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  1. EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation's Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. ...

  2. EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to assist with funding the construction, operation, and maintenance of modifications to the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation’s Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. The proposed action could include support for modifications to the existing hatchery, a new hatchery/acclimation facility in Wahkiacus, Washington, and an acclimation facility at McCreedy Creek in Yakima County, Washington.

  3. Klickitat County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype B. Energy Generation Facilities in Klickitat County, Washington Roosevelt Biogas 1 Biomass Facility Places in Klickitat County, Washington Bickleton, Washington...

  4. PUD No 1 of Klickitat County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Klickitat County Jump to: navigation, search Name: PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Place: Washington Phone Number: Goldendale: 509-773-5891; 800-548-8357 -- White Salmon:...

  5. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  6. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward

    2005-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  7. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R.

    2009-07-30

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  8. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  9. EIS-0424: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Download Document PDF icon EIS-0424: Draft Environmental Impact Statement More Documents & Publications EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis ...

  10. Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  11. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho Summary DOE's ...

  12. Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  13. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2004-05-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Combined fish stocking by the hatcheries and net pen rearing projects in 2003 included: 899,168 kokanee yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt; 1,087,331 kokanee fry/fingerlings released into Banks Lake, 44,000 rainbow trout fingerlings and; 580,880 rainbow trout yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt. Stock composition of 2003 releases consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2003 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the success of hatchery/net pen stocking on the number of harvestable fish. Preliminary results of gonad necropsies indicate a reduced incidence of precocious kokanee produced at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery in 2003. This was a probable attribute of change in hatchery rearing practices employed on 2002 brood year kokanee produced in 2003, primarily thermal manipulation and feed protein source. Kokanee and rainbow trout fingerlings transferred to Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake net pen rearing operations in the fall of 2003 for subsequent release as yearlings in 2004 consisted of 645,234 rainbow trout and 627,037 kokanee salmon. A total of 590,000 Lake Whatcom kokanee fingerlings were carried over at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery for stocking as yearlings in 2004. Recommendations for future hatchery/net pen operations include use of stocks compatible or native to the upper Columbia River, continue hatchery-rearing practices to reduce precocity rates of kokanee and continue new kokanee stocking strategies associated with increased kokanee harvest rates.

  15. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2005-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Fish produced by this project in 2004 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 1,655,722 kokanee fingerlings, 537,783 rainbow trout fingerlings and 507,660 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the success of hatchery/net pen stocking on the number of harvestable fish. Recommendations for future hatchery/net pen operations include use of stocks compatible or native to the upper Columbia River, continue hatchery-rearing practices to reduce precocity rates of kokanee and continue new kokanee stocking strategies associated with increased kokanee harvest rates.

  16. EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

  17. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  18. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to rainbow trout catch and harvest rates while the impact on the kokanee fishery was minimal. Success of the Lake Roosevelt kokanee artificial production program appears to be limited primarily owing to predation, precocity and high entrainment rates through Grand Coulee Dam. Recommendations for future hatchery/net pen operations include use of stocks compatible or native to the upper Columbia River, continue kokanee fry and post-smolt releases, 100% triploid hatchery stock rainbow trout used and adipose fin clip hatchery stock rainbow trout prior to release. The Spokane Tribal Hatchery is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration under directives by the Northwest Power Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish & Wildlife Program, Resident Fish Substitution Measures, 1987 to current (Subbasin Plan), as partial mitigation for anadromous and resident fish losses in the blocked areas above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  19. EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to include a hatchery control line, maintained entirely by spawning hatchery-origin fish. DOEEIS-0169-SA-05, Supplement Analysis for YakimaKlickitat Fisheries Project, Cle...

  20. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County, Washington Contact Dave Goodman jdgoodman@bpa.gov (503) 230-4764 More Information http:efw.bpa.gov...

  1. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download...

  2. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho SUMMARY DOE's Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of...

  3. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2003-03-01

    The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

  4. EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho.

  5. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan

    2009-04-16

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit (ESU), Distinct Population Segment (MPG) or Major Population Group (MPG) reviewed, the HSRG presents its findings and recommendations in the form of an HSRG solution. This package of recommended changes to current hatchery and harvest program design and operation is intended to demonstrate how the programs could be managed to significantly increase the likelihood of meeting the managers goals for both harvest and conservation of the ESU/DPS/MPG. The 'HSRG solution' also highlights the biological principles that the HSRG believes must form the foundation for successful use of hatcheries and fisheries as management tools.

  6. Willamette Hatchery Oxygen Supplementation Studies : Annual Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, R.D.; Ewing, S.K.; Sheahan, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Hydropower development and operations in the Columbia River basin have caused the loss of 5 million to 11 million salmonids. An interim goal of the Northwest Power Planning Council is to reestablish these historical numbers by doubling the present adult runs from 2.5 million to 5.0 million fish. This increase in production will be accomplished through comprehensive management of both wild and hatchery fish, but artificial propagation will play a major role in the augmentation process. The current husbandry techniques in existing hatcheries require improvements that may include changes in rearing densities, addition of oxygen, removal of excess nitrogen, and improvement in raceway design. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to increase the number of fish released from hatcheries that survive to return as adults.

  7. EIS-0213: Nez-Perce Tribal Hatchery Project (NPTH).

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Nez Perce Tribe propose to supplement their existing program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. This EIS evaluates the Proposed Action that the Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities.

  8. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  9. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M.

    2001-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

  10. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  11. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery .

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  12. Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

  13. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

  14. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

  15. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenema, David

    2003-03-01

    The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

  16. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

  17. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  18. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a proposed hatchery for coho salmon. BPA’s proposed action is to fund the Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation construction of a hatchery on 50 acres of land owned by the Yakama Nation in Kittitas County, Washington. Hatchery operations would include collection of adult coho for broodstock at the existing Roza and Sunnyside dams, incubation and rearing of up to 200,000 juvenile coho salmon, and release of smolts into the Yakima and Naches Rivers.

  19. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  20. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Combs, Mitch

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

  1. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1988 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1989-02-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1988. Estimated kokanee abundance in early September was 10.2 million fish. This estimate is 70% higher than 1987 and 140% higher than the populations's low point in 1986. Increased population size over the past two years is the result of two consecutive strong year classes produced from high recruitment of hatchery and wild fry. High recruitment of wild fry in 1988 resulted from good parental escapement (strong year class) in 1987 and relatively high fry survival. Hatchery fry made up 51% of total fry recruitment (73% of total fry biomass), which is the largest contribution since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. High hatchery fry abundance resulted from a large release (13 million fry) from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery and excellent fry survival (29%) during their first summer in Lake Pend Oreille. Improved fry release strategies enhanced survival, which doubled from 1987 to 1988 and was ten times higher than survival in 1986. Our research goal is to maintain 30% survival so we are very optimistic, but need to replicate additional years to address annual variability. 27 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  3. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

  4. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  5. Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-10-02

    The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a resident trout hatchery on the Colville Indian Reservation to partially mitigate for anadromours and other fish losses resulting from the construction and operation of the Chief Joseph Dam and Grand Coulee Dam hydroelectric projects. Since the hatchery was constructed, ongoing Operation and Maintenance (O&M) and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been funded by BPA. The O&M and M&E activities examined in the EA were very general in nature due to the fact the project was in the conceptual stage. Since that time the hatchery has refined the need for specific O&M and M&E activities, proposed for fiscal year 2004, (funding for projects runs from October 2003 to September 2004). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze the environmental impacts that would result from the specific O&M and M&E activities proposed for fiscal year 2004.

  6. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

  7. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  8. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

  9. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2006-03-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

  10. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1988-02-02

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  11. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2005-12-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  12. Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

    2008-12-01

    Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed, naturally spawning populations in the Columbia River Basin. As a consequence of that BO, NOAA recommended - as a reasonable and prudent alternative (RPA) - that federal and state agencies phase out non-native broodstocks of steelhead and replace them with native broodstocks. However, NOAA provided no guidance on how to achieve that RPA. The development of native broodstocks of hatchery steelhead can potentially pose unacceptable biological risks to naturally spawning populations, particularly those that are already listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The traditional method of initiating new hatchery broodstocks of anadromous salmonid fishes is by trapping adults during their upstream, spawning migration. However, removing natural-origin adults from ESA listed populations may not be biologically acceptable because such activities may further depress those populations via 'broodstock mining'. In addition, trapping adult steelhead may be logistically unfeasible in many subbasins due to high water flows in the spring, when steelhead are moving upstream to spawn, that will often 'blow out' temporary weirs. Additional risks associated with trapping adults include genetic founder effects and difficulties meeting minimum, genetic effective number of breeders without 'mining' the wild population to potential extinction. As a result, alternative methods for developing native broodstocks are highly desired. One alternative for developing native broodstocks, particularly when the collection of adults is logistically unfeasible or biologically unacceptable, is captive rearing of natural-origin juveniles to sexual maturity. In this approach, pre-smolt juveniles are collected from the stream or watershed for which a native broodstock is desired, and those juveniles are raised to sexual maturity in a hatchery. Those hatchery-reared adults then become the broodstock source for gametes and initial progeny releases. Such a captive rearing program offers many genetic advantages over traditional adult-trapping programs for developing native broodstocks: (1) Large numbers of juveniles can be collected from the wild with only minimal impacts to naturally spawning populations because juvenile (age 0+parr)-to-adult survivals are typically very small (<1%) under natural conditions. (2) The genetic base of the broodstock (i.e. genetic effective population size) can be substantially larger for juveniles than adults because juveniles can theoretically represent the offspring of all adults that spawned successfully within a stream or watershed, as opposed to trapping only a small portion of returning adults for broodstock. (3) Collecting juveniles for broodstock can substantially reduce the risk of genetically 'swamping' naturally spawning populations with hatchery-origin fish (i.e. via a 'Ryman-Laikre effect') as occurs when hatchery-released fish represent the progeny of a relatively small number of trapped adults.

  13. Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooley, Sharon

    2009-03-20

    A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and habitat conditions. The RBT were stocked in six distribution trips from June through September. The number of fish stocked and the receiving waters are identified below (see Table 2).

  14. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R.

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  15. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  16. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S.

    2009-05-28

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

  17. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick; Petrosky, Charlie; Schaller, Howard

    2002-02-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

  18. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T.

    1994-06-01

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  19. Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

    2003-08-01

    The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

  20. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.

    1995-02-01

    At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

  2. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  3. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  4. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  5. Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal

    2009-02-18

    This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

  6. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

  7. EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies.

  8. albuquerque complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    albuquerque complex

  9. The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVII : Effects of Ocean Covariates and Release Timing on First Ocean-Year Survival of Fall Chinook Salmon from Oregon and Washington Coastal Hatcheries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

    2001-05-01

    Effects of oceanographic conditions, as well as effects of release-timing and release-size, on first ocean-year survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon were investigated by analyzing CWT release and recovery data from Oregon and Washington coastal hatcheries. Age-class strength was estimated using a multinomial probability likelihood which estimated first-year survival as a proportional hazards regression against ocean and release covariates. Weight-at-release and release-month were found to significantly effect first year survival (p < 0.05) and ocean effects were therefore estimated after adjusting for weight-at-release. Negative survival trend was modeled for sea surface temperature (SST) during 11 months of the year over the study period (1970-1992). Statistically significant negative survival trends (p < 0.05) were found for SST during April, June, November and December. Strong pairwise correlations (r > 0.6) between SST in April/June, April/November and April/December suggest the significant relationships were due to one underlying process. At higher latitudes (45{sup o} and 48{sup o}N), summer upwelling (June-August) showed positive survival trend with survival and fall (September-November) downwelling showed positive trend with survival, indicating early fall transition improved survival. At 45{sup o} and 48{sup o}, during spring, alternating survival trends with upwelling were observed between March and May, with negative trend occurring in March and May, and positive trend with survival occurring in April. In January, two distinct scenarios of improved survival were linked to upwelling conditions, indicated by (1) a significant linear model effect (p < 0.05) showing improved survival with increasing upwelling, and (2) significant bowl-shaped curvature (p < 0.05) of survival with upwelling. The interpretation of the effects is that there was (1) significantly improved survival when downwelling conditions shifted to upwelling conditions in January (i.e., early spring transition occurred, p < 0.05), (2) improved survival during strong downwelling conditions (Bakun units < -250). Survival decreased during weak downwelling conditions (Bakun units between -180 and -100). Strong to moderately strong correlations between January upwelling and April SST (r = 0.5), June SST (r = 0.6), and the North Pacific Index (NPI) of Aleutian Low strength (r > 0.7) suggest January is a period when important effects originate and play out over ensuing months. Significant inverse trend with survival (p < 0.05) was found for Bakun indices in December, indicating strong downwelling improved survival. Higher-than-average adult return rates were observed for cohorts from brood-years 1982-1983, strong El Nino years. Individual hatcheries were found to have unique age-class strength and age-at-return characteristics.

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  12. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  13. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  14. EIS-0397: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Falls Fishway in Klickitat County, near Lyle, Washington. The improvements would ease fish passage to upstream high quality habitat in the Klickitat Basin and improve...

  15. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  16. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  17. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  18. Hot Cell Complex Building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Hot Cell Complex Building Engineering Contract (REVISED) Call for Nomination It is important to note that participation in this tender process will NOT cause a conflict of interest (and hence exclusion) regarding further tenders relating to the Hot Cell Building Complex. This current tender is essentially for a Conceptual Design only. 1 Purpose ITER is a first of a kind mega-project with a wide range of disparate leading edge/high-tech systems to be assembled and installed into buildings at

  19. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  20. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  1. EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington

  2. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  3. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  4. SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The 300,000-square-foot, vault-type building features an unobstructed 43,500-square-foot computer room, which is an open room about three-fourths the size of a football field. The Strategic Computing

  5. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  6. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Franklin J. Ramanathan, Shriram

    2014-07-01

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research.

  7. Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Y-12 National Security Complex Home Nuclear Deterrence Global Security Naval Reactors Partnerships Security News Search form Search... Search Latest News | CNS, UT chemical...

  8. Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building ...

  9. Complexity, action, and black holes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-18

    In an earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" we conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the `Wheeler-DeWitt' patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  10. Plastic Deformations in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durniak, C.; Samsonov, D.

    2011-04-29

    Complex plasmas are macroscopic model systems of real solids and liquids, used to study underdamped dynamics and wave phenomena. Plastic deformations of complex plasma crystals under slow uniaxial compression have been studied experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the lattice becomes locally sheared and that this strain is relaxed by shear slips resulting in global uniform compression and heat generation. Shear slips generate pairs of dislocations which move in opposite directions at subsonic speeds.

  11. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    an Environmental Impact Statement Click the image to view the EIS. Contact Donald Rose dlrose@bpa.gov (503) 323-3796 More Information http:efw.bpa.govenvironmentalservice...

  12. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

  13. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments will be posted in their entirety on BPA's website. At a public scoping meeting: December 9, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.; Hal Holmes Community Center, 209 N. Ruby Street, Ellensburg, ...

  14. Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex ...

  15. Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons and X-rays This ... Next Title: Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons ...

  16. EA-2010: Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Complex Improvements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-2010: Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Complex Improvements at Brookhaven National Laboratory; Upton, New York EA-2010: Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Complex Improvements at ...

  17. Albuquerque Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Locations Albuquerque Complex The Albuquerque Complex provides responsive business, technical, financial, legal, and management advice and services to successfully ...

  18. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  19. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-14

    EMCAS is a model developed for the simulation and analysis of electricity markets. As power markets are relatively new and still continue to evolve, there is a growing need for advanced modeling approaches that simulate the behavior of electricity markets over time and how market participants may act and react to the changing economic, financial, and regulatory environments in which they operate. A new and rather promising approach applied in the EMCAS software is tomore » model the electricity market as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation scheme. With its unique combination of various novel approaches, the Agent Based Modeling System (ABMS) provides the ability to capture and investigate the complex interactions between the physical infrastructures (generation, transmission, and distribution) and the economic behavior of market participants that are a trademark of the newly emerging markets.« less

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Complex Wide Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Complex Wide Agreements Sandia National Laboratories utilizes complex wide agreements to leverage the annual spending, to yield lower prices, and to provide cost savings to the complex. The Complex agreements utilized by Sandia National Laboratories include: Supply Chain Management Center (SCMC) agreements Integrated Contractor Purchasing TEAM (ICPT) General Services Administration (GSA)

  1. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  2. KTM Experimental Complex Project Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazhibayeva, I.L.; Azizov, E.A.; Krylov, V.A.; Shkolnik, V.S.; Velikhov, E.P.; Obysov, N.A.; Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Shestakov, V.P.; Filatov, O.G

    2005-04-15

    A review of KTM experimental complex project status, which is aimed the creation of a Kazakhstani spherical tokamak for study and tests materials and components of future fusion reactors. Revised basic parameters of the KTM facility and ground of the changes taking into account new plasma core geometry, new design of vacuum chamber and modified magnetic system, transport sluice and movable divertor devices, and additional RF-heating system are presented here.

  3. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  4. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang, E-mail: qiangweibeihua@163.com [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Xie, Cheng-jun [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Liu, Hong-jun [School of Information Engineering, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China); Li, Yan-hui [The Library, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. EIS-0421: Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA is proposing to build a new 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County, Washington and a new substation in Klickitat County. The new BPA transmission line...

  7. EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington

  8. EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington

  9. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  10. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arunava; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  11. Complex Flow Workshop Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complex Flow Workshop Report Complex Flow Workshop Report A discussion on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales. PDF icon complex_flow_workshop_report.pdf More Documents & Publications Atmosphere to Electrons: Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting Summary Report

  12. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    DiVincenzo, David [IBM Watson Research Center

    2009-09-01

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  13. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  14. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  15. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  16. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred embodiments, the cosmid clones are arranged in a three dimensional matrix, pooled and compared in threes according to intersecting planes of the three dimensional matrix. Arrangements corresponding to geometries of higher dimensions may also be prepared and used to simultaneously identify overlapping clones in highly complex libraries with relatively few hybridization reactions.

