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1

EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington 4: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to assist with funding the construction, operation, and maintenance of modifications to the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation's Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. The proposed action could include support for modifications to the existing hatchery, a new hatchery/acclimation facility in Wahkiacus, Washington, and an acclimation facility at McCreedy Creek in Yakima County, Washington. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

2

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery-and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Yakima Spring Chinook supplementation program, wild fish are brought into the Cle Elum Hatchery, artificially crossed, reared, transferred to acclimation sites, and released into the upper Yakima River as smolts. When these fish mature and return to the Yakima River most of them will be allowed to spawn naturally; a few, however, will be brought back to the hatchery and used for research purposes. In order for this supplementation approach to be successful, hatchery-origin fish must be able to spawn and produce offspring under natural conditions. Recent investigations on salmonid fishes have indicated that exposure to hatchery environments during juvenile life may cause significant behavioral, physiological, and morphological changes in adult fish. These changes appear to reduce the reproductive competence of hatchery fish. In general, males are more affected than females; species with prolonged freshwater rearing periods are more strongly impacted than those with shorter rearing periods; and stocks that have been exposed to artificial culture for multiple generations are more impaired than those with a relatively short exposure history to hatchery conditions.

Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Rau, J.A. (Cle Elum Supplementation Research, Cle Elum, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-05) 9/20/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 20, 2002 September 20, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-05) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the domestication selection research task would be modified to include a hatchery control line, maintained entirely by spawning hatchery-origin fish. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of

8

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

PUD No 1 of Klickitat County | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klickitat County Klickitat County Jump to: navigation, search Name PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Place Washington Utility Id 10393 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Irrigation Service Single Phase Commercial Irrigation Service TOU Single Phase Irrigation Service TOU Three Phase

10

Effects of Domestication on Predation Mortality and Competitive Dominance; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second of a series of progress reports that address the effects of hatchery domestication on predation mortality and competitive dominance in the upper Yakima River basin (Pearsons et al. 2004). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. Raising fish in hatcheries can cause unintended behavioral, physiological, or morphological changes in chinook salmon due to domestication selection. Domestication selection is defined by Busack and Currens 1995 as, ''changes in quantity, variety, or combination of alleles within a captive population or between a captive population and its source population in the wild as a result of selection in an artificial environment''. Selection in artificial environments could be due to intentional or artificial selection, biased sampling during some stage of culture, or unintentional selection (Busack and Currens 1995). Genetic changes can result in lowered survival in the natural environment (Reisenbichler and Rubin 1999). The goal of supplementation or conservation hatcheries is to produce fish that will integrate into natural populations. Conservation hatcheries attempt to minimize intentional or biased sampling so that the hatchery fish are similar to naturally produced fish. However, the selective pressures in hatcheries are dramatically different than in the wild, which can result in genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish. The selective pressures may be particularly prominent during the freshwater rearing stage where most mortality of wild fish occurs. The Yakima Fisheries Project is studying the effects of domestication on a variety of adult and juvenile traits of spring chinook salmon (Busack et al. 2003). The overall experimental design is to compare a variety of traits, across generations, from three lines of Yakima basin chinook, a hatchery control, supplementation line, and a wild control. The hatchery line was derived from wild upper Yakima broodstock and is only allowed to spawn in the hatchery. The supplementation line is upper Yakima stock that spawns in the upper Yakima River. This stock is an integration of wild and hatchery supplementation fish. Starting in 2005, we plan to use a wild control line of fish that will be the offspring of wild broodstock collected in the Naches River system, a tributary to the Yakima River. The Naches River is not stocked with hatchery fish, and there is minimal stray from Upper Yakima supplementation, so we believe that these will serve as a control to compare any genotypic changes in the hatchery and the supplementation line. As generations of fish are tested, we believe we will be able to analyze the data using an analysis of covariance to test the hypothesis that the hatchery line will exhibit greater domestication over generations, the wild line will remain at baseline levels, and the supplementation line will be somewhere in between. In this report, we have used the terms ''hatchery'' or ''supplementation'' to refer to upper Yakima fish that are progeny of fish that spent one generation in the hatchery, and ''wild'' to refer to fish that have had no exposure to the hatchery other than the matings for this experiment. The terms are relative to the parents that produced the fish for these experiments. All progeny of these fish were mated and reared under the same laboratory conditions. This report addresses two juvenile traits: predation mortality, and competitive dominance. Other traits will be presented in other project reports. It is anticipated that it will take at least two to five generations to detect measurable responses in many domestication response variables (Busack et

Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Scott, Jennifer L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project--Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (11/7/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 7, 2000 November 7, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 TO : Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery facilities. Project No.: F3204 Location: Prosser and Toppenish, Yakima County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

12

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Umatilla Hatchery Final Predesign Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the preliminary design of Umatilla Fish Hatchery near Irrigon, Oregon. The fish hatchery will be capable of rearing steelhead and chinook with an initial capacity of 290,000 pounds. Future expansion will allow for a total capacity of 500,000 pounds if the initial production goals are met. The hatchery will consist of both Oregon and Michigan style ponds. The Oregon ponds are similar to those at Irrigon. The Michigan ponds are more narrow and shallow, are self cleaning, and use oxygen supplementation to obtain higher rearing densities as is currently being done in the state of Michigan. The Oregon ponds are a two-pass system with the capability to convert to Michigan style ponds, if this mode of operation proves to be an effective method in the west. The Michigan ponds are three-pass with the capability to expand to four-pass.

Unknown Author

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-167: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Program EIS - Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration (08/09/04)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2004 9, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-167) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project - Klickitat Meadows Restoration Project No: 1997-056-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams, 1.6 Install Large Woody Debris Structures, 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection Using Bioengineering Methods, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 7.18 Road Closures, 8.10 Stream Channel Protection

16

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Microsoft Word - 2011_07_05_KHP Draft EIS.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

N N Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement July 2011 DOE/EA-0424 Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0424 Bonneville Power Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Bureau of Indian Affairs Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation July 2011 Abstract - Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agencies: Lead federal agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); cooperating federal agencies: National Marine Fisheries Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Lead state agency: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW); cooperating tribe: Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

18

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In chapter 1 we report on studies of the population genetic structure, using DNA microsatellites, of steelhead collected from different locations in the Yakima River basin (Roza Dam, Ahtanum Creek, Toppenish Creek, and Satus Creek) in 2000 and 2001. Of 28 pairwise tests of genotypic differentiation, only the 2000 and 2001 Roza Dam collections and the 2000 and 2001 Satus Creek collections did not exhibit significant differences. Similarly, pairwise tests of genetic differentiation (FST) were significant for all comparisons except the between-years comparisons of Roza Dam, Toppenish Creek, and Satus Creek collections. All tests between populations sampled from different localities were significant, indicating that these collections represent genetically differentiated stocks. In chapter 2 we report on genetic comparisons, again using microsatellites, of the three spring chinook populations in the Yakima basin (Upper Yakima, Naches, and American) with respect to our ability to be able to estimate the proportions of the three populations in mixed smolt samples collected at Chandler. We evaluated this both in terms of mixed fishery analysis, where proportions are estimated, but the likely provenance of any particular fish is unknown, and classification, where an attempt is made to assign individual fish to their population of origin. Simulations were done over the entire ranged of stock proportions observed in the Yakima basin in the last 20+ years. Stock proportions can be estimated very accurately by either method. Chapter 3 reports on our ongoing effort at cryopreserving semen from wild Upper Yakima spring chinook. In 2002, semen from 91 males, more than 50% of those spawned, was cryopreserved. Representation over the spawning season was excellent. Chapters 4,5, and 6 all relate to the continuing development of the domestication study design. Chapter 4 details the ISRP consultations and evolution of the design from last year's preferred alternative to the current plan of using the Naches population as a wild control, and maintaining a hatchery-only control line alongside the supplemented line. During discussions this year a major issue was the possible impact to the research and to the supplementation effort, of gene flow from precocious males from the hatchery control line into the supplemented line. At the end of the contracting period, this issue still had not been resolved. Along with the discussion of development of the domestication research design, chapter 4 presents the current monitoring plan document, with discussion of the approach to the various traits to be analyzed. Chapters 5 and 6 deal with experimental power of the domestication monitoring design. There is still much work to be done on power, but in chapter 5 we explore our power to detect differences among the three lines for traits measured on individual adults. Power was found to be quite good for effects of 5% per generation over three generations for traits having a coefficient of variation (CV) of 10-20%, but low if the CV was 50%. Power is higher for comparisons between the hatchery control line and supplemented line than between the supplemented line and the wild control, a consequence of trying to avoid heavy impacts to the Naches population. Power could be improved considerably improved by sampling more Naches fish in years of high abundance. Chapter 6 presents the same power analysis, but attempts to explore the effect of precocious males from the hatchery control line spawning in the wild. It is clear that if gene flow from precocious males is more than one or two percent that the between line comparisons will be biased, making the supplemented line appear to be more similar to the hatchery control line than it should and more different from the wild control line than it should. However, it was also clear that more analysis is desirable, as the heightened or diminished power is really just an enhancement or reduction of a real difference. A more straightforward analysis of the proportion of observed differences that can be attributed to precoci

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Loxterman, Janet (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

20

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Draft Environmental Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0384 May 2007 Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Project: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Cooperating Tribe: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation State Involved: Washington Abstract: The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) describes a Chinook salmon hatchery production program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes). BPA proposes to fund the construction, operation and maintenance of the program to help mitigate for anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Colville Tribes want to produce adequate

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21

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde … Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2004 Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program -- Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Project i Table of Contents Page Chapter 1: Updated Summary and Project Description 1.1 Introduction..............................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Purpose and Need for the Proposed Action .............................................................1-2 1.3 Decisions to be Made and Responsible Officials ....................................................1-3 1.4 Summary of Public Involvement, Consultation, and Coordination.........................1-3

23

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Draft Environmental Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joseph Hatchery Program Joseph Hatchery Program Draft EIS S-1 SUMMARY Purpose and Need The Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC, www.nwcouncil.org) recommended that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) study and consider funding a Chinook salmon production program and hatchery proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes). The proposal intends to increase returns of adult summer/fall Chinook by raising and releasing juvenile fish in the waters of the Okanogan River, and in the Columbia River below Chief Joseph Dam and above its confluence with the Okanogan River. The proposed program would construct, operate and maintain a hatchery below the Chief Joseph Dam on the Columbia River and several fish acclimation and release ponds on the Okanogan River and Omak

24

Wenatchee Subbasin Plan Hatchery Information for Subbasin Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modifications and reform. Some of the principal processes are: Federal: Hatchery and Genetic Management Plans hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. Much of the initial work on the HGMP process was coordinated) The APRE process seeks to document progress toward hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. The NPCC used

25

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

27

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery (8/16/99)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 16, 1999 August 16, 1999 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEWI-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02 David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery PL-6: F3204 Location: Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington (CESRF) and Prosser Juvenile Research Facility, Prosser, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

28

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

29

EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham 13: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Mitigation Action Plan Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Project, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Finding of No Significant Impact Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Final Environmental Assessment

30

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental...

32

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 7, 2004 April 7, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the upper Yakima south of Cle Elum, WA. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS)

33

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

34

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho's construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort. Website for the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Native Fish Aquaculture Program: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Kootenai_Aquaculture_Program/

35

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; 495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin. Additional information is available at the project website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/WallaWallaHatchery/. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILALE FOR DOWNLOAD March 28, 2013 EIS-0495: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

36

Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing waterfalls than males. The study also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 3,971 kcals (34% anaerobic and 66% aerobic) for a sample of five fish. A bioenergetics example was run, which estimated that fall chinook salmon would expend an estimated 1,208 kcal to pass from the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam and 874 kcals to pass Bonneville Dam and pool and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat River, plus an additional 2,770 kcals above the falls to reach the spawning grounds, leaving them with approximately 18% (1,089 kcals) of their original energy reserves for spawning. Results of the bioenergetics example suggest that a delay of 9 to 11 days along the lower Klickitat River may deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 105 kcal d{sup -1}) resulting in death before spawning would occur.

Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson National Fish Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Jackson, Wyoming Coordinates 43.4799291°, -110.7624282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

38

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Gunnison, Colorado Coordinates 38.5458246°, -106.9253207° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

39

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mammoth Lakes, California Coordinates 37.648546°, -118.972079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

40

Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Belmont Springs Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Fielding, Utah Coordinates 41.8146489°, -112.1160644° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

modified to include a hatchery control line, maintained entirely by spawning hatchery-origin fish. DOEEIS-0169-SA-05, Supplement Analysis for YakimaKlickitat Fisheries Project,...

42

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evaluation of the Reproductive Success of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead in Hatchery and Natural and Hatchery Environments : Annual Report for 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the field, laboratory, and analytical work from December 2007 through November 2008 on a research project that investigates interactions and comparative reproductive success of wild and hatchery origin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout in Forks Creek, a tributary of the Willapa River in southwest Washington. First, we continued to successfully sample hatchery and wild (i.e., naturally spawned) adult and wild smolt steelhead at Forks Creek. Second, we revealed microsatellite genotype data for adults and smolts through brood year 2008. Finally, four formal scientific manuscripts were published in 2008 and two are in press, one is in revision and two are in preparations.

Quinn, Thomas P.; Seamons, todd; Hauser, Lorenz; Naish, Kerry

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

ISAB Artificial Production Review Report 3 Recommendations for the Design of Hatchery Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis for judging and proposing reforms in fish husbandry practices. To analyze and understand reform. Assessing the effects of hatchery produced fish on wild and other hatchery fish outside

45

EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

340: Oregon Hatchery Project 340: Oregon Hatchery Project EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project Summary This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 23, 2006 EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

46

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REPORT A: UMATILLA HATCHERY MONITORING AND EVALUATION--This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for 1 November, 1999 to 31 October, 2002. Studies at UFH are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated along with the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring at UFH are mandatory. An experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. An evaluation of survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon reared at three densities will be completed with final returns in 2005. Two new evaluations were started during this reporting period. The first is an evaluation of spring chinook survival of groups transferred to Imeques acclimation facility in the fall, overwinter-acclimated and released with the standard acclimated production groups in March. The second is an evaluation of subyearling fall chinook survival and straying of a direct-stream released group in the lower Umatilla River and the standard group acclimated at Thornhollow acclimation facility in the upper Umatilla River. An important aspect of the project is evaluation of the spring chinook and summer steelhead fisheries in the upper and lower Umatilla River. REPORT B: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000 Fiscal Year--The results presented in this report are from the ninth year of Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Broodstock monitoring for hatchery production was conducted on adult returns to the Umatilla River at Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla adult facilities for salmon; steelhead adults were monitored at Minthorn adult facility. A new addition to this year's report is the effort to bring together an overview of fish health monitoring results including historical and year to date pathogen information. This information is in table form (Appendix Tables A-28, A-29 and A-30). A summary of juvenile disease outbreaks at Umatilla Hatchery is also included (Appendix Table A-31). REPORT C: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Fiscal Year--Results from the 2001 annual report cover the 10th year of Fish Health Monitoring in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Efforts were again made to provide up to date fish health and juvenile disease outbreak loss summary tables from the beginning of the Umatilla Hatchery program (Appendix Tables A-27, A-28, A-29 and A-30). Outmigrant Fish Health Monitoring results were included in this report since this was part of the fish health work statement for this report period. The discussion section for the 2001 and 2002 annual reports are combined in the 2002 report due to time constraints and consolidation efforts to complete this report by the end of May 2003.

Chess, Dale W.; Cameron, William A.; Stonecypher, Jr., R. Wes (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for the period November 1, 1997 to October 31, 1998. Studies at Umatilla Hatchery are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated as part of the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring are mandatory and have become the responsibility of the fish health staff conducting studies at UFH. Additional studies include evaluations of sport fisheries in the Umatilla River and mass marking and straying of fall chinook salmon. Except for adult recovery data, an experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. We are currently in the second year of rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon at three densities. Experimental rearing of subyearling, fall release, and yearling spring chinook salmon, and steelhead has also been conducted. Although preliminary adult return data has been recovered, data on smolt-to-adult survival for all groups is incomplete. Conclusions in this report should be viewed as preliminary and used in conjunction with additional data as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Brown, Kassandra A.; Waln, Karen (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous salmonid hatcheries Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution and Plants 2 Review of Artificial Production of Anadromous and Resident Fish Summary: performance might be among the anadromous salmonid hatchery fish. These...

51

Design, construction and operation of an inland red drum hatchery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The surface area of the filter cloth was sufficient so that water could be puinped through the incubator and out the standpipe without sigtuficant water velocity that would impinge planktonic eggs or larvae. Lab and F d pre ara' n Area The remote location... 15 16 19 Critique of Internship LIST OF FIGURES 1 Hatchery Floor Plan 23 2 Water Flow Diagram 3 Spawn Tank Elevation and Plan View 25 4 Incubation Platform 5 Maturation Regime 27 ABSTRACT My Master of Agriculture internship was served...

Turner, John M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

Doulas, Speros

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EIS-0424: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

424: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0424: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klickitat Hatchery...

56

DOE/EIS-0340; Grand Ronde … Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 NORTHEAST OREGON HATCHERY PROGRAM GRANDE RONDE - IMNAHA SPRING CHINOOK HATCHERY PROJECT DOE/EIS-0340 Draft Environmental Impact Statement Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0340) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Federal Agencies: U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS); U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Cooperating Tribes: Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Cooperating State Agencies: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)

57

Marginal metabolic scope and growth of hatchery-produced, juvenile red drum by progeny group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nine broodstock groups of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (each consisting of two males and three females) at a State of Texas fish hatchery spawned 13 concurrent progeny groups for which two performance factors, marginal metabolic scope (MMS...

