 2 km into a porous sandstone layer containing ambient salt water, forming

  10. A lower crustal perspective on the stabilization and reactivation of continental lithosphere in the western Canadian shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Rebecca Marie

    2005-01-01

    New geochronological, thermochronological, geological and isotopic data from an extensive (> 20,000 km²) exposure of high-pressure granulites (0.8 to > 1.5 GPa, >750 ?C) in the East Lake Athabasca region of the Snowbird ...

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Integration of hydrologic and water allocation models in basin-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    area of Iran (1,648,195 km2 ). Average annual hydropower production of Karkheh dam is 600 GWH (Iran 2010, Marjanzadeh et al. 2010) and hydropower generation (Jamali et al. 2013). Looking at the high var

  12. Seismic facies and growth history of Miocene carbonate platforms, Wonocolo Formation, North Madura area, East Java Basin, Indonesia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhyaksawan, Rahadian

    2002-01-01

    The Miocene Wonocolo Formation in the North Madura area, East Java Basin, contains numerous isolated carbonate platforms that are broadly distributed across a ~3000 sq km area of the Indonesian back-arc region. The Wonocolo platforms provide...

  13. Construction of a Highway Section Within a White-Tailed Deep Winter Yard Near Quebec City, Canada: Mitigation Measures, Monitoring, and Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leblanc, Yves; Bélanger, Jacques; Desjardins, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    3S9, Canada Abstract: The construction of a new 10.4 km (6.5during and after the construction. Some preliminary resultsroads. Before and during construction deer were captured

  14. Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement rock. Two canister options were analyzed ...

  15. Shenhur, Temple of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Meyer, Marleen; Minas-Nerpel, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The Roman Period temple of Isis at Shenhur was built anddedicated to the Great Goddess Isis, is located 20 km northdoor, where the Great Goddess Isis manifested herself to the

  16. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    of ozone towards reduction by NOx in the 25 to 32 km rangethe larger NOx injections ozone column reduction shows theon the predicted ozone reduction due to NOx increases and to

  17. Topologically Clean Distance Fields Attila G. Gyulassy, Mark A. Duchaineau, Member, IEEE, Vijay Natarajan, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascucci, Valerio

    of their comet dust catcher [16]. This dust catcher was made of aerogel, a silica foam where the comet particles, moving at 6 km/s, were slowly decel- erated and stored for recovery after the aerogel returned, and were

  18. Mesozoic to Early Tertiary tectonic-sedimentary evolution of the Northern Neotethys Ocean: evidence from the Beysehir-Hoyran-Hadim Nappes, S.W. Turkey. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Theo

    The Bey?ehir-Hoyran-Hadim Nappes crop out over 700km, from east to west in the Pisidian and Central Taurus Mountains of southern Turkey. During this study, field obsevations of lithological, structural and sedimentological features are combined...

  19. The 1960s Drought and the Subsequent Shift to a Wetter Climate in the Catskill Mountains Region of the New York City Watershed*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    connected to the city by underground aqueducts. New York City's water supply system began to be developed in the mid-nineteenth century, first with the damming of the Croton River in Westchester County about 50 km

  20. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarsi, Livio

    1998-06-15

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

  1. Sismotettonica dell'Italia nord-orientale e possibile comparazione con gli Appennini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stati più profondi, tra i 5 e 10 km. D'altra parte, nel terremoto dell'Irpinia del 1980, nell riconosciuto anche per il terremoto Umbro-Marchigiano del 1997. In altre parole la sismicità sembra migrare dai

  2. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    N/m 2 per 10000km) against crosswind SST gradients ( ? C peroverlaid with contours crosswind SST gradients ( ? C perpositive (negative) crosswind SST gradients at 0.4 ? C per

  3. 1. Page 1, Monograph. Left column line 12 from bottom: For a 200 keV electron the probability of producing an X-ray photon at any energy below 200 keV is 0.5%. It's not 0.5% of the electron energy that is transferred to a photon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Østgaard, Nikolai

    hour local time duskward in 9 min giving an average westward travelling surge (WTS) velocity of about 0 time duskward in ~12 min giving an average westward travel- ling surge (WTS) velocity of about 0.8 km

  4. 16 Herpetological Review 36(1), 2005 Herpetological Review, 2005, 36(1), 1619.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), and snake tongs were used to capture poisonous snakes. Sex, SVL, tail length, tail condition (complete­15 March. Most amphibians collected from this site were found on the margins of one small pond located 1 km

  5. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km3 of Sea Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy...