  17. Software Complexity Threatens Performance Portability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamblin, T.

    2015-09-11

    Modern HPC software packages are rarely self-contained. They depend on a large number of external libraries, and many spend large fractions of their runtime in external subroutines. Performance portability depends not only on the effort of application teams, but also on the availability of well-tuned libraries. At most sites, the burden of maintaining libraries is shared by code teams and facilities. Facilities typically provide well-tuned default versions, but code teams frequently build with bleeding-edge compilers to achieve high performance. For this reason, HPC has no “standard” software stack, unlike other domains where performance is not critical. Incompatibilities among compilers and software versions force application teams and facility staff to re-build custom versions of libraries for each new toolchain. Because the number of potential configurations is combinatorial, and because HPC software is notoriously difficult to port to new machines [3, 7, 8], the tuning effort required to support and maintain performance-portable libraries outstrips the available manpower at most sites. Software complexity is a growing obstacle to performance portability for HPC.

  18. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  19. Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production ...

  20. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding ...

  1. Mediating Biofuel Complexity through "Mediator" Modification...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Mediating Biofuel Complexity through "Mediator" Modification Basic Energy Sciences (BES) ... to more efficient and lower cost routes to high-yield biomass-derived renewable fuels. ...

  2. A brief history of the Biology Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Most of the "Biology" buildings were constructed in early 1945 and were built as expansion capability for the uranium preparation operations being conducted across the...

  3. NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between Cyclodextrins and the Neurotoxin Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NMR ...

  4. Expertise | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex has more than 60 years of experience in the production, handling, packaging, transportation and accountability of nuclear materials. In conducting this...

  5. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxidation of light paraffins and olefins, as well as the partial oxidation of methanol. We present HAADF-STEM investigations of various complex oxide phases and show that...

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This page intentionally blank i Complex-Wide Review of DOE's Radioactive Waste Management ... 1.8 Demonstrated Progress in Radioactive Waste Management ......

  7. Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Tommy Rhea Seda Rhodes Narc Ribot Alison Rice Pamela Richard Linda Richards Don ... Seitz E. W. Seols Lee Sessions Sue Severin Anne Shainline Chapter 15 Final Complex ...

  8. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, G.A.

    1993-06-15

    A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

  9. NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cyclodextrins and the Neurotoxin Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between Cyclodextrins and the Neurotoxin Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NMR Spectroscopic Investigation of Inclusion Complexes between Cyclodextrins and the Neurotoxin Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) Authors: Mayer, B P ; Albo, R F ; Hok, S ; Valdez, C A

  10. ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, P. L.

    2007-06-25

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

  11. Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech21_lee_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications Window Daylighting Demo High Performance Window Attachments Fenestration Software Tools

  12. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  13. Complex Oxides > Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Oxides In This Section Combinatorial Analysis Nanoparticles Nanostructured Systems Deposition Complex Oxides Combinatorial Analysis Nanoparticles Nanostructured Systems...

  14. Spin Glasses: Old and New Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, D. L.

    2011-09-22

    Spin glasses are disordered magnetic systems that exhibit a variety of properties that are characteristic of 'complex systems'. After a brief review of the systems themselves, I will discuss how spin glass concepts have found use in and, in some cases, further advanced areas such as computer science, biology, and other fields: what one might term 'old complexity'. I will then turn to a discussion of more recent concepts and ideas that have flowed from studies of spin glasses, and using these introduce a proposal for a kind of 'new complexity'.

  15. Contact Us | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Contact Us Mail and delivery address information: Y-12 National Security Complex P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245* Non-mail deliveries: Bear Creek Road P.O. Box...

  16. EM Corporate Performance Measures- Complex Wide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The corporate (i.e., relating to the entire DOE-EM complex) measures are tracked in the context of the total measure (life-cycle) necessary to complete cleanup of each site, as well as the EM...

  17. About | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About The Y-12 National Security Complex is a premier manufacturing facility dedicated to making our nation and the world a safer place and plays a vital role in the Department of...

  18. Y-12 National Security Complex Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects completed at the Y-12 National Security Complex.

  19. Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troutner, D.E.; John, C.S.; Pillai, M.R.A.

    1995-03-07

    A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula, as shown in the accompanying diagrams, wherein n, m, R, R{sup 1}, R{sup 2} and L are defined in the specification.

  20. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs.

  1. Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troutner, David E.; John, Christy S.; Pillai, Maroor R. A.

    1995-01-01

    A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula: ##STR1## wherein n, m, R, R.sup.1, R.sup.2 and L are defined in the specification.

  2. SEPARATION PROCESS USING COMPLEXING AND ADSORPTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spedding, J.H.; Ayers, J.A.

    1958-06-01

    An adsorption process is described for separating plutonium from a solution of neutron-irradiated uranium containing ions of a compound of plutonium and other cations. The method consists of forming a chelate complex compound with plutoniunn ions in the solution by adding a derivative of 8- hydroxyquinoline, which derivative contains a sulfonic acid group, and adsorbing the remaining cations from the solution on a cation exchange resin, while the complexed plutonium remains in the solution.

  3. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY SECONDARY XANTHATE COMPLEXING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-09-01

    A method is described for separating and recovering uranium values contained in an acidic aqueous solution together with thorium or protactinium values. In accordance with the invention, the acidic solution containing uranium in the uranyl form is contacted with an organic xanthate. The xanthate forms a urano-xanthate complex but is substantially non-reactive with thorium and protactinium. The urano-xanthate complex is recovered by organic solvent extraction.

  4. Phase distribution in complex geometry conduits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Lopez de Bertodano, M.; Jones, O.C. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Some of the most important and challenging problems in two-phase flow today have to do with the understanding and prediction of multidimensional phenomena, in particular, lateral phase distribution in both simple and complex geometry conduits. A prior review paper summarized the state-of-the-art in the understanding of phase distribution phenomena, and the ability to perform mechanistic multidimensional predictions. The purpose of this paper is to update that review, with particular emphasis on complex geometry conduit predictive capabilities.

  5. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  6. Design tools for complex dynamic security systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Rigdon, James Brian; Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Laguna, Glenn A.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Groom, Kenneth Neal; Wilson, David Gerald; Bickerstaff, Robert J.; Harrington, John J.

    2007-01-01

    The development of tools for complex dynamic security systems is not a straight forward engineering task but, rather, a scientific task where discovery of new scientific principles and math is necessary. For years, scientists have observed complex behavior but have had difficulty understanding it. Prominent examples include: insect colony organization, the stock market, molecular interactions, fractals, and emergent behavior. Engineering such systems will be an even greater challenge. This report explores four tools for engineered complex dynamic security systems: Partially Observable Markov Decision Process, Percolation Theory, Graph Theory, and Exergy/Entropy Theory. Additionally, enabling hardware technology for next generation security systems are described: a 100 node wireless sensor network, unmanned ground vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle.

  7. Minimal five dimensional supergravities and complex geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.

    2010-07-28

    We discuss the relation between solutions admitting Killing spinors of minimal super-gravities in five dimensions, both timelike and null, and complex geometries. For the timelike solutions the results may be summarised as follows. In the ungauged case (vanishing cosmological constant {Lambda} 0) the solutions are determined in terms of a hyper-Kaehler base space; in the gauged case ({Lambda}<0) the complex geometry is Kaehler; in the de Sitter case ({Lambda}>0) the complex geometry is hyper-Kaehler with torsion (HKT). For the null solutions we shall focus on the de Sitter case, for which the solutions are determined by a constrained Einstein-Weyl 3-geometry called Gauduchon-Tod space. The method for constructing explicit solutions is discussed in each case.

  8. More Recycling Means Less Waste for Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recycling Means Less Waste for Complex What do batteries, lead bricks, and mineral oil have in common? They are all on the list of recently recycled materials at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The goal of these recycling efforts is to minimize waste volumes at the site and encourage the repurposing of materials across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. In September 2011, a total of 33,000 pounds of lead was shipped from the NNSS to the recycling company, Toxco Inc. A portion

  9. SEP Request for Approval Form 3 - Other Complex Regression Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 - Other Complex Regression Model Rationale SEP Request for Approval Form 3 - Other Complex Regression Model Rationale File SEP-Request-for-Approval-Form-3Other-Complex-Regressio...

  10. Complex States, Emergent Phenomena & Superconductivity in Intermetallic &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex Management Team The Sandia Field Office serves as the landlord of the NNSA Albuquerque Complex facilities. The Sandia Field Office's Complex Management Team is responsible for providing security, safety, emergency management, as well as facilities and project management for the tenants at the NNSA Albuquerque Complex facilities. In addition, the Complex Management Team provides management and oversight of support contracts for the NNSA Albuquerque Complex facilities including: building

  11. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014 Site-Level Exercise - January 2015 January, 2015 Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014 ...

  12. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex Emergency Management ... Security Administration's (NNSA) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) exercise program. ...

  13. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 April 2003 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health ...

  14. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A ...

  15. ADR Lunchtime Program: MEDIATING COMPLEX DISPUTES WITH THE GOVERNMENT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEDIATING COMPLEX DISPUTES WITH THE GOVERNMENT - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES ADR Lunchtime Program: MEDIATING COMPLEX DISPUTES WITH THE GOVERNMENT - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES ...

  16. Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional substructures Twisting Phonons in Higher Manganese Silicides with a Complex Nowotny Chimney Ladder Structure Prev ...

  17. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office ...

  18. PNNL: Mechanistic-Based Ductility Prediction for Complex Mg Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PNNL: Mechanistic-Based Ductility Prediction for Complex Mg Castings PNNL: Mechanistic-Based Ductility Prediction for Complex Mg Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program ...

  19. Quzhou Tadi Hydro Complex Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quzhou Tadi Hydro Complex Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Quzhou Tadi Hydro Complex Development Co., Ltd. Place: Quzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 324022...

  20. Zhejiang Longyou Xiaoxitan Hydro Complex Development Co Ltd ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Longyou Xiaoxitan Hydro Complex Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Longyou Xiaoxitan Hydro Complex Development Co., Ltd Place: Quzhou, Zhejiang Province,...

  1. Seeing Stripes: Competition and Complexity in High-Temperature...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Seeing Stripes: Competition and Complexity in High-Temperature Superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seeing Stripes: Competition and Complexity in...

  2. Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12...

  3. Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion You are ...

  4. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Complex Adaptive System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System AgencyCompany Organization: Argonne National...

  5. Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate ...

  6. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complex, Volume I - September 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 September 2005 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...

  7. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complex - June 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 June 2008 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12...

  8. Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 May 2013 Appraisal of the Uranium Processing...

  9. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFesub 2Assub 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Complex temperature evolution of the electronic ...

  10. Alkene epoxidation employing metal nitro complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, M.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Kelley, K.P.

    1982-07-15

    Process for converting alkenes to form epoxides utilizes transition metal nitro complexes of the formula: M(RCN)/sub 2/XNO/sub 2/ wherein M is palladium or platinum, R is an alkyl or aryl group containing up to 12 carbon atoms, and X is a monoanionic, monodentate ligand such as chlorine, optionally in the presence of molecular oxygen.

  11. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m[sup 3] of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  12. A Multifaceted Mathematical Approach for Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, F.; Anitescu, M.; Bell, J.; Brown, D.; Ferris, M.; Luskin, M.; Mehrotra, S.; Moser, B.; Pinar, A.; Tartakovsky, A.; Willcox, K.; Wright, S.; Zavala, V.

    2012-03-07

    Applied mathematics has an important role to play in developing the tools needed for the analysis, simulation, and optimization of complex problems. These efforts require the development of the mathematical foundations for scientific discovery, engineering design, and risk analysis based on a sound integrated approach for the understanding of complex systems. However, maximizing the impact of applied mathematics on these challenges requires a novel perspective on approaching the mathematical enterprise. Previous reports that have surveyed the DOE's research needs in applied mathematics have played a key role in defining research directions with the community. Although these reports have had significant impact, accurately assessing current research needs requires an evaluation of today's challenges against the backdrop of recent advances in applied mathematics and computing. To address these needs, the DOE Applied Mathematics Program sponsored a Workshop for Mathematics for the Analysis, Simulation and Optimization of Complex Systems on September 13-14, 2011. The workshop had approximately 50 participants from both the national labs and academia. The goal of the workshop was to identify new research areas in applied mathematics that will complement and enhance the existing DOE ASCR Applied Mathematics Program efforts that are needed to address problems associated with complex systems. This report describes recommendations from the workshop and subsequent analysis of the workshop findings by the organizing committee.

  13. Quantum electrodynamics with complex fermion mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKellar, B.J.H. . School of Physics); Wu, D.D. . School of Physics Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ . Inst. of High Energy Physics Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX )

    1991-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamics (QED) with a complex fermion mass -- that is, a fermion mass with a chiral phase -- is restudied, together with its chirally rotated version. We show how fake electric dipole moment can be obtained and how to avoid it. 10 refs.

  14. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  15. Coordinating Tectons: Bipyridyl Terminated Allenylidene Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Lengkeek, Nigel A.; Petrie, Simon; Sanford, Vanessa; Schauer, Phil A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Stranger, Robert; White, Allan H.

    2009-01-15

    A series of complexes with {pi}-conjugated carbon chains terminated by bipyridyl moieties has been prepared. These allenylidene complexes were derived from 9-hydroxy-9-ethynyl-4,5-diazafluorene, the preparation of which is reported; the new allenylidene complexes are highly colored with the cumulated carbon chain terminating in a bipyridyl unit providing a site for further coordination. The synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structure determination of trans-[MCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]PF{sub 6} (M = Ru, P{intersection}P = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm), 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe), 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe); M = Os, P{intersection}P = dppm) are described. The effect of the variation in metal and ligand on electronic and electrochemical characteristics of these complexes has been investigated by using UV-vis, solution electrochemistry, and a combination of these techniques in spectroelectrochemical experiments. DFT calculations have been performed on trans-[RuCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]{sup q} (P{intersection}P = dppm, bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (dmpm); q = -1, 0, +1, +2) and subsequently solvent-corrected calculations with use of COSMO were also undertaken to examine the nature of electronic transitions in various oxidation states.

  16. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-10

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  17. Group 4 Metalloporphyrin diolato Complexes and Catalytic Application of Metalloporphyrins and Related Transition Metal Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guodong Du

    2004-12-19

    In this work, the first examples of group 4 metalloporphyrin 1,2-diolato complexes were synthesized through a number of strategies. In general, treatment of imido metalloporphyrin complexes, (TTP)M=NR, (M = Ti, Zr, Hf), with vicinal diols led to the formation of a series of diolato complexes. Alternatively, the chelating pinacolate complexes could be prepared by metathesis of (TTP)MCl{sub 2} (M = Ti, Hf) with disodium pinacolate. These complexes were found to undergo C-C cleavage reactions to produce organic carbonyl compounds. For titanium porphyrins, treatment of a titanium(II) alkyne adduct, (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh), with aromatic aldehydes or aryl ketones resulted in reductive coupling of the carbonyl groups to produce the corresponding diolato complexes. Aliphatic aldehydes or ketones were not reactive towards (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh). However, these carbonyl compounds could be incorporated into a diolato complex on reaction with a reactive precursor, (TTP)Ti[O(Ph){sub 2}C(Ph){sub 2}O] to provide unsymmetrical diolato complexes via cross coupling reactions. In addition, an enediolato complex (TTP)Ti(OCPhCPhO) was obtained from the reaction of (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh) with benzoin. Titanium porphyrin diolato complexes were found to be intermediates in the (TTP)Ti=O-catalyzed cleavage reactions of vicinal diols, in which atmospheric oxygen was the oxidant. Furthermore, (TTP)Ti=O was capable of catalyzing the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and {alpha}-hydroxy ketones to benzaldehyde and {alpha}-diketones, respectively. Other high valent metalloporphyrin complexes also can catalyze the oxidative diol cleavage and the benzyl alcohol oxidation reactions with dioxygen. A comparison of Ti(IV) and Sn(IV) porphyrin chemistry was undertaken. While chelated diolato complexes were invariably obtained for titanium porphyrins on treatment with 1,2-diols, the reaction of vicinal diols with tin porphyrins gave a number of products, including mono-, bis-alkoxo, and chelating diolato complexes, depending on the identity of diols and the stoichiometry employed. It was also found that tin porphyrin complexes promoted the oxidative cleavage of vicinal diols and the oxidation of {alpha}-ketols to {alpha}-diketones with dioxygen. In extending the chemistry of metalloporphyrins and analogous complexes, a series of chiral tetraaza macrocyclic ligands and metal complexes were designed and synthesized. Examination of iron(II) complexes showed that they were efficient catalysts for the cyclopropanation of styrene by diazo reagents. Good yields and high diastereoselectivity were obtained with modest enantioselectivity. A rationalization of the stereoselectivity was presented on the basis of structural factors in a carbene intermediate.

  18. Refiners Switch to RFG Complex Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    On January 1, 1998, domestic and foreign refineries and importers must stop using the "simple" model and begin using the "complex" model to calculate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic air pollutants (TAP), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from motor gasoline. The primary differences between application of the two models is that some refineries may have to meet stricter standards for the sulfur and olefin content of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) they produce and all refineries will now be held accountable for NOx emissions. Requirements for calculating emissions from conventional gasoline under the anti-dumping rule similarly change for exhaust TAP and NOx. However, the change to the complex model is not expected to result in an increase in the price premium for RFG or constrain supplies.

  19. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, M.; Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-21

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

  20. Thermal performance of complex fenestration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, S.C.; Elmahdy, A.H.