Clark, Kevin Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

Peck, Larry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01) TO: Greg Baesler Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project-Modifications to original proposal Project No.: 1985-038-00 Location: Colville Indian Reservation, Okanogan County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPAs proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

62

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

64

EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEs Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

65

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

69

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

70

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE/EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for NEOH Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project (03/23/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2006 3, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for NEOH Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project (DOE/EIS-0340-SA-01) Ken Kirkman - KEWU-4 Project Manager Proposed Action: Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Modifications Resulting from Final Design Project No.: 1988-053-01 Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Nez Perce Tribe Introduction: BPA, in its March 11, 2005 Record of Decision (ROD) on the Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project, decided to fund value engineering, land acquisition and final design of fish production facilities to support an ongoing program of Snake River spring chinook propagation for conservation and recovery of the species. BPA analyzed the

76

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation; Creston National Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitigation Objective 1: Produce Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire eggs and rear up to 100,000 Westslope Cutthroat trout annually for offsite mitigation stocking. Accomplishments: A total of 141,000 westslope cutthroat eggs (M012 strain) was acquired from the State of Montana Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in May 2002 for this objective. We also received an additional 22,000 westslope cutthroat eggs, MO12 strain naturalized, from feral fish at Rogers Lake, Flathead County, Montana. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Survival from the swim up fry stage to stocking was 95.6%. We achieved a 0.80 feed conversion this year on a new diet, Skretting ''Nutra Plus''. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring and adaptive management. Mitigation Objective 2: Produce Rainbow Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire and rear up to 100,000 Rainbow trout annually for offsite mitigation in closed basin waters. Accomplishments: A total of 54,000 rainbow trout eggs (Arlee strain) was acquired from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery in December 2002 for this objective. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Survival from the swim up fry stage to stocking was 99.9%. We achieved a 0.79 feed conversion this year on a new diet, Skretting ''Nutra Plus''. Arlee rainbow trout are being used for this objective because the stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs and habitat conditions and returns to the creel are unsuitable for native cutthroat. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring and adaptive management.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff, (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Creston National Fish Hatchery, Kalispell, MT)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Survival of Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-Flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1998-2001 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results from four years (1998-2001) of an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. We report analyses of associations among river conditions and survival and travel time estimates, which include data from 1995 through 1997. At weekly intervals from early June to early July each year (mid-May to late June in 2001), hatchery-reared subyearling fall chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released above Lower Granite Dam at Pittsburgh Landing and Billy Creek on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Each year, a small proportion of fish released were not detected until the following spring. However, the number that overwintered in the river and migrated seaward as yearlings the following spring was small and had minimal effect on survival estimates. Concurrent with our studies, a number of subyearling fall chinook salmon that reared naturally in the Snake River were caught by beach seine, PIT tagged, and released. We compared a number of characteristics of hatchery and wild fish. Hatchery and wild fish were similar in 2001, and from 1995 through 1997. Results for 1998 through 2000 showed some relatively large differences between hatchery and wild fish. However, recent information suggests that a considerable proportion of wild subyearling chinook salmon migrating in a given year may actually be stream-type (spring/summer), rather than ocean-type (fall) fish, which may account for some of the differences we have observed.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA)

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fish Research Project, Oregon : Evaluation of the Success of Supplementing Imnaha River Steelhead with Hatchery Reared Smolts: Phase One : Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two streams in the Imnaha River subbasin (Camp Creek and Little Sheep Creek) and eight streams in the Grande Ronde River subbasin (Catherine, Deer, Five Points, Fly, Indian, Lookingglass, Meadow, and Sheep creeks) were selected as study streams to evaluate the success and impacts of steelhead supplementation in northeast Oregon. The habitat of the study streams was inventoried to compare streams and to evaluate whether habitat might influence the performance parameters we will measure in the study. The mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 1-salts returning to Little Sheep Creek fish facility in 1990 and 1991 ranged from 3,550 to 4,663 eggs/female; the mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 2-salts ranged from 5,020 to 5,879 eggs/female. Variation in length explained 57% of the variation in fecundity of natural steelhead, but only 41% to 51% of the variation in fecundity of hatchery steelhead. Adult steelhead males had an average spermatocrit of 43.9% at spawning. We were also able to stain sperm cells so that viable cells could be distinguished from dead cells. Large, red disc tags may be the most useful for observing adults on the spawning grounds. The density of wild, juvenile steelhead ranged from 0 fish/l00{sup 2} to 35.1 (age-0) and 14.0 (age-1) fish/l00m{sup 2}. Evidence provided from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests that hatchery and wild fish within a subbasin are genetically similar. The long-term experimental design is presented as a component of this report.

Carmichael, Richard W.; Whitesel, Timothy A.; Jonasson, Brian C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

82

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS AND...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Complex Program, Klickitat and Yakima Counties, Washington Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Yakama...

83

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

91 - 8300 of 28,905 results. 91 - 8300 of 28,905 results. Download Report to Congress on the Price-Anderson Act http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/report-congress-price-anderson-act Download EIS-0424: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0424-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download CX-007518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sort and Segregation Facility CX(s) Applied: B6.5, B6.6 Date: 12/15/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007518-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ash Removal Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.6 Date: 12/15/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007520-categorical-exclusion-determination

86

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal (Nez Perce Tribe)

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Microsoft Word - SA-07-EIS-0169-biocontrol.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2003 14, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-07) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish & Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) Management Plan calls for noxious weed control at the hatchery and acclimation sites. Biological control agents are being proposed for use at the hatchery and Jack Creek acclimation sites to reduce weeds along BPA-owned property, hatchery structures, roads, and wildlife preserve lands. The Kittitas County Noxious Weed Control Board has targeted the management of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria genistifolia ssp. Dalmatica) as

89

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities The purpose of this Supplement Analysis is to determine if a Supplemental EIS is needed to analyze the construction/modification upgrades to the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) fall chinook and coho experimental facilities at the Prosser and Marion Drain Hatcheries. Construction/modifications are in support of the experimental acclimation, rearing and incubating activities for coho and fall chinook. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (November 2000)

90

Klickitat County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Washington: Energy Resources County, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.888824°, -120.9711029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.888824,"lon":-120.9711029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington BPA, YIN and WDFW are proposing to collect broodstock, incubate eggs and rear fry in hatcheries; acclimate and release smolts; and study the natural production, ecological interactions, long-term fitness, and culturing/genetics of spring and fall chinook and coho salmon in the Yakima River basin. In the Klickitat basin, salmonid life history and physical habitat data would be collected. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-1: Supplement Analysis for Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington (May 1999)

92

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 17, 2009 July 17, 2009 EIS-0424: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Klickitat Hatchery Program, Klickitat and Yakima Counties, WA July 1, 2009 EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington April 21, 2009 EIS-0419: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Whistling Ridge Energy Project in Skamania County, Washington. March 12, 2009 State Energy Program Assurances - Washington Governor Gregoire Letter from Washington Governor Gregoire providing Secretary Chu with the assurances needed so that Recovery Act funds can be made available. These assurances are required by Section 410 of the American Recovery and

95

Complexity in Big History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spier, Fred. How Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

Spier, Fred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 DOE/BP-60629-7 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U Report 1992, Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1991BI60629, Project No. 199204300 for: U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box

98

Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Link to BPA Home Page Agency Topics Finance & Rates Jobs Public Involvement Contact Link to BPA Home Page EFW - Salmon Swimming Upriver EFW - Forest, Evening Sky EFW - Deer in...

99

Complexity, Ecology, Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiners Switch to Reformulated Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 , (Adobe

103

Supramolecular chemistry: from complexes to complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1]cryptand (3) is selective for lithium cations (with a diameter of 1.36 A...figure 1i). Spherands bind sodium and lithium cations very strongly (compound 6 forms...calixarene cyt c complex in the presence of excess ascorbate was considerably slower than...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

U1A Complex  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

U1A Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Quantum implicit computational complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a quantum lambda calculus inspired by Lafont's Soft Linear Logic and capturing the polynomial quantum complexity classes EQP, BQP and ZQP. The calculus is based on the ''classical control and quantum data'' paradigm. This is the first example ... Keywords: Implicit computational complexity, Lambda calculus, Quantum computation

Ugo Dal Lago; Andrea Masini; Margherita Zorzi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Selenophene transition metal complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

White, C.J.

1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Complex-plasma boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study deals with the boundary between a normal plasma of ions and electrons, and an adjacent complex plasma of ions, electrons, and microparticles, as found in innumerable examples in nature. Here we show that the matching between the two plasmas involve electrostatic double layers. These double layers explain the sharp boundaries observed in the laboratory and in astrophysics. A modified theory is derived for the double layers that form at the discontinuity between two different complex plasmas and at the point of contact of three complex plasmas. The theory is applied to the first measurements from the Plasma Kristall Experiment (PKE) Nefedov Laboratory in the International Space Station.

B. M. Annaratone; S. A. Khrapak; P. Bryant; G. E. Morfill; H. Rothermel; H. M. Thomas; M. Zuzic; V. E. Fortov; V. I. Molotkov; A. P. Nefedov; S. Krikalev; Yu. P. Semenov

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mobile multiwave lidar complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiwave mobile lidar complexes (MLCs) are designed and developed. A number of vehicle-based MLCs are built. The set of complex lidar probing data obtained with the help of MLCs is synchronised in space and time, covers a large area (the operation range of an MLC is 15 km), and is based on a unified methodological approach. The results of probing contain information on the concentration and physical nature of atmospheric aerosol, chemical composition of the gaseous phase of the atmosphere, wind and turbulence. The obtained data form the basis for a complex analysis of the ecological situation and prognosis of its development.

A S Boreysho; M A Konyaev; A V Morozov; A V Pikulik; A V Savin; A V Trilis; S Ya Chakchir; N I Boiko; Yu N Vlasov; S P Nikitaev; A V Rozhnov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Carney complex (CNC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Carney complex (CNC) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by ... be also observed in some patients without other CNC manifestations or familial history of the disease. ... may be multiple. One of ...

Jrme Bertherat

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Circulating Immune Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antigens, self or foreign, induce an immune response leading to production of specific antibodies that interact with the inciting antigens and may form antigenantibody (immune) complexes. An immune response i...

Dinesh Kumar

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The NNSA Albuquerque Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Albuquerque Complex Transition Site Albuquerque Complex Transition Site National Nuclear Security Administration - Service Center Internet Site Skip to Content Click to make text smaller Click to make text larger Viewing Options-Click to increase or decrease page font size. NNSA Home Page Office of Public Affairs Employee Concerns Program Whistleblower Home Page Office of Civil Rights Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Current Management and Operating Contracts Freedom of Information Privacy Act NEPA Contractor Human Resources Office of Field Financial Management The NNSA Albuquerque Complex Transition Site We are incorporating the web pages on this site into the NNSA HQ site, located at http://www.nnsa.energy.gov. We now provide links to the current locations of all our previous pages and hosted Field Office sites.

113

Synchronization in complex networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Complexity: Order contra Chaos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity: Order contra Chaos James P. Crutchfield Physics Department University of California. Philosophical consequences of deterministic chaos are noted. Appearing in Handbook of Metaphysics and Ontology's behaviour is symbolically specified in its entirety. How does unpredictability arise in such a situation

Crutchfield, Jim

115

Capitalizing on Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the first decade of this new century. In a very short time, we've become aware of global climate change with complexity, the CEO of an industrial products company calls the economic environment of 2009 "a wake-up call and public sector leaders, three widely shared perspectives stand in relief. 1) The world's private

116

Complex Systems and Brain Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Charles E. Schmidt College of Science www.ccs.fau.edu #12;Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Our Mission The mission of the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences is to understand the principles and mechanisms underlying complex behavior

Fernandez, Eduardo

117

APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Transforms, Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Appendix F Transforms, Complex Analysis This appendix discusses Fourier and Laplace transforms as they are used in plasma physics and this book. Also, key properties of complex variable theory that are needed for understanding and inverting these transforms

Callen, James D.

118

SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The 300,000-square-foot, vault-type building features an unobstructed 43,500-square-foot computer room, which is an open room about three-fourths the size of a football field. The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. National Security

119

RHIC | Accelerator Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RHIC Accelerators RHIC Accelerators The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider complex is actually composed of a long "chain" of particle accelerators Heavy ions begin their travels in the Electron Beam Ion Source accelerator (1). The ions then travel to the small, circular Booster (3) where, with each pass, they are accelerated to higher energy. From the Booster, ions travel to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (4), which then injects the beams via a beamline (5) into the two rings of RHIC (6). In RHIC, the beams get a final accelerator "kick up" in energy from radio waves. Once accelerated, the ions can "orbit" inside the rings for hours. RHIC can also conduct colliding-beam experiments with polarized protons. These are first accelerated in the Linac (2), and further in the Booster (3), AGS (4), and

120

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Complex Glazing Database  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1.2 1.2 This is a Beta version of the Complex Glazing Database (CGDB) for WINDOW 6. The data in the list below was measured by LBNL for this first data set. In the future, LBNL will publish measurement and submittal procedures so that manufacturers can submit their own data to LBNL for review and inclusion in subsequent databases, in a similar fashion to the International Glazing Database (IGDB). The numbering scheme for each manufacturer is a Beta scheme and will be further developed in the next few months. Alkenz USA Inc Shading Material Name BSDF XML File Shading Layer Name ID Type Sunshadow 3000, N901 Charcoal (SA-31) 2011-SA31.XML Sunshadow 3000, N901 Charcoal (WS) 7000 BSDF File Sunshadow 3100, N002 white/bone (SA-30) 2011-SA30.XML Sunshadow 3100, N002 white/bone (WS)

122

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review The main goal of this complex-wide review was to obtain feedback from DOE sites...

123

Complexity of Ising Spin Glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compute the complexity [logarithm of the number of Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) states] associated with minima and index-one saddle points of the TAP free energy. Higher-index saddles have smaller complexities. The two leading complexities are equal, consistent with the Morse theorem on the total number of turning points, and have the value given by Bray and Moore [J. Phys. C 13, L469 (1980)]. In the thermodynamic limit, TAP states of all free energies become marginally stable.

T. Aspelmeier; A. J. Bray; M. A. Moore

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Complex higher order derivative theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico)

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

Molecular Modeling of Dirhodium Complexes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Dirhodium complexes such as carboxylates and carboxylamidates are very efficient metal catalysts used in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Recent experimental work has (more)

Debrah, Duke A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Sun-Climate Complexity Linking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that Earths short-term temperature anomalies share the same complexity index ? as solar flares. We show that this property is not accidental and is a consequence of the phenomenon of information transfer based on the crucial role of non-Poisson renewal events in complex networks.

B. J. West and P. Grigolini

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f), and that Q E (f) # D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Computer Science Division University of California . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

Aaronson, Scott

128

Reverse Engineering of Biological Complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...levels of complexity. For example, a Boeing 777 is fully fly-by-wire with...12, 24). 54 The development of the Boeing 777 alone required...levels of complexity. For example, a Boeing 777-is fully "fly-by-wire" with...

Marie E. Csete; John C. Doyle

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Competing complexity metrics and adults' production of complex sentences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adequacy of 11 metrics for measuring linguistic complexity was evaluated by applying each metric to language samples obtained from 30 different adult speakers, aged 60-90 years. The analysis then determined how well ...

Kemper, Susan; Cheng, Hintat

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Actinide cation-cation complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

Stoyer, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Architecting complex systems for robustness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust design methodologies are frequently utilized by organizations to develop robust and reliable complex systems. The intent of robust design is to create systems that are insensitive to variations from production, the ...

Slagle, Jason C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Renormalization flows in complex networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex networks have acquired a great popularity in recent years, since the graph representation of many natural, social, and technological systems is often very helpful to characterize and model their phenomenology. Additionally, the mathematical tools of statistical physics have proven to be particularly suitable for studying and understanding complex networks. Nevertheless, an important obstacle to this theoretical approach is still represented by the difficulties to draw parallelisms between network science and more traditional aspects of statistical physics. In this paper, we explore the relation between complex networks and a well known topic of statistical physics: renormalization. A general method to analyze renormalization flows of complex networks is introduced. The method can be applied to study any suitable renormalization transformation. Finite-size scaling can be performed on computer-generated networks in order to classify them in universality classes. We also present applications of the method on real networks.

Filippo Radicchi; Alain Barrat; Santo Fortunato; Jos J. Ramasco

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(f) # D (f ), and that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f). 1 If f is partial (i.e. S #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Abstract Given a Boolean function f , we study two . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

Aaronson, Scott

135

Bonneville Power Administration Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17 17 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 203 / Tuesday, October 21, 1997 / Notices all comments received within 60 days of the date of publication of this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on this proposed information collection or to obtain a copy of the proposal and associated collection instruments, please write the above address, or call Department of the Army Reports clearance officer at (703) 614-0454. Title: Research to Develop a Profile of Army National Guard Members. Needs and Uses: This research will be a mail survey among Army National Guard members. The research will assist the Army National Guard (ARNG) in making the most effective use of its public relations, advertising and marketing budget for recruiting efforts. The research will help the ARNG and its

136

Sacramento River Steelhead: Hatchery vs. Natural Smolt Outmigration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that made it to the Golden Gate Bridge listening station diddetected passing the Golden Gate Bridge over a more thanfish detected at the Golden Gate Bridge were from two groups

Sandstrom, Phil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 DOE/BP-60629-4 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1991BI60629, Project No. 199204300, 129 electronic pages (BPA documents or other printed media, contact or write to: Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish

138

Notes From the Chair 2 Re-thinking Hatcheries: 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flying Windmills Technology: 3 A Look at Efforts to Capture Wind Energy N.W. Q&A: Dick Whitney 4 awareness of the water, power, fish and wildlife, and related aspects of the transboundary Columbia River and Wildlife Program. The Council invited proposals last November; the deadline for submis- sion was in April

139

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

Williams, Rube B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies Chapter, Encyclopedia Importance II. Introduction to Computational Complexity III. Computational Complexity of Mechanical Devices and their Movement Problems IV. Concrete Mechanical Computing Devices V. Future Directions VI. Bibliography Glossary

Reif, John H.

142

Complex Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Complex Queries Complex Queries < User:Jweers Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Using Nested Queries 1.1 Programs 2 Using Inverse Property Ask Query 3 Using Wildcards Plus Array Print with Count 3.1 States start with A (4) Using Nested Queries Complex Help:Inline queries are queries which involve multiple subjects, properties, or nested queries. The following is an example of a nested query which will return only Programs (Category:Programs) in the Energy Sector (Property:ProgramSector = Energy) within the subsector of Wind (Property:Sector = Wind) which have been developed by National Labs (Category:United States Department of Energy National Laboratories). The last piece mentioned is where the nested query comes into play. To find Programs which have been developed by National Labs, we must search the

143

Epidemic processes in complex networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and socio-technical systems. The complex properties of real world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. Here we present a coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, epidemiologists, computer and social scientists share a common interest in studying epidemic spreading and...

Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Van Mieghem, Piet; Vespignani, Alessandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Information entropy of complex structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The information entropy function provides a sensitive measure of the complexity of a multi-component material system, where complexity refers to the range of length scales over which morphological features are present. This is demonstrated for an evolving, two-phase microstructure simulated by a population of interacting particles on a two-dimensional surface. The information entropy increases at all length scales as the initially random configuration of particles evolves to produce a distribution of ramified clusters. Maxima in the normalized information entropy function, which is obtained by subtracting the information entropy of a perfectly random configuration from that of the clustered configuration, occur at length scales for which the system most differs from a random configuration, while minima occur at length scales for which the system is periodic or relatively ordered. Besides analysis of complex microstructures, information entropy is useful in detecting features present in any collection of data.

Clinton DeW. Van Siclen

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Invisible defects in complex crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that invisible localized defects, i.e. defects that can not be detected by an outside observer, can be realized in a crystal with an engineered imaginary potential at the defect site. The invisible defects are synthesized by means of supersymmetric (Darboux) transformations of an ordinary crystal using band-edge wave functions to construct the superpotential. The complex crystal has an entire real-valued energy spectrum and Bragg scattering is not influenced by the defects. An example of complex crystal synthesis is presented for the Mathieu potential.