  6. Geophys. J. Int. (2009) 176, 431442 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2008.03975.x GJIGeomagnetism,rockmagnetismandpalaeomagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    vertical magnetic field is well known as the geomagnetic coast effect, but the ocean-side consequences have a geothermal gradient of 25.4 ± 8 K km-1 . Key words: Electrical properties; Magnetotelluric; Marine

  7. Geophys. J. Int. (2008) 175, 11081126 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2008.03951.x GJISeismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    , with a horizontal resolution of several hundred kilometres and a vertical resolution of 50 km, to a depth of about upper mantle. The temper- ature profiles were fit to a geotherm to determine the thickness

  8. PHYSICS OF OCEAN CIRCULATION Instructor: S. Riser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Topography Tides Wind Geothermal heating Surface flows elsewhere #12;How deep is the ocean? The average ocean circulation #12;UNITS Horizontal distance: km (= 105 cm) Vertical distance: m Velocity: cm/sec Density: g/cm3

  9. The Ants of Fiji

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarnat, Eli M.; Economo, Evan P.

    2012-01-01

    nr Nuku Vlg. Ocean Pacific Ocean Pacific Ratu Sukuna Parknr Nabukavesi Vlg. Ocean Pacific Resort, 2km SE Nabukavesi700 b, Navai 700, Ocean Pacific 1, Mt. Naqarababuluti 912,

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Earth. As major conduits for freshwater and nutrients into the coastal ocean, their impact on water column ecosystems extend for up to a thousand km into oligotrophic oceans....

  11. From the Sun to the Earth: The 13 May 2005 Coronal Mass Ejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    S. : 1995, Waves: the radio and plasma wave investigation ongenerally accepted that the radio waves are emitted near thefrom the scattering of radio waves by small-scale (? 150 km)

  12. What determines the price received by farmers? The case of cocoa in Cameroon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergaly Kamdem, Cyrille; Galtier, Franck; Gockowski, James; David-Benz, Hélène; Egg, Johny; Kamgnia Dia, Bernadette

    2009-01-01

    finally reaching the port of Douala (where the exporters areof the cocoa (the port of Douala) as well as the conditionpoint of sale and the port of Douala Number of non-tarmac km

  13. Planning for post-Cassini/HuygensPlanning for post-Cassini/Huygens Exploration of Titan:Exploration of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchamp, Jack

    dioxide 0.02 as solid ½-1 km thick organic layer on surface, mostly liquid There is no remote sensing propane 20 as liquid hydrogen cyanide 20 as solid cyanoacetylene 2 as solid cyanogen 0.8 as solid carbon

  14. The impact of land cover change on carbon and water cycling in the US Central Plains grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Tyler

    2010-07-30

    Using the eddy covariance technique, the impact of land cover variability on carbon and water cycling was examined at three different grasslands in Northeast Kansas. One site 8 km north of Lawrence, Kansas at the Nelson Environmental Study Area...

  15. A study of binary Kuiper Belt objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Susan Diane

    2006-01-01

    About 105 bodies larger than 100km in diameter (Jewitt 1998) reside in the Kuiper Belt, beyond the orbit of Neptune. Since 1992 observational surveys have discovered over one thousand of these objects, believed to be fossil ...

  16. Bulletin of the SeismologicalSociety of America,Vol.74, No. 1, pp. 121-136, February 1984 OBSERVATIONS OF HARD-ROCK SITE EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatzfeld, Denis

    intermediate-depth (100 to 250 km) Afghani- stan earthquakes impinge on the Garm region from the south, at near station of that name. There are two tunnels, drilled northward into the Tien Shan Mountains and separated

  17. Polychaete Annelid Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, From Shallow Water to the Deep-Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Fangyuan

    2014-12-16

    Polychaete annelids dominated the macrobenthos in sediments located 5 to 9 km from the Deep Water Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill site five months after the event. Numbers of species, abundance, and biodiversity indices in the polychaete taxa were...

  18. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

  19. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

  20. Universittsmedizin Gttingen Publikationen und Hochschulschriften 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollisch, Tim

    , Stürmer KM, Frosch KH (2009) Impact of monopolar radiofrequency energy on subchondral bone viability. Knee, Dresing K (2009) Improving education on C-arm operation and radiation protection with a computer

  1. Quaternary International 90 (2002) 87115 Sedimentary and stratigraphic evidence for subglacial flooding,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    the geomorphology, stratigraphy, and sedimentology of the study area mainly within Jackson and Calhoun Counties. Sedimentary descriptions from 14 gravel pits indicate a consistent stratigraphy across a width of 15 km

  2. Language experience shapes early electrophysiological responses to visual stimuli: The effects of writing system, stimulus length, and presentation duration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, G; Xue, G; Xue, G; Jiang, T; Chen, C; Dong, Q

    2008-01-01

    1563. Gauthier, I. , Curran, T. , Curby, K.M. , Collins,J.W. , Sheinberg, D.L. , Curran, T. , 2006. A reevaluation341, 45–48. Tanaka, J.W. , Curran, T. , 2001. A neural basis

  3. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 41074115, 2007 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/4107/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    region where, during the equinoxes, there is a two-fold increase in Na density be- low 94 km between morning and evening. This is most likely caused by the strong downward wind produced by the diurnal tide

  4. Exhumation, rift-flank uplift, and the thermal evolution of the Rwenzori Mountains determined by combined (U-Th)/He and U-Pb thermochronometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacPhee, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Rising over 5 km along the border of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Rwenzori Mountains represent an extreme example of basement rift-flank uplift in the western branch of the East African Rift, a ...