    1994-12-31

    The thermal performance (i.e., U-factor) of four complex fenestration systems is examined using computer simulation tools and guarded hot box testing. The systems include a flat glazed skylight, a domed or bubble skylight, a greenhouse window, and a curtain wall. The extra care required in performing simulation and testing of these complex products is described. There was good agreement (within 10%) between test and simulation for two of the four products. The agreement was slightly poorer (maximum difference of 16%) for the two high-heat-transfer products: the domed skylight and the greenhouse window. Possible causes for the larger discrepancy in these projecting window products are uncertainties in the inside and outside film coefficients and lower warm-side air temperatures because of stagnant airflow.

  1. Expertise | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise Expertise An instructor provides an overview on a calcining furnance to a soldier during a training event. As one of the National Nuclear Security Administration's original nuclear weapons production facilities, Y-12 National Security Complex has more than 60 years of experience in the production, handling, packaging, transportation and accountability of nuclear materials. In conducting this production mission, Y-12 personnel have developed expertise in the operation of personal

  2. Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Security The Y-12 National Security Complex places the highest priority on maintaining and improving its security posture. We employ security police officers, cyber security specialists, and other personnel to safeguard our security assets. Y-12 continuously monitors local and world events to prepare for potential risks to the site, our information and our employees. Security personnel also participate in numerous assessments each year to ensure readiness in protecting the site's vital

  3. Nuclear Advances | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advances Nuclear Advances Posted: February 11, 2013 - 2:52pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 The scope of research and development at the Y-12 National Security Complex has widened from a single-focus World War II defense mission to a panoply of explorations and achievements. Seventy years of projects with members of the Nuclear Security Enterprise, other government agencies, universities and private industry have supercharged Y-12 into an invaluable scientific and technological

  4. Bimetallic complexes and polymerization catalysts therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Jasson T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Li, Liting

    2000-11-28

    Group 3-6 or Lanthanide metal complexes possessing two metal centers, catalysts derived therefrom by combining the same with strong Lewis acids, Bronsted acid salts, salts containing a cationic oxidizing agent or subjected to bulk electrolysis in the presence of compatible, inert non-coordinating anions and the use of such catalysts for polymerizing olefins, diolefins and/or acetylenically unsaturated monomers are disclosed.

  5. Relocation Assistance | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relocation Assistance Relocation Assistance The CNS Relocation Assistance Program can help make your relocation to the area as smooth as possible. When you have accepted employment at the Y-12 National Security Complex, we want to help make your relocation to the area as smooth as possible. The Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, Relocation Assistance Program can lessen the financial burden of relocating. Assistance is available to eligible transfers and new hires who meet the criteria

  6. Images | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images Images Browse through images of our mission-related activities and our involvement in community events, as well as conceptual drawings of facilities soon to appear on the Y-12 National Security Complex. Click thumbnails to see larger images. Partnerships Testing our solution: Setting up a lab for Tin Whiskers CRADA CNS contributes to UT's College of Engineering Diversity Program Consolidation increases potential tech transfer opportunities ChIMES: "Limited only by our

  7. Annual Report | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About / Annual Report Annual Report View Annual Report Fiscal 2013 marked the 70th anniversary of the Y-12 National Security Complex, located in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Originally part of the Manhattan Project, Y-12 was constructed to enrich uranium for an atomic weapon to end World War II. For seven decades, Y-12 has met evolving national security needs - from separating lithium-6 for thermonuclear weapons during the Cold War to Y-12's modern missions: maintaining the safety, security and

  8. Vendor Information | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vendor Information Vendor Information Thank you for your interest in the Y-12 National Security Complex. For small businesses that desire to provide products/services in support of Y-12's mission, there are several options that your company may want to consider: Y-12 Mission: Determine if the products/services your company provides meet one or more of Y-12's missions: Nuclear Deterrence, Global Security, or Naval Reactors. Vendor Information Database: Register your company into the Y-12 Vendor

  9. Tag: Awards | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards Tag: Awards Displaying 1 - 8 of 8... Category: News Y-12 garners six NNSA Sustainability Awards Site's efforts earn half of 2016 honors More... Category: News Edlund Named DOE Facility Representative of the Year Jeff Edlund named the U.S. Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year. More... Category: News Y-12 and Pantex teams receive NNSA Defense Programs awards 260 employees at the Pantex Plant and the Y-12 National Security Complex received National Nuclear Security

  10. METHOD AND MEANS FOR RECOGNIZING COMPLEX PATTERNS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, P.V.C.

    1962-12-18

    This patent relates to a method and means for recognizing a complex pattern in a picture. The picture is divided into framelets, each framelet being sized so that any segment of the complex pattern therewithin is essentially a straight line. Each framelet is scanned to produce an electrical pulse for each point scanned on the segment therewithin. Each of the electrical pulses of each segment is then transformed into a separate strnight line to form a plane transform in a pictorial display. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is positioned laterally so that a point on the line midway between the top and the bottom of the pictorial display occurs at a distance from the left edge of the pictorial display equal to the distance of the generating point in the segment from the left edge of the framelet. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is inclined in the pictorial display at an angle to the vertical whose tangent is proportional to the vertical displacement of the generating point in the segment from the center of the framelet. The coordinate position of the point of intersection of the lines in the pictorial display for each segment is determined and recorded. The sum total of said recorded coordinate positions being representative of the complex pattern. (AEC)

  11. Analysis of complex networks using aggressive abstraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin.; Willard, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler (but equivalent) representation, the required analysis is performed using the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit abstractions that are simultaneously dramatically simplifying and property preserving - we call these aggressive abstractions -- and which can therefore be analyzed using the proposed approach. We then introduce and develop two forms of aggressive abstraction: 1.) finite state abstraction, in which dynamical networks with uncountable state spaces are modeled using finite state systems, and 2.) onedimensional abstraction, whereby high dimensional network dynamics are captured in a meaningful way using a single scalar variable. In each case, the property preserving nature of the abstraction process is rigorously established and efficient algorithms are presented for computing the abstraction. The considerable potential of the proposed approach to complex networks analysis is illustrated through case studies involving vulnerability analysis of technological networks and predictive analysis for social processes.

  12. Dependency visualization for complex system understanding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, J.A.C.

    1994-09-01

    With the volume of software in production use dramatically increasing, the importance of software maintenance has become strikingly apparent. Techniques now sought and developed for reverse engineering and design extraction and recovery. At present, numerous commercial products and research tools exist which are capable of visualizing a variety of programming languages and software constructs. The list of new tools and services continues to grow rapidly. Although the scope of the existing commercial and academic product set is quite broad, these tools still share a common underlying problem. The ability of each tool to visually organize object representations is increasingly impaired as the number of components and component dependencies within systems increases. Regardless of how objects are defined, complex ``spaghetti`` networks result in nearly all large system cases. While this problem is immediately apparent in modem systems analysis involving large software implementations, it is not new. As will be discussed in Chapter 2, related problems involving the theory of graphs were identified long ago. This important theoretical foundation provides a useful vehicle for representing and analyzing complex system structures. While the utility of directed graph based concepts in software tool design has been demonstrated in literature, these tools still lack the capabilities necessary for large system comprehension. This foundation must therefore be expanded with new orgnizational and visualization constructs necessary to meet this challenge. This dissertation addresses this need by constructing a conceptual model and a set of methods for interactively exploring, organizing, and understanding the structure of complex software systems.

  13. Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex's primary mission is to support of the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance program. Activities include assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons components, secure storage of special nuclear material (SNM), and various other nuclear weapons-related activities. Other activities include various aspects of testing

  14. Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex The Jack Case Center at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The Jack Case Center at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The Y-12 National Security Complex is one of the nation's most important national security assets. The 811 acre site contains the nation's stockpile of highly enriched uranium and also performs nuclear non-proliferation missions. Historically, Y-12's operations focused on a uranium enrichment method that used vast

  15. Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    substructures [Twisting Phonons in Higher Manganese Silicides with a Complex Nowotny Chimney Ladder Structure] (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional substructures [Twisting Phonons in Higher Manganese Silicides with a Complex Nowotny Chimney Ladder Structure] « Prev Next » Title: Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional substructures [Twisting Phonons in Higher Manganese Silicides with a Complex Nowotny Chimney

  16. Sales | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Suppliers / Sales Sales The Y-12 Complex is managed for the Department of Energy, and use of government property is essential for us to effectively achieve our missions. Items that are excess to Y-12's needs are offered for sale to the general public after all other steps in the excess cycle have been completed. We conduct different types of sales taylored to the specific commodity. The method chosen depends on the item's quantity, condition, location and special nature. When a sale is being

  17. Nuclear Deterrence | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Posted: February 7, 2013 - 6:03pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 The Y-12 National Security Complex was created, and exists today, to carry out one principal mission - defend the nation. Although new missions have emerged and the country hasn't built a new nuclear weapon since the early 1990s, Y-12 remains committed to sustaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent. The following stories highlight Y-12's role in carrying out the nation's nuclear

  18. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  19. Optimization strategies for complex engineering applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldred, M.S.

    1998-02-01

    LDRD research activities have focused on increasing the robustness and efficiency of optimization studies for computationally complex engineering problems. Engineering applications can be characterized by extreme computational expense, lack of gradient information, discrete parameters, non-converging simulations, and nonsmooth, multimodal, and discontinuous response variations. Guided by these challenges, the LDRD research activities have developed application-specific techniques, fundamental optimization algorithms, multilevel hybrid and sequential approximate optimization strategies, parallel processing approaches, and automatic differentiation and adjoint augmentation methods. This report surveys these activities and summarizes the key findings and recommendations.

  20. Constrained inflaton due to a complex scalar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budhi, Romy H. S.; Kashiwase, Shoichi; Suematsu, Daijiro

    2015-09-14

    We reexamine inflation due to a constrained inflaton in the model of a complex scalar. Inflaton evolves along a spiral-like valley of special scalar potential in the scalar field space just like single field inflation. Sub-Planckian inflaton can induce sufficient e-foldings because of a long slow-roll path. In a special limit, the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio has equivalent expressions to the inflation with monomial potential φ{sup n}. The favorable values for them could be obtained by varying parameters in the potential. This model could be embedded in a certain radiative neutrino mass model.

  1. Report Articles | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Articles Report Articles The Y-12 Report communicates the significant accomplishments of and events involving the Y-12 National Security Complex and its people. View report articles by Issue. Y-12 Report | Vol. 10, Issue 2 | Y/CS-035 Jamaican Connection May 7, 2014 Sizing up nuclear fuel May 7, 2014 Tool of tomorrow today May 7, 2014 Just the facts in crisis reporting May 7, 2014 Sea change for foam May 7, 2014 UPF workers' two cents lead to savings May 7, 2014 The doctor is INnovative

  2. Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

    2004-12-30

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

  3. Efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, R.K.; Walker, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This article will present the steps necessary to perform a comprehensive analysis of complex pressure relief systems. The goal is not to discuss detailed calculations for proper valve sizing and selection, but rather to analyze and verify existing system configurations. Sizing and selection have been covered in detail by the American Petroleum Institute (API) RP 520, API RP 521, various AIChE Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) publications, and other sources. In their work with industry, the authors have noticed a tendency for some engineers to proceed with detailed calculations without first preparing an overall strategy and implementation plan to make sure that the calculations yield the desired results. They have seen detailed pressure relief system analyses costing hundreds of thousands of dollars which, for any number of reasons, are incorrect. The old adage GIGO (garbage in/garbage out) certainly applies to pressure relief system analysis. They will address the thought processes and actions necessary to correctly and efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems.

  4. Complex Systems: Science for the 21st Century (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Complex Systems: Science for the 21st Century Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Complex Systems: Science for the 21st Century You are accessing a document from the ...

  5. Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites Status of Contractor Pension and PRB Benefit ...

  6. Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in an all-atom Go model Title: Folding and association of a homotetrameric protein complex in an all-atom Go model ...

  7. EM Presents Video Highlights of Cleanup Across DOE Complex in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presents Video Highlights of Cleanup Across DOE Complex in YouTube Playlist EM Presents Video Highlights of Cleanup Across DOE Complex in YouTube Playlist April 20, 2016 - 12:00pm ...

  8. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that...

  9. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review,Y-12 National Security Complex -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2015 | Department of Energy Review,Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2015 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review,Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2015 March 2015 Targeted Review of Work Planning and Control at the Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA), conducted an independent assessment of the Y-12 National Security Complex activity-level

  10. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2003 | Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 April 2003 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex This report provides the results of an inspection of environment, safety, and health management at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex. The inspection was conducted in March and April 2003 by the Office of

  11. Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex- May 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex

  12. Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 | Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project This report provides the results of an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Department of Energy's Uranium Processing Facility Project at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The review was performed by the

  13. Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; and others

    1997-06-26

    This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

  14. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  15. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  16. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  17. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  18. 3D Diagnostic Of Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Edward; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2011-11-29

    This paper reports the development of a three-dimensional(3D) dust particle position diagnostic for complex plasmas. A beam produce by Light Emitting Diodes(LEDs) is formed into horizontal sheet, for the illumination of the particles. The light sheet has a vertical colour gradient across its width, from two opposing colours. The light scattered from the particles is imaged with the camera from above. The horizontal coordinates are measured from the positions on the image. The third coordinate is determined from the colour which represents a position on the gradient of the light sheet. The use of LEDs as a light source reduces a variation in Mie scattered intensity from the particles due to the particle size distribution. The variation would induce a large vertical positional error.

  19. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  20. Polymeric complexes of polyaniline as anticorrosion coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racicot, R.J.; Yang, S.C.; Brown, R.

    1998-07-01

    During the past few years there has been a strong interest in developing conducting polymers as an alternative to the traditional anticorrosion coatings. One of the driving forces for this research comes from the need for an environmentally friendly chromate-free anticorrosion coating for high-strength light weight aluminum alloys. The possibilities for a new scratch-tolerant paint for steel prompted the development of conductive polymer anticorrosion paints. By molecular engineering, the authors have synthesized a double-strand polymeric complex of polyaniline that is suitable as an anticorrosion paint on metals in low pH environments. In this article, the authors will discuss (1) the molecular design for solubility and adhesion, (2) the effectiveness of the electroactive coating under electrochemical impedance tests, and (3) a mechanistic study of the anticorrosion mechanism by examining the polymer/metal interfacial interactions.

  1. Exploratory study of complexant concentrate waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Bray, L.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Morrey, J.R.; Swanson, J.L.; Wester, D.W.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, was to determine the effect of applying advanced chemical separations technologies to the processing and disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) stored in underground tanks. The major goals of this study were to determine (1) if the wastes can be partitioned into a small volume of HLW plus a large volume of low-level waste (LLW), and (2) if the activity in the LLW can be lowered enough to meet NRC Class LLW criteria. This report presents the results obtained in a brief scouting study of various processes for separating radionuclides from Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) waste.

  2. Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

    1990-06-01

    A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

  3. Y-12 National Security Complex Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Shana E.; Bassett, P.; McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2010-11-01

    The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y 12 National Security Complex (Y 12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y 12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements that could be applied not only at Y-12 but at other Federal facilities as well. FEMP selected Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to coordinate and manage the water assessment. PNNL contracted Water Savers, LLC to lead the technical aspects of the water assessment. Water Savers provided key technical expertise in water auditing, metering, and cooling systems. This is the report of that effort, which concluded that the Y-12 facility could realize considerable water savings by implementing the recommended water efficiency opportunities.

  4. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  5. B Plant Complex preclosure work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADLER, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    This preclosure work plan describes the condition of the dangerous waste treatment storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit after completion of the B Plant Complex decommissioning Transition Phase preclosure activities. This description includes waste characteristics, waste types, locations, and associated hazards. The goal to be met by the Transition Phase preclosure activities is to place the TSD unit into a safe and environmentally secure condition for the long-term Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Phase of the facility decommissioning process. This preclosure work plan has been prepared in accordance with Section 8.0 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1996). The preclosure work plan is one of three critical Transition Phase documents, the other two being: B Plant End Points Document (WHC-SD-WM-TPP-054) and B Plant S&M plan. These documents are prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its contractors with the involvement of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The tanks and vessels addressed by this preclosure work plan are limited to those tanks end vessels included on the B Plant Complex Part A, Form 3, Permit Application (DOE/RL-88-21). The criteria for determining which tanks or vessels are in the Part A, Form 3, are discussed in the following. The closure plan for the TSD unit will not be prepared until the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process is initiated, which follows the long-term S&M Phase. Final closure will occur during the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process. The Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) is excluded from the scope of this preclosure work plan.

  6. Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

    2014-09-01

    Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

  7. Intermediate-Valence Tautomerism in Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methyl-Substituted Bipyridines (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Intermediate-Valence Tautomerism in Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Methyl-Substituted Bipyridines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Intermediate-Valence Tautomerism in Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Methyl-Substituted Bipyridines Multiconfigurational, intermediate valent ground states are established in several methyl-substituted bipyridine complexes of bispentamethylcyclopentadienylytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}

  8. Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerators September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis YakimaKlickitat Fisheries Project, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington September 2, 2002...

  9. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A substantial increase in the Klickitat County tax base would provide benefits to all ... Turbines would also be visible to other county residents and people traveling through the ...

  10. EIS-0421: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision EIS-0421: Record of Decision Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County, Washington For more information contact: Ms. Stacy Mason,...

  11. EIS-0421: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement EIS-0421: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County,...

  12. EIS-0421: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEIS for this project, the Bonneville Power Administration has decided to construct the Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County,...

  13. EIS-0421: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0421: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project, Wasco County, OR and Klickitat County, WA PDF icon...

  14. EIS-0421: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0421: Final Environmental Impact Statement Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Project, Wasco County, OR and Klickitat County, WA PDF icon...