S. Longhi; G. Della Valle

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington

147

Complex Forces Affect China's Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global efforts have been put into biodiversity conservation, but biodiversity loss continues rapidly in biodiversity conservation to the global level and help protect biodiversity in other developing countries Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;208 ConservationBiology COMPLEXITY OF INTERACTING FORCES AFFECTING BIODIVERSITY

148

Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(f) R0 (f), and that QE (f) D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) = {0, 1}n ), then Q2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson Computer Science Division University of California for all i S then f (Y ) = f (X). Then CX (f) is the mini- mum size of a certificate for X, and C (f

Aaronson, Scott

150

Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman Lance Fortnow Ilan Newman Nikolai Vereshchagin b(n, l) denote the binomial sum: b(n, l) = n 0 + n 1 + · · · + n l . Theorem 2 (Harper). Let J 2n . Take all the strings with less than l ones and take J - l first strings with l ones

Fortnow, Lance

151

Consolidated Manufacturing Complex | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consolidated Manufacturing ... Consolidated Manufacturing ... Consolidated Manufacturing Complex An integral part of Y-12's transformation, the Consolidated Manufacturing Complex will fulfill the NNSA mission of placing production processes in right-sized, modern facilities. The CMC will consolidate several mission-critical processes required to meet Y-12 customer needs. Updating processing methods and right-sizing the facility will mean a significant reduction, projected at more than 250,000 square feet, in the footprint. CMC will eliminate several 40- to 65-year-old facilities and alleviate concerns associated with aged facilities built to different codes and standards. Functions being evaluated for inclusion in CMC are lithium operations, general machining operations, depleted uranium operations and deuterium

152

1: Redox chemistry of bimetallic fulvalene complexes; 2: Oligocyclopentadienyl complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemistry of the heterobimetallic complexes (fulvalene)WFe(CO){sub 5} (30) and (fulvalene)WRu(CO){sub 5} (31) has been investigated. Compound 30 is reduced in two one-electron processes, and this behavior was exploited synthetically to prepare a tetranuclear dimer by selective metal reduction. Complex 31 displayed a distinction between the metals upon reoxidation of the dianion, allowing the formation of a dimer by selective metal anion oxidation. The redox behavior of 30 led to an investigation of the use of electrocatalysis to effect metal-specific ligand substitution. It was found that reduction of 30 with a catalytic amount of CpFe(C{sub 6}Me{sub 6}) (97) in the presence of excess P(OMe){sub 3} or PMe{sub 3} led to the formation of the zwitterions (fulvalene)[W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}][Fe(CO)PR{sub 3}{sup +}] (107, R = P(OMe){sub 3}; 108, R = PMe{sub 3}). Compound 31 also displayed unique behavior with different reducing agents, as the monosubstituted zwitterion (fulvalene)[W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}][Ru(CO){sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sup +}] was obtained when 97 was used while the disubstituted complex (fulvalene) [W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}] [Ru(CO)(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup +}] was produced when Cp*Fe(C{sub 6}Me{sub 6}) was the catalyst. Potential synthetic routes to quatercyclopentadienyl complexes were also explored. Various attempts to couple heterobimetallic fulvalene compounds proved to be unsuccessful. 138 refs.

Brown, D.S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 (f) R 2 (f) R 0 (f) D (f) n, that QE (f) D (f), and that Q0 (f) R0 (f).1 If f is partial (i.eQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson Abstract Given a Boolean function f, we study two/2, and otherwise outputs "I don't know" (it can never output an incorrect value). If we require the algorithm

Aaronson, Scott

154

Experiments on Cryogenic Complex Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on a cryogenic complex plasma have been performed. Preliminary experiments include production of a plasma in a liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by a pulsed discharge. The extended production of a plasma has been realized in a vapor of liquid helium or in a cryogenic helium gas by rf discharge. The charge of dust particles injected in such a plasma has been studied in detail.

Ishihara, O.; Sekine, W.; Kubota, J.; Uotani, N.; Chikasue, M.; Shindo, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University Yokohama, 240-8501 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Complex Lagrangians and phantom cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the generalization of quantum theory for the case of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians with PT symmetry, we show how a classical cosmological model describes a smooth transition from ordinary dark energy to the phantom one. The model is based on a classical complex Lagrangian of a scalar field. Specific symmetry properties analogous to PT in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics lead to purely real equation of motion.

A. A. Andrianov; F. Cannata; A. Y. Kamenshchik

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Complex Lagrangians and phantom cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the generalization of quantum theory for the case of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians with PT symmetry, we show how a classical cosmological model describes a smooth transition from ordinary dark energy to the phantom one. The model is based on a classical complex Lagrangian of a scalar field. Specific symmetry properties analogous to PT in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics lead to purely real equation of motion.

Andrianov, A A; Kamenshchik, A Yu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fusion under a complex barrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of fusion of two heavy nuclei is formulated within the concept of transmission across a mildly absorptive effective fusion barrier (EFB). The intensity of transmitted waves across such a barrier could be represented by the product TRPS where TR stands for the transmission coefficient across the corresponding real barrier and PS is a factor of survival probability against absorption under the complex barrier. The justification of this result and the physical basis of the above EFB transmission model of fusion, which is complementary to the definition of fusion based on absorption in the interior region known as the direct reaction model (DRM), are demonstrated in the case of a complex square well potential with a complex rectangular barrier. Based on a WKB approach, expressions for TR for different partial waves utilizing a realistic nucleus-nucleus potential are derived. Using the resulting expressions for the fusion cross section (?F), the experimental values of ?F and the corresponding data of the average angular momentum of the fused body are explained satisfactorily over a wide range of energy around the Coulomb barrier in various heavy ion systems such as 16O+152,154Sm, 58,64Ni+58,64Ni, 64Ni+92Zr, and 64Ni+100Mo.

Basudeb Sahu; I. Jamir; E. F. P. Lyngdoh; C. S. Shastry

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Decision Theory under Complex Uncertainty Durham 15 May 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decision Theory under Complex Uncertainty Durham 15 May 2008 Decision Theory under Complex #12;Decision Theory under Complex Uncertainty Durham 15 May 2008 Decision Theory under Complex Robert Hable University of Bayreuth #12;Decision Theory under Complex Uncertainty Decision Theory

Hable, Robert

159

Nueva School Hillside Learning Complex  

High Performance Buildings Database

Hillsborough, CA Founded in 1967, the Nueva School is a private K-8 school serving 370 students. The school's mission is to inspire passion for lifelong learning, foster social acuity, and develop each child's imaginative mind, enabling students to learn how to make choices that will benefit the world. The Hillside Learning Complex includes three buildings-a library and media center, a student center, and a classroom building with administrative offices, seven classrooms, and an R&D lab-which are organized around a central plaza. The classroom building serves only the fifth through eighth grades.

160

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of complex fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Lattice Boltzmann simulations of complex fluids...OX1 3NP, UK We discuss how lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model...binary and lamellar fluids. lattice Boltzmann|complex fluids|shear flow......

J. M. YEOMANS; ALEXANDER J. WAGNER

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results... THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results...

Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions called symbols. Generali* *zing this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection

Shoj, Toshiaki

163

Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

On the Complexity of the Pancake Problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the computational complexity of finding a line that bisects simultaneously two sets in the two-dimensional plane, called the pancake problem, using the oracle Turing machine model of Ko. We also study the basic problem of bisecting a set at ... Keywords: #P, Computational complexity, complexity theory of real functions, the pancake problem

Fuxiang Yu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing Design Kasidit Leoviriyakit and Antony@stanford.edu and jameson@baboon.stanford.edu This paper focuses on aerodynamic design methodology. It discusses challenges and complexity of aerodynamic wing design for a transonic aircraft, which arise from the complex nature of flow

Jameson, Antony

166

Expressive Power and Complexity in Algebraic Logic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the expressive power and complexity...applies to any system that has to handle...the expressive power and complexity...closed under the operations of taking converse...MA. Expressive Power and Complexity...simulations. In Handbook of Theoretical...about Physical Systems, 373-381......

ROBIN HIRSCH

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

What makes a multi-complex exact?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we give a sufficient condition which makes the total complex of a cube exact. This can be regarded as a variant of the Buchsbaum-Eisenbud theorem which gives a characterization of what makes a complex of finitely generated free modules exact in terms of the grade of the Fitting ideals of boundary maps of the complex.

Satoshi Mochizuki; Seidai Yasuda

168

The multiparty communication complexity of set disjointness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the set disjointness problem in the number-on-the-forehead model of multiparty communication. (i) We prove that k-party set disjointness has communication complexity Omega(n/4k)1/4 in the randomized and nondeterministic ... Keywords: circuit complexity, direct product theorems, multiparty communication complexity, set disjointness problem

Alexander A. Sherstov

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Integration of Biomass processes in an existing Petrochemical ComplexPetrochemical Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Biomass processes in an existing Petrochemical ComplexPetrochemical Complex Debalina · Biomass conversion processes · Integration in existing plant complex l i· Conclusions #12;Sustainability;Overview · Biomass based processes integrated into a chemical production complex. Utili b di id f i th l

Pike, Ralph W.

170

Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

About About Careers Community Employees & Retirees Library Suppliers Contact Us Y-12 Home Y-12 National Security Complex Home Nuclear Deterrence Global Security Naval Reactors Partnerships Security News Search form Search... Search Latest News | B&W Y-12 donates $75,000 to Emory Valley Center Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Feature Stories Expertise Our NRFTC trainers have many years of operational experience at Y-12 as well as on numerous international missions. Nuclear Detection and Forensics A strong technical nuclear detection and forensics capability is important to the nation's security. "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America. Young Innovators' Society Awesome Eyeballs visit Y-12

171

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Los Alamos-Argonne partnership will aid understanding of complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partnership will aid understanding of complex materials Los Alamos-Argonne partnership will aid understanding of complex materials An intimate understanding of complex materials...

173

Physical mapping of complex genomes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred embodiments, the cosmid clones are arranged in a three dimensional matrix, pooled and compared in threes according to intersecting planes of the three dimensional matrix. Arrangements corresponding to geometries of higher dimensions may also be prepared and used to simultaneously identify overlapping clones in highly complex libraries with relatively few hybridization reactions.

Evans, Glen A. (Encinitas, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Spreading dynamics in complex networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social communityLiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

Sen Pei; Hernn A Makse

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Information mobility in complex networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of information mobility in complex networks is introduced on the basis of a stochastic process taking place in the network. The transition matrix for this process represents the probability that the information arising at a given node is transferred to a target one. We use the fractional powers of this transition matrix to investigate the stochastic process at fractional time intervals. The mobility coefficient is then introduced on the basis of the trace of these fractional powers of the stochastic matrix. The fractional time at which a network diffuses 50% of the information contained in its nodes (1/k50) is also introduced. We then show that the scale-free random networks display a better spread of information than the non-scale-free ones. We study 38 real-world networks and analyze their performance in spreading information from their nodes. We find that some real-world networks perform even better than the scale-free networks with the same average degree and we point out some of the structural parameters that make this possible.

Ernesto Estrada

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tag: About | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Y-12 National Security Complex. More... Category: About Best Practices Workshop for Safety Culture A two-day Safety Culture workshop featured more than two dozen...

178

CORRELATION PROFILES AND MOTIFS IN COMPLEX NETWORKS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Networks have recently emerged as a unifying theme in complex systems research [1]. It is in fact no coincidence that networks and complexity are so heavily intertwined. Any future definition of a complex system should reflect the fact that such systems consist of many mutually interacting components. These components are far from being identical as say electrons in systems studied by condensed matter physics. In a truly complex system each of them has a unique identity allowing one to separate it from the others. The very first question one may ask about such a system is which other components a given component interacts with? This information system wide can be visualized as a graph, whose nodes correspond to individual components of the complex system in question and edges to their mutual interactions. Such a network can be thought of as a backbone of the complex system. Of course, system's dynamics depends not only on the topology of an underlying network but also on the exact form of interaction of components with each other, which can be very different in various complex systems. However, the underlying network may contain clues about the basic design principles and/or evolutionary history of the complex system in question. The goal of this article is to provide readers with a set of useful tools that would help to decide which features of a complex network are there by pure chance alone, and which of them were possibly designed or evolved to their present state.

MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.ALON,U.

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

REFLEXIVITY AND RIGIDITY FOR COMPLEXES, II: SCHEMES ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 1, 2010 ... our main tools. Indeed, rigid dualizing complexes ... (This opens the way to examination of more general sites, not undertaken here.) One such...

2011-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

A geometric entropy measuring networks complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A central issue of the science of complex systems is the quantitative characterization of complexity. In the present work a new entropic measure of complexity is proposed which has unprecedented advantages. Starting from the framework of the so-called information geometry we propose a new and constructive way to associate to a - in principle any - network a differentiable object (a Riemannian manifold) whose volume is used to define an entropy. The effectiveness of this new entropic measure of networks complexity is successfully proved through its capability of detecting a classical phase transition in random graphs: the emergence of the "giant component" according to the celebrated Erd\\"os-R\\'enyi theorem.

Roberto Franzosi; Domenico Felice; Stefano Mancini; Marco Pettini

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Models of organometallic complexes for optoelectronic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organometallic complexes have potential applications as the optically active components of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). Development of more effective complexes may be aided by understanding their excited state properties. Here we discuss two key theoretical approaches to investigate these complexes: first principles atomistic models and effective Hamiltonian models. We review applications of these methods, such as, determining the nature of the emitting state, predicting the fraction of injected charges that form triplet excitations, and explaining the sensitivity of device performance to small changes in the molecular structure of the organometallic complexes.

A. C. Jacko; Ross H. McKenzie; B. J. Powell

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

Draft Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

which analyzed programmatic alternatives for the weapons complex in the absence of nuclear testing. NNSA maintains the safety, security, and reliability of nuclear weapons...

183

Mixing in complex coastal hydrogeologic systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mixing zone developed at freshwater-seawater interface is one of the most important features in complex coastal hydrogeologic systems, which controls subsurface flow and reactive (more)

Lu, Chunhui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Environmental policy in a complex world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most concepts of environmental policy do not consider adequately the complexity of nature and society. While neoclassical economics seems to fall into the trap of steering illusion, evolutionary economic concepts that consider societal complexity are too optimistic about the favours of laissez-faire. A coevolutionary perspective may combine both it may consider the complexity of societal processes as well as environmental constraints. As an example for a coevolutionary strategy, the dematerialisation approach illustrates how environmental policy can handle the two problems of complexity.

Friedrich Hinterberger; Fred Luks; Marcus Stewen; Jan van der Straaten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Security | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Security Security The Y-12 National Security Complex places the highest priority on maintaining and improving its security posture. We employ security police officers, cyber...

187

Complex networks in confined comminution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical process of confined comminution is investigated within the framework of complex networks. We first characterize the topology of the unweighted contact networks as generated by the confined comminution process. We find this process gives rise to an ultimate contact network which exhibits a scale-free degree distribution and small world properties. In particular, if viewed in the context of networks through which information travels along shortest paths, we find that the global average of the node vulnerability decreases as the comminution process continues, with individual node vulnerability correlating with grain size. A possible application to the design of synthetic networks (e.g., sensor networks) is highlighted. Next we turn our attention to the physics of the granular comminution process and examine force transmission with respect to the weighted contact networks, where each link is weighted by the inverse magnitude of the normal force acting at the associated contact. We find that the strong forces (i.e., force chains) are transmitted along pathways in the network which are mainly following shortest-path routing protocols, as typically found, for example, in communication systems. Motivated by our earlier studies of the building blocks for self-organization in dense granular systems, we also explore the properties of the minimal contact cycles. The distribution of the contact strain energy intensity of 4-cycle motifs in the ultimate state of the confined comminution process is shown to be consistent with a scale-free distribution with infinite variance, thereby suggesting that 4-cycle arrangements of grains are capable of storing vast amounts of energy in their contacts without breaking.

David M. Walker; Antoinette Tordesillas; Itai Einav; Michael Small

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Agriculture and Life Sciences Complex Usage Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture and Life Sciences Complex Usage Guidelines General Policies 1. Pursuant to Texas A Sciences Complex Usage Request Form and submit a copy to the building manager, Paul Gregg (phone: 979-777-2766, email: paul.gregg@ag.tamu.edu, office: AGLS 517F). The AGLS-ALCT Usage Request Form can be found at

189

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department of Mathematics Science University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278­8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions of classical groups this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection groups G(e, 1, n), and study

Shoj, Toshiaki

190

ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

Gibson, P. L.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

California at Santa Barbara, University of

193

Y-12 National Security Complex - Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Y-12 National Security Complex Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013 Review Reports 2012 Review of the Long Lead Procurement Processed Used by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Project, July 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project, June 2012 Review of the Y-12 Implementation Verification Review Processes, June 2012 Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Y-12 National Security Complex, February 2012 Office of Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC at the Y-12 National Security Complex, January 20, 2012

194

Property:ToolComplexity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ToolComplexity ToolComplexity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ToolComplexity Property Type Text Description Complexity, or ease of use, of tool/application Allows Values Simple;Moderate;Advanced;Not Available This is a property of type Text. Pages using the property "ToolComplexity" Showing 14 pages using this property. A Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool + Moderate Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + Advanced E Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model + Advanced Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) + Simple Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook + Advanced G Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database + Not Available

195

The rhetoric of business and complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management and organisation research has been too alacritous espousing non-linearity, a.k.a. complexity, and trying to adapt it to its purposes. Complexity has yet to become fully mainstream even in the natural sciences and, at any rate, a prerequisite for business people to become involved in discussions of emerging behaviour, statistical mechanics, chaos theories and the like, is that they first become acquainted with decision science, systems theory, linearity, probability and statistics. In addition, business complexity and colloquial complexity are not always the same (in fact, they seldom are) as non-linear complexity; epistemological issues do not necessarily have practical consequences; and not all theoretical impossibilities do translate into practical impotence.

Paolo Magrassi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Physical mapping of complex genomes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

Evans, G.A.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Managing Complex Network Operation with Predictive Analytics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex networks play an important role in modern societies. Their failures, such as power grid blackouts, would lead to significant disruption of peoples life, industry and commercial activities, and result in massive economic losses. Operation of these complex networks is an extremely challenging task due to their complex structures, wide geographical coverage, complex data/information technology systems, and highly dynamic and nonlinear behaviors. None of the complex network operation is fully automated; human-in-the-loop operation is critical. Given the complexity involved, there may be thousands of possible topological configurations at any given time. During an emergency, it is not uncommon for human operators to examine thousands of possible configurations in near real-time to choose the best option and operate the network effectively. In todays practice, network operation is largely based on experience with very limited real-time decision support, resulting in inadequate management of complex predictions and inability to anticipate, recognize, and respond to situations caused by human errors, natural disasters, and cyber attacks. A systematic approach is needed to manage the complex operation paradigms and choose the best option in a near-real-time manner. This paper applies predictive analytics techniques to establish a decision support system for complex network operation management and help operators to predict potential network failures and adapt the network to adverse situations. The resultant decision support system enables continuous monitoring of network performance and turns large amounts of data into actionable information. Examples with actual power grid data are presented to demonstrate the capability of this proposed decision support system.

Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Chen, Yousu; Ma, Jian; Schneider, Kevin P.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tetrahydrothiophene complexes of technetium(IV)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technetium(IV) complex of the composition trans-[TcCl4(tht)2] (tht=tetrahydrothiophene) is formed during heating of \\{K2TcCl6\\} in a mixture of tht and aqueous HCl. The thioether ligands are only weakly bonded and the red crystals slowly decompose under release of tht. The weak technetiumsulphur bonds are confirmed by TcS distances of 2.494(1) . The anionic thioether technetium(IV) complex [TcBr5(tht)]? is formed by the reaction of (NBu4)2[TcBr6] with neat tht. The tetrabutylammonium salt of the complex is indefinitely stable in air.

Adelheid Hagenbach; Ulrich Abram

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Power grid vulnerability: A complex network approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power grids exhibit patterns of reaction to outages similar to complex networks. Blackout sequences follow power laws as complex systems operating near a critical point. Here the tolerance of electric power grids to both accidental and malicious outages is analyzed in the framework of complex network theory. In particular the quantity known as efficiency is modified by introducing a new concept of distance between nodes. As a result a new parameter called net-ability is proposed to evaluate the performance of power grids. A comparison between efficiency and net-ability is provided by estimating the vulnerability of sample networks in terms of both the metrics.

S. Arianos; E. Bompard; A. Carbone; F. Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.

W.M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Explicit regulator maps on polylogarithmic motivic complexes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a regulator map from the weight n polylogarithmic motivic complex to the weight n Deligne complex of an algebraic variety X. The regulator map is constructed explicitly via the classical polylogarithms with some funny combinations of Bernoulli numbers as coefficients. This leads to conjectures on special values of L-functions at s=n which reduce to Zagier's conjecture when X is of dimension zero over Q. The cone of this map, shifted by one, should be called the Arakelov motivic complex of X. Its last cohomology group is identified with a group of codimension n Arakelov cycles on X.

A. B. Goncharov

202

Photoinduced Electron Transport of Macromolecular Metal Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron transport as an important process for macromolecule-metal complexes (MMC) to function as active centers in catalysis is discussed in Chap. 4.4 and 4.5. This behavior is directly related to energy leve...