  5. Fission track evidence for widespread early to Middle miocene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the...

  6. Morphology, genetics, and ecology of pocket gophers (genus Geomys) in a narrow hybrid zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaney, Lawrence R.; Timm, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    A population of hybrid pocket gophers (Geomys bursarius × G. lutescens) exists 1–2 km west of Oakdale, Antelope County, Nebraska, U.S.A. The hybrids occur in soil that has characteristics intermediate between that occupied ...

  7. Pseudotsuga menziesii (Native) 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    river, ~160 km to the NE). It is hypothesized that the westernmost Cap de Creus canyon is intercepting the regional sediment-transport pathway and directing it offshore, allowing significant sediment export through this area. The overall goal...

  8. Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Leslie Ann

    2002-01-01

    Deformation and mineral alteration adjacent to a 2 km long segment of the Kern Canyon fault near Lake Isabella, California are studied to characterize the internal structure of the fault zone and to understand the development of fault structure...

  9. Mixing fraction of inner solar system material in comet 81P/Wild2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westphal, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    captured in low-density aerogel tiles onboard the Stardustcaptured at 1 km s ?1 in aerogel form turnip- or carrot-the par- ticles from the aerogel, so analyses were done on

  10. Vol.11, No.2 GLOBAL OCEAN ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS OCTOBER 2005 GLOBEC Editorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino, Mikko

    understanding of fish response to the environment is generally more obvious at the meso-scale (10- 100km, days of fish response to climate compatible with process understanding requires that meso-scale oceanic

  11. 2012 Changing Arctic Ocean 506E/497E -Lecture 1 -Woodgate What makes the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    INPUTS/OUTPUTS ­ E-P, rivers RIVERS (Russian and US) - order 3000 km3/yr freshwater Evaporation position, air pressure and temperature to satellite Photo D. Barton,1992 Satellites (SSM/I, AMSR), NASA

  12. Demographics, Life Cycle, Habitat Characterization and Transplant Methods for the Endangered Orchid, Spiranthes parksii Correll 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammons, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-14

    Spiranthes parksii Correll is an endemic terrestrial orchid to the Post Oak Savannah of East Texas and is currently listed as federally endangered. The construction of Twin Oaks landfill, approximately 20 km east of College ...

  13. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered...

  14. Radiation and dissipation of internal waves generated by geostrophic motions impinging on small-scale topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikurashin, Maxim (Maxim Anatolevich)

    2009-01-01

    Observations and inverse models suggest that small-scale turbulent mixing is enhanced in the Southern Ocean in regions above rough topography. The enhancement extends 1 km above the topography suggesting that mixing is ...

  15. Travel directions to "Lingezicht" 't Oosteneind 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    the westernmost platform. In the daytime they run at quarter-hour intervals; less frequently in the late evening Deil starts just beyond it. By car Deil is close to Geldermalsen, about 25 km south of Utrecht. Driving

  16. Dipole-dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    was completed at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA in September 1977. This survey has defined a bedrock resistivity low at least 4 sq mi (10 sq km) in extent associated with the...

  17. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    may occur to exhume and expose rocks currently at depths of 4-6 km in the vicinity of the geothermal field. Speculatively, the bedrock of such a future "Coso Range" would consist...

  18. Current Status of Nucleon Decay Searches with Super-Kamiokande Brett Viren for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    containing 50 ktons of ultra pure water held in a cylindrical stainless steel tank 1 km underground in a mine is viewed with 1885 20 cm diameter photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and acts as a veto shield to tag incoming

  19. DATA 07 CENS Research Testbeds CENS maintains a number of testbeds to enable and encourage various degrees of "in lab" to "real world"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    500 devices to support urban and participatory sensing. CENS Mobile Personal Sensing Testbed With over 50 m) groundwater wells along a 1 km flow path from orchards, through row crops and a riparian zone

  20. An Overview of Offline Software for AMANDA John Jacobsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    detector of about 1 km 3 size using the natural glacial environment as detector medium and thus achieve energy neutrino interactions. Using this technique, the AMANDA collaboration aims to construct a neutrino