  15. Hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xing-yuan, E-mail: wangxy@dlut.edu.cn; Hu, Xiao-peng [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-02-15

    This paper investigates hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks. When the complex dynamical networks could be synchronized up to an equilibrium or periodic orbit, a hybrid feedback controller is designed to realize the different component of vector of node could be synchronized up to different desired scaling function in complex dynamical networks with time delay. Hybrid function projective synchronization (HFPS) in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and HFPS in complex dynamical networks with time-varying coupling delay are researched, respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  16. New hydroprocessing catalysts prepared from molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    Current commercial hydroprocessing catalysts are transition metal sulfides (TMS) based on Group 8 and 11 metals. They are prepared by dispersing MoO{sub 3} and a promoter metal oxide, either CoO or NiO, on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SiO{sub 2}-modified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This is followed by sulfiding with a sulfur-bearing stream such as H{sub 2}S at high temperatures. The thus formed MoS{sub 2} crystallites are the backbone of the working catalysts. A potentially fruitful approach to new catalysts would be to molecularly incorporate promoter metals into the structure of MoS{sub 2} edge planes. As a first step, it would seem reasonable to exploit the use of heterometallic metal sulfur complexes as hydroprocessing catalyst precursors. The authors have developed several families of new catalysts along this line. In this paper the authors restrict themselves to the metal amine thiomolybdate-derived catalysts. Specifically, they give an overview of the performance of the bulk (unsupported) FeMo sulfide prepared from MAT. This low-surface-area catalyst shows a high HDN-to-HDS volumetric activity ratio and is also active for HDA. While most of the results are taken from their previous publications, some new results are reported here.

  17. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  18. Alarm system for a nuclear control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  19. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  20. Console for a nuclear control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  1. Mathematical approaches for complexity/predictivity trade-offs in complex system models : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Mayo, Jackson R.; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Armstrong, Robert C.; Vanderveen, Keith

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this research was to examine foundational methods, both computational and theoretical, that can improve the veracity of entity-based complex system models and increase confidence in their predictions for emergent behavior. The strategy was to seek insight and guidance from simplified yet realistic models, such as cellular automata and Boolean networks, whose properties can be generalized to production entity-based simulations. We have explored the usefulness of renormalization-group methods for finding reduced models of such idealized complex systems. We have prototyped representative models that are both tractable and relevant to Sandia mission applications, and quantified the effect of computational renormalization on the predictive accuracy of these models, finding good predictivity from renormalized versions of cellular automata and Boolean networks. Furthermore, we have theoretically analyzed the robustness properties of certain Boolean networks, relevant for characterizing organic behavior, and obtained precise mathematical constraints on systems that are robust to failures. In combination, our results provide important guidance for more rigorous construction of entity-based models, which currently are often devised in an ad-hoc manner. Our results can also help in designing complex systems with the goal of predictable behavior, e.g., for cybersecurity.

  2. Chirality-selected phase behaviour in ionic polypeptide complexes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perry, Sarah L.; Leon, Lorraine; Hoffmann, Kyle Q.; Kade, Matthew J.; Priftis, Dimitrios; Black, Katie A.; Wong, Derek; Klein, Ryan A.; Pierce, III, Charles F.; Margossian, Khatcher O.; et al

    2015-01-14

    In this study, polyelectrolyte complexes present new opportunities for self-assembled soft matter. Factors determining whether the phase of the complex is solid or liquid remain unclear. Ionic polypeptides enable examination of the effects of stereochemistry on complex formation. Here we demonstrate that chirality determines the state of polyelectrolyte complexes, formed from mixing dilute solutions of oppositely charged polypeptides, via a combination of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Fluid complexes occur when at least one of the polypeptides in the mixture is racemic, which disrupts backbone hydrogen-bonding networks. Pairs of purely chiral polypeptides, of any sense, form compact, fibrillar solids with amore » β-sheet structure. Analogous behaviour occurs in micelles formed from polypeptide block copolymers with polyethylene oxide, where assembly into aggregates with either solid or fluid cores, and eventually into ordered phases at high concentrations, is possible. Chirality is an exploitable tool for manipulating material properties in polyelectrolyte complexation.« less

  3. Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Y-12 Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the results of an independent review of the implementation verification review (IVR) processes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex. The review was conducted March 12-30, 2012, by the DOE Office of Safety and Emergency Management

  4. Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and X-rays (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons and X-rays This content will become publicly available on September 2, 2016 « Prev Next » Title: Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons and X-rays Magnetic complex-oxide heterostructures are of keen interest because a wealth of phenomena at the interface of dissimilar materials can give rise to fundamentally new physics and potentially

  5. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels | Department of Energy Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels white paper exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production PDF icon

  6. Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity January 29, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis SHARP Supporting Elements During this quarter, the framework team was involved in two primary efforts, mesh generation and implementation of a MOAB-based coupled multi-physics simulation. For mesh generation, finishing touches were put on three major, high-complexity hexahedral meshes, and support was provided for their use in various simulations: MATiS-H, an

  7. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security Complex

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - April 2012 | Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2012 April 2012 Evaluation to determine whether Y-12 National Security Complex is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. The Team conducted its review during April 10-19, 2012 to determine whether Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP

  8. Evaluation of Tris-Bipyridine Chromium Complexes for Flow Battery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications: Impact of Bipyridine Ligand Structure on Solubility and Electrochemistry - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 15, 2015, Research Highlights Evaluation of Tris-Bipyridine Chromium Complexes for Flow Battery Applications: Impact of Bipyridine Ligand Structure on Solubility and Electrochemistry (Top) Synthesis of a series of Cr-bipyridine complexes for the evaluation of solubility and electrochemistry as a function of the metal complex structure. (Bottom) Impact of the

  9. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  10. Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mixtures (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures Efficient deconstruction of cellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars for fuel and chemical production is accomplished by a complex mixture of cellulases, hemicellulases and accessory enzymes (e.g., >50 extracellular proteins).

  11. Disruption of Hydrogen Bonds between Major Histocompatibility Complex Class

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    II and the Peptide NTerminus Is Not Sufficient to Form a Human Leukocyte Antigen-DM Receptive State of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Disruption of Hydrogen Bonds between Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II and the Peptide NTerminus Is Not Sufficient to Form a Human Leukocyte Antigen-DM Receptive State of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Disruption of Hydrogen Bonds between Major

  12. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Monday, 27 February 2012 15:06 The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational

  13. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | DOEPatents Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes Title: Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline

  14. Complexes Containing Redox Non-Innocent Ligands for Symmetric,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multi-Electron Transfer Non-Aqueous Redox Flow Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research May 28, 2015, Research Highlights Complexes Containing Redox Non-Innocent Ligands for Symmetric, Multi-Electron Transfer Non-Aqueous Redox Flow Batteries (Top) Functionalized chromium bipyridine complexes (left), and solubility data for the charged and neutral species (right). (Bottom) Charge-discharge curves for the Cr(L3)3 complex: A) Full H-cell potential, B) Positive electrode potential,

  15. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates

  16. Step-by-step growth of complex oxide microstructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Datskos, Panos G.; Cullen, David A.; Sharma, Jaswinder K.

    2015-06-10

    The synthesis of complex and hybrid oxide microstructures is of fundamental interest and practical applications. However, the design and synthesis of such structures is a challenging task. We developed a solution phase process to synthesize complex silica and silica titania hybrid microstructures by exploiting the emulsion droplet based shape control and step by step growth. The strategy is robust and can be extended to make complex hybrid structures made of two or more materials while each having its own shape.

  17. Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion New tris-amidinate actinide (Th, U) complexes containing a rare O-bound terminal phosphaethynolate (OCP-) ligand were synthesized and fully characterized. The cyanate (OCN-) and thiocyanate (SCN-) analogs were prepared for comparison and feature a preferential N-coordination to the actinide metals. The

  18. An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to

  19. Y-12 earns communications honors | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earns communications ... Y-12 earns communications honors Posted: September 5, 2013 - 4:06pm The Y-12 National Security Complex received multiple communications awards during three...

  20. Y-12 earns communications honors | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earns communications ... Y-12 earns communications honors Posted: June 27, 2012 - 9:38am The Y-12 National Security Complex received multiple communications awards during two...

  1. Organimetallic Fluorescent Complex Polymers For Light Emitting Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Song Q.; So, Franky

    1997-10-28

    A fluorescent complex polymer with fluorescent organometallic complexes connected by organic chain spacers is utilized in the fabrication of light emitting devices on a substantially transparent planar substrate by depositing a first conductive layer having p-type conductivity on the planar surface of the substrate, depositing a layer of a hole transporting and electron blocking material on the first conductive layer, depositing a layer of the fluorescent complex polymer on the layer of hole transporting and electron blocking material as an electron transporting emissive layer and depositing a second conductive layer having n-type conductivity on the layer of fluorescent complex polymer.

  2. Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex- June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Lead Orientation Visit to the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex [HIAR-Y-12-2011-06-23

  3. Synthetic Information and Decision Informatics for Complex Systems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics & Simulation Science Laboratory SALISHAN 2010 Tackling Big Data: HPC Approaches to Informatics Synthetic Information and Decision Informatics for Complex Socially-Coupled...

  4. Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administrat...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 completes waste removal project two years ahead of ... accidents have increased in recent years, particularly with inclement weather... ...

  5. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things are more complicated...

  6. Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Models: Rob Jacob Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors ... It's math in action. A global model depends on submodels Submodels can be broken into two ...

  7. Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu2+ complexes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu2+ complexes in solutions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu2+ ...

  8. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complex physical-socio-technical systems. Examples include: tropical rain forests, agro-eco systems, cities, infrastructure, governments, political systems, education systems,...

  9. Y-12 National Security Complex recognized for outstanding procurement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the highest savings rate for fiscal year 2013 in the NNSA complex. At the Supply Chain Management Center biannual operational meeting in April, NNSA presented Y-12...

  10. Chemical Hieroglyphs: Abstract Depiction of Complex Void Space...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Hieroglyphs: Abstract Depiction of Complex Void Space Topology of Nanoporous Materials Previous Next List Kevin Theisen, Berend Smit and Maciej Haranczyk, J. Chem. Inf. ...

  11. Superconductors and Complex Transition Metal Oxides for Tunable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Superconductors and Complex Transition Metal Oxides for Tunable THz Plasmonic Metamaterials The outline of this presentation are: (1) Motivation - Non-tunability of metal ...

  12. Complex Polynomial Optimization and its Application to Power...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as electric power systems, signal processing, imaging science, automatic control, and quantum mechanics. Complex numbers are typically used to model oscillatory phenomena which...

  13. Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News.....

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Anson Franklin, 202586-7371 September 21, 2001 NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex John Gordon, Administrator of the Department of Energy's ...

  14. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    formats Prev Next Title: High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats You are accessing a document from...

  15. Superconductors and Complex Transition Metal Oxides for Tunable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in superconductor metamaterials; (4) Controlling the conductivity with infrared pump beam; (5) Complex metal oxides as active substrates - Strontium Titanate; and (6) Conclusion. ...

  16. Structure of the TGF-Beta Receptor Complex Reveals Evolutionary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of the TGF-Beta Receptor Complex Reveals Evolutionary Adaptations that have Led to Diversification of Function with the Superfamily Growth factors are peptides and ...

  17. Small-Business Policy | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Suppliers Socioeconomic Programs Small-Business Policy Small-Business Policy It is the policy of the Y-12 National Security Complex to provide maximum practicable contracting...

  18. Complex Hydrides-A New Frontier for Future Energy Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics and chemistry of complex hydrides, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron microscopy, and first-principles...

  19. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase ...

  20. Methyltrihydroborate complexes of the lanthanides and actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinomoto, R.S.

    1984-11-01

    Reaction of MC1/sub 4/ (M = Zr, Hf, U, Th, Np) with LiBH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/ in chlorobenzene produces volatile, hexane-soluble M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/. Crystal structures are monomeric, tetrahedral species. Lewis base adducts prepared include U(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.THT, Th(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.L (L = THF (tetrahydrofuran), THT (tetrahydrothiophene), SMe/sub 2/, OMe/sub 2/), U(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.2L (L = THF, pyridine, NH/sub 3/), Th(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.2L (L = THF, THT, py, NH/sub 3/), M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.L-L (M = U, Th; L-L = dme (1,2-dimethoxyethane), bmte (bis(1,2-methylthio)ethane), tmed (N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine), dmpe (1,2-dimethylphosphinoethane)) and Th(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.1/2 OEt/sub 2/. Reaction of MC1/sub 3/ (M = Ho, Yb, Lu) with LiBH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/ in diethyl ether produces volatile, toluene-soluble M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.OEt/sub 2/. Other Lewis base adducts prepared from M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.OEt/sub 2/ include Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.L (L = THT, THF, py), Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.2L (L = THT, THF, py), Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.tmed, Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.3/2 L-L (L-L = dmpe, bmte), Yb(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.3/2 dmpe, Yb(BH/sub 3/Ch/sub 3/).L (L = THF, dme), Yb(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.2THF, and Lu(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.THF. By structural criteria, the bonding in actinide and lanthanide methyltrihydroborate complexes is primarily ionic in character even though they display covalent-like physical properties. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that there is some degree of covalent bonding in U(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.

  1. EIS-0384: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hatchery Program The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund the Proposed Action of the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program (hatchery program) as described in the Chief...

  2. Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Wagner, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

  3. Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Wagner, R.W.

    1996-01-02

    Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins are disclosed having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

  4. Complex fragment emission at low and high excitation energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-08-01

    Complex fragment emission has been certified as a compound nucleus process at low energies. An extension of the measurements to heavy ion reactions up to 50 MeV/u shows that most complex fragments are emitted by highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions. 12 refs., 26 figs.

  5. Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-08

    The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Supersedes DOE O 5600.1.

  6. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developedmore » which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

  7. On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.; Halsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

  8. Diverse ages and origins of basement complexes, Luzon, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geary, E.E.; Harrison, T.M.; Heizler, M.

    1988-04-01

    Geological field investigations and /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar ages from two basement complexes in southeast Luzon document the first known occurrences of pre-Late Cretaceous age rocks in the eastern Philippines. However, individual components within the two complexes vary in age from Late Jurassic (Caramoan basement complex) to Early Cretaceous and early Miocene (Camarines Norte-Calaguas Islands basement complex). These and other data show that southeast Luzon basement complexes are genetically diverse, and they indicate that the concept of an old, autochthonous basement in the Philippines is open to question. This supports the hypothesis that the Philippine Archipelago is an amalgamation of allochthonous Mesozoic and Cenozoic island-arc, ocean-basin, and continental fragments that were assembled during the Tertiary.

  9. Portsmouth RI/FS Report for the Process Buildings and Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project Portsmouth RIFS Report for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities ...

  10. Multiple-hydrogen complexes in dilute nitride alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amore Bonapasta, A.; Filippone, F.; Mattioli, G.

    2007-04-10

    Complexes formed by H and the isoelectronic impurity N in GaAs1-yNy alloys have been widely investigated to explain the significant effects of N on the host material properties and their passivation by H. However, available results still present a quite puzzling picture, none of the models proposed by theory for the N-H complexes being able to account for all of the experimental findings. An N-H{sub 2}* complex first proposed by theory was challenged by infrared results. A following C2{nu} complex has been challenged by a recent high resolution x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy study questioning the structural effects of this complex. In the present study, we show that a peculiar character of the H interaction with an isoelectronic impurity can induce the formation of novel, multiple-H complexes. In turn, one of this complexes can account for the H structural effects recently observed, thus reconciling theory and experiment.

  11. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  12. Five Dimensional Minimal Supergravities and Four Dimensional Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, Jai; Gutowski, Jan B.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Sabra, Wafic

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the relation between solutions admitting Killing spinors of minimal supergravities in five dimensions and four dimensional complex geometries. In the ungauged case (vanishing cosmological constant {lambda} 0) the solutions are determined in terms of a hyper-Kaehler base space; in the gauged case ({lambda}<0) the complex geometry is Kaehler; in the de Sitter case ({lambda}>0) the complex geometry is hyper-Kaehler with torsion (HKT). In the latter case some details of the derivation are given. The method for constructing explicit solutions is discussed in each case.

  13. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY CYCLOALKYLDITHIO-CARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of uranium-233 from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium by selectively complexing the uranium is described. The separation is carried out by contacting the thorium solution with a non- aromatic organic dithiocarbamate selected from the group which consists of alkali and alkaline earth cycloalkyldithiocarbamates and recovering the resulting uranyl cycloalkyldithiocarbamate complex by organic solvent extraction such as with methyl ethyl ketone. The complexed uranium may be stripped from the separated organic phase by scrubbing with one normal nitric acid solution.

  14. EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

  15. Joel Brock > Research Thrust Leader - Complex OxidesProfessor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joel Brock Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides Professor Applied and Engineering Physics Research Group Webpage jdb20@cornell.edu Dr. Brock is a Professor in the School of...

  16. ES&H Policy Statement | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ES&H Policy Statement ES&H Policy Statement As we work to achieve the Y-12 mission and our vision of a modernized Y-12 Complex, we will do so by ensuring the safety and health of ...

  17. Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administrat...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) serves as the nation's only source of enriched uranium nuclear weapons components and provides enriched uranium for the U.S. Navy. Y-12 is a...

  18. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, Powell; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    1984-05-15

    A novel Ruthenium-transferrin complex, prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40.degree. C. for about 2 hours, and purifying said complex by means of gel chromotography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparative results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex.

  19. High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2014-11-11

    Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

  20. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1984-05-15

    A novel ruthenium-transferrin complex is disclosed which is prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40 C for about 2 hours. The complex is purified by means of gel chromotography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparative results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex. No Drawings

  1. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  2. Non-metallocene organometallic complexes and related methods and systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agapie, Theodor; Golisz, Suzanne Rose; Tofan, Daniel; Bercaw, John E.

    2010-12-07

    A non-metallocene organometallic complex comprising a tridentate ligand and a metal bonded to a tridentate ligand, wherein two substituted aryl groups in the tridentate ligand are connected to a cyclic group at the ortho position via semi-rigid ring-ring linkages, and selected so to provide the resulting non-metallocene organometallic complex with a C.sub.S geometry, a C.sub.1 geometry, a C.sub.2 geometry or a C.sub.2v geometry. Method for performing olefin polymerization with a non-metallocene organometallic complex as a catalyst, related catalytic systems, tridentate ligand and method for providing a non-metallocene organometallic complex.