Masao Kaneko; Dieter Whrle

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electrodialysis Treatment of Metal-Cyanide Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal-cyanide complexes have been used for many years as decorative and protective coatings on a variety of metal substrates. The most important method to protect iron and steel against corrosion is the applicati...

Marco Antnio Siqueira Rodrigues; Luciano Marder

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described.

Nash, K.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Symptoms of complexity in a tourism system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism destinations behave as dynamic evolving complex systems, encompassing numerous factors and activities which are interdependent and whose relationships might be highly nonlinear. Traditional research in this field has looked after a linear approach: variables and relationships are monitored in order to forecast future outcomes with simplified models and to derive implications for management organizations. The limitations of this approach have become apparent in many cases, and several authors claim for a new and different attitude. While complex systems ideas are amongst the most promising interdisciplinary research themes emerged in the last few decades, very little has been done so far in the field of tourism. This paper presents a brief overview of the complexity framework as a means to understand structures, characteristics, relationships and explores the implications and contributions of the complexity literature on tourism systems. The objective is to allow the reader to gain a deeper appreciatio...

Baggio, R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Complexity of Agreement Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Agreement Scott Aaronson # Abstract A celebrated 1976 theorem of Aumann asserts the computations needed for that conversation be performed e#ciently? This paper answers both questions in the a

Aaronson, Scott

207

The Complexity of Agreement # Scott Aaronson +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Agreement # Scott Aaronson + ABSTRACT A celebrated 1976 theorem of Aumann asserts his information and e#ort. Yet according to well­ known theory, such honest disagreement is im

Aaronson, Scott

208

Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels 20-24 June 2011 (All and issues Theme: Biofuel systems and issues (Chair: Nigel Burroughs) 13 (Bielefeld) Biofuels from algae- challenges for industrial levels

Rand, David

209

Understanding and Enhancing Polarization in Complex Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent advances in theoretical methods and high-performance computing allow for reliable first-principles investigations of complex materials. This article focuses on calculating and predicting the properties of piezoelectrics and "designing" new materials ...

Jerry Bernholc; Serge M. Nakhmanson; Marco Buongiorno Nardelli; Vincent Meunier

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS. A generalization of Macdonald o* *perators is also constructed, and we characterize such functions by making use of * *Macdonald operators, assuming a certain conjecture

Shoj, Toshiaki

211

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department version of the above Hall-Littlewood functions, as a generalization of Macdonald functions associated to symmetric groups. A generalization of Macdonald operators is also constructed, and we characterize

Shoj, Toshiaki

212

Measuring icon complexity: An automated analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measures of icon designs rely heavily on surveys of the ... to which changes in the structure of an icon will alter its perceived complexity can be ... reduce development costs and time. Measures of icon complexi...

Alex Forsythe; Noel Sheehy; Martin Sawey

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

EM Corporate Performance Measures- Complex Wide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The corporate (i.e., relating to the entire DOE-EM complex) measures are tracked in the context of the total measure (life-cycle) necessary to complete cleanup of each site, as well as the EM...

214

Structure of the BPA-Fructose Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fructose complex of Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is commonly used for in vivo administration, due to its improved water solubility.1...Until now, however, the detailed molecular structure of the BPA-fructose com...

P. Bendel; C. Anderson; G. W. Kabalka

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Y-12 National Security Complex Cleanup  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet provides an update on all of the current cleanup projects at the site, and it also lists the major projects completed at the Y-12 National Security Complex.

216

Seismic modeling of complex stratified reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for such complex reservoirs is crucial and necessary to reduce exploration risk. A fast and accurate approach generating synthetic seismograms for such reservoir models combines wavefront construction ray tracing with composite reflection coefficients in a hybrid...

Lai, Hung-Liang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Complex Technical System Operation Processes Identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods of identification of the operation processes of complex technical systems are presented. These are methods and procedures ... for estimating the unknown basic parameters of the system operation proces...

Krzysztof Ko?owrocki; Joanna Soszy?ska-Budny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Improvements in communication complexity using quantum entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMUNICATION COMPLEXITY USING QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT A Thesis by ANGAD MOHANDAS KAMAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMUNICATION COMPLEXITY USING QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT A Thesis by ANGAD MOHANDAS KAMAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Kamat, Angad Mohandas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Studies of complexity in fluid systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Grant DE-FG02-92ER25119, ''Studies of Complexity in Fluids'', we have investigated turbulence, flow in granular materials, singularities in evolution of fluid surfaces and selective withdrawal fluid flows. We have studied numerical methods for dealing with complex phenomena, and done simulations on the formation of river networks. We have also studied contact-line deposition that occurs in a drying drop.

Nagel, Sidney R.

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project...

224

Oversight Reports - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project...

225

Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

226

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Two case studies for commercial vehicle...

227

Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

228

Y-12 National Security Complex Technology Marketing Summaries...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the Y-12 National Security Complex...

229

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

230

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 April 2003 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex This report...

231

Manhattan Project: F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX F REACTOR PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION COMPLEX Hanford Engineer Works, 1945 Resources > Photo Gallery Plutonium production area, Hanford, ca. 1945 The F Reactor plutonium production complex at Hanford. The "boxy" building between the two water towers on the right is the plutonium production reactor; the long building in the center of the photograph is the water treatment plant. The photograph was reproduced from Henry DeWolf Smyth, Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb under the Auspices of the United States Government, 1940-1945 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1945). The Smyth Report was commissioned by Leslie Groves and originally issued by the Manhattan Engineer District. Princeton University Press reprinted it in book form as a "public service" with "reproduction in whole or in part authorized and permitted."

232

Rutgers EcoComplex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rutgers EcoComplex Rutgers EcoComplex Jump to: navigation, search Name Rutgers EcoComplex Address 1200 Florence-Columbus Rd. Place Bordentown, New Jersey Zip 08505 Region New York Area - NY NJ CT PA Coordinates 40.078026°, -74.755129° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.078026,"lon":-74.755129,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Coastal Structures Modeling Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structures Modeling Complex Structures Modeling Complex Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Structures Modeling Complex Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 54.9 Beam(m) 35.4 Depth(m) 1.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

234

Resurgent Dome Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Resurgent Dome Complex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Resurgent Dome Complex Dictionary.png Resurgent Dome Complex: Resurgent domes are encountered near the center of many caldera depressions, and form via uplift of the caldera valley floor due to movement in the underlying magma chamber. Resurgent domes typically host numerous deformation structures that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource

235

Judging model reduction of complex systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model reduction is a common goal in the study of complex systems, consisting of many components with a complex interaction structure. The quality of such reduction, however, may not be reflected correctly in the stepwise prediction error in the model since it ignores the global geometry of the dynamics. Here we introduce a general two-step framework, consisting of dimensionality reduction of the time series followed by modeling of the resulting time series, and propose the use of the shadowing distance to measure the quality of the second step. Using coupled oscillator networks as a prototypical example, we demonstrate that our approach can outperform those based on stepwise error and suggest that it sheds light on the problem of identifying and modeling low-dimensional dynamics in large-scale complex systems.

Jie Sun; Erik M. Bollt; Takashi Nishikawa

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

Sun, Wen [School of Information and Mathematics, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)] [School of Information and Mathematics, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); L, Jinhu [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, Shihua [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)] [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Xinghuo [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

PT invariant complex E(8) root spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a construction procedure for complex root spaces invariant under antilinear transformations, which may be applied to any Coxeter group. The procedure is based on the factorisation of a chosen element of the Coxeter group into two factors. Each of the factors constitutes an involution and may therefore be deformed in an antilinear fashion. Having the importance of the E(8)-Coxeter group in mind, such as underlying a particular perturbation of the Ising model and the fact that for it no solution could be found previously, we exemplify the procedure for this particular case. As a concrete application of this construction we propose new generalisations of Calogero-Moser Sutherland models and affine Toda field theories based on the invariant complex root spaces and deformed complex simple roots, respectively.

Andreas Fring; Monique Smith

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Complex geometry and pre-metric electromagnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intimate link between complex geometry and the problem of the pre-metric formulation of electromagnetism is explored. In particular, the relationship between 3+1 decompositions of R4 and the decompositions of the vector space of bivectors over R4 into real and imaginary subspaces relative to a choice of complex structure is emphasized. The role of the various scalar products on the space of bivectors that are defined in terms of a volume element on R4 and a complex structure on the space of bivectors that makes it C-linear isomorphic to C3 is discussed in the context of formulation of a theory of electromagnetism in which the Lorentzian metric on spacetime follows as a consequence of the existence of electromagnetic waves, not a prior assumption.

D. H. Delphenich

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Stable Oxide Nanoparticle Clusters Obtained by Complexation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolyte-neutral copolymers and oppositely charged 6 nm-crystalline nanoparticles. For two different dispersions of oxide nanoparticles, the electrostatic complexation gives rise to the formation of stable nanoparticle clusters in the range 20 - 100 nm. It is found that inside the clusters, the particles are pasted together by the polyelectrolyte blocks adsorbed on their surface. Cryo-transmission electronic microscopy allows to visualize the clusters and to determine the probability distributions functions in size and in aggregation number. The comparison between light scattering and cryo-microscopy results suggests the existence of a polymer brush around the clusters.

J. -F. Berret; A. Sehgal; M. Morvan; O. Sandre; A. Vacher; M. Airiau

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Baton Rouge Complex Steam Real Time Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baton Rouge Complex Steam Real Time Optimization IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana Tope Iyun ExxonMobil Chemical Company May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-32 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20...-23, 2014 Proprietary 2 Agenda Baton Rouge Complex Steam System Overview Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategy Site-Wide Steam System Optimization Results Benefits/Wrap-Up ESL-IE-14-05-32 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy...

Iyun, T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data Title Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-4416E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Lee, Eleanor S., Jacob C. Jonsson, and Maria Konstantoglou Call Number LBNL-4416E Abstract Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

242

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Coal-Based Chemical Complexes [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

20 March 1981 research-article Coal-Based Chemical Complexes [and Discussion...In addition to heat or kinetic energy, coal can be used to produce carbon (in various...and chemicals containing these elements. Coal conversion developments have recently tended...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

Understanding complexity in the human brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding complexity in the human brain Danielle S. Bassett1 and Michael S. Gazzaniga2 1 the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its work- ings of mind­brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neu- roscientific studies are coupled

Gazzaniga, Michael

246

Validating Complex Agent Behavior Scott A. Wallace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavior by Scott A. Wallace Chair: John E. Laird Developing software agents that replicate human behaviorValidating Complex Agent Behavior by Scott A. Wallace A dissertation submitted in partial) in The University of Michigan 2003 Doctoral Committee: Professor John E. Laird, Chair Associate Professor William P

Wallace, Scott

247

COMPLEX PLASMOID BEHAVIORS IN DUSTY PLASMA EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- coupled radio-frequency (13.56 MHz, 3 W) dis- charge at low pressure ( 1.5 mbar). One par- ticularity is that the rf power is applied in push- pull mode, giving a more homogeneous plasma for dust particles onlyCOMPLEX PLASMOID BEHAVIORS IN DUSTY PLASMA EXPERIMENTS MAXIME MIKIKIAN, HAGOP TAWIDIAN AND THOMAS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

Energy Complexity of Optical Computations Akhilesh Tyagi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Complexity of Optical Computations Akhilesh Tyagi and John H. Reif Abstract This paper provides lower bounds on the energy consumption and demonstrates an energy-time trade-off in optical ­ shifting. Since the energy consumption in an optical transmission is a non-linear function of the distance

Reif, John H.

249

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

250

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes Ali Raissi Florida Solar Energy Center;Advantages of Ammonia Costs about $150 per short ton or less than $6.25 per million BTU of H2 contained and utilization Stores 30% more energy by liquid volume than LH2 Easily reformed using 16% of the energy

251

Ship Patrol: Multiagent Patrol in Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

point to another. For example, in marine environments, the travel time of ships depends on parameters) in marine environments. When designing algorithms for ships in such environments, it is critical to considerShip Patrol: Multiagent Patrol in Complex Environmental Conditions Noa Agmon1 , Daniel Urieli2

Stone, Peter

252

P Signal Complexity Re-examined  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......6.6 3.8 3.0 30.0 B. Nevada Test Site-Granite Crust (Werth & Herbst...evidencefor multipathing for the path Nevada Test Site (NTS) to EKA. Fig. 6(a...approximatemethod of deconvolution. (ii) Nevada Test Site (NTS). 4. Complex signals......

A. Douglas; P. D. Marshall; P. G. Gibbs; J. B. Young; C. Blarney

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture Koji KAWAMURA1,2 ,Laurence HIBRAND´e, FRANCE , 2. Department of Environmental Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Ohmiya, Asahi architecture is a crit- ical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

February 22, 1998 Clustering ECG Complexes Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LU TP 98­1 February 22, 1998 Clustering ECG Complexes Using Hermite Functions and Self Transactions on Biomedical Engineering Abstract: An integrated method for identifying and classifying ECG for analysis and interpretation of ECGs have been subject to intense research for nearly four decades

Lunds Universitet,

255

Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex- June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project

256

1) Introduction 1 1. 1) Complexity Theory 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents Preface i 1) Introduction 1 1. 1) Complexity Theory 1 1. 2) Boolean functions and Boolean algebra 7 1. 3) Boolean networks 18 Bibliographic notes 25 2) Combinational Network Complexity 27 2. 1 on combinational complexity 100 Bibliographic notes 115 3) Monotone Network Complexity 117 #12;3. 1) Bounds

Atkinson, Katie

257

Global Team Boundary Complexity: A Social Network Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we propose and develop a "global team boundary complexity" construct based on coordination and complexity theories, to quantify the complexity of the global collaboration environment, from a coordination perspective. The construct contains ... Keywords: Global teams, virtual teams, global team boundaries, team boundary complexity, social networs

J. Alberto Espinosa; Gwanhoo Lee; William DeLone

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CPCS Overview CPCS Overview Section 2-1-1 Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems Facility The Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems (CPCS) Facility supports the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) mission of fostering fundamental research in the natural sciences to provide the basis for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use and contaminant releases. This research provides a foundation for understanding interactions of atoms, molecules, and ions with materials and with photons and electrons. Particular emphasis is on interfacial processes. A distinguishing feature of research at national laboratories is their approach to problem- solving. Significant scientific issues are addressed using focused and multidisciplinary

259

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Travel and tourism: Into a complex network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is discussed how the worldwide tourist arrivals, about 10% of world's domestic product, form a largely heterogeneous and directed complex network. Remarkably the random network of connectivity is converted into a scale-free network of intensities. The importance of weights on network connections is brought into discussion. It is also shown how strategic positioning particularly benefit from market diversity and that interactions among countries prevail on a technological and economic pattern, questioning the backbones of traveling driving forces.

Miguens, J I L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Biologic response to complex blast waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small, bare charges were detonated inside an M59 armored personnel carrier (APC) in an attempt to simulate the complex blast waves generated by the jets from shaped-charge warheads penetrating into armored vehicles. Anesthetized sheep were placed inside the APC at 92- and 122-cm ranges from 57- or 113-g pentolite charges. Pressure-time was measured by pressure transducers either mounted on the animals or free standing at comparable ranges on the opposite side of the vehicle. In general, the waveforms were characterized by an initial shock wave of less than 1-msec duration followed by repeated reflections of decreasing magnitude. No deaths nor lung hemorrhages were observed, but all the animals sustained severe ear injury. Animals subjected to peak overpressures of 1.2 to 2.3 bar from the 113-g explosions also received slight non-auditory blast injuries to the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; those exposed to peak overpressures of just under 1 bar from the 57-g charges did not. The non-auditory blast injuries inside the APC were more severe than those sustained by sheep at comparable distances from 113-g charges in the open. The results suggested that the biological consequences of a complex wave of the type encountered in this study can be equated approximately to a Friedlander wave with a peak overpressure equal to that of the complex wave and with a total impulse equal to the impulse over the first 2 to 3 msec of the complex wave. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Richmond, D.R.; Yelverton, J.T.; Fletcher, E.R.; Phillips, Y.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Superluminal transformations in complex Minkowski spaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the mixing of real and imaginary components of space and time under the influence of superluminal boots in the x direction. A unique mixing is determined for this superluminal Lorentz transformation when we consider the symmetry properties afforded by the inclusion of three temporal directions. Superluminal transformations in complex six-dimensional space exhibit unique tachyonic connections which have both remote and local space--time event connections.

Ramon, C.; Rauscher, E.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facades, Daylighting, and Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Eleanor Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory eslee@lbl.gov 510-486-4997 April 5, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: In order to reach BTO's aggressive 50% energy savings goal by 2030, innovative façade systems must minimize both lighting and HVAC energy end use consumption more optimally while addressing occupant comfort and amenity requirements.

264

The Geometric Structure of Complex Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops the theory of affine Euler-Poincar\\'e and affine Lie-Poisson reductions and applies these processes to various examples of complex fluids, including Yang-Mills and Hall magnetohydrodynamics for fluids and superfluids, spin glasses, microfluids, and liquid crystals. As a consequence of the Lagrangian approach, the variational formulation of the equations is determined. On the Hamiltonian side, the associated Poisson brackets are obtained by reduction of a canonical cotangent bundle. A Kelvin-Noether circulation theorem is presented and is applied to these examples.

Franois Gay-Balmaz; Tudor S. Ratiu

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

265

Organosilicon ion-exchange and complexing adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on the ion-exchange and complexing organosilicon adsorbents published during the last 1012 years, including the results of systematic research of the authors, are summarized and analyzed. The following types of substances are considered: silicas with covalently grafted modifiers, silicas and aluminosilicates with non-covalently grafted modifiers and carbofunctional polyorganylsilsesquioxanes prepared by polycondensation of appropriate organosilicon monomers. Adsorbents of these types find extensive practical use, in particular, as analytical reagents for determination of metals in natural and artificial specimens, agents for isolation of valuable elements from industrial wastes and agents for removal of especially hazardous components from wastes and effluents. The bibliography includes 109 references.

N N Vlasova; E N Oborina; O Yu Grigoryeva; Mikhail G Voronkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fully Automated Calculations in the complex MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent progress towards automated higher-order calculations in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The consistent renormalization of all relevant sectors of the cMSSM and the inclusion into the FeynArts/FormCalc framework has recently been completed. Some example calculations applying this framework are briefly discussed. These include two-loop corrections to cMSSM Higgs boson masses as well as partial decay widths of electroweak supersymmetric particles decaying into a Higgs boson and another supersymmetric particle.

Hahn, T; von der Pahlen, F; Rzehak, H; Schappacher, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fully Automated Calculations in the complex MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent progress towards automated higher-order calculations in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The consistent renormalization of all relevant sectors of the cMSSM and the inclusion into the FeynArts/FormCalc framework has recently been completed. Some example calculations applying this framework are briefly discussed. These include two-loop corrections to cMSSM Higgs boson masses as well as partial decay widths of electroweak supersymmetric particles decaying into a Higgs boson and another supersymmetric particle.

T. Hahn; S. Heinemeyer; F. von der Pahlen; H. Rzehak; C. Schappacher

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Cascade Control and Defense in Complex Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex networks with a heterogeneous distribution of loads may undergo a global cascade of overload failures when highly loaded nodes or edges are removed due to attacks or failures. Since a small attack or failure has the potential to trigger a global cascade, a fundamental question regards the possible strategies of defense to prevent the cascade from propagating through the entire network. Here we introduce and investigate a costless strategy of defense based on a selective further removal of nodes and edges, right after the initial attack or failure. This intentional removal of network elements is shown to drastically reduce the size of the cascade.

