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1

EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EISStatement | DepartmentStatement | Department

2

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Klickitat Monitoring and Evaluation, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for salmonid fish populations and habitat in the Klickitat River subbasin in south-central Washington. The M&E activities described here were conducted as a part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)-funded Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) and were designed by consensus of the scientists with the Yakama Nation (YN) Fisheries Program. YKFP is a joint project between YN and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Overall YKFP goals are to increase natural production of and opportunity to harvest salmon and steelhead in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins using hatchery supplementation, harvest augmentation and habitat improvements. Klickitat subbasin M&E activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of the YKFP Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. YKFP biologists have also been involved with the Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP - a project aimed at improving the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key M&E questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia Basin) and are working towards keeping Klickitat M&E activities consistent with CSMEP recommendations. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - to gather baseline information in order to characterize habitat and salmonid populations pre- and post-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) Ecological Interactions - to determine presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information. (3) Genetics - to develop YKFP supplementation broodstock collection protocols for the preservation of genetic variability, by refining methods of detecting within-stock genetic variability and between-stock genetic variability.

Zendt, Joe; Babcock, Mike [Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency-Arriving Summer/Fall Chinook 97 Table B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River

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HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5. Estimated Carrying Capacity of Natural

9

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Klickitat Only Monitoring and Evaluation, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monitoring and evaluation activities described in this report were determined by consensus of the scientists from the Yakama Nation (YN). Klickitat Subbasin Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of YKFP's Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP project biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - Accurately characterize baseline available habitat and salmonid populations pre-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) EDT Modeling - Identify and evaluate habitat and artificial production enhancement options. (3) Genetics - Characterize the genetic profile of wild steelhead in the Klickitat Basin. (4) Ecological Interactions - Determine the presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information.

Sampson, Melvin; Evenson, Rolf

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

12

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Appendix 50 Creston National Fish Hatchery: Hatchery and Genetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to take individuals from wild stocks. 1.9) List of program "Performance Standards." 1. Provide predictable VERSION (HGMP-RF) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: Hatchery Program: Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Mitigation

14

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH PRODUCTION.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected as follows: Shelldrake, Tom, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Hatcheries, Integrated Hatchery Operations Team

18

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

20

Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

26

PACIFIC SALMON Hatchery Propagation and Its Role  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and shop, cold storage and food preparation, and the hatching building. The waste-water channel back AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR #12;Abstract Population growth and industrial in The hatchery building 42 Troughs 42 Food preparation 44 Food storage 45 Rearing ponds 46 Trapping adult salmon

27

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of tall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Spring Chinook : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead. and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

SAFS-UW-1001 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAFS-UW-1001 July 2010 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild Salmon by Region of the North Pacific Moore Foundation #12;Hatchery and Wild Salmon Abundance Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 Approaches to estimating wild salmon spawner abundances......................................... 1

Washington at Seattle, University of

31

Baseline avian use and behavior at the CARES wind plant site, Klickitat County, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a literature review on avian-wind turbine interactions and the results of a one-year avian baseline study conducted in 1998 at the proposed Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) wind development site in Klickitat County, Washington. Avian use of the site ranged from 1.11/survey in the winter to 5.69/survey in the spring. Average use by passerines in the study plots ranged from 1.15 minutes/survey in the winter to 40.98 minutes/survey in the spring. Raptors spent much less time within plots than other groups, ranging from 0.05 minutes/survey in the winter to 0.77 minutes/survey during the fall. Thirteen percent of all flying birds were within the rotor-swept height (25 to 75 m); 41.6% of all raptors were flying at this height. Raptors with the greatest potential turbine exposure are red-tailed hawks and golden eagles. Passerines with the highest turbine exposure are common ravens, American robins, and horned larks. Spatial use data for the site indicate that avian use tends to be concentrated near the rim, indicating that placing turbines away from the rim may reduce risk. Avian use data at the CARES site indicate that if a wind plant is constructed in the future, avian mortality would likely be relatively low.

Erickson, W.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Strickland, M.D.; Kronner, K.; Becker, P.S.; Orloff, S.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

32

Determination of Swimming Speeds and Energetic Demands of Upriver Migrating Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) in the Klickitat River, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program during the fall of 2001. The objective was to study the migration and energy use of adult fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) traveling up the Klickitat River to spawn. The salmon were tagged with either surgically implanted electromyogram (EMG) transmitters or gastrically implanted coded transmitters and were monitored with mobile and stationary receivers. Swim speed and aerobic and anaerobic energy use were determined for the fish as they attempted passage of three waterfalls on the lower Klickitat River and as they traversed free-flowing stretches between, below, and above the falls. Of the 35 EMG-tagged fish released near the mouth of the Klickitat River, 40% passed the first falls, 24% passed the second falls, and 20% made it to Lyle Falls. None of the EMG-tagged fish were able to pass Lyle Falls, either over the falls or via a fishway at Lyle Falls. Mean swimming speeds ranged from as low as 52.6 centimeters per second (cm s{sup -1}) between falls to as high as 189 (cm s{sup -1}) at falls passage. Fish swam above critical swimming speeds while passing the falls more often than while swimming between the falls (58.9% versus 1.7% of the transmitter signals). However, fish expended more energy swimming the stretches between the falls than during actual falls passage (100.7 to 128.2 kilocalories [kcals] to traverse areas between or below falls versus 0.3 to 1.0 kcals to pass falls). Relationships between sex, length, and time of day on the success of falls passage were also examined. Average swimming speeds were highest during the day in all areas except at some waterfalls. There was no apparent relationship between either fish condition or length and successful passage of waterfalls in the lower Klickitat River. Female fall chinook salmon, however, had a much lower likelihood of passing waterfalls than males. The study also examined energy costs and swimming speeds for fish released above Lyle Falls as they migrated to upstream spawning areas. This journey averaged 15.93 days to travel a mean maximum of 37.6 km upstream at a total energy cost of approx 3,971 kcals (34% anaerobic and 66% aerobic) for a sample of five fish. A bioenergetics example was run, which estimated that fall chinook salmon would expend an estimated 1,208 kcal to pass from the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam and 874 kcals to pass Bonneville Dam and pool and the three falls on the Lower Klickitat River, plus an additional 2,770 kcals above the falls to reach the spawning grounds, leaving them with approximately 18% (1,089 kcals) of their original energy reserves for spawning. Results of the bioenergetics example suggest that a delay of 9 to 11 days along the lower Klickitat River may deplete their remaining energy reserves (at a rate of about 105 kcal d{sup -1}) resulting in death before spawning would occur.

Brown, Richard S.; Geist, David R.; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan-55-040 National Poultry Improvement Plan. A hatchery appearing on this list in no way constitutes endorsement

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

34

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into three chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fifth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River basin. Chapter 2 describes our tributary sampling methodology for monitoring the status of tributary NTT. Chapter 3 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River. The chapters in this report are in various stages of d

Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho.

37

ISAB Artificial Production Review Report 3 Recommendations for the Design of Hatchery Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis for judging and proposing reforms in fish husbandry practices. To analyze and understand reform. Assessing the effects of hatchery produced fish on