  3. Method and system for producing complex-shape objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jeantette, Francisco P.; Keicher, David M.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.

    2000-01-01

    A method and system are provided for producing complex, three-dimensional, net shape objects from a variety of powdered materials. The system includes unique components to ensure a uniform and continuous flow of powdered materials as well as to focus and locate the flow of powdered materials with respect to a laser beam which results in the melting of the powdered material. The system also includes a controller so that the flow of molten powdered materials can map out and form complex, three-dimensional, net-shape objects by layering the molten powdered material. Advantageously, such complex, three-dimensional net-shape objects can be produced having material densities varying from 90% of theoretical to fully dense, as well as a variety of controlled physical properties. Additionally, such complex, three-dimensional objects can be produced from two or more different materials so that the composition of the object can be transitioned from one material to another.

  4. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    channel. An SRP contains ribonucleic acids (RNA) and proteins. When an SRP recognizes the signal sequence of a nascent polypeptide, it forms a complex with its membrane-associated...

  5. Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak; Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Bhinde, Manoj V.

    1997-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  6. Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1997-03-04

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

  7. EA-1250: Proposed Strategic Computing Complex, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Strategic Computing Complex within the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical...

  8. A Supramolecular Complex in Small-Molecule Solar Cells based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Small-Molecule Solar Cells based on Contorted Aromatic Molecules Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Supramolecular Complex in Small-Molecule Solar Cells based on ...

  9. Quantum interference within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Sanz, Angel S.; Miret-Artes, Salvador; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2010-10-15

    Quantum interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. As shown in a previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 250401], complex quantum trajectories display helical wrapping around stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near vortical tubes, these structures being prominent features of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. Here, we further analyze the divergence and vorticity of the quantum momentum function along streamlines near poles, showing the intricacy of the complex dynamics. Nevertheless, despite this behavior, we show that the appearance of the well-known interference features (on the real axis) can be easily understood in terms of the rotation of the nodal line in the complex plane. This offers a unified description of interference as well as an elegant and practical method to compute the lifetime for interference features, defined in terms of the average wrapping time, i.e., considering such features as a resonant process.

  10. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  11. Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex- April 13, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site,

  12. Simple Model Representations of Transport in a Complex Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It is common, however, to represent the complex fracture by much simpler models consisting ... Simple-model properties are often inferred from the analysis of short-term (one to a few ...

  13. Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton pump Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Volker Zickermann, Goethe...

  14. Complexation of americium with {alpha}-d-iso-saccharinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, S.; Knutsson, A.; Oedegaard-Jensen, A.; Ekberg, C.; Jolsteraa, R.

    2008-07-01

    Under alkaline conditions, cellulose will degrade, with iso-saccharinate being the dominant end-product. One of the formed diastereomers, the {alpha}-D-iso-saccharinate, is a strong complexing agent for tri- and tetravalent actinides and is the dominant conformation at pH > 5, rendering other conformations insignificant at neutral to alkaline conditions. The presence of {alpha}-D-iso-saccharinate increases the amount of metal in solution and also affects the surface interactions. Understanding this complexation is of relevance for long-term repository assessments. This study has investigated the complexation of americium with {alpha}-D-iso-saccharinate using solvent-extraction and radioanalytical techniques at 25 deg. C. The stability constants for the complexation reactions were determined by curve fitting of a distribution-ratio equation to experimental data.

  15. Defense Programs: the mission | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II. Those factors and a can-do attitude led the site into other mission areas; however, ... What Price Victory Y-12's ability to produce large numbers of complex weapon components ...

  16. 340 waste handling complex: Deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1998-06-25

    This document provides an overview of the strategy for deactivating the 340 Waste Handling Complex within Hanford`s 300 Area. The plan covers the period from the pending September 30, 1998 cessation of voluntary radioactive liquid waste (RLW) transfers to the 340 Complex, until such time that those portions of the 340 Complex that remain active beyond September 30, 1998, specifically, the Retention Process Sewer (RPS), can also be shut down and deactivated. Specific activities are detailed and divided into two phases. Phase 1 ends in 2001 after the core RLW systems have been deactivated. Phase 2 covers the subsequent interim surveillance of deactivated and stand-by components during the period of continued RPS operation, through the final transfer of the entire 340 Complex to the Environmental Restoration Contractor. One of several possible scenarios was postulated and developed as a budget and schedule planning case.

  17. Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List D. Wu, T. M. McDonald, Z. Quan, S. V. Ushakov, P. Zhang, J. R....

  18. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaconescu, Paula L.; Garcia, Evan

    2014-05-31

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  19. Rapid global structure determination of large RNA and RNA complexes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rapid global structure determination of large RNA and RNA complexes using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid global structure...

  20. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated...

  1. Simple Model Representations of Transport in a Complex Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects on Long-Term Predictions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simple Model Representations of Transport in a Complex Fracture and Their Effects on Long-Term ...

  2. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons

  3. Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initiation Complex Structure and Promoter Proofreading Authors: Liu, Xin ; Bushnell, David A. ; Silva, Daniel-Adriano ; Huang, Xuhui ; Kornberg, Roger D. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Stanford-MED Publication Date: 2015-11-30 OSTI Identifier: 1227486 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Science; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 07, 2011 Publisher:

  4. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant

  5. Materiel availability modeling and analysis for a complex army weapon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Materiel availability modeling and analysis for a complex army weapon system. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materiel availability modeling and analysis for a complex army weapon system. Materiel availability (A{sub m}) is a new US Department of Defense Key Performance Parameter (KPP) implemented through a mandatory Sustainment Metric consisting of an Availability KPP and two supporting Key System Attributes (KSAs), materiel reliability and

  6. Methods for producing complex films, and films produced thereby (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Methods for producing complex films, and films produced thereby Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Methods for producing complex films, and films produced thereby A method for producing a film, the method comprising melting a layer of precursor particles on a substrate until at least a portion of the melted particles are planarized and merged to produce the film. The invention is also directed to a method for producing a photovoltaic film, the method comprising

  7. Y-12 National Security Complex Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 National Security Campus Ambassador Ensher visits Y-12 and NNSS Ambassador Henry S. Ensher, the top U.S. diplomat at the United States Mission to International Organizations in Vienna, Austria, recently visited two facilities to understand NNSA's mission better: the Y-12 National Security Complex and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). At Y-12, he Nuclear Security Administration

    Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement February 26, 2016 Click here for a larger

  8. Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biochemical processes (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex biochemical processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex biochemical processes No abstract prepared. Authors: Bell, Golan [1] ; Munsky, Brian [1] ; Nemenman, Iiya [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2009-04-07 OSTI Identifier: 988321 Report

  9. Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biochemical processes (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex biochemical processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simplicity of first passage time distributions for common complex biochemical processes × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service.

  10. Stochastic Optimization of Complex Systems (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Stochastic Optimization of Complex Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stochastic Optimization of Complex Systems This project focused on methodologies for the solution of stochastic optimization problems based on relaxation and penalty methods, Monte Carlo simulation, parallel processing, and inverse optimization. The main results of the project were the development of a convergent method for the solution of models that include expectation constraints as in

  11. Structure of a eukaryotic SWEET transporter in a homotrimeric complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure of a eukaryotic SWEET transporter in a homotrimeric complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of a eukaryotic SWEET transporter in a homotrimeric complex Authors: Tao, Yuyong ; Cheung, Lily S. ; Li, Shuo ; Eom, Joon-Seob ; Chen, Li-Qing ; Xu, Yan ; Perry, Kay ; Frommer, Wolf B. ; Feng, Liang [1] ; Cornell) [2] + Show Author Affiliations Stanford-MED ( Publication Date: 2015-11-23 OSTI Identifier: 1226370 Resource Type: Journal

  12. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of

  13. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Wednesday, 28 May 2014 00:00 Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks

  14. ADR Lunchtime Program: MEDIATING COMPLEX DISPUTES WITH THE GOVERNMENT -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES | Department of Energy MEDIATING COMPLEX DISPUTES WITH THE GOVERNMENT - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES ADR Lunchtime Program: MEDIATING COMPLEX DISPUTES WITH THE GOVERNMENT - OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES Mr. Feinberg is one of the nation's leading experts in mediation and alternative dispute resolution (ADR). He was appointed Special Master of the Federal September 11th Victim Compensation Fund of 2001 and the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) Executive

  15. Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evolving Morphology (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology Our main activity has been doing lab experiments where plasmas having morphology and behavior similar to solar and astrophysical plasmas are produced and studied. The solar experiment is mounted

  16. Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries Fast and accurate reconstruction of imaging-derived geometries and subsequent quality mesh generation for biomedical computation are enabling technologies for

  17. Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling The multiphysics capabilities of COMSOL provide the necessary tools to simulate the turbulent thermal-fluid aspects of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Version 4.1, and later, of COMSOL provides three different turbulence models: the standard k-{var_epsilon}

  18. Component-Centered Approach Towards Oxidation Studies of Complex Biofuels.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Component-Centered Approach Towards Oxidation Studies of Complex Biofuels. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Component-Centered Approach Towards Oxidation Studies of Complex Biofuels. Abstract not provided. Authors: Rotavera, Brandon ; Welz, Oliver ; Sheps, Leonid ; Scheer, Adam Michael ; Savee, John David ; Osborn, David L. ; Simmons, Blake ; Taatjes, Craig A. ; Ali, Mohamad A. ; Lee, Taek Soon ; Violi, Angela Publication Date: 2013-07-01

  19. Reproducible cold fusion reaction using a complex cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arata, Y.; Zhang, Y.C. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses a new complex cathode which was developed, consisting of a nickel (or palladium) rod with a palladium layer applied by plasma spraying. High reproducibility of a cold fusion reaction is confirmed by using this cathode. The palladium layer activates the surface functions of the deuterated cathode, and reliable evidence is obtained that a new type of heat generation occurred in the complex cathode.

  20. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  1. High Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical Rheometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension. In this snapshot of the simulation, the stress on each suspended particle is shown color-coded with its specific value drawn on its surface. Suspended particles that have a stress value below a specific threshold value are shown in outline form in order to better view those particles that are carrying the majority of the stress

  2. Special Training Materials | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68 Special Report: IG-0868 August 29, 2012 Inquiry into the Security Breach at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Y-12 National Security Complex We initiated this inquiry to identify the circumstances surrounding the Y-12 National Security Complex breach because of the importance of ensuring the safe and secure storage of nuclear materials. Our review found that the Y-12 security incident represented multiple system failures on several levels. We identified troubling displays of

  3. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  4. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  5. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  6. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things are more complicated than we thought December 22, 2014 The newly discovered rolling movement shown in (A) three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy image of ribosome, and (B) computer-generated atomic-resolution model of the human ribosome consistent with microscopy. An international team of researchers deployed to

  7. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of

  8. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of

  9. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of

  10. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Management Exercise Program - August 2015 | Department of Energy Emergency Management Exercise Program - August 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex Emergency Management Exercise Program - August 2015 August 2015 Review of Emergency Management Exercise Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) conducted a review of National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Y-12 National Security Complex

  11. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  12. Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent

  13. Structures of GRP94-Nucleotide Complexes Reveal Mechanistic Differences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between the Hsp90 Chaperones Structures of GRP94-Nucleotide Complexes Reveal Mechanistic Differences between the Hsp90 Chaperones Life depends on the biochemical activity of the thousands of proteins that inhabit and decorate the surface of every one of our cells. Proteins themselves, although simple linear combinations of the twenty amino acids, derive their remarkable properties from the complex three-dimensional structures into which they fold. In this way, enzyme active sites are

  14. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of

  15. DNA origami with Complex Curvatures in 3D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Complex Curvatures in 3D 15 Apr 2011 Center researchers have developed a new DNA origami design strategy for engineering complex, arbitrarily shaped 3D DNA nanostructures that have substantial intrinsic curvatures. This strategy has been presented in a paper by Professors Hao Yan, Yan Liu and coworkers that was featured on the cover of Science for April 15, 2011. Use of DNA as a structural material is in the basis of the DNA nanotechnology searching for ways to assemble nanoscale structures

  16. Superconductors and Complex Transition Metal Oxides for Tunable THz

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasmonic Metamaterials (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Superconductors and Complex Transition Metal Oxides for Tunable THz Plasmonic Metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superconductors and Complex Transition Metal Oxides for Tunable THz Plasmonic Metamaterials The outline of this presentation are: (1) Motivation - Non-tunability of metal metamaterials; (2) Superconductors for temperature tunable metamaterials; (3) Ultrafast optical switching in superconductor

  17. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This

  18. Automated Testing Instrument for Verification of Complex Computational

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Automated Testing Instrument for Verification of Complex Computational Systems Verifying the functionality and proper operation of both hardware and software of complex, low, medium and high speed, Real-Time Instrumentation, Acquisition, Control and Protection systems is typically time consuming and costly. When these systems are expanded, modified, enhanced with new features or software 'bugs' corrected, re-verification of correct operation must be

  19. Highly Luminescent Lanthanide Complexes of 1 Hydroxy-2-pyridinones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Lawrence National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Jocher, Christoph J.; Castro-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-11-01

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes formed from two differing bis-bidentate ligands incorporating either alkyl or alkyl ether linkages and featuring the 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) chelate group in complex with Eu(III), Sm(III) and Gd(III) are reported. The Eu(III) complexes are among some of the best examples, pairing highly efficient emission ({Phi}{sub tot}{sup Eu} {approx} 21.5%) with high stability (pEu {approx} 18.6) in aqueous solution, and are excellent candidates for use in biological assays. A comparison of the observed behavior of the complexes with differing backbone linkages shows remarkable similarities, both in stability and photophysical properties. Low temperature photophysical measurements for a Gd(III) complex were also used to gain insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree with corresponding TD-DFT calculations for a model complex. A comparison of the high resolution Eu(III) emission spectra in solution and from single crystals also revealed a more symmetric coordination geometry about the metal ion in solution due to dynamic rotation of the observed solid state structure.

  20. Combustion-related studies using weakly-bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaudet, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    Binary van der Waals complexes involving species of interest to combustion research are prepared in supersonic free-jet expansions, and their photochemical and photophysical properties are probed by using IR tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy. In the first phase, geometries and other molecular properties are being determined from vibration-rotational spectra. In the second phase, these complexes will be used as precursors to study photoinitiated reactions in precursor geometry limited environments. Two complementary classes of binary complexes are being investigated. The first involves molecular oxygen and hydrogen containing constituents (e.g. O{sub 2}-HCN, O{sub 2}-HF, O{sub 2}-HCl, O{sub 2}-HBr, O{sub 2}-HI and O{sub 2}-hydrocarbons). These species are interesting candidates for study since upon photodissociating the hydride portion, the reaction H and O{sub 2} via the vibrationally excited HO{sub 2} intermediate can conceivably be studied, (e.g. BrH-O{sub 2} + hv(193 nm) {yields} Br-H-O{sub 2} {yields} Br + HO{sub 2} {yields} Br + OH + O). High resolution IR spectroscopy of such complexes have not been obtained previously and the structural information deriving from IR spectra is certainly very useful for better designing and understanding photoinitiated reactions that occur in these complexes.

  1. EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities

  2. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Decision support systems and methods for complex networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak Chung; Ma, Jian; Mackey, Patrick S; Chen, Yousu; Schneider, Kevin P

    2012-02-28

    Methods and systems for automated decision support in analyzing operation data from a complex network. Embodiments of the present invention utilize these algorithms and techniques not only to characterize the past and present condition of a complex network, but also to predict future conditions to help operators anticipate deteriorating and/or problem situations. In particular, embodiments of the present invention characterize network conditions from operation data using a state estimator. Contingency scenarios can then be generated based on those network conditions. For at least a portion of all of the contingency scenarios, risk indices are determined that describe the potential impact of each of those scenarios. Contingency scenarios with risk indices are presented visually as graphical representations in the context of a visual representation of the complex network. Analysis of the historical risk indices based on the graphical representations can then provide trends that allow for prediction of future network conditions.

  4. Complexation of lanthanides and actinides by acetohydroxamic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.J.; Sinkov, S.I.; Choppin, G.R.

    2008-07-01

    Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a suitable reagent for the complexant-based, as opposed to reductive, stripping of plutonium and neptunium ions from the tributylphosphate solvent phase in advanced PUREX or UREX processes designed for future nuclear-fuel reprocessing. Stripping is achieved by the formation of strong hydrophilic complexes with the tetravalent actinides in nitric acid solutions. To underpin such applications, knowledge of the complexation constants of AHA with all relevant actinide (5f) and lanthanide (4f) ions is therefore important. This paper reports the determination of stability constants of AHA with the heavier lanthanide ions (Dy-Yb) and also U(IV) and Th(IV) ions. Comparisons with our previously published AHA stability-constant data for 4f and 5f ions are made. (authors)

  5. Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Camp, Clément; Settineri, Nicholas; Lefèvre, Julia; Jupp, Andrew R.; Goicoechea, José M.; Maron, Laurent; Arnold, John

    2015-06-20

    New tris-amidinate actinide (Th, U) complexes containing a rare O-bound terminal phosphaethynolate (OCP⁻) ligand were synthesized and fully characterized. The cyanate (OCN⁻) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) analogs were prepared for comparison and feature a preferential N-coordination to the actinide metals. The Th(amid)3(OCP) complex reacts with Ni(COD)2 to yield the heterobimetallic adduct (amid)3Th(μ-η1(O):η2(C,P)-OCP)Ni(COD) featuring an unprecedented reduced (OCP⁻) bent fragment bridging the two metals.