Adilson E. Motter

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space Authors: Han, D., Pal, S., Nangreave, J., Deng, Z., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures...

271

Consumption patterns, complexity and enrichment in aquatic food chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...22 May 1998 research-article Consumption patterns, complexity and enrichment...patterns resembling ratio-dependent consumption. However, whereas the prey-dependent...prey-dependent|enrichment|omnivory| Consumption patterns, complexity and enrichment...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Note on Fuzzy Real and Complex Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the concept of fuzzy field, we have considered the fuzzy field of real and complex numbers and thereafter we have established a few standard results of real and complex numbers with respect to a membership function.

T. K. Samanta

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessing and reducing product portfolio complexity in the pharmaceutical industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overly complex product portfolios lead to inefficient use of resources and limit an organization's ability to react quickly to changing market dynamics. The challenges of reducing portfolio complexity are defining excess ...

Leiter, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Rigorous Synthesis and Simulation of Complex Distillation Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rigorous Synthesis and Simulation of Complex Distillation Networks Gerardo J. Ruiz, Seon B. Kim energy-efficient distillation net- works. Complex column networks have substantial potential for energy column, networks, temperature collocation, inverse design, Aspen validation Introduction Distillation

Linninger, Andreas A.

275

Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex modulus is one of the key parameters in the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG). The purpose of this study is to implement an accurate and high-efficiency mechanical method to measure and calculate the complex modulus...

Ling, Meng

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

COMPLEXITY IN EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN I. RELATION TO EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of eight small second-order designs from the literature. Complexity has been advocated as a crite- Iion

Ramirez, Donald E.

277

Institut FARMAN Simulation, modlisation et tests virtuels de systmes complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institut FARMAN Simulation, modélisation et tests virtuels de systèmes complexes Laboratoires CMLA

278

Pseudofunctorial behavior of Cousin complexes on formal schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contemporary Mathematics. Pseudofunctorial behavior of Cousin complexes on formal schemes. Joseph Lipman, Suresh Nayak, and Pramathanath Sastry.

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex- May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex

280

The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP , Sangxia Huang2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP Modulo k Heng Guo1 , Sangxia Huang2 , Pinyan Lu3@gmail.com Abstract We prove a complexity dichotomy theorem for counting weighted Boolean CSP modulo k for any similar to the one for the complex weighted Boolean #CSP, found by [Cai, Lu and Xia, STOC 2009]. Then we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Biosorption of anionic metal complexes Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

containing toxic heavy metals, often in anionic complex forms such as anionic chromate (CrO4 2- ), vanadate1 Biosorption of anionic metal complexes Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky* http Street, MONTREAL, Canada H3A 2B2 *corresponding author Anionic metal complexes, are very effectively

Volesky, Bohumil

282

Complex Network Framework Based Dependency Matrix of Electric Power Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Network Framework Based Dependency Matrix of Electric Power Grid A. B. M. Nasiruzzaman, H scale analysis of power grid using complex network framework a network matrix is formed. The elements. INTRODUCTION Power grid is one of the most complex man made in- frastructures of modern day. For example

Pota, Himanshu Roy

283

Original article Lignin-carbohydrate complexes in forages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Lignin-carbohydrate complexes in forages: structure and consequences) Summary ― Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCS) are recognised as key structures in forage microorganisms are discussed. lignin-carbohydrate complexes I cell wall I forage I digestibility Résumé

Boyer, Edmond

284

Complex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach Thomas J. Bruno, Lisa S. Ott for measuring distillation curves reveals the physicochemical properties of complex fluids such as fuels distillation curves of complex fluids. The distillation curve provides the only practical avenue to assess

285

Understanding change in complex socio-technical systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper elaborates the conceptual underpinnings needed to understand and influence change in complex socio-technical systems. The nature of causality is first addressed, followed by consideration of the nature of complexity. It is argued that, at ... Keywords: Causality, Complexity, Economics, Healthcare, Modeling

William B. Rouse; Nicoleta Serban

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems C. Ringhofer Abstract We emphasis is given to the implementation of service rules for complex systems, involving multiple product flow type models for complex production systems. Traffic flow models represent, in some sense

Ringhofer, Christian

287

EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Complex Level Complex Level July, 2013 Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2013 Lifecycle Values 2013 Target 2014 Target Pu packaged for long-term disposition Number of Containers 5,089 5,089 5,089 5,089 eU packaged for disposition Number of Containers 8,198 8,016 8,016 8,016 Pu/U residues packaged for disposition Kilograms of Bulk 107,828 107,828 107,828 107,828 DU & U packaged for disposition Metric Tons 736,801 32,452 45,317 76,817 Liquid Waste eliminated Thousands of Gallons 91,907 5,340 6,260 6,812 Liquid Waste Tanks closed Number of Tanks 239 11 11 13 HLW packaged for disposition Number of Containers 24,183 3,802 4,077 4,283 SNF packaged for disposition Metric Tons of Heavy Metal 2,450 2,128 2,128 2,128

288

Complexity analysis of hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complexity measures of the Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC (L\\'opez-Ruiz, Mancini and Calvet) types of the Rakhmanov probability density $\\rho_n(x)=\\omega(x) p_n^2(x)$ of the polynomials $p_n(x)$ orthogonal with respect to the weight function $\\omega(x)$, $x\\in (a,b)$, are used to quantify various two-fold facets of the spreading of the Hermite, Laguerre and Jacobi systems all over their corresponding orthogonality intervals in both analytical and computational ways. Their explicit (Cr\\'amer-Rao) and asymptotical (Fisher-Shannon, LMC) values are given for the three systems of orthogonal polynomials. Then, these complexity-type mathematical quantities are numerically examined in terms of the polynomial's degree $n$ and the parameters which characterize the weight function. Finally, several open problems about the generalised hypergeometric functions of Lauricella and Srivastava-Daoust types, as well as on the asymptotics of weighted $L_q$-norms of Laguerre and Jacobi polynomials are pointed out.

J. S. Dehesa; A. Guerrero; P. Snchez-Moreno

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

A New Route to Azadithiolato Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti(SH){sub 2}] with cyclic imines with the formula (CH{sub 2}NR){sub 3} gives 2-aza-1,3-dithiolato chelate complexes [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NR}] (1, R = Ph; 2, R = Me; 3, R = CH{sub 2}Ph). These compounds demonstrate that azadithiolate ligands can exist on mononuclear metal centers. The complexes were characterized by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Variable-temperature {sup 1}H NMR studies reveal that the dithiolate ligands undergo ring inversion like other dithiatitanacyclohexanes. Treatment of [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NPh}] (1) with [Fe(benzylideneacetone)(CO){sub 3}] afforded [Fe{sub 2}{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NPh}(CO){sub 6}] in good yield.

Angamuthu, R.; Carroll, M.E.; Ramesh, M.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in techniques such as NMR and EPR spectroscopy have enabled the elucidation of how proteins undergo structural changes to act in concert in complex networks. The three minireviews in this series highlight current findings and the capabilities of new methodologies for unraveling the dynamic changes controlling diverse cellular functions. They represent a sampling of the cutting-edge research presented at the 17th Meeting of Methods in Protein Structure Analysis, MPSA2008, in Sapporo, Japan, 26-29 August, 2008 (http://www.iapsap.bnl.gov). The first minireview, by Christensen and Klevit, reports on a structure-based yeast two-hybrid method for identifying E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that interact with the E3 BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer ligase to generate either mono- or polyubiquitinated products. This method demonstrated for the first time that the BRCA1/BARD1 E3 can interact with 10 different E2 enzymes. Interestingly, the interaction with multiple E2 enzymes displayed unique ubiquitin-transfer properties, a feature expected to be common among other RING and U-box E3s. Further characterization of new E3 ligases and the E2 enzymes that interact with them will greatly enhance our understanding of ubiquitin transfer and facilitate studies of roles of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in protein processing and trafficking. Stein et al., in the second minireview, describe recent progress in defining the binding specificity of different peptide-binding domains. The authors clearly point out that transient peptide interactions mediated by both post-translational modifications and disordered regions ensure a high level of specificity. They postulate that a regulatory code may dictate the number of combinations of domains and post-translational modifications needed to achieve the required level of interaction specificity. Moreover, recognition alone is not enough to obtain a stable complex, especially in a complex cellular environment. Increasing evidence indicates that disordered domains can acquire structural features that modulate the binding and strength of the signaling cascade. Whereas the first two minireviews describe ways in which protein interactions are modulated, the third, by Tompa, focuses on the importance of protein disorder in a subset of amyloid proteins. It is apparent that within this group, part of the polypeptide chain remains disordered during amyloid formation. Moreover, the disordered segments have different amino acid composition and physicochemical characteristics, which suggests that they may play a role in amyloid stability. The disordered region may serve as a linker to connect the ordered core and a globular domain, maintaining the stability and structure of the globular domain and minimizing protein refolding upon amyloid formation. As techniques in protein chemistry advance, we are learning more and more about the mechanisms that regulate and are regulated by protein interactions. The three minireviews in this series offer a glimpse of the complex dynamics fundamental to protein-protein interactions. In the future, we expect that the knowledge gained will help to augment our ability to control complex pathologies and treat diverse diseases states.

Appella, E.; Anderson, C.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks. When the complex dynamical networks could be synchronized up to an equilibrium or periodic orbit, a hybrid feedback controller is designed to realize the different component of vector of node could be synchronized up to different desired scaling function in complex dynamical networks with time delay. Hybrid function projective synchronization (HFPS) in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and HFPS in complex dynamical networks with time-varying coupling delay are researched, respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xing-yuan, E-mail: wangxy@dlut.edu.cn; Hu, Xiao-peng [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Influence of Complex Structure on the Biodegradation of Iron-Citrate Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carbon source was isolated from a leachate sample collected from the low-level radioactive waste disposal site at West Valley, N.Y. The choice of culture medium is critical in elucidating the biodegradation of metal-citrate complexes because...

A. J. Francis; C. J. Dodge

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center and the Nuclear Materials Information Program Library, a premier manufacturing facility operated by B&W Y-12 for NNSA, plays a vital role in DOE's Nuclear Security a safe and reliable US nuclear weapons deterrent. The complex also retrieves and stores nuclear materials

Pennycook, Steve

294

Complex biological and bio-inspired systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding and characterization ofthe fundamental processes of the function of biological systems underpins many of the important challenges facing American society, from the pathology of infectious disease and the efficacy ofvaccines, to the development of materials that mimic biological functionality and deliver exceptional and novel structural and dynamic properties. These problems are fundamentally complex, involving many interacting components and poorly understood bio-chemical kinetics. We use the basic science of statistical physics, kinetic theory, cellular bio-chemistry, soft-matter physics, and information science to develop cell level models and explore the use ofbiomimetic materials. This project seeks to determine how cell level processes, such as response to mechanical stresses, chemical constituents and related gradients, and other cell signaling mechanisms, integrate and combine to create a functioning organism. The research focuses on the basic physical processes that take place at different levels ofthe biological organism: the basic role of molecular and chemical interactions are investigated, the dynamics of the DNA-molecule and its phylogenetic role are examined and the regulatory networks of complex biochemical processes are modeled. These efforts may lead to early warning algorithms ofpathogen outbreaks, new bio-sensors to detect hazards from pathomic viruses to chemical contaminants. Other potential applications include the development of efficient bio-fuel alternative-energy processes and the exploration ofnovel materials for energy usages. Finally, we use the notion of 'coarse-graining,' which is a method for averaging over less important degrees of freedom to develop computational models to predict cell function and systems-level response to disease, chemical stress, or biological pathomic agents. This project supports Energy Security, Threat Reduction, and the missions of the DOE Office of Science through its efforts to accurately model biological systems at the molecular and cellular level. The project's impact encompasses applications to biofuels, to novel sensors and to materials with broad use for energy or threat reduction. The broad, interdisciplinary approach of CNLS offers the unparalleled strength of combining science backgrounds and expertise -a unique and important asset in attacking the complex science of biological organisms. This approach also allows crossfertilization, with concepts and techniques transferring across field boundaries.

Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Oversight Reports - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Oversight Reports - Y-12 National Security Complex Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Independent Oversight Review, Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC

296

Tag: partnerships | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partnerships partnerships Tag: partnerships Displaying 1 - 10 of 14... Category: News Grad Assistants Make Their Mark UT students work with the UPF project and Y-12 researchers seeking fresh ideas and extra hands. More... Category: News B&W Y-12 signs two new Mentor-Protégé agreements B&W Y-12 recently signed agreements with two new protégés. The companies join eight other groups currently involved in Y-12's Mentor-Protégé program. More... Category: News Students analyze artificial implants at ASM Materials Camp The leg bone is connected to the hip prosthesis: Students analyze artificial implants at ASM Materials Camp More... Category: News Y-12, UT, and Stanley Healthcare work to advance technology Representatives from the Y-12 National Security Complex; the University of

297

Contact Us | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contact Us Contact Us Contact Us Mail and delivery address information: Y-12 National Security Complex P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245* Non-mail deliveries: Bear Creek Road P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 *This mailstop is for general inquiries. For other mail, please contact the intended recipient for the appropriate mailstop. If you don't find what you're looking for on our Home Page or through our Search page, try one of the resources listed below. Media Inquiries Ellen Boatner, 865.241.4937 Public and Governmental Affairs Alice Brandon, 865.576.2963 Benefits One Call, 865.574.1500 New Hope Center Public Use Areas Ray Smith, 865.576.7781 Procurement procurement@y12.doe.gov, 865.576-8500 Socioeconomic Programs Lisa Copeland, 865.576.2090 Employment Staffing, staff@y12.doe.gov, 865.576.1377

298

Tag: security | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

security security Tag: security Displaying 1 - 5 of 5... Category: Security Security Y-12 places the highest priority on maintaining and improving its security posture. More... Category: News Johnson shares perspective on security Rod Johnson, B&W Y-12 deputy general manager of Security, recently discussed the security atmosphere since his arrival last August and what he sees as Y-12's security future. More... Category: News Y-12 to Install New Fence to Reduce Trespassing The National Nuclear Security Administration today announced plans to extend the boundary fence at the Y-12 National Security Complex along Scarboro Road. The new fence is expected to be in place by April 4. More... Category: News New institute promotes nuclear security Y-12 is partnering with the University of Tennessee and others to provide

299

Media Coverage | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Media Coverage Media Coverage Media Coverage Lee Bzorgi is named a Pathfinder Research Entrepreneur of the Year by Tech 2020. The Tech 2020 Council's inaugural Pathfinder Research Entrepreneur of the Year award went to Lee Bzorgi, director of the National Security Technology Center at Y-12. Bzorgi shares the award with innovator and entrepreneur, Jimmy Mays, a UT professor of Chemistry with a joint appointment with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Source: Tech 2020 News Release, Thurs, 4 November 2010. Y-12 researchers garner R&D 100 awards A research chemist and his revolutionary cloth invented to clean surfaces leaving no sticky residue, even down to the nanoscale, have captured a prestigious R&D 100 award, along with three other researchers at the Y-12 National Security Complex. Source: Y-12 News Release, Mon, 21 July 2008.

300

Technologies licensed | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies licensed Technologies licensed Technologies licensed Posted: July 16, 2012 - 3:49pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 Rendering of Y-12's Access Rate Control System Wherever threatening situations arise, in-place security measures make the most of every second. On Feb. 8, a startup firm in Knoxville, Tenn., licensed two security-related technologies from the Y-12 National Security Complex that do just that. The technologies, which delay entrance to controlled-access areas, provide a security solution for various potential markets: commercial nuclear facilities, pharmaceutical manufacturers, correctional facilities and large sporting venues, as well as for other Department of Energy sites. Sustainable Environment Technologies, LLC (SET), licensed the Access Rate

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301

Y-12 National Security Complex Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y 12 National Security Complex (Y 12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y 12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements that could be applied not only at Y-12 but at other Federal facilities as well. FEMP selected Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to coordinate and manage the water assessment. PNNL contracted Water Savers, LLC to lead the technical aspects of the water assessment. Water Savers provided key technical expertise in water auditing, metering, and cooling systems. This is the report of that effort, which concluded that the Y-12 facility could realize considerable water savings by implementing the recommended water efficiency opportunities.

Elam, Shana E.; Bassett, P.; McMordie Stoughton, Kate

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

Meacham, J.E.; and others

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Invisibility in PT-symmetric complex crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bragg scattering in sinusoidal PT-symmetric complex crystals of finite thickness is theoretically investigated by the derivation of exact analytical expressions for reflection and transmission coefficients in terms of modified Bessel functions of first kind. The analytical results indicate that unidirectional invisibility, recently predicted for such crystals by coupled-mode theory [Z. Lin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 213901 (2011)], breaks down for crystals containing a large number of unit cells. In particular, for a given modulation depth in a shallow sinusoidal potential, three regimes are encountered as the crystal thickness is increased. At short lengths the crystal is reflectionless and invisible when probed from one side (unidirectional invisibility), whereas at intermediate lengths the crystal remains reflectionless but not invisible; for longer crystals both unidirectional reflectionless and invisibility properties are broken.

Stefano Longhi

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cascade-based attacks on complex networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We live in a modern world supported by large, complex networks. Examples range from financial markets to communication and transportation systems. In many realistic situations the flow of physical quantities in the network, as characterized by the loads on nodes, is important. We show that for such networks where loads can redistribute among the nodes, intentional attacks can lead to a cascade of overload failures, which can in turn cause the entire or a substantial part of the network to collapse. This is relevant for real-world networks that possess a highly heterogeneous distribution of loads, such as the Internet and power grids. We demonstrate that the heterogeneity of these networks makes them particularly vulnerable to attacks in that a large-scale cascade may be triggered by disabling a single key node. This brings obvious concerns on the security of such systems.

Adilson E. Motter and Ying-Cheng Lai

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

B Plant Complex preclosure work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preclosure work plan describes the condition of the dangerous waste treatment storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit after completion of the B Plant Complex decommissioning Transition Phase preclosure activities. This description includes waste characteristics, waste types, locations, and associated hazards. The goal to be met by the Transition Phase preclosure activities is to place the TSD unit into a safe and environmentally secure condition for the long-term Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Phase of the facility decommissioning process. This preclosure work plan has been prepared in accordance with Section 8.0 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1996). The preclosure work plan is one of three critical Transition Phase documents, the other two being: B Plant End Points Document (WHC-SD-WM-TPP-054) and B Plant S&M plan. These documents are prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its contractors with the involvement of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The tanks and vessels addressed by this preclosure work plan are limited to those tanks end vessels included on the B Plant Complex Part A, Form 3, Permit Application (DOE/RL-88-21). The criteria for determining which tanks or vessels are in the Part A, Form 3, are discussed in the following. The closure plan for the TSD unit will not be prepared until the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process is initiated, which follows the long-term S&M Phase. Final closure will occur during the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process. The Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) is excluded from the scope of this preclosure work plan.

ADLER, J.G.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

309

Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

MORPHOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT OF HATCHERY-CULTURED AMERICAN SHAD, ALOSA SAPIDISSIMA (WILSON)I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mary, Gloucester, Va.; present address: Environmental Affairs Department, Rio BIan- co Oil Shale

311

Fate of 2 year-old, hatchery-reared trout cod Maccullochella macquariensis (Percichthyidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a range of habitats including pools, riffles and runs but is usually associated with deeper water into two upland rivers B. C. EBNER*, J. D. THIEM* AND M. LINTERMANS* *Parks, Conservation & Lands water rat Hydromys chrysogaster were the probable causes of mortality. Predator-assisted movement

Cooke, Steven J.

312

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III - November 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III - November 2001 November 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an emergency management program review at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in October 2001. The purpose of this inspection was to assess Y-12's readiness to protect site personnel and the public from the consequences of onsite events that could result in the release of hazardous materials from site facilities and activities. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume

313

Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex's primary mission is to support of the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance program. Activities include assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons components, secure storage of special nuclear material (SNM), and various other nuclear weapons-related activities. Other activities include various aspects of testing and development, nonproliferation, and technology transfer. Enforcement June 13, 2008 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Babcock & Wilcox Teclmical Services Y -12, LLC - NEA-2008-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC, related to a Uranium Chip Fire at the Y-12 National

314

Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Locations > Y-12 National Security Complex Home > About Us > Our Locations > Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex http://www.y12.doe.gov/ Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas and the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Y-12 supports the Nuclear Security Enterprise through nuclear material processing, manufacturing and storage operations and nuclear nonproliferation activities and provides enriched uranium feedstock for the U.S. Navy. National Security Complex: The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) serves as the nation's only source of enriched uranium nuclear weapons components and provides enriched uranium for the U.S. Navy. Y-12 is a leader in materials science and precision manufacturing and serves as the

315

Pitch Perception of Complex Sounds: Nonlinearity Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability of the auditory system to perceive the fundamental frequency of a sound even when this frequency is removed from the stimulus is an interesting phenomenon related to the pitch of complex sounds. This capability is known as ``residue'' or ``virtual pitch'' perception and was first reported last century in the pioneering work of Seebeck. It is residue perception that allows one to listen to music with small transistor radios, which in general have a very poor and sometimes negligible response to low frequencies. The first attempt, due to Helmholtz, to explain the residue as a nonlinear effect in the ear considered it to originate from difference combination tones. However, later experiments have shown that the residue does not coincide with a difference combination tone. These results and the fact that dichotically presented signals also elicit residue perception have led to nonlinear theories being gradually abandoned in favour of central processor models. In this paper we use recent results from the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems to show that physical frequencies produced by generic nonlinear oscillators acted upon by two independent periodic excitations can reproduce with great precision most of the experimental data about the residue without resorting to any kind of central processing mechanism.

D. L. Gonzalez; L. Morettini; F. Sportolari; O. Rosso; J. H. E. Cartwright; O. Piro

1995-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Decommissioning of the Iraq former nuclear complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A number of sites in Iraq have some degree of radiological contamination and require decommissioning and remediation in order to ensure radiological safety. Many of these sites in Iraq are located at the nuclear research centre at Al Tuwaitha. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors has approved a project to assist the Government of Iraq in the evaluation and decommissioning of former facilities that used radioactive materials. The project is divided into three phases: Phase 1: collect and analyze all available data and conduct training of the Iraqi staff, Phase 2: develop a decommissioning and remediation plan, and Phase 3: implement field activities relating to decommissioning, remediation and site selection suitable for final disposal of waste. Four working groups have been established to complete the Phase 1 work and significant progress has been made in drafting a new nuclear law which will provide the legal basis for the licensing of the decommissioning of the former nuclear complex. Work is also underway to collect and analysis existing date, to prioritize future activities and to develop a waste management strategy. This will be a long-term and costly project. (authors)

Abbas, Mohammed [Ministry of Science and Technology (Iraq); Helou, Tuama; Ahmead, Bushra [Ministry of Environment (Iraq); Al-Atia, Mousa; Al-Mubarak, Mowaffak [Iraqi Radiation Sources Regulatory Authority (Iraq); Danneels, Jeffrey; Cochran, John; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Addressing the Complexity of the Earth System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper highlights the role of the Earth-system biosphere and illustrates the complex: biosphere-atmosphere interactions in the Amazon Basin, changes in nitrogen cycling, ocean chemistry, and land use. It introduces three important requirements for accelerating the development and use of Earth system information. The first requirement is to develop Earth system analysis and prediction models that account for multi-scale physical, chemical and biological processes, including their interactions in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-land-ice system. The development of these models requires partnerships between academia, national research centers, and operational prediction facilities, and builds upon accomplishments in weather and climate predictions. They will highlight the regional aspects of global change, and include modules for water system, agriculture, forestry, energy, air quality, health, etc. The second requirement is to model the interactions between humans and the weather-climate-biogeochemical system. The third requirement is to introduce novel methodologies to account for societal drivers, impacts and feedbacks. This is a challenging endeavor requiring creative solutions and some compromising because human behavior cannot be fully represented within the framework of present-day physical prediction systems.

Nobre, Carlos; Brasseur, Guy P.; Shapiro, Melvyn; Lahsen, Myanna; Brunet, Gilbert; Busalacchi, Antonio; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Noone, Kevin; Ometto, Jean P.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alarm system for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Console for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Sigma Model on Complex Projective Superspaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sigma model on complex projective superspaces CP^{S-1|S} gives rise to a continuous family of interacting 2D conformal field theories which are parametrized by the curvature radius R and the theta angle \\theta. Our main goal is to determine the spectrum of the model, non-perturbatively as a function of both parameters. We succeed to do so for all open boundary conditions preserving the full global symmetry of the model. In string theory parlor, these correspond to volume filling branes that are equipped with a monopole line bundle and connection. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part, we approach the problem within the continuum formulation. Combining combinatorial arguments with perturbative studies and some simple free field calculations, we determine a closed formula for the partition function of the theory. This is then tested numerically in the second part. There we propose a spin chain regularization of the CP^{S-1|S} model with open boundary conditions and use it to determine the spect...

Candu, Constantin; Quella, Thomas; Saleur, Hubert; Schomerus, Volker

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Sigma Model on Complex Projective Superspaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sigma model on complex projective superspaces CP^{S-1|S} gives rise to a continuous family of interacting 2D conformal field theories which are parametrized by the curvature radius R and the theta angle \\theta. Our main goal is to determine the spectrum of the model, non-perturbatively as a function of both parameters. We succeed to do so for all open boundary conditions preserving the full global symmetry of the model. In string theory parlor, these correspond to volume filling branes that are equipped with a monopole line bundle and connection. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part, we approach the problem within the continuum formulation. Combining combinatorial arguments with perturbative studies and some simple free field calculations, we determine a closed formula for the partition function of the theory. This is then tested numerically in the second part. There we propose a spin chain regularization of the CP^{S-1|S} model with open boundary conditions and use it to determine the spectrum at the conformal fixed point. The numerical results are in remarkable agreement with the continuum analysis.

Constantin Candu; Vladimir Mitev; Thomas Quella; Hubert Saleur; Volker Schomerus

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lure system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya, E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com; Ratnavelu, K., E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com [Network Science Research Group, Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex - April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex - April 13, 2010 April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement's investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with quality assurance deficiencies in the fabrication of safety significant embed plates. These embed plates were fabricated by Parsons Technology Development and Fabrication Complex (PTDFC) a supplier to

325

Optimization Online - On the evaluation complexity of composite ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 8, 2011 ... On the evaluation complexity of composite function minimization with applications to nonconvex nonlinear programming. C Cartis (coralia.cartis...

C Cartis

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Y-12 National Security Complex DOE Oak Ridge Environmental Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Complex began efforts to separate lithium isotopes to develop hydrogen bombs based on fusion. Millions of pounds of mercury were needed to separate the lithium. Three similar...

327

Experimental Measurement of Radiation Heat Transfer from Complex Fenestration Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A well instrumented facility for the measurement of heat transfer from complex fenestration systems was built and validated. The facility provided very accurate measurements based (more)

Wilson, Barry Allan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Radiative heat transfer in a flow of rheologically complex fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of complex radiative and convective heat transfer in steady-state generalized Couette flow of a nonlinear viscoplastic fluid is examined.

V. F. Volchenok; Z. P. Shul'man

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Small-Business Policy | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Suppliers Socioeconomic Programs Small-Business Policy Small-Business Policy It is the policy of the Y-12 National Security Complex to provide maximum practicable contracting...

330

Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash...

331

Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Complex - March 2014 March 2014 Review of the Uranium Processing Facility Project Design Requirements and Configuration Management Program This report documents the results of...

332

IdentifyingAttributesofPerceptionofProjectComplexity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? There is a common belief amongst those who are involved in projects that as project complexity increases the difficulty to manage a project increases (more)

Rakhman, Eries

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Exploring Written Communication Techniques for Complex Natural Resource Issues.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many natural resource issues are increasingly complex and multi-faceted, and solutions may not be readily apparent. Increasing public understanding and encouraging public involvement is assumed (more)

Oxarart, Annie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countrysidea shift to renewable energy production. Even if politicaldifficulties. Renewable energy production as a new economic

Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Random complex dynamics and semigroups of holomorphic maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of polynomials. Under certain conditions these functions T are complex analogues of the devil's staircase, Markov process, rational semigroups, polynomial semigroups, Julia sets, fractal geometry, cooperation

Sumi, Hiroki

336

Making biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel | Center...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel 4 Nov 2012 Souvik Roy, graduate student (Subtask 3, laboratory of Anne Jones). "I am involved mostly in mimicking Fe-hydrogenases,...

337

Kintic study of ferrous nitrosyl complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and dissociation rate constants and equilibrium constants for the reversible binding of NO to Fe/sup II/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/, Fe/sup II/(cit), Fe/sup II/(acac)/sub 2/, and Fe/sup II/(EDTA) in aqueous solution are reported (cit = citrate, acac = acetylacetonate, EDTA = ethylenediaminetetraacetate). The constants were determined (at 25/sup 0/C) as follows: Fe/sup II/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/NO, k/sub 1/ = 7.1 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, k/sub /sup -1// = 1.5 x 10/sup 3/ s/sup -1/, K = 470 M/sup -1/; Fe/sup II/(cit)NO, k/sub 1/ = 4.4 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, k/sub -/sub 1// = 6.6 x 10/sup 2/ s/sup -1/, K = 670 M/sup -1/; Fe/sup II/(acac)/sub 2/NO, k/sub 1/ = 4.0 x 10/sup 2/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, k//sup -//sub 1// = 24 s/sup -1/, K = 17 M/sup -1/; Fe/sup II/(EDTA)NO, k/sub 1/ greater than or equal to 6.0 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, k/sub -/sub 1// greater than or equal to 60 s/sup -1/. The visible spectra of the complexes are also reported.

Littlejohn, D.; Chang, S.G.

1982-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Low-complexity Video Encoding for UAV Reconnaissance and Surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-complexity Video Encoding for UAV Reconnaissance and Surveillance Malavika Bhaskaranand-complexity decoder. However, applications such as unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance and surveillance in the video sequences is due to the movement of the UAV and the camera mounts which is known. Motivated

Liebling, Michael

339

RANDOMNESS IN PROOF COMPLEXITY Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RANDOMNESS IN PROOF COMPLEXITY by Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim A thesis submitted in conformity of Toronto Copyright c 2005 by Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim #12;Abstract Randomness in Proof Complexity Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Computer Science University of Toronto 2005

Penn, Gerald

340

NUCLEAR ARMS COMPLEX: Huge problems beset cleanup, redesign  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ARMS COMPLEX: Huge problems beset cleanup, redesign ... Two documents issued during the past week and a half paint a dismaying picture of the horrendous legacy of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons complex and the massive task that lies ahead. ...

1991-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technology Infusion for Complex Systems: A Framework and Case Study*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Infusion for Complex Systems: A Framework and Case Study* Eun Suk Suh,1, Michael R Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139TECHNOLOGY INFUSION FOR COMPLEX SYSTEMS: CASE STUDY Received 1 July 2008 in today's competitive environment constantly need to develop new technolo- gies and infuse them

de Weck, Olivier L.

342

Performance of Concurrent Rendezvous Systems with Complex Pipeline Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Concurrent Rendezvous Systems with Complex Pipeline Structures Real February 11, 1998 Abstract The term ``complex pipeline'' describes a set of tasks which process incoming data in a sequence, like a pipeline, but have various kinds of parallel execution steps coupled

Woodside, C. Murray

343

On the Communication Complexity of Correlation and Entanglement Distillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Communication Complexity of Correlation and Entanglement Distillation Ke Yang May 4th, 2004 distillation, entanglement distillation, communication complexity, EPR pairs, quantum key distribution #12) information, and then engage in a protocol to \\distill" the correlation/entanglement via communication. We

344

On the Complexity of Computing Generators of Closed Sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Complexity of Computing Generators of Closed Sets Miki Hermann1 and Bari¸s Sertkaya2 1 LIX investigate the computational complexity of some deci- sion and counting problems related to generators the problem of checking the existence of a generator with a specified cardinality, and about the problem

Baader, Franz

345

Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Cancels DOE O 5600.1.

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

A distributed shifting bottleneck heuristic for complex job shops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider distributed versions of a modified shifting bottleneck heuristic for complex job shops. The considered job shop environment contains parallel batching machines, machines with sequence-dependent setup times and reentrant process ... Keywords: Complex job shops, Computational experiments, Distributed scheduling, Hierarchical production control, Shifting bottleneck heuristic

Lars Mnch; Ren Drieel

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Efficient Complex Query Support for Multiversion XML Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Complex Query Support for Multiversion XML Documents Shu-Yao Chien1 , Vassilis J. Tsotras documents represents a critical requirement for many applications. Also, there has been much recent interest). In this paper, we examine the problem of supporting efficiently complex queries on multiversioned XML documents

Zhang, Donghui

348

The Complexity of Decision Problems in Automata Theory and Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Decision Problems in Automata Theory and Logic by Larry J. Stockmeyer #12, and the f i r s t order theory of two successors and prefix, among others. It follows that the decision of recursive function theory. Keywords: computational complexity, decision procedure star- free, Turing machine

Polz, Martin

349

Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to the information engineer a suitable service deployment scheme compatible with the environment. The PermissionVisual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments Augusto Celentano and Fabio for in- teractive services in complex physical environments using a knowl- edge based approach to define

Celentano, Augusto

350

Single-molecule analysis of DNA-protein complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-molecule analysis of DNA-protein complexes using nanopores Breton Hornblower1,2, Amy Coombs1. In contrast, single-molecule measurements can reveal information masked by ensemble averaging in bulk with single-molecule approaches, hun- dreds of copies of the same complex must be analyzed. This often

Meller, Amit

351

Complex multiplication, rationality and mirror symmetry for abelian varieties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that complex multiplication on abelian varieties is equivalent to the existence of a constant rational K\\"ahler metric. We give a sufficient condition for a mirror of an abelian variety of CM-type to be of CM-type as well. We also study the relationship between complex multiplication and rationality of a toroidal lattice vertex algebra.

Meng Chen

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development Andrei Kirilyuk be used as a basis for the latter, in the form of "complexity revolution" in information systems-driven IT to various aspects of post-industrial civilisation dynamics, including intelligent communication, context

Boyer, Edmond

353

CONDENSING COMPUTABLE SCENES USING VISUAL COMPLEXITY AND FILM SYNTAX ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSING COMPUTABLE SCENES USING VISUAL COMPLEXITY AND FILM SYNTAX ANALYSIS Hari Sundaram Shih, sfchang}@ctr.columbia.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we present a novel algorithm to condense computable, lighting and sound. We attempt to condense such scenes in two ways. First, we define visual complexity

Chang, Shih-Fu

354

Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Wagner, Richard W. (Murrysville, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins are disclosed having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Wagner, R.W.

1996-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in March-April 2003. The inspection was performed by OA's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Overall, YSO and BWXT have established a generally effective ISM program. YSO and BWXT management have demonstrated their commitment to continuous improvement and have effective tools and process enhancements to address

359

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 June 2008 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Y-12 Site Office (YSO) and Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) during March through May 2008. The ES&H inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Many aspects of the Y-12 ISM program are effective. For example, most work observed was performed using well written and technically accurate

360

Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > M & O Support Department > Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex DE-AC05-00OR22800 Operated by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Updated to Modification 297 dated 09/30/2013 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract dated 8/31/2000 (pdf, 13,886KB) Y-12 A001 (9/15/00) (pdf, 60KB) Y-12 Conformed Contract (Conformed to Mod 297 dated 09/30/2013 (pdf, 4201 KB) Y-12 A002 (10/15/00) (pdf, 130KB) Y-12 M003 (10/26/00) (pdf, 77KB) Y-12 M004 (10/31/00) (pdf, 865KB) Y-12 M006 (10/31/00) (pdf, 191KB)

362

A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex Posted By Office of Public Affairs Nuclear family "A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex" is a four episode

363

Enforcement Documents - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Enforcement Documents - Y-12 National Security Complex June 13, 2008 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Babcock & Wilcox Teclmical Services Y-12, LLC - NEA-2008-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC, related to a Uranium Chip Fire at the Y-12 National Security Complex September 18, 2007 Preliminary Notice of Violation, BWXT Y-12 LLC - EA-2007-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to BWXT Y-12, LLC, related to Criticality Safety Controls at the Y-12 National Security Complex June 15, 2006 Enforcement Letter, BWXT Y-12 - June 15, 2006 Enforcement Letter issued to BWXT Y-12 related to Quality Assurance Deficiencies in construction activities at the Y-12 National Security

364

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - February  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2008 February 2008 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight inspected the emergency management program at DOE's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in October-November 2007. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63). Independent Oversight reports to the Chief, Office of Health, Safety and Security, who reports directly to the Secretary of Energy. This 2007 inspection found that YSO and B&W Y-12 have established an emergency management program that generally protects site workers and the

365

Princeton Professor Resolves Complex Puzzle | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Princeton Professor Resolves Complex Puzzle Princeton Professor Resolves Complex Puzzle Princeton Professor Resolves Complex Puzzle November 24, 2010 - 11:32am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Dr. Torquato's work -- in addition to detecting gravitational waves and improving understanding of low-temperature states of matter -- could have applications in areas ranging from wireless communications network layouts to data compression and coding and cryptography. A change in perspective can change everything. A complex jigsaw puzzle may suddenly be solved by stepping back ... Taking the dog for a walk ... Or going to the gym. Physicists and mathematicians often work in similar fashion: taking a step back, looking at a complex problem in a new way, and

366

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex July 1, 2010 - 10:11am Addthis What does this project do? This nonprofit weatherized a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. The weatherization program of the Rural Nevada Development Corporation (RNDC) reached a recent success in its eleven counties-wide territory. In June, the nonprofit finished weatherizing a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. "That is one big savings and is why I am proud of this project," says Dru Simerson, RNDC Weatherization Manager. RNDC's crew replaced all windows and 17 furnaces and installed floor

367

Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex - June Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 June 2011 Site Lead Orientation Visit to the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex [HIAR-Y-12-2011-06-23] The purposes of the visit were to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, initiate the site lead program, increase operational awareness of the site's activities, and discuss methods the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) uses to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Oak Ridge Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public

368

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 September 2005 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Summary Report The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) during August and September 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. YSO and BWXT have established ISM systems that are conceptually sound. BWXT also has appropriate programs in place to ensure the functionality of the

369

Methyltrihydroborate complexes of the lanthanides and actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reaction of MC1/sub 4/ (M = Zr, Hf, U, Th, Np) with LiBH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/ in chlorobenzene produces volatile, hexane-soluble M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/. Crystal structures are monomeric, tetrahedral species. Lewis base adducts prepared include U(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.THT, Th(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.L (L = THF (tetrahydrofuran), THT (tetrahydrothiophene), SMe/sub 2/, OMe/sub 2/), U(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.2L (L = THF, pyridine, NH/sub 3/), Th(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.2L (L = THF, THT, py, NH/sub 3/), M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.L-L (M = U, Th; L-L = dme (1,2-dimethoxyethane), bmte (bis(1,2-methylthio)ethane), tmed (N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine), dmpe (1,2-dimethylphosphinoethane)) and Th(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.1/2 OEt/sub 2/. Reaction of MC1/sub 3/ (M = Ho, Yb, Lu) with LiBH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/ in diethyl ether produces volatile, toluene-soluble M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.OEt/sub 2/. Other Lewis base adducts prepared from M(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.OEt/sub 2/ include Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.L (L = THT, THF, py), Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.2L (L = THT, THF, py), Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.tmed, Ho(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.3/2 L-L (L-L = dmpe, bmte), Yb(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.3/2 dmpe, Yb(BH/sub 3/Ch/sub 3/).L (L = THF, dme), Yb(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.2THF, and Lu(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/.THF. By structural criteria, the bonding in actinide and lanthanide methyltrihydroborate complexes is primarily ionic in character even though they display covalent-like physical properties. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that there is some degree of covalent bonding in U(BH/sub 3/CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/.

Shinomoto, R.S.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electron absorption by complex potentials: One-dimensional case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the electronic absorption induced by a complex potential in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. By solving the Schrdinger equation for spatially localized and extended complex potentials, we derive the electronic absorption coefficient ?. Neither a single nor a double Dirac-? potential can represent a totally absorbing potential (?=1) for any choice of the complex amplitude of the potential. Maximum absorption coefficients for these potential types are 0.5 and 2(?2-1)?0.828, respectively. On the contrary, wall and well potentials do account for total absorption at a particular limit of the potential parameters. 1996 The American Physical Society.

Patrici Molins-Mata and Pau Molins-Mata

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Realised levels of geometric complexity in additive manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emergence of Additive Manufacturing (AM) is seen by many as a promising addition to the existing spectrum of manufacturing technology. Assessing a sample of 43 AM produced components, this paper investigates features of complex part geometry. It is found that the measured levels of geometric complexity approximate the normal distribution. Results indicate several factors promoting complexity: membership of the medical industry, organisational stability and the utilisation of powder bed or polymer vat AM technology. The current paper provides some empirical evidence that AM adoption may lead to advances in product performance for a wide range of applications.

Martin Baumers; Chris Tuck; Richard Hague

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Calorimetric studies of curium complexation. 2. Amino carboxylates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calorimetric titrations using the long-lived isotope of curium (curium-248) have been conducted with nitrilotriacetate, trans-1,2-cyclohexanedinitrilotetraacetate, and trimethylenedinitrilotetraacetate. The data plus the stability constants measured previously allowed calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of the 1:1 complexation. Similar titrations were conducted with europium to provide comparison of the lanthanide and actinide trivalent ion behaviors. The enthalpy values for the amino polycarboxylate complexing of Cm(III) are greater than those for Eu(III). However, the entropy values for the complexing of both cations are similar. These results are comparable to the previously reported data for EDTA. 13 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Choppin, G.R.; Rizkalla, E.N.; Sullivan, J.C.

1987-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Complexity measures applied to an applications case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintenance of large applications programs has become the most costly function of many Management Information Systems. As a result, recent research has attempted to objectively determine the qualities of low maintenance software. Related research has been directed toward quantifying the complexity, or unmaintainability of existing software. This paper will reference a case study of a large MIS software application and will discuss current maintenance problems and associated costs. A mathematical model will then be presented which correlates quantifiable complexity measures with actual maintenance costs. Finally, a method for projecting cost savings from the reduced complexity of software will be suggested.

Brice, L.; Connell, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a foundation for hatchery reform, to help salmon and steelhead hatcheries in the Columbia River meet harvest and hatchery reforms are needed The HSRG report recommends principles for hatchery management

376

Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of these subunits were previously known, a group from the University of California, San Diego, is the first to determine (to a resolution of 2.0 Å) the structure of the PKA catalytic subunits bound to the regulatory subunit. The structure of the complex clarifies the mechanism for PKA inhibition, and its comparison with the structure of cAMP bound to the regulatory subunit hints at how cAMP binding drives its activation.

378

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent proteins to the eukaryotic ER. To learn more about co-translational protein targeting, researchers from UC Berkeley and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology collaborated to determine the crystal structure of the prokaryotic SRP:SR complex arrested in the cargo release state at 3.9 Å resolution.

379

Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex - June Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Y-12 Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the independent review of implementation verification review (IVR) processes at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The review was performed from March 12 - 30, 2012. The objective of this review was to evaluate the extent to which the site management and operating contractor, B&W Y-12, a partnership of Babcock & Wilcox and Bechtel Corporation, and the Y-12 Site

380

Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Uranium Processing Facility Project (UPF). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at UPF project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred from late February through March 2012. The safety culture evaluation performed by the external independent safety

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381

Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 February 2012 Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Y-12 National Security Complex This report documents the independent targeted review of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) preparedness for severe natural phenomena events, conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was carried out as the pilot for similar reviews at other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The purpose of the targeted review

382

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Signal Recognition Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Monday, 27 February 2012 15:06 The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent proteins to the eukaryotic ER. To learn more about co-translational protein targeting, researchers from UC Berkeley and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology collaborated to determine the crystal structure of the prokaryotic SRP:SR complex arrested in the cargo release state at 3.9 Å resolution.

383

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent proteins to the eukaryotic ER. To learn more about co-translational protein targeting, researchers from UC Berkeley and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology collaborated to determine the crystal structure of the prokaryotic SRP:SR complex arrested in the cargo release state at 3.9 Å resolution.

384

EA-1407: Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and Consolidation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07: Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and 07: Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and Consolidation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1407: Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and Consolidation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate offices, laboratories, and shops within the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area 16 engineering complex where Engineering and Science Applications Division operations would be consolidated from other locations at LANL. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 23, 2002 EA-1407: Finding of No Significant Impact

385

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent proteins to the eukaryotic ER. To learn more about co-translational protein targeting, researchers from UC Berkeley and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology collaborated to determine the crystal structure of the prokaryotic SRP:SR complex arrested in the cargo release state at 3.9 Å resolution.

386

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

387

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent proteins to the eukaryotic ER. To learn more about co-translational protein targeting, researchers from UC Berkeley and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology collaborated to determine the crystal structure of the prokaryotic SRP:SR complex arrested in the cargo release state at 3.9 Å resolution.

388

Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 February 2012 Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Y-12 National Security Complex This report documents the independent targeted review of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) preparedness for severe natural phenomena events, conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was carried out as the pilot for similar reviews at other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The purpose of the targeted review

389

High Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical Rheometry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension. In this snapshot of the simulation, the stress on each suspended particle is shown color-coded with its specific value drawn on its surface. Suspended particles that have a stress value below a specific threshold value are shown in outline form in order to better view those particles that are carrying the majority of the stress in the system. This image and the software used to produce it was developed by Steven Satterfield, John Hagedorn, and John Kelso of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and Marc Olano of NIST and the University of Maryland-Baltimore County. High Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical Rheometry

390

NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship (SSGF) annual fellows' conference

391

Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex Posted By Office of Public Affairs Acting NNSA Administrator and Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security

392

Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 May 2013 Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), conducted an appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Preliminary Safety Design Report (PSDR) and associated site office review processes. This appraisal focused on selected aspects of the PSDR submitted to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Production Office (NPO) for review

393

Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity Mesh Generation for SHARP: Unprecedented Complexity January 29, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis SHARP Supporting Elements During this quarter, the framework team was involved in two primary efforts, mesh generation and implementation of a MOAB-based coupled multi-physics simulation. For mesh generation, finishing touches were put on three major, high-complexity hexahedral meshes, and support was provided for their use in various simulations: MATiS-H, an OECD-NEA experiment for single-phase flow over a rod bundle and grid. [ANL] Nuscale, a hexahedral mesh of the core internals of the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor, a 1/3-scale mockup of the Nuscale reactor. [ANL] XX09, a high-fidelity model of the XX09 test fuel assembly used in

394

Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of these subunits were previously known, a group from the University of California, San Diego, is the first to determine (to a resolution of 2.0 Å) the structure of the PKA catalytic subunits bound to the regulatory subunit. The structure of the complex clarifies the mechanism for PKA inhibition, and its comparison with the structure of cAMP bound to the regulatory subunit hints at how cAMP binding drives its activation.

395

Complexity cost quantification and modeling for strategic portfolio management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project explores portfolio management and planning through effectively reducing complexity within operations. We apply this to a major healthcare company (referred to as Company X). The anticipated launch of new ...

Ma, Jan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Obesity and FTO: changing focus at a complex locus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Obesity and FTO: changing focus at a complex locus. YC Loraine Tung, Giles SH Yeo, Stephen ORahilly & Anthony P Coll* University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories MRC Metabolic Diseases Unit Level 4, Wellcome Trust...

Tung, Y. C. Loraine; Yeo, Giles S. H.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Coll, Anthony P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Imitation of complex grammatical constructions by elderly adults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elderly adults (70 to 89 years) and young adults (30 to 49 years) were asked to imitate complex sentences involving embedded gerunds, w/z-clauses, r/ia/-clauses, and relative clauses. The young adults were able to imitate ...

Kemper, Susan

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

New scaleinvariant nonlinear differential equations for a complex scalar field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sciences of Ukraine, Tereshchenkivska Str.3, 252004 Kiev, Ukraine Abstract We describe all complex wave of Sciences of Ukraine, Tereshchenkivska Str.3, 252004 Kiev, Ukraine 1 #12; where ??; k are arbitrary constants

Zhdanov, Renat

399

Artificial neural networks using complex numbers and phase encoded weights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The model of a simple perceptron using phase-encoded inputs and complex-valued weights is proposed. The aggregation function, activation function, and learning rule for the proposed...

Michel, Howard E; Awwal, Abdul Ahad S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Quantitative Analysis of Group Decision Making for Complex Engineered Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding group decision-making processes is crucial for design or operation of a complex system. Unfortunately, there are few experimental tools that might contribute to the development of a theory of group decision-making ...

Broniatowski, David Andre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

On the Query Complexity of Perfect Gate Discrimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Query Complexity of Perfect Gate Discrimination Giulio Chiribella1 , Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano2 queries are called at different time steps [5]. T Q C © Giulio Chiribella, Giacomo Mauro D

D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

402

Cyclodextrin Cuprate Sandwich-Type Complexes Abdulaziz A. Bagabas,*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porosity of these new complexes. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption studies show that the extended structure, obtained upon crystallization of the Rb+ -based sandwich-type dimers, has the highest CO2 sequestration

403

Sandia National Laboratories: decrease the complexity of enzymes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

decrease the complexity of enzymes needed for the hydrolysis of plant biomass Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology On July 31,...

404

Dissection of the telomere complex CST in Arabidopsis thaliana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Arabidopsis CST is required for telomere length maintenance, for preventing telomere recombination and chromosome end-to-end fusions. Mutations in the CST complex result in severe genomic instability and stem cells defects. My research also shows that CST...

Leehy, Katherine

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

EA-1250: Proposed Strategic Computing Complex, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Strategic Computing Complex within the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical...

406

Quantum interference within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. As shown in a previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 250401], complex quantum trajectories display helical wrapping around stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near vortical tubes, these structures being prominent features of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. Here, we further analyze the divergence and vorticity of the quantum momentum function along streamlines near poles, showing the intricacy of the complex dynamics. Nevertheless, despite this behavior, we show that the appearance of the well-known interference features (on the real axis) can be easily understood in terms of the rotation of the nodal line in the complex plane. This offers a unified description of interference as well as an elegant and practical method to compute the lifetime for interference features, defined in terms of the average wrapping time, i.e., considering such features as a resonant process.

Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: chiachun@mail.utexas.ed [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Sanz, Angel S., E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Miret-Artes, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wyatt, Robert E., E-mail: wyattre@mail.utexas.ed [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Developing a complex approach to health phenomena (step 1)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Health is a complex object for science and operative levels, partly because there are many approaches defining it but not scientifically sufficient or operatively accepted. This is relevant for health understa...

Myriam Patricia Cifuentes M.D. PhD. Public Health

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mathematics of complexity in experimental high energy physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical ideas and approaches common in complexity-related fields have been fruitfully applied in experimental high energy physics also. We briefly review some of the cross-pollination that is occurring.

H. C. Eggers

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Photo-induced Valence Tautomerism in Co Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photo-induced Valence Tautomerism in Co Complexes ... His research interests include the development of photomagnets and phototunable photonic crystals and the design of supramolecules exhibiting photo-bistability. ... Photo-induced Valence Tautomerism in Mononuclear Compounds ...

Osamu Sato; Aili Cui; Ryotaro Matsuda; Jun Tao; Shinya Hayami

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Determining Factors Influencing Nuclear Envelope and Nuclear Pore Complex Structure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cells nuclear envelope (NE) has pores that are stabilized by nuclear pore complexes (NPC), large proteinaceous structures whose function is to mediate transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Although the transport process is well studied...

Gouni, Sushanth

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sources of Schedule Risk in Complex System Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From one perspective, developing complex systems is an exercise in uncertainty reduction and risk management. In this article I first organize the principle sources of risk in product development into five categories: ...

Browning, Tyson R.

1998-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

Wilson, Justin Jeff

413

Inflated contours for extreme response prediction in complex structural systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates the technique of environmental contour inflation to account for statistical uncertainties in either the loading or the response. Complex structural systems are treated as simple systems and the additional loadings are treated...

Van De Lindt, John Willem

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Visualization of Large Complex Datasets Using Virtual Reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Major advances in high performance computing software and hardware have made it possible for designers and analysts to obtain detailed information about the behavior of complex systems. However, this has lead to a proliferation of vast amounts of data, ...

S. Sarathy; K. Shujaee; K. Cannon

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

Von Dreele, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions and Hall-Littlewoo* *d functions associated to W are introduced, and Green functions are described

Shoj, Toshiaki

417

Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

Oprsal, Ivo

418

Automatic testing of software with structurally complex inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern software pervasively uses structurally complex data such as linked data structures. The standard approach to generating test suites for such software, manual generation of the inputs in the suite, is tedious and ...

Marinov, Darko, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Computational design of a theater complex for Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of a theater complex for Boston is used as a test case for the more integrated use of computers in the design process. In architecture digital media remain mostly tools for efficiency and productivity rather ...

Braude, Talia, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

An integrated strategic sourcing process for complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerospace firms continue to outsource increasingly complex components and systems for access to talent, lower costs, and global presence. In addition to strong competition from Airbus and other emergent companies, Boeing ...

Hsu, David T. (David Ta-wei)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Drilling into controversy: the educational complexity of shale gas development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential development of shale gas presents a complicated and controversial education problem. ... the concepts necessary for understanding the development of shale gas within the energy system as a complex, ... ...

Joseph A. Henderson; Don Duggan-Haas

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Synchronization in complex oscillator networks and smart grids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complex network scenarios and in smart grid applications. The scientific interest in the...synchronization condition [2] in a volatile smart grid scenario, we make the following...oscillator networks as well as for smart grid applications. Our results pose...

Florian Drfler; Michael Chertkov; Francesco Bullo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The linear and nonlinear rheology of multiscale complex fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The microstructures of many complex fluids are typically characterized by a broad distribution of internal length scales. Examples of such multiscale materials include physically and chemically cross-linked gels, emulsions, ...

Jaishankar, Aditya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Tuning the photophysical properties of amidophosphine complexes of copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of monomeric copper complexes that allow for the tuning of the emission properties is reported. Luminescence lifetimes up to 150 [mu]s are observed in benzene solution at ambient temperature, which are comparable ...

Mickenberg, Seth F. (Seth Fox)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated ...

Zhao, Wei

427

DNA origami with Complex Curvatures in 3D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have proven the three-dimensional nature of the synthesized complexes. In the Center for Bio-inspired Solar Fuel Production Professors Hao Yan and Yan Liu are involved in Subtask...

428

Subtask 3: Fuel production complex | Center for Bio-Inspired...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: Fuel production complex All papers by year Subtask 1 Subtask 2 Subtask 3 Subtask 4 Subtask 5 Trovitch, R.J.(2014)Comparing Well-Defined Manganese, Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel...

429

An evolving view of epigenetic complexity in the brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...encompassing canonical epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation...order chromatin modulatory processes. Although our understanding...layers of epigenetic complexity interrelated with the above processes are rapidly emerging and seem...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

On Quantum Algorithm for Binary Search and Its Computational Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new quantum algorithm for a search problem and its computational complexity are discussed. It is shown in the search problem containing 2^n objects that our algorithm runs in polynomial time.

S. Iriyama; M. Ohya; I. V. Volovich

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies of Structure and Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by Single Molecule and Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy (2DFS) March 20, 2014 at 3pm36-428 Andrew Marcus...

432

Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

433

Polysomatic series in the structures of complex cuprates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study has shown that the polysomatic model can be efficiently applied to the structural analysis of complex cuprates. The structure of ladder-type cuprates was analysed in more detail.

Leonyuk, L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla) Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 Gregory S. Smith Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 Jaroslaw Majewski Manuel

Kuhl, Tonya L.

435

Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 May 2013 Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), conducted an appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Preliminary Safety Design Report (PSDR) and associated site office review processes. This appraisal focused on selected aspects of the PSDR submitted to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Production Office (NPO) for review

436

Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Uranium Processing Facility Project (UPF). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at UPF project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred from late February through March 2012. The safety culture evaluation performed by the external independent safety

437

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print Signal Recognition Particle-Receptor Complex Structure Solved Print The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that delivers membrane and secretory proteins to the cell membrane in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that forms a network of protein and lipid synthesizing factories. This process, called co-translational protein targeting, is an essential and evolutionarily conserved pathway for delivering nascent proteins to the eukaryotic ER. To learn more about co-translational protein targeting, researchers from UC Berkeley and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology collaborated to determine the crystal structure of the prokaryotic SRP:SR complex arrested in the cargo release state at 3.9 Å resolution.

438

Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex Print Protein kinase A (PKA) is an enzyme that regulates processes as diverse as growth, memory, and metabolism. In its unactivated state, PKA exists as a tetrameric complex of two catalytic subunits and a regulatory subunit dimer, but when the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binds to the regulatory subunit, it facilitates dissociation and activation of the catalytic subunits. While separate structures of these subunits were previously known, a group from the University of California, San Diego, is the first to determine (to a resolution of 2.0 Å) the structure of the PKA catalytic subunits bound to the regulatory subunit. The structure of the complex clarifies the mechanism for PKA inhibition, and its comparison with the structure of cAMP bound to the regulatory subunit hints at how cAMP binding drives its activation.

439

Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert October 7, 2010 - 11:58am Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this project do? Rooftop solar panels provide 27 percent of the facility's energy. Maricopa County officials estimate the complex is 42 percent more energy efficient than many modern day buildings. Next month, hikers marveling at the sun bathed canyons and ridges of White Tank Mountain in the Sonoran Desert will see something on the horizon - if they look hard. Built to blend into the desert landscape, the new 29,000 square-foot White Tank Library and Nature Center in Surprise, Ariz., is set to open on Nov. 13. Rooftop solar panels provide 27 percent of the facility's energy.

440

Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Relationship between classifier performance and distributional complexity for small samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a limited number of samples for classification, several issues arise with respect to design, performance and analysis of classifiers. This is especially so in the case of microarray-based classification. In this paper, we use a complexity...

Attoor, Sanju Nair

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Generation of Gradients Having Complex Shapes Using Microfluidic Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of Gradients Having Complex Shapes Using Microfluidic Networks Stephan K. W. Dertinger, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 This paper describes the generation each carrying different concentrations of substances laminarly and side-by-side generated step

Prentiss, Mara

443

Complex muscle architecture described with diffusion weighted MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex array of fiber orientations exhibited by muscles such as the tongue, esophagus, and heart, enable function beyond basic pulling. Among other things, the presence of crossing geometry adds the ability to push ...

Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Complexes of niobium and tantalum containing metal-metal bonds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new entry into the area of low valent niobium and tantalum complexes containing metal-metal bonds is described. M/sub 2/X/sub 6/ (..mu..-THT)(THF)/sub 2/ complexes, where M = Nb or Ta, X = Cl or Br and THT - tetrahydrothiophene, are conveniently synthesized via the reaction of M/sub 2/M/sub 6/(THT)/sub 3/ with THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran). Unlike M/sub 2/X/sub 6/(THT)/sub 3/, M/sub 2/X/sub 6/(..mu..-THT)(THF)/sub 2/ can be easily reduced by sodium amalgam. In THF and in the presence of THT, complexes of the type M/sub 2/X/sub 6/(..mu..-THT)/sub 3//sup 2 -/ form. Salts of these compounds can also be synthesized directly from the metal pentahalides in a two step, one pot reaction in which M/sub 2/X/sub 6/(THT)/sub 3/ is an intermediate. The M/sub 2/X/sub 6/(..mu..-THT)/sub 3//sup 2 -/ complexes have a face-sharing bioctahedral structure with metal-metal triple bonds, the first reported for niobium or tantalum. These compounds are relatively inert, but (Nb/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/(..mu..-THT)/sub 3//sup 2 -/ does reach with pyridine and with a solution of acetic acid/acetic anhydride. These reactions and those of some of the sodium salts are described. In general, trinuclear complexes of niobium and tantalum are rare, and this type of discrete trinuclear complex, which contains one capping, three bridging and nine terminal ligands, has been seen only once before for the group 5 metals, although many examples of similar group 6 metal complexes are known. Full details of the synthesis and characterization of these complexes are described and an interpretation of their electronic structures is given.

Diebold, M.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A methodological approach to the complexity measurement of software designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulffilment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Computer Science A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: Willi m M. L' (Co-Chair of C ittee...

Williams, Clay Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

Managing Complex Photophysical Pathways for Solar Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Managing Complex Photophysical Pathways for Solar Energy Conversion ... Zhu provides us with a refreshing discussion of the advantages and limitations of models presently employed to depict the interconversion of excitons and charge carriers and proposes a new energy level diagram for this purpose based exclusively on single-particle energies of ground and optically excited states. ... For example, in photosynthesis, antenna complexes capture sunlight and direct the energy to reaction centers that then carry out the assocd. ...

Ryan D. Pensack; Gregory D. Scholes

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NV-21, Pyramid Lake Solar Assisted Fish Hatchery NV-64.Award~ PYRAMID LAKE SOLAR ASSISTED FISH HATCHERY Applicant

Case, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp synthase complex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complex Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp synthase complex Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The F0F1-ATP Synthase Complex Contains...

451

A Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration Systems Title A Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration Systems Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37037 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Klems, Joseph H., Jeffrey L. Warner, and Guy O. Kelley Conference Name ASHRAE Transactions Volume 102, Part 1 Date Published 02/1996 Conference Location Atlanta, GA Call Number LBL-37037 Abstract Calorimetric measurements of the dynamic net heat flow through a complex fenestration system consisting of a buff venetian blind inside clear double glazing are used to derive the direction-dependent beam SHGC of the fenestration. These measurements are compared with calculations according to a proposed general method for deriving complex fenestration system SHGCs from bidirectional layer optical properties and generic calorimetric properties. Previously published optical measurements of the same venetian blind and generic inward-flowing fraction measurements are used in the calculation. The authors find satisfactory agreement between the SHGC measurements and the calculation.

452

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Copper(III) Pyrophosphate Complexes in Aqueous Solution. A Pulse Radiolysis Study at Ambient and High Pressure Diane E. Cabelli, James F. Wishart, Jerzy Holcman, Martin Meier, and Rudi van Eldik J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5131-5136 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The reaction between OH radicals and [CuII(P2O7)2(H2O) 2]6- results in the formation of a Cu(III) complex. No reaction is observed with N3· or Br2·-, whereas SO4·- initiates the same steps as seen with ·OH. This suggests that the mechanism probably involves a ligand interchange or H · atom abstraction process. The Cu(III) complex undergoes a rapid first-order reaction, probably loss of a P2O74- chelate, followed by addition of OH- (pKOH ~ 10) to yield a Cu(III) complex that is predominantly hydroxylated

453

Combustion-related studies using weakly-bonded complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binary van der Waals complexes involving species of interest to combustion research are prepared in supersonic free-jet expansions, and their photochemical and photophysical properties are probed by using IR tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy. In the first phase, geometries and other molecular properties are being determined from vibration-rotational spectra. In the second phase, these complexes will be used as precursors to study photoinitiated reactions in precursor geometry limited environments. Two complementary classes of binary complexes are being investigated. The first involves molecular oxygen and hydrogen containing constituents (e.g. O{sub 2}-HCN, O{sub 2}-HF, O{sub 2}-HCl, O{sub 2}-HBr, O{sub 2}-HI and O{sub 2}-hydrocarbons). These species are interesting candidates for study since upon photodissociating the hydride portion, the reaction H and O{sub 2} via the vibrationally excited HO{sub 2} intermediate can conceivably be studied, (e.g. BrH-O{sub 2} + hv(193 nm) {yields} Br-H-O{sub 2} {yields} Br + HO{sub 2} {yields} Br + OH + O). High resolution IR spectroscopy of such complexes have not been obtained previously and the structural information deriving from IR spectra is certainly very useful for better designing and understanding photoinitiated reactions that occur in these complexes.

Beaudet, R.A. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Complex saddle points in QCD at finite temperature and density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sign problem in QCD at finite temperature and density leads naturally to the consideration of complex saddle points of the action or effective action. The global symmetry $\\mathcal{CK}$ of the finite-density action, where $\\mathcal{C}$ is charge conjugation and $\\mathcal{K}$ is complex conjugation, constrains the eigenvalues of the Polyakov loop operator $P$ at a saddle point in such a way that the action is real at a saddle point, and net color charge is zero. The values of $Tr_{F}P$ and $Tr_{F}P^{\\dagger}$ at the saddle point, are real but not identical, indicating the different free energy cost associated with inserting a heavy quark versus an antiquark into the system. At such complex saddle points, the mass matrix associated with Polyakov loops may have complex eigenvalues, reflecting oscillatory behavior in color-charge densities. We illustrate these properties with a simple model which includes the one-loop contribution of gluons and massless quarks moving in a constant Polyakov loop background. Confinement-deconfinement effects are modeled phenomenologically via an added potential term depending on the Polyakov loop eigenvalues. For sufficiently large $T$ and $\\mu$, the results obtained reduce to those of perturbation theory at the complex saddle point. These results may be experimentally relevant for the CBM experiment at FAIR.

Hiromichi Nishimura; Michael C. Ogilvie; Kamal Pangeni

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Colloquium: Fractional calculus view of complexity: A tutorial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fractional calculus has been part of the mathematics and science literature for 310years. However, it is only in the past decade or so that it has drawn the attention of mainstream science as a way to describe the dynamics of complex phenomena with long-term memory, spatial heterogeneity, along with nonstationary and nonergodic statistics. The most recent application encompasses complex networks, which require new ways of thinking about the world. Part of the new cognition is provided by the fractional calculus description of temporal and topological complexity. Consequently, this Colloquium is not so much a tutorial on the mathematics of the fractional calculus as it is an exploration of how complex phenomena in the physical, social, and life sciences that have eluded traditional mathematical modeling become less mysterious when certain historical assumptions such as differentiability are discarded and the ordinary calculus is replaced with the fractional calculus. Exemplars considered include the fractional differential equations describing the dynamics of viscoelastic materials, turbulence, foraging, and phase transitions in complex social networks.

Bruce J. West

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

456

Physical protection design approach for the Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have been designated as the technical lead for Security, Safeguards and Computer/Information Security systems for all the DOE Complex 21/Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) facilities. The physical protection systems in these facilities will be required to meet the most current DOE orders and incorporate the latest physical protection technologies, proven state-of-the-art systems and strategies. The planned approach requires that security assistance and information be provided to the designers (e.g. the Complex 21 Architect & Engineer and the Weapons Complex Lead Laboratories) as early as possible and throughout all design phases. The outcome should avoid the costly retrofits to existing facilities that have occurred in the past and result in effective and comprehensive protection against current and projected threats with minimal impact on operations, safety and costs. This paper discusses the physical protection considerations being promoted for the integrated design effort for the Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities, such as the tritium, uranium/lithium, plutonium processing and storage, high explosive and assembly and disassembly facilities.

Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Zack, N.R.; Hunteman, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - au complexe entre Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complexe entre Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: au complexe entre Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Contributions runies par Gabriel...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide metal complexes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

metal actinide complex halides: thermochemical and structural Summary: on the thermodynamics of the actinide halogeno-complexes with alkali metal ions is reviewed, with...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide halide complexes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It has been observed that complexes of lanthanide, actinide, and transition metal activate... that these actinide alkyl complexes undergo interesting C-H and C-N bond...

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide complexation kinetics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It has been observed that complexes of lanthanide, actinide, and transition metal activate... that these actinide alkyl complexes undergo interesting C-H and C-N bond...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Representatives of DOE Savannah River Operations Office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation sign the next generation partnering agreement. Representatives of DOE Savannah River Operations Office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation sign the next generation partnering agreement. AIKEN, S.C. - DOE Savannah River Operations Office Manager Dave Moody views the partnering relationship between his office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation (SRR) as an opportunity to view cleanup work from each other's point of view. "While both DOE and SRR continue to work well together, the partnering

462

Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in atmospheric organics: Insights into emission sources, atmospheric processing, and secondary organic aerosol formation Title Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in atmospheric organics: Insights into emission sources, atmospheric processing, and secondary organic aerosol formation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Arthur W. H., Gabriel Isaacman, Kevin R. Wilson, David R. Worton, Christopher R. Ruehl, Theodora Nah, Drew R. Gentner, Timothy R. Dallmann, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Robert A. Harley, Jessica B. Gilman, William C. Kuster, Joost A. de Gouw, John H. Offenberg, Tadeusz E. Kleindienst, Ying H. Lin, Caitlin L. Rubitschun, Jason D. Surratt, Patrick L. Hayes, Jose L. Jimenez, and Allen H. Goldstein

463

EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Representatives of DOE Savannah River Operations Office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation sign the next generation partnering agreement. Representatives of DOE Savannah River Operations Office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation sign the next generation partnering agreement. AIKEN, S.C. - DOE Savannah River Operations Office Manager Dave Moody views the partnering relationship between his office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation (SRR) as an opportunity to view cleanup work from each other's point of view. "While both DOE and SRR continue to work well together, the partnering

464

Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement October 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I Volume I Chapters 1 - 4 Chapters 1 - 4 DOE/EIS-0236-S4 National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy October 2008 C C CO O OM MP PL LE EXtransfo o or r rm m mat on COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Complex Transformation SPEIS, DOE/EIS-0236-S4) CONTACTS: For further information on this SPEIS, For general information on the DOE write or call: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Theodore A. Wyka Carol Borgstrom, Director Complex Transformation Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, GC-20 SPEIS Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transformation, NA-10.1 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

465

Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement October 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Summary Summary DOE/EIS-0236-S4 National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy October 2008 C C CO O OM MP PL LE EXtransfo o or r rm m mat on COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Complex Transformation SPEIS, DOE/EIS-0236-S4) CONTACTS: For further information on this SPEIS, For general information on the DOE write or call: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Theodore A. Wyka Carol Borgstrom, Director Complex Transformation Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, GC-20 SPEIS Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transformation, NA-10.1 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

466

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons which have interact inelastically with the potentials of the atoms in the specimen and therefore resembles the better known Z2 (Z is atomic number) Rutherford scattering. One class of important catalysts consists of bronzes based on pentagonal {Mo6O21} building units; these include Mo5O14 and Mo17O47. In the last 20 years, new materials doped with

467

ARM - Field Campaign - Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsComplex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX) govCampaignsComplex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Complex Layered Cloud Experiment (CLEX) 1996.06.20 - 1996.07.02 Lead Scientist : Graeme Stephens Data Availability TABLE 1 Locations and Status of Extended Facilitiesa SMOS(c) Comments Site Elevation(b) Latitude, Surface Flux SIROS(c) (m) Longitude Type Station(c) (deg) Larned, KS 632 38.202 N Wheat ECOR Yes Yes Power and communication center EF-1 99.316 W 9/95 9/95 9/95 installation planned for July 1995 Hillsboro, 450 38.306 N Pasture EBBR 8/95 No Yes 8/95 Power and communication center

468

A New Type of pi-Molecular Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure, and Magnetism of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Structure, and Magnetism of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Containing Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes and Benzene: Bis[2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5, 7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II)-Benzene and Bis[2,2-dimethyl-7- ((4-nitrophenyl)imino)-3,5,7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II)-Bis(benzene) James F. Wishart, Christopher Ceccarelli, Richard L. Lintvedt, Jeremy M. Berg, David P. Foley, Tom Frey, James E. Hahn, Keith O. Hodgson and Robert Weis Inorg. Chem. 22, 1667-1671 (1983) Abstract: The title compounds have been crystallized and examined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The structure of Cu2(PAAan)2°C6H6 consists of stacks of alternating bis[2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5,7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II), Cu2(PAAan)2, and benzene molecules in an ADAD... pattern. Crystal data are

469

Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

Id Betan, R. [Rosario Physics Institute, Rosario, Argentina] [Rosario Physics Institute, Rosario, Argentina; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Quantum Clocks and the Origin of Time in Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin and nature of time in complex systems is explored using quantum (or 'Feynman') clocks and the signals produced by them. Networks of these clocks provide the basis for the evolution of complex systems. The general concept of 'time' is translated into the 'lifetimes' of these unstable configurations of matter. 'Temporal phase transitions' mark the emergence of classical properties such as irreversibility, entropy, and thermodynamic arrows of time. It is proposed that the creation of the universe can be modeled as a quantum clock. Keywords: the problem of time, the arrow of time, time asymmetry, the many-body problem, cellular networks, complexity, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, quantum cosmology, and instantons.

Scott Hitchcock

1999-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

471

Polymer-Nanoparticle Complexes : from Dilute Solution to Solid State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the formation and the structural properties of supermicellar aggregates also called electrostatic complexes, made from mineral nanoparticles and polyelectrolyte-neutral block copolymers in aqueous solutions. The mineral particles put under scrutiny are ultra-fine and positively charged yttrium hydroxyacetate nanoparticles. Combining light, neutron and x-ray scattering experiments, we have characterized the sizes and the aggregation numbers of the organic-inorganic complexes. We have found that the hybrid aggregates have typical sizes in the range 100 nm and exhibit a remarkable colloidal stability with respect to ionic strength and concentration variations. Solid films with thicknesses up to several hundreds of micrometers were cast from solutions, resulting in a bulk polymer matrix in which nanoparticle clusters are dispersed and immobilized. It was found in addition that the structure of the complexes remains practically unchanged during film casting.

Jean-Francois Berret; Kazuhiko Yokota; Mikel Morvan; Ralf Schweins

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

On the design of highly luminescent lanthanide complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Presently, phosphors and luminescent materials for lighting, telecommunications, displays, security inks and marking, as well as for probes in biosciences represent one third of the total value of the lanthanides used worldwide. If optical glasses and laser materials are added, this figure is close to 40%, explaining the large interest that the scientific community is devoting to such materials. The present review focuses on the design of highly luminescent lanthanide complexes and discusses all aspects needing optimization. Reference is made to the mastering of the various energy migration processes in luminescence sensitization by organic ligands, to minimizing non-radiative deactivation mechanisms, as well as to other parameters such as the radiative lifetime, the refractive index, and the benefit of inserting luminescent complexes into inorganic-hybrid structures. Comparative tables list the most luminescent complexes emitting in the visible and near-infrared ranges and the best chromophores are pointed out.

Jean-Claude G. Bnzli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Complex energy approaches for calculating isobaric analogue states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parameters of isobaric analog resonance (IAR) are calculated in the framework of the Lane model using different methods. In the standard method, the direct numerical solution of the coupled channel (CC) Lane equations served as a reference for checking two complex energy methods, namely the complex energy shell model (CXSM) and the complex scaling (CS) approaches. The IAR parameters calculated by the CXSM and the CS methods agree with that of the CC results within 1 keV for all partial waves considered. Although the CXSM and the CS methods have similarities, an important difference is that only the CXSM method offers a direct way for studying the configurations of the IAR wave function.

R. Id Betan; A. T. Kruppa; T. Vertse

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

474

Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement October 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volume II Volume II Volume II Chapters 5 - 15 and Chapters 5 - 15 and Appendices A - G Appendices A - G DOE/EIS-0236-S4 National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy October 2008 C C CO O OM MP PL LE EXtransfo o or r rm m mat on COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Complex Transformation SPEIS, DOE/EIS-0236-S4) CONTACTS: For further information on this SPEIS, For general information on the DOE write or call: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Theodore A. Wyka Carol Borgstrom, Director Complex Transformation Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, GC-20 SPEIS Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy

475

2-1 Chemistry & Physics of Complex Systems Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CPCS Overview CPCS Overview Chemistry & Physics of Complex Systems Facility The Chemistry & Physics of Complex Systems (CPCS) Facility supports the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) mission of fostering fundamental research in the natural sciences to provide the basis for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use and contaminant releases. This research provides a foundation for understanding interactions of atoms, molecules, and ions with materials and with photons and electrons. Particular emphasis is on interfacial processes. A distinguishing feature of research at national laboratories is their approach to problem- solving. Significant scientific issues are addressed using focused and multidisciplinary

476

Modeling Terrorist Networks, Complex Systems at the Mid-range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we develop the themes presented at the 2003 Joint Complexity Conference at the London School of Economics and subsequently published in The Intelligencer (2004) and O Tempo Das Redes (2008). Following the data analysis of the 9/11 high-jacker network developed by Valdis Krebs from open sources, we apply social network theory to examine salient arguments regarding terrorism as seen from the standpoint of complex adaptive systems theory. In particular, we explore the concepts of group cohesion, adhesion and alternative network mappings derived from node removal.

Fellman, Philip Vos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life. How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood. In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

Olaf Sporns

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

Information geometric complexity of a trivariate Gaussian statistical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the information geometric complexity of entropic motion on low-dimensional Gaussian statistical manifolds in order to quantify how difficult is making macroscopic predictions about a systems in the presence of limited information. Specifically, we observe that the complexity of such entropic inferences not only depends on the amount of available pieces of information but also on the manner in which such pieces are correlated. Finally, we uncover that for certain correlational structures, the impossibility of reaching the most favorable configuration from an entropic inference viewpoint, seems to lead to an information geometric analog of the well-known frustration effect that occurs in statistical physics.

D. Felice; C. Cafaro; S. Mancini

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons by dinuclear iron complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our efforts during the past eight months were directed towards characterizing synthetic complexes that model the electronic and reactivity properties of the active site of methane monooxygenase (MMO), a metalloenzyme found in methanotrophic bacteria responsible for the biological oxidation of methane to methanol. We have investigated the structural/electronic and reactivity properties of a series of dinuclear model complexes that can function as oxygen atom transfer catalysts. In particular, our studies focused on [Fe[sup 2+][sub 2](H[sub 2]Hbab)[sub 2](N-MeIm)[sub 2

Caradonna, J.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Airborne chemical baseline evaluation of the 222-S laboratory complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 222-S Laboratory complex stores and uses over 400 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are used in laboratory analysis and some are used for maintenance activities. The majority of laboratory analysis chemicals are only used inside of fume hoods or glove boxes to control both chemical and radionuclide airborne concentrations. This evaluation was designed to determine the potential for laboratory analysis chemicals at the 222-S Laboratory complex to cause elevated airborne chemical concentrations under normal conditions. This was done to identify conditions and activities that should be subject to airborne chemical monitoring