  6. A Multiobjective Optimization Framework for Stochastic Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas; Maroulas, Vasileios; Xiong, Professor Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of subsystems that interact with each other and the environment. We treat the stochastic control problem as a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution is an optimal control policy that minimizes the average cost criterion for the entire system. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those we study here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value in deriving online an optimal control policy in complex systems.

  7. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olaf Sporns

    2008-01-23

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  8. Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration fieldoffices / Welcome to the NNSA Production Office / NPO News Releases Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement February 26, 2016 Click here for a larger image OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- Dismantlement of W69 canned subassemblies (CSAs) has been completed at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The W69 was the warhead for the short-range attack missile (SRAM) and was retired from the U.S. nuclear stockpile in 1992. The last W69 weapon was dismantled

  9. Complex chaos in the conditional dynamics of qubits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiss, T. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, P. O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Jex, I.; Vymetal, S. [Department of Physics, FJFI CVUT, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1-Stare Mesto (Czech Republic); Alber, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    We analyze the consequences of iterative measurement-induced nonlinearity on the dynamical behavior of qubits. We present a one-qubit scheme where the equation governing the time evolution is a complex-valued nonlinear map with one complex parameter. In contrast to the usual notion of quantum chaos, exponential sensitivity to the initial state occurs here. We calculate analytically the Lyapunov exponent based on the overlap of quantum states, and find that it is positive. We present a few illustrative examples of the emerging dynamics.

  10. Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu2+ complexes in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solutions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu2+ complexes in solutions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Origins of optical absorption characteristics of Cu2+ complexes in solutions Authors: Qiu, S R ; Wood, B C ; Ehrmann, P R ; Demos, S G ; Miller, P E ; Schaffers, K I ; Suratwala, T I Publication Date: 2015-02-27 OSTI Identifier: 1234585 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-668007 DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal

  11. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Olaf Sporns

    2010-01-08

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  12. Uranium at Y-12: Accountability | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science EDGE ARTICLE View Article Online View Journal £ 1 CrossMark <-click for updates Cite this: DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02150b Uranium and thorium complexes of the phosphaethynolate ionf Clement Camp,a Nicholas Settineri,a Julia Lefevre,b Andrew R. Jupp,c Jose M. Goicoechea,c Laurent Maron*b and John Arnold*a Received 14th June 2015 Accepted 17th July 2015 DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02150b www.rsc.org/chemicalscience New tris-amidinate actinide (Th, U) complexes containing a rare O-bound terminal

  13. DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space Authors: Han, D., Pal, S., Nangreave, J., Deng, Z., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space Source: Science Year: 2011 Volume: 332 Pages: 342-346 ABSTRACT: We present a strategy to design and construct self-assembling DNA nanostructures that define intricate curved surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space using the DNA origami folding technique. Double-helical DNA is bent to follow

  14. A duality framework for stochastic optimal control of complex systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of interactive subsystems. We formulate a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems and provide a duality framework to prove that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion of the system. We provide the conditions of existence and a geometric interpretation of the solution. For practical situations having constraints consistent with those studied here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value when we seek to derive online the optimal control policy in complex systems.

  15. Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex DE-AC05-00OR22800 Operated by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Updated to Modification 297 dated 09/30/2013 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract dated 8/31/2000 (pdf, 13,886KB) Y-12 A001 (9/15/00) (pdf, 60KB) Y-12 Conformed Contract (Conformed to Mod 297 dated 09/30/2013 (pdf, 4201 KB) Y-12 A002 (10/15/00) (pdf, 130KB)

  16. Is the bipyridyl thorium metallocene a low-valent thorium complex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thorium complex? A combined experimental and computational study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the bipyridyl thorium metallocene a low-valent thorium complex? ...

  17. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory Citation ... This content will become publicly available on April 27, 2016 Title: Complex-energy ...

  18. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Michael D.

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55?m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  19. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  20. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  1. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  2. Exploring Complex Systems Aspects of Blackout Risk and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2011-01-01

    Electric power transmission systems are a key infrastructure, and blackouts of these systems have major consequences for the economy and national security. Analyses of blackout data suggest that blackout size distributions have a power law form over much of their range. This result is an indication that blackouts behave as a complex dynamical system. We use a simulation of an upgrading power transmission system to investigate how these complex system dynamics impact the assessment and mitigation of blackout risk. The mitigation of failures in complex systems needs to be approached with care. The mitigation efforts can move the system to a new dynamic equilibrium while remaining near criticality and preserving the power law region. Thus, while the absolute frequency of blackouts of all sizes may be reduced, the underlying forces can still cause the relative frequency of large blackouts to small blackouts to remain the same. Moreover, in some cases, efforts to mitigate small blackouts can even increase the frequency of large blackouts. This result occurs because the large and small blackouts are not mutually independent, but are strongly coupled by the complex dynamics.

  3. Direct observation of photoinduced bent nitrosyl excited-state complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Steele, Ryan P.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-06-28

    Ground state structures with side-on nitrosyl ({eta}{sup 2}-NO) and isonitrosyl (ON) ligands have been observed in a variety of transition-metal complexes. In contrast, excited state structures with bent-NO ligands have been proposed for years but never directly observed. Here we use picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modeling to study the photochemistry of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO), a model transition-metal-NO compound. Surprisingly, we have observed no evidence for ON and {eta}{sup 2}-NO structural isomers, but have observed two bent-NO complexes. DFT modeling of the ground and excited state potentials indicates that the bent-NO complexes correspond to triplet excited states. Photolysis of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO) with a 400-nm pump pulse leads to population of a manifold of excited states which decay to form an excited state triplet bent-NO complex within 1 ps. This structure relaxes to the ground triplet state in ca. 350 ps to form a second bent-NO structure.

  4. Vulnerability analysis for complex networks using aggressive abstraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin L.

    2010-06-01

    Large, complex networks are ubiquitous in nature and society, and there is great interest in developing rigorous, scalable methods for identifying and characterizing their vulnerabilities. This paper presents an approach for analyzing the dynamics of complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler, but mathematically equivalent, representation, the required analysis is performed on the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit vulnerability-preserving, finite state abstractions, and develop efficient algorithms for computing these abstractions. We then propose a vulnerability analysis methodology which combines these finite state abstractions with formal analytics from theoretical computer science to yield a comprehensive vulnerability analysis process for networks of realworld scale and complexity. The potential of the proposed approach is illustrated with a case study involving a realistic electric power grid model and also with brief discussions of biological and social network examples.

  5. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  6. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  7. Phthalamide lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  8. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-07-29

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  9. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2006-03-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  10. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2005-03-08

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  11. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grgory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(?-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-?-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(?-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the ?-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  12. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observedmore » when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.« less

  13. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  14. Evidence of a New Hydrogen Complex in Dilute Nitride Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisognin, G.; De Salvador, D.; Napolitani, E.; Berti, M.; Polimeni, A.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Guengerich, M.; Klar, P. J.; Bais, G.; Jabeen, F.; Piccin, M.; Rubini, S.; Martelli, F.; Franciosi, A.

    2007-04-10

    By means of high resolution x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements we demonstrate that, as a result of hydrogen irradiation of GaAs1-xNx/GaAs, the original tensile strain of the as-grown material is reversed into a compressive one and that, at the same time, N atoms are electronically passivated. We show that the amount of compressive strain is determined exclusively by N concentration. This compressive strain is caused by the formation of peculiar N-H complexes and disappears after moderate annealing, while N electronic passivation still holds. These experimental results demonstrate that the lattice properties of fully-hydrogenated GaAs1-xNx/GaAs are ruled by a H complex which is different and less stable than that responsible for electronic passivation of N in GaAs1-xNx/GaAs.

  15. A duality framework for stochastic optimal control of complex systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of interactive subsystems. We formulate a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems and provide a duality framework to prove that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion of the system. We provide the conditions of existence and a geometric interpretation of the solution. For practical situations having constraints consistent with those studied here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value when we seek to derivemore » online the optimal control policy in complex systems.« less

  16. Method for synthesizing metal bis(borano) hypophosphite complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph G.

    2013-06-18

    The present invention describes the synthesis of a family of metal bis(borano) hypophosphite complexes. One procedure described in detail is the syntheses of complexes beginning from phosphorus trichloride and sodium borohydride. Temperature, solvent, concentration, and atmosphere are all critical to ensure product formation. In the case of sodium bis(borano) hypophosphite, hydrogen gas was evolved upon heating at temperatures above 150.degree. C. Included in this family of materials are the salts of the alkali metals Li, Na and K, and those of the alkaline earth metals Mg and Ca. Hydrogen storage materials are possible. In particular the lithium salt, Li[PH.sub.2(BH.sub.3).sub.2], theoretically would contain nearly 12 wt % hydrogen. Analytical data for product characterization and thermal properties are given.

  17. Daylighting and Electric Lighting Analysis for Complex Spaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-07

    SUPERLITE is a powerful lighting analysis program designed to accurately predict interior illuminance in complex building spaces due to daylight and electric lighting systems. The program enables users to model interior daylight levels for any sun and sky condition in spaces having windows, skylights or other standard fenestration systems. SUPERLITE Version 2.0 includes the capability to calculate electric lighting levels in addition to the daylighting prediction, allowing lighting performance simulation for integrated lighting systems. Themore » program calculates lighting levels on all interior surfaces, as well as on planes that can be arbitrarily positioned to represent work surfaces or other locations of interest. SUPERLITE is intended to be used by researchers and lighting designers who require detailed analysis of the illuminance distribution in architecturally complex spaces.« less

  18. Seismic analyses of equipment in 2736-Z complex. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the structural qualification for the existing equipment when subjected to seismic loading in the Plutonium Storage Complex. It replaces in entirety Revision 0 and reconciles the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) comments on Revision 0. The Complex consists of 2736-Z Building (plutonium storage vault), 2736-ZA Building (vault ventilation equipment building), and 2736-ZB Building (shipping/receiving, repackaging activities). The existing equipment structurally qualified in this report are the metal storage racks for 7 inch and lard cans in room 2 of Building 2736-Z; the cubicles, can holders and pedestals in rooms 1, 3, and 4 of Building 2736-Z; the ventilation duct including exhaust fans/motors, emergency diesel generator, and HEPA filter housing in Building 2736-ZA; the repackaging glovebox in Building 2736-ZB; and the interface duct between Buildings 2736-Z and 2736-ZA.

  19. Carboxy, carboalkoxy and carbamile substituted isonitrile radionuclide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Kronauge, James; Abrams, Michael J.

    1988-04-05

    A coordination complex comprising a radionuclide selected from the class consisting of radioactive isotopes of Tc, Ru, Co, Pt and Re and an isonitrile ligand of the formula: (CNX)R, where X is a lower alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, wherein R is selected from the group consisting of COOR.sup.1 and CONR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.1 can be H, a pharmaceutically acceptable cation, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 can be H, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, and R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 can be the same or different is disclosed. Kits that can be used to form these complexes are also disclosed.

  20. Carboxy, carboalkoxy and carbamile substituted isonitrile radionuclide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Kronauge, James; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A coordination complex comprising a radionuclide selected from the class consisting of radioactive isotopes of Tc, Ru, Co, Pt and Re and an isonitrile ligand of the formula: (CNX)R, where X is a lower alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, wherein R is selected from the group consisting of COOR.sup.1 and CONR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.1 can be H, a pharmaceutically acceptable cation, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms. R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 can be H, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, and R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 can be the same of different is disclosed. Kits that can be used to form these complexes are also disclosed.

  1. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.; Doering, M.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; Meissner, U.-G.

    2011-07-15

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  2. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I- September 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Summary Report

  3. Information Center Complex publications and presentations, 1971-1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, A.B.; Hawthorne, S.W.

    1981-08-01

    This indexed bibliography lists publications and presentations of the Information Center Complex, Information Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, from 1971 through 1980. The 659 entries cover such topics as toxicology, air and water pollution, management and transportation of hazardous wastes, energy resources and conservation, and information science. Publications range in length from 1 page to 3502 pages and include topical reports, books, journal articles, fact sheets, and newsletters. Author, title, and group indexes are provided. Annual updates are planned.

  4. Sir John Pople, Gaussian Code, and Complex Chemical Reactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sir John Pople, Gaussian Code, and Complex Chemical Reactions Resources with Additional Information Sir John A. Pople Courtesy of Northwestern University Sir John A. Pople [was] a mathematician who became a chemist and won a Nobel Prize in 1998 for a computer tool that describes the dance of molecules in chemical reactions ... . Dr. Pople was among the first to realize the potential of computers in chemistry. The behavior of all molecules is defined by the Schrödinger equation, the fundamental

  5. The Complex Systems Landscape of Future Urban Transportation | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory The Complex Systems Landscape of Future Urban Transportation In an effort "to examine the nexus of energy and mobility for future transportation systems," the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has launched the Systems and Modeling for Accelerated Research in Transportation (SMART) Mobility consortium. By studying mobility as a system researchers can predict future trends, an invaluable asset to policymakers as they prepare for the future of transportation. This

  6. NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The energy market is diversifying. In addition to traditional power sources, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and geothermal technologies as well. Each of these technologies has complex performance characteristics and economics that vary with location and other project specifics, making it difficult to analyze the viability of such projects. But that analysis is easier now, thanks to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  7. Y-12's New Face | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration recognized for outstanding procurement stewardship Tuesday, July 22, 2014 - 4:29pm The Y-12 National Security Complex recently was recognized by NNSA for achieving the highest savings rate in the NNSA enterprise for fiscal year 2013. At the recent Supply Chain Management Center (SCMC) biannual operational meeting, NNSA presented Y-12 Procurement Operations with the award for attaining the Highest Total Strategic Savings Rate among NNSA's seven management and

  8. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seglke, Brent W.; Lekin, Timothy P.

    2008-12-09

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  9. Structure and dynamics of small van der Waals complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loreau, J.

    2014-10-06

    We illustrate computational aspects of the calculation of the potential energy surfaces of small (up to five atoms) van der Waals complexes with high-level quantum chemistry techniques such as the CCSD(T) method with extended basis sets. We discuss the compromise between the required accuracy and the computational time. Further, we show how these potential energy surfaces can be fitted and used in dynamical calculations such as non-reactive inelastic scattering.

  10. BWXTymes, April 2005, Y-12 National Security Complex newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APRIL 2005 A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex NNSA authorizes restart of key Y-12 facility Process is fi nal step to full production operations Organizational changes board announced New offi cers and board members for the Y-12 Employees' Society have been elected. Offi cers * President-Thomas Watson, Manufacturing * Vice President-Ala Montgomery, Facilities, Infrastructure and Services * Secretary-Sue Toler, Public Affairs and Communications *

  11. EOI: Offsite Depleted Uranium Metalworking | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offsite Depleted ... EOI: Offsite Depleted Uranium Metalworking Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC (hereafter known as "CNS", for additional company information, see website (www.y12.doe.gov)), acting under its Prime Contract No. DE-NA0001942 with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), is soliciting an Expression of Interest (EOI) for offsite metalworking of Depleted Uranium, for the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Supplier should have experience in

  12. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.R.

    1989-08-01

    Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

  13. Elucidating the Complex Recombination Kinetics in Organic-Inorganic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trihalide Perovskites* | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Elucidating the Complex Recombination Kinetics in Organic-Inorganic Trihalide Perovskites* December 8, 2015 at 4:30pm/36-428 Dane de Quilettes University of Washington deQuilettes-2 Solution processed semiconductors are often plagued by performance limiting defects, surprisingly organometal trihalide perovskites (e.g. CH3NH3PbI3) have exhibited excellent photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies comparable to meticulously refined

  14. Environment, Safety and Health | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About / Environment, Safety and ... Environment, Safety and Health In performing Y-12's mission and in modernizing the Y-12 Complex, we are fully committed to ensuring the safety and health of our workers, the public, and the environment. Our commitment is described in our ES&H Policy Statement, which explains how Y-12's policy is integrated into our business processes and systems, day-to-day operations, modernization initiatives, and planning activities. Activities performed by Consolidated

  15. American Indian Complex to Cool Off Using Ice Storage System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Oklahoma City, summer temperatures can get above 100 degrees, making cooling more of a necessity than a luxury. But the designers of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum (AICCM) wanted to make cooling choices that reflect American Indian cultures' respect for the land. So, rather than using conventional air-conditioning, the museum's main complex will use an ice storage system estimated to save 644,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year.

  16. Geometric Transitions, Topological Strings, and Generalized Complex Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-06-29

    Mirror symmetry is one of the most beautiful symmetries in string theory. It helps us very effectively gain insights into non-perturbative worldsheet instanton effects. It was also shown that the study of mirror symmetry for Calabi-Yau flux compactification leads us to the territory of ''Non-Kaehlerity''. In this thesis we demonstrate how to construct a new class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua via generalized geometric transitions. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. From a variety of sources, including super-gravity analysis and KK reduction on SU(3) structure manifolds, we conclude that string theory connects Calabi-Yau spaces to both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds and the resulting manifolds lie in generalized complex geometry. We go on to study the topological twisted models on a class of generalized complex geometry, bi-Hermitian geometry, which is the most general target space for (2, 2) world-sheet theory with non-trivial H flux turned on. We show that the usual Kaehler A and B models are generalized in a natural way. Since the gauged supergravity is the low energy effective theory for the compactifications on generalized geometries, we study the fate of flux-induced isometry gauging in N = 2 IIA and heterotic strings under non-perturbative instanton effects. Interestingly, we find we have protection mechanisms preventing the corrections to the hyper moduli spaces. Besides generalized geometries, we also discuss the possibility of new NS-NS fluxes in a new doubled formalism.

  17. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  18. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  19. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  20. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  1. New Guide Helps Clarify Complex Clean Air Laws

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guide Helps Clarify Complex Clean Air Laws For information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., February 20, 1998 — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has released A Guide to the Emissions Certification Procedures for Aftermarket Conversions. This new federal guide can help fleet managers, equipment manufacturers and installers of vehicle conversion kits navigate through emissions regulations for vehicles converted

  2. Tag: technology transfer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology transfer Tag: technology transfer Displaying 1 - 10 of 12... Category: News CNS, UT chemical sensing technology wins R&D 100 Award An inexpensive, small and portable chemical sensor developed by Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC researchers at the Y-12 National Security Complex and the University of Tennessee received a pres More... Category: News CNS research teams named 2015 R&D 100 Award finalists CNS partners with universities on significant technology advances. More...

  3. Supplemental design requirements document solid waste operations complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocampo, V.P.; Boothe, G.F.; Broz, D.R.; Eaton, H.E.; Greager, T.M.; Huckfeldt, R.A.; Kooiker, S.L.; Lamberd, D.L.; Lang, L.L.; Myers, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    This document provides additional and supplemental information to the WHC-SD-W112-FDC-001, WHC-SD-W113-FDC-001, and WHC-SD-W100-FDC-001. It provides additional requirements for the design and summarizes Westinghouse Hanford Company key design guidance and establishes the technical baseline agreements to be used for definitive design common to the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) Facilities (Project W-112, Project W-113, and WRAP 2A).

  4. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  5. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have difficulty simultaneously identifying and spatially resolving this realm of matter, which ranges from about 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. But ALS researchers recently developed a broadband imaging technique that looks inside the mesoscale realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The new technique,

  6. A Collection of Complex Permittivity and Permeability Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, W.; Byrd, J.; Johnson, J.; Smithwick, J.

    1993-02-01

    We present the results of measurements of the complex permittivity and permeability over a frequency range of 0.1-5.1 GHz for a range of microwave absorbing materials used in a variety of accelerator applications. We also describe the automated measurement technique which uses swept-frequency S-parameter measurements made on a strip transmission line device loaded with the material under test.

  7. Broader National Security Missions | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Broader National Security ... Broader National Security Missions Learn more For 70 years, the Y-12 National Security Complex has transformed in response to changing national security priorities and assigned missions, evolving technological opportunities, and growing concerns regarding health and public safety. As the global security situation has changed, the site has adapted - beginning as a uranium enrichment facility, transforming to a weapons manufacturing facility, and accepting new

  8. Overview of contamination from US and Russian nuclear complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper briefly compares the United States and Russian weapons complexes and provides a perspective on the releases of radioactivity to the environment in both countries. Fortunately, the technologies, data, models, and scientific experience that have been gained over the last 50 years are being shared between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (MINATOM) which constitutes a new environmental partnership between the two countries.

  9. Alarm Response Training ribbon cutting | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alarm Response Training ... Alarm Response Training ribbon cutting Posted: October 24, 2014 - 4:45pm The Alarm Response Training Academy officially celebrated its new location at the Y-12 National Security Complex Thursday,Oct. 23. On hand to cut the ribbon were (pictured from left) Teresa Robbins, NNSA Production Office Acting Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Health and Quality; Anne Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief

  10. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  11. Pseudopotentials of the particles interactions in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Muratov, M. M.

    2011-10-15

    This article discusses the effective interaction potentials in a complex dusty plasma. The interaction of electrons with atoms and the interaction between dusty particles are studied by the method of the dielectric response function. In the effective interaction, potential between electron and atom the quantum effects of diffraction were taken into account. On the curve of the interaction potential between dust particles under certain conditions the oscillations can be observed.

  12. Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors of Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems | Argonne National Laboratory Rob Jacob talks about climate models Climate Models: Rob Jacob Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors of Earth systems By Angela Hardin * December 16, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Whenever news breaks about what Earth's climate is expected to be like decades into the future or how much rainfall various regions around the country or the world are likely to receive, those educated estimates are generated by a global climate model. But

  13. Advanced Nuclear Fuel | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium-based Technologies / Advanced Nuclear Fuel Advanced Nuclear Fuel Y-12 developers co-roll zirconium clad LEU-Mo. The Y-12 National Security Complex has over 60 years of reactor fuel experience and for more than 25 years has supplied feedstock material for U.S. research reactor fuel. Now, Y-12's materials science expertise contributes to nonproliferation progress and advances new fuel development. Uranium/molybdenum foils are essential for conversion of high-power research reactors that

  14. Alarm Response Training | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Alarm Response Training Academy opens at Y-12 Friday, October 24, 2014 - 8:43am NNSA Blog The Alarm Response Training Academy officially celebrated its new location at the Y-12 National Security Complex today. On hand to cut the ribbon were (from left) Teresa Robbins, NNSA Production Office Acting Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Health and Quality; Anne Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief Operating

  15. Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by Single

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecule and Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy (2DFS) | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by Single Molecule and Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy (2DFS) March 20, 2014 at 3pm/36-428 Andrew Marcus Department of Chemistry, Univeristy of Oregon marcus001 Abstract: The properties of biological macromolecules are greatly influenced by local soft interactions between proteins, nucleic acids, sugars and lipids. Such

  16. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of prokaryotic partition is the Escherichia coli P1 plasmid par system, which consists of a centromere

  17. David Muller > Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Applied and Engineering Physics > Faculty Directory > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell David Muller Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides Professor Applied and Engineering Physics Research Group Webpage dm24@cornell.edu He joined the Applied and Engineering Physics faculty at Cornell University in July 2003, is a graduate of the University of Sydney and completed his Ph.D. in physics at Cornell in 1996. David was a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories

  18. Gas chemical complex to be built at Seidi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-12-23

    Turkmenistan, the Central Asian republic of the CIS, is preparing to set up its first petrochemical complex as part of an industrialization program. Sources in Ashkhabad say the gas authority, Turkmengaz, has signed a letter of intent with TPL (Rome) to build a gas cracker and polyethylene (PE) units. Promoted by the deputy prime minister of Turkmenistan, Nazar Soyunov, the complex is expected to be built at Seidi, near an existing oil refinery. Feedstock will be natural gas supplied by Turkmengaz. It is understood that two processes - from BP Chemicals and Phillips - are being considered for PE production. Total PE capacity will be 200,000 m.t./year. An additional plant, making 10,000 m.t./year of the PE comonomer butene-1, is also planned. Turkmengaz is looking for a quick return on investment and hopes to export 150,000 m.t./year of PE to Western Europe, the Turkic region, and Southeast Asia. The contact is expected to be signed as soon as financing has been raised. The complex has been estimated to require investment of $1 billion. Basic engineering on the cracker, which will use KTI (Zoetermeer, the Netherlands) furnaces, has been completed.

  19. Relationships Between Complex Core Level Spectra and Materials Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelin, Constance J.; Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Chambers, Scott A.; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-01

    The XPS of many oxides are quite complex and there may be several peaks of significant intensity for each subshell. These peaks arise from many-electron effects, which normally are treated with configuration interaction (CI) wavefunctions where static correlation effects are taken into account. It is common to use semiempirical methods to determine the matrix elements of the CI Hamiltonian and there are few rigorous CI calculations where parameters are not adjusted to fit experiment. In contrast, we present, in the present work, theoretical XPS spectra obtained with rigorous CI wavefunctions for CeO2 where the XPS are especially complex; several different core levels are studied. This study uses an embedded CeO8 cluster model to represent bulk CeO2 and the relativistic CI wavefunctions are determined using four-component spinors from Dirac-Fock calculations. In particular, we examine the importance of interatomic many-body effects where there is a transfer of electrons from occupied oxygen 2p orbitals into empty cation orbitals as it is common to ascribe the complex XPS to this effect. We also contrast the importance of many-body charge-transfer effects for the isoelectronic cations of Ce4+ and La3+. The long-range goal of this work is to relate the XPS features to the nature of the chemical bonding in CeO2 and we describe our progress toward this goal.

  20. Constructing the S-matrix With Complex Factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Philip C.; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP

    2009-06-19

    A remarkable connection between BCFW recursion relations and constraints on the S-matrix was made by Benincasa and Cachazo in 0705.4305, who noted that mutual consistency of different BCFW constructions of four-particle amplitudes generates nontrivial (but familiar) constraints on three-particle coupling constants - these include gauge invariance, the equivalence principle, and the lack of non-trivial couplings for spins > 2. These constraints can also be derived with weaker assumptions, by demanding the existence of four-point amplitudes that factorize properly in all unitarity limits with complex momenta. From this starting point, we show that the BCFW prescription can be interpreted as an algorithm for fully constructing a tree-level S-matrix, and that complex factorization of general BCFW amplitudes follows from the factorization of four-particle amplitudes. The allowed set of BCFW deformations is identified, formulated entirely as a statement on the three-particle sector, and using only complex factorization as a guide. Consequently, our analysis based on the physical consistency of the S-matrix is entirely independent of field theory. We analyze the case of pure Yang-Mills, and outline a proof for gravity. For Yang-Mills, we also show that the well-known scaling behavior of BCFW-deformed amplitudes at large z is a simple consequence of factorization. For gravity, factorization in certain channels requires asymptotic behavior {approx} 1/z{sup 2}.

  1. Physical protection technologies for the reconfigured weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was a memtier of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Safeguards and Security (S&S) team providing assistance to the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Weapons Complex Reconfigaration. New and improved S&S concepts, approaches and technologies were needed to support both new and upgraded facilities. Physical protection technologies used in these facilities were to use proven state-of-the-art systems in such areas as image processing, alarm communications and display, entry control, contraband detection, intrusion detection and video assessment, access delay, automation and robotics, and various insider protection systems. Factors considered in the selection of these technologies were protection against the design basis threat, reducing S&S life-cycle costs, automation of S&S functions to minimize operational costs, access to critical assets and exposure of people to hazardous environments, increasing the amount of delay to an outsider adversary and having reliable and maintainable systems. This paper will discuss the S&S issues, requirements, technology opportunities and needs. Physical protection technologies and systems considered in the design effort of the Weapons Complex Reconfiguration facilities will be reviewed.

  2. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  3. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  4. Y-12 Times, A newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex The Jack Case Center at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The Jack Case Center at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The Y-12 National Security Complex is one of the nation's most important national security assets. The 811 acre site contains the nation's stockpile of highly enriched uranium and also performs nuclear non-proliferation missions. Historically, Y-12's operations focused on a uranium enrichment method that used vast

  5. Y-12 National Security Complex's Waste Diversion Efforts, OAS-L-12-08

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex's primary mission is to support of the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance program. Activities include assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons components, secure storage of special nuclear material (SNM), and various other nuclear weapons-related activities. Other activities include various aspects of testing

  6. Molybdenum Hydride and Dihydride Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with a Pendant Amine: Formation of Complexes With Bound Amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-07-06

    CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes (PNP = (R2PCH2)2NMe, R = Et or Ph) were synthesized by displacement of two CO ligands of CpMo(CO)3H by the PNP ligand; these complexes were characterized by IR and variable temperature 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes are formed as mixture of cis and trans-isomers. Both cis-CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and trans-CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical oxidation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H in CH3CN are both irreversible at slow scan rates and quasi-reversible at higher scan rates, with E1/2 = -0.36 V (vs. Cp2Fe+/0) for CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and E1/2 = -0.18 V for CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H. Hydride abstraction from CpMo(CO)(PNP)H with [Ph3C]+[A]- (A = B(C6F5)4 or BArF4; [ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]) afforded “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes that feature the amine bound to the metal. Displacement of the κ3 Mo-N bond by CD3CN gives [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(CD3CN)]+. The kinetics of this reaction were studied by NMR spectroscopy, providing the activation parameters ΔH‡ = 22.1 kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = 1.89 cal/(mol·K), Ea = 22.7 kcal/mol. Protonation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H affords [CpMo(CO)(κ2-PEtNMePEt)(H)2]+ as a Mo dihydride complex, which loses H2 to generate [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PEtNMePEt)]+ at room temperature. CpMo(CO)(dppp)H (dppp = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) was studied as a Mo diphosphine analogue without a pendant amine, and the product of protonation of this complex gives [CpMo(CO)(dppp)(H)2]+. Our results show that the pendant amine has a strong driving force to form stable “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes, and also promotes hydrogen elimination from [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(H)2]+ complexes by formation of Mo-N dative bond. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. We thank Monte Helm, Elliott Hulley and Deanna Miller for help on the crystallography, and Ming Fang for assistance on the electrochemical experiments.

  7. The activation of carbon dioxide by niobocene complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    The reduction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(Cl)R (Cp[prime] = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 5]H[sub 4]CH[sub 3]) by Na/Hg under one atmosphere of CO[sub 2] produces Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])R (R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]Ph, CH[sub 3]). Thermolysis of Cp [sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])R (R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]Ph) in THF at 60[degrees]C (at low concentration for R = CH[sub 2]Ph) resulted in decarbonylation of the complex with first order kinetics to generate the corresponding metal-oxo complexes Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(O)R. The same process is greatly accelerated photochemically with a quantum yield of 0.17 for R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3]. At higher concentration, carbonyl complex Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)Ch[sub 2]Ph is also generated in the thermolysis of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])CH[sub 2]Ph. In continuing effort to promote migratory insertion of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], its reactions with of a variety of Lewis acids (LiPF[sub 6], BF[sub 3][center dot]Et[sub 2]O, ZnCl[sub 2], HgCl[sub 2], CdCl[sub 2], and ClSiMe[sub 3]) have been investigated. The interaction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3] with several Lewis acids resulted in its facile decarbonylation. The carbonyl complexes Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)R (R = CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]CMe[sub 3], CH[sub 2]Ph, CH[sub 3]) reacted cleanly and quantitatively with molecular oxygen under ambient conditions to produce the corresponding CO[sub 2] complexes, Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CO[sub 2])R, in high yield. The interaction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)H with O[sub 2] generates a novel formato complex. The reaction of Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb(CO)CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3] with elemental sulfur (S[sub 8]) gives a carbonyl sulfide complex Cp[prime][sub 2]Nb([eta][sup 2]-CSO) CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3], whose structure has been established crystallographically.

  8. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  9. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  10. Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28

    Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex begins with a global to regional perspective regarding the location of low-level and mixed low-level waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site. For decades, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has served as a vital disposal resource in the nation-wide cleanup of former nuclear research and testing facilities. State-of-the-art waste management sites at the NNSS offer a safe, permanent disposal option for U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Department of Defense facilities generating cleanup-related radioactive waste.

  11. The greening of Y-12 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The greening of Y-12 The greening of Y-12 Posted: September 9, 2013 - 2:48pm With more than 1,230 pollution prevention initiatives reducing some 2.07 billion pounds of waste since 1993, Y-12 sustainability programs yielded $70.7 million in cost efficiencies to the Y-12 Complex, and consequently, to taxpayers. Here are a few other Y-12 green facts: In FY 2012, Y-12 recycled more than 3 million pounds of materials off-site including routine paper, cardboard, wooden pallets, scrap metal, lamps,

  12. Underground nuclear energy complexes - technical and economic advantages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Carl W; Kunze, Jay F; Giraud, Kellen M; Mahar, James M

    2010-01-01

    Underground nuclear power plant parks have been projected to be economically feasible compared to above ground instalIations. This paper includes a thorough cost analysis of the savings, compared to above ground facilities, resulting from in-place entombment (decommissioning) of facilities at the end of their life. reduced costs of security for the lifetime of the various facilities in the underground park. reduced transportation costs. and reduced costs in the operation of the waste storage complex (also underground). compared to the fair share of the costs of operating a national waste repository.

  13. Y-12 construction | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Park | National Nuclear Security Administration completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National Park Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 9:43am Tom Richey of the Y-12 National Security Complex, left, and his son Austin put a bench in place at the Elkmont Campground amphitheater as project leader Al Roberson and Scott Underwood, both of Y-12, look on. The groups recent refurbishment of the amphitheater carries on a 20-year tradition of supporting the Great Smoky Mountains

  14. Health monitoring display system for a complex plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ridolfo, Charles F.; Harmon, Daryl L.; Colin, Dreyfuss

    2006-08-08

    A single page enterprise wide level display provides a comprehensive readily understood representation of the overall health status of a complex plant. Color coded failure domains allow rapid intuitive recognition of component failure status. A three-tier hierarchy of displays provide details on the health status of the components and systems displayed on the enterprise wide level display in a manner that supports a logical drill down to the health status of sub-components on Tier 1 to expected faults of the sub-components on Tier 2 to specific information relative to expected sub-component failures on Tier 3.

  15. EOI: Body Armor | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Body Armor EOI: Body Armor Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC (hereafter known as "CNS", for additional company information, see website (www.y12.doe.gov)), acting under its Prime Contract No. DE-NA0001942 with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), is soliciting an Expression of Interest (EOI) for replacement of Body Armor for the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This request for EOI does not constitute an invitation for sealed bids, a request for

  16. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA Duplication Revealed in New Beginnings DNA Duplication Revealed in New Beginnings April 3, 2012 - 9:36am Addthis The DNA replication origin recognition complex (ORC) is a six-protein machine with a slightly twisted half-ring structure (yellow). ORC is proposed to wrap around and bend approximately 70 base pairs of double stranded DNA (red and blue). When a replication initiator Cdc6 (green) joins ORC, the partial ring is now complete and ready to load another protein onto the DNA. This last

  17. Self-Diffusion in a Liquid Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunomura, S.; Samsonov, D.; Zhdanov, S.; Morfill, G.

    2006-01-13

    Self-diffusion has been experimentally studied in a two-dimensional underdamped liquid complex (dusty) plasma. It was found that the self-diffusion coefficient D increases linearly with the temperature T: D/{omega}{sub E}a{sup 2}=(0.019{+-}0.007)(T/T{sub m}-1), where T{sub m}, {omega}{sub E}, and a are the melting temperature, the Einstein frequency, and the mean particle separation, respectively. No superdiffusion was observed, whereas a subdiffusion occurred at temperatures close to melting.

  18. Comparison of topotactic fluorination methods for complex oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, E. J. Choquette, A. K.; Huon, A.; Kulesa, S. Z.; May, S. J.; Barbash, D.

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the synthesis of SrFeO{sub 3??}F{sub ?} (? and ? ? 1) perovskite films using topotactic fluorination reactions utilizing poly(vinylidene fluoride) as a fluorine source. Two different fluorination methods, a spin-coating and a vapor transport approach, were performed on as-grown SrFeO{sub 2.5} films. We highlight differences in the structural, compositional, and optical properties of the oxyfluoride films obtained via the two methods, providing insight into how fluorination reactions can be used to modify electronic and optical behavior in complex oxide heterostructures.

  19. Modeling and Algorithmic Approaches to Constitutively-Complex, Microstructured Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Gregory H.; Forest, Gregory

    2011-12-22

    We present a new multiscale model for complex uids based on three scales: microscopic, kinetic, and continuum. We choose the microscopic level as Kramers' bead-rod model for polymers, which we describe as a system of stochastic di#11;erential equations with an implicit constraint formulation. The associated Fokker-Planck equation is then derived, and adiabatic elimination removes the fast momentum coordinates. Approached in this way, the kinetic level reduces to a dispersive drift equation. The continuum level is modeled with a #12;nite volume Godunov-projection algorithm. We demonstrate computation of viscoelastic stress divergence using this multiscale approach.

  20. ICDF Complex Waste Profile and Verification Sample Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-10-01

    This guidance document will assist waste generators who characterize waste streams destined for disposal at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The purpose of this document is to develop a conservative but appropriate way to (1) characterize waste for entry into the ICDF; (2) ensure compliance with the waste acceptance criteria; and (3) facilitate disposal at the ICDF landfill or evaporation pond. In addition, this document will establish the waste verification process used by ICDF personnel to ensure that untreated waste meets applicable ICDF acceptance limits

  1. Rodigo 1, northern Italy: A geothermal complex for agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faccini, U.; Magnoni, S.; Sordelli, C. )

    1993-04-01

    The Padana Valley is an area rich in warm waters. At Rodigo, near Mantua, a well drilled by Agip supplied 80 m[sup 3]/h of water at 59[degree]C. A cooperative of farmers, with the aid of the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Milan, has developed a complex for agricultural uses of these warm waters: greenhouses, plants for cereal and forage drying and tanks for aquaculture, all utilizing geothermal energy. The Institute of Applied Physics has also installed a continuous radon monitoring station which measures the radon level in the geothermal well.

  2. Space-time complexity in solid state models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    In this Workshop on symmetry-breaking it is appropriate to include the evolving fields of nonlinear-nonequilibrium systems in which transitions to and between various degrees of ''complexity'' (including ''chaos'') occur in time or space or both. These notions naturally bring together phenomena of pattern formation and chaos and therefore have ramifications for a huge array of natural sciences - astrophysics, plasmas and lasers, hydrodynamics, field theory, materials and solid state theory, optics and electronics, biology, pattern recognition and evolution, etc. Our particular concerns here are with examples from solid state and condensed matter.

  3. Effective Interaction Potentials and Physical Properties of Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.

    2009-11-10

    Microscopic, thermodynamic and transport properties of complex plasmas are investigated on the basis of effective potentials of interparticle interaction. These potentials take into account correlation effects and quantum-mechanical diffraction. Plasma composition, thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and helium plasmas are obtained for a wide region of coupling parameter. Collision processes in partially ionized plasma are considered; some kinetic characteristics such as phase shift, scattering cross section, bremsstrahlung cross section and absorption coefficient are investigated. Dynamic and transport properties of dusty plasma are studied by computer simulation method of the Langevin dynamics.

  4. Parallel Computation of Persistent Homology using the Blowup Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Ryan; Morozov, Dmitriy

    2015-04-27

    We describe a parallel algorithm that computes persistent homology, an algebraic descriptor of a filtered topological space. Our algorithm is distinguished by operating on a spatial decomposition of the domain, as opposed to a decomposition with respect to the filtration. We rely on a classical construction, called the Mayer--Vietoris blowup complex, to glue global topological information about a space from its disjoint subsets. We introduce an efficient algorithm to perform this gluing operation, which may be of independent interest, and describe how to process the domain hierarchically. We report on a set of experiments that help assess the strengths and identify the limitations of our method.

  5. ARRA wraps up | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARRA wraps up ARRA wraps up Posted: July 18, 2012 - 1:52pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 aimed to create jobs, and at the Y-12 National Security Complex that meant hiring workers to clean up waste from the Cold War. Over the span of three years, more than 2,100 jobs were created - about 200 with B&W Y-12 and more than 1,900 with subcontractors. For Danny Gibson, the call to work at Y-12 couldn't have come at a better time. A

  6. Subtask 4: Artificial reaction center-antenna complex | Center for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 4: Artificial reaction center-antenna complex All papers by year Subtask 1 Subtask 2 Subtask 3 Subtask 4 Subtask 5 Megiatto, J.D., Méndez-Hernández, D.D., Tejeda-Ferrari, M.E., Teillout, A.-L., Llansola-Portolés, M.J., Kodis, G., Poluektov, O.G., Rajh, T., Mujica, V., Groy, T. L., Gust, D., Moore, T.A., Moore, A.L. (2014) A bioinspired redox relay that mimics radical interactions of the Tyr-His pairs of photosystem II, Nature Chemistry, 6, 423-428,

  7. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  8. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the most abundant transition element on earth, and is typically found in formal oxidation states of either II or III. However, high valent Fe(IV) and Fe(V) complexes are invoked in the mechanisms of both heme and non-heme enzymes; and Fe(VI) is known to exist in the mineral ferrate.[1] Ferrate is a powerful oxidant, which has been used in soil and wastewater treatment, batteries, and disinfectants; however, it is unstable and often indiscriminately reactive. This has driven chemists to

  9. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers.

  10. Using multiple perspectives to suppress information and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, R.L. |; Webster, R.B.; Hartley, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Dissemination of battlespace information involves getting information to particular warfighters that is both useful and in a form that facilitates the tasks of those particular warfighters. There are two issues which motivate this problem of dissemination. The first issue deals with disseminating pertinent information to a particular warfighter. This can be thought of as information suppression. The second issue deals with facilitating the use of the information by tailoring the computer interface to the specific tasks of an individual warfighter. This can be thought of as interface complexity suppression. This paper presents a framework for suppressing information using an object-based knowledge representation methodology. This methodology has the ability to represent knowledge and information in multiple perspectives. Information can be suppressed by creating a perspective specific to an individual warfighter. In this way, only the information pertinent and useful to a warfighter is made available to that warfighter. Information is not removed, lost, or changed, but spread among multiple perspectives. Interface complexity is managed in a similar manner. Rather than have one generalized computer interface to access all information, the computer interface can be divided into interface elements. Interface elements can then be selected and arranged into a perspective-specific interface. This is done in a manner to facilitate completion of tasks contained in that perspective. A basic battlespace domain containing ground and air elements and associated warfighters is used to exercise the methodology.

  11. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0more » to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.« less

  12. Managing Scientific Software Complexity with Bocca and CCA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allan, Benjamin A.; Norris, Boyana; Elwasif, Wael R.; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with the component glue code and software build processes to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error-prone. Component-based software meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity to the extent that the user must learn and remember the interfaces and conventions of the component model itself. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enablemore » application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software-engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for high-performance computing (HPC) applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the languages commonly used in scientific applications: C, C++, Fortran, Python and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby on Rails for web applications: start with something that works, and evolve it to the user's purpose.« less

  13. Managing scientific software complexity with Bocca and CCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Allan A.; Norris, Boyana; Elwasif, Wael R; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with the component glue code and software build processes to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error-prone. Component-based software meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity to the extent that the user must learn and remember the interfaces and conventions of the component model itself. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enable application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software-engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for high-performance computing (HPC) applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the languages commonly used in scientific applications: C, C++, Fortran, Python and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby on Rails for web applications: start with something that works, and evolve it to the user's purpose.

  14. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.

  15. Russia`s nuke complex: A case for downsizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukharin, O.

    1995-07-01

    Nuclear weapons stored in former Soviet republics, uncontrolled export of bomb-grade nuclear materials, and recruitment of ex-Soviet nuclear physicists by Third-World nations remain today`s top proliferation risks, reports Oleg Bukharin, a visiting researcher at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environment Studies. To address these risks, Russia {open_quotes}must shift its weapons production and development to weapons dismantlement, management of weapons materials, and maintenance of a much smaller...arsenal,{close_quotes} Bukharin writes. The goal of such conversion, he says, {open_quotes}is a nuclear complex that is environmentally safe...and compatible with nonproliferation objectives.{close_quotes} Reconfiguration of Russia`s weapons complex also must provide for redeployment of the hundreds of thousands of scientists, engineers, and technicians who have supported the federation`s nuclear weapons program, Bukharin insists. {open_quotes}A truly durable strategy to prevent the dispersion of Russian weapons expertise must [involve] these weapons experts in non-weapons research,{close_quotes} says Bukharin. Furthermore, Bukharin writes, the Russian conversion program must prevent nuclear materials from falling into the wrong hands. {open_quotes}Widespread corruption, crime, and emerging black markets increase the risk of diversion of weapons-grade uranium or plutonium,{close_quotes} he says.

  16. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bae, Brian; Feklistov, Andrey; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka; Landick, Robert; Darst, Seth A.

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the -10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstreammore » of the -10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Additionally a RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.« less

  17. Measurement of bidirectional optical properties of complex shading devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.; Warner, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    A new method of predicting the solar heat gain through complex fenestration systems involving nonspecular layers such as shades or blinds has been examined in a project jointly sponsored by ASHRAE and DOE. In this method, a scanning radiometer is used to measure the bidirectional radiative transmittance and reflectance of each layer of a fenestration system. The properties of systems containing these layers are then built up computationally from the measured layer properties using a transmission/multiple-reflection calculation. The calculation produces the total directional-hemispherical transmittance of the fenestration system and the layer-by-layer absorptances. These properties are in turn combined with layer-specific measurements of the inward-flowing fractions of absorbed solar energy to produce the overall solar heat gain coefficient. This paper describes the method of measuring the spatially averaged bidirectional optical properties using an automated, large-sample gonioradiometer/photometer, termed a ``Scanning Radiometer.`` Property measurements are presented for one of the most optically complex systems in common use, a venetian blind. These measurements will form the basis for optical system calculations used to test the method of determining performance.

  18. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, Brian; Feklistov, Andrey; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka; Landick, Robert; Darst, Seth A.

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the -10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstream of the -10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Additionally a RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.

  19. Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chundawat, Shishir P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Gao, Dahai; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E.

    2011-10-07

    Efficient deconstruction of cellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars for fuel and chemical production is accomplished by a complex mixture of cellulases, hemicellulases and accessory enzymes (e.g., >50 extracellular proteins). Cellulolytic enzyme mixtures, produced industrially mostly using fungi like Trichoderma reesei, are poorly characterized in terms of their protein composition and its correlation to hydrolytic activity on cellulosic biomass. The secretomes of commercial glycosyl hydrolase producing microbes was explored using a proteomics approach with high-throughput quantification using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Here, we show that proteomics based spectral counting approach is a reasonably accurate and rapid analytical technique that can be used to determine protein composition of complex glycosyl hydrolase mixtures that also correlates with the specific activity of individual enzymes present within the mixture. For example, a strong linear correlation was seen between Avicelase activity and total cellobiohydrolase content. Reliable, quantitative and cheaper analytical methods that provide insight into the cellulosic biomass degrading fungal and bacterial secretomes would lead to further improvements towards commercialization of plant biomass derived fuels and chemicals.

  20. Modification of heterogeneous chemistry by complex substrate morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, B.F.; Buelow, S.J.; Robinson, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Chemistry in many environmental systems is determined at some stage by heterogeneous reaction with a surface. Typically the surface exists as a dispersion or matrix of particulate matter or pores, and a determination of the heterogeneous chemistry of the system must address the extent to which the complexity of the environmental surface affects the reaction rates. Reactions that are of current interest are the series of chlorine nitrate reactions important in polar ozone depletion. The authors have applied surface spectroscopic techniques developed at LANL to address the chemistry of chlorine nitrate reactions on porous nitric and sulfuric acid ice surfaces as a model study of the measurement of complex, heterogeneous reaction rates. The result of the study is an experimental determination of the surface coverage of one adsorbed reagent and a mechanism of reactivity based on the dependence of this coverage on temperature and vapor pressure. The resulting mechanism allows the first comprehensive modeling of chlorine nitrate reaction probability data from several laboratories.

  1. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

  2. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Yoreo, J J; Bartelt, M C; Orme, C A; Villacampa, A; Weeks, B L; Miller, A E

    2002-01-31

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies of three classes of ''super molecular'' nanostructured materials. These included (1) dendrimers, (2) DNA bonded nano-particles, and (3) colloids, all of which form solution-based self-organizing systems. To this end, our goals were, first, to learn how to modify models of epitaxy in small molecule systems so that they are useful, efficient, and applicable to assembly of super-molecular species; and, second, to learn how systematic variations in the structure and bonding of the building blocks affect the surface kinetics and energetics that control the assembly process and the subsequent dynamic behavior of the assembled structures. AFM imaging provided experimental data on morphology and kinetics, while kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations related these data to molecular-scale processes and features.

  3. Zinc surface complexes on birnessite: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison

    2009-01-05

    Biogeochemical cycling of zinc is strongly influenced by sorption on birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which are found in diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments. Zinc has been observed to form both tetrahedral (Zn{sup IV}) and octahedral (Zn{sup VI}) triple-corner-sharing surface complexes (TCS) at Mn(IV) vacancy sites in hexagonal birnessite. The octahedral complex is expected to be similar to that of Zn in the Mn oxide mineral, chalcophanite (ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O), but the reason for the occurrence of the four-coordinate Zn surface species remains unclear. We address this issue computationally using spin-polarized Density Functional Theory (DFT) to examine the Zn{sub IV}-TCS and Zn{sup VI}-TCS species. Structural parameters obtained by DFT geometry optimization were in excellent agreement with available experimental data on Zn-birnessites. Total energy, magnetic moments, and electron-overlap populations obtained by DFT for isolated Zn{sup IV}-TCS revealed that this species is stable in birnessite without a need for Mn(III) substitution in the octahedral sheet and that it is more effective in reducing undersaturation of surface O at a Mn vacancy than is Zn{sub VI}-TCS. Comparison between geometry-optimized ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O (chalcophanite) and the hypothetical monohydrate mineral, ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, which contains only tetrahedral Zn, showed that the hydration state of Zn significantly affects birnessite structural stability. Finally, our study also revealed that, relative to their positions in an ideal vacancy-free MnO{sub 2}, Mn nearest to Zn in a TCS surface complex move toward the vacancy by 0.08-0.11 {angstrom}, while surface O bordering the vacancy move away from it by 0.16-0.21 {angstrom}, in agreement with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses.

  4. High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Many...

  5. Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D X center Prev Next Title: Electron-limiting defect complex in hyperdoped GaAs: The D D X center Authors: Ma, Jie ...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225_Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    225Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint -...

  7. Complex catalytic behaviors of CuTiOx mixed-oxide during CO oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Complex catalytic behaviors of CuTiOx mixed-oxide during CO oxidation Citation Details ... This content will become publicly available on September 21, 2016 Title: Complex catalytic ...

  8. Structure of Fc[gamma]RI in complex with Fc reveals the importance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    complex with Fc reveals the importance of glycan recognition for high-affinity IgG binding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of FcgammaRI in complex with Fc ...

  9. Structure of a Bud6/Actin Complex Reveals a Novel WH2-like Actin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of a Bud6Actin Complex Reveals a Novel WH2-like Actin Monomer Recruitment Motif Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of a Bud6Actin Complex Reveals a Novel ...

  10. Structures of Clamp-Loader Complexes Are Key to DNA Replication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of Clamp-Loader Complexes Are Key to DNA Replication Structures of Clamp-Loader Complexes Are Key to DNA Replication Print Wednesday, 30 May 2012 00:00 DNA Replication:...

  11. Cu 2 S 3 complex on Cu(111) as a candidate for mass transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cu 2 S 3 complex on Cu(111) as a candidate for mass transport enhancement Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cu 2 S 3 complex on Cu(111) as a candidate for mass transport ...

  12. Complex matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A

    2014-02-11

    Mechanisms for performing a complex matrix multiplication operation are provided. A vector load operation is performed to load a first vector operand of the complex matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. The first vector operand comprises a real and imaginary part of a first complex vector value. A complex load and splat operation is performed to load a second complex vector value of a second vector operand and replicate the second complex vector value within a second target vector register. The second complex vector value has a real and imaginary part. A cross multiply add operation is performed on elements of the first target vector register and elements of the second target vector register to generate a partial product of the complex matrix multiplication operation. The partial product is accumulated with other partial products and a resulting accumulated partial product is stored in a result vector register.

  13. Policy Flash 2014-18 Complex-Wide Strategic Sourcing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Complex-Wide Strategic Sourcing Policy Flash 2014-18 Complex-Wide Strategic Sourcing Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Scott Clemons of the Strategic...

  14. C-340 Complex D&D Final Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C-340 Complex D&D Final Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, Sep 2011 C-340 Complex D&D Final Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management ...

  15. EA-1857: Wind Turbine Power Generation Complex at Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA would evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed wind turbine power generation complex at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho.

  16. Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex- February 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Y-12 National Security Complex

  17. NNSA Releases Report on Plans for Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Report on Plans for Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex February 02, 2007 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) released a report today that further outlines its plans to modernize the nation's aging, Cold War-era nuclear weapons complex. With its "Complex 2030" plan for the future, NNSA is seeking to transform today's complex into one that is smaller, more efficient, more secure and

  18. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachn, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  19. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  20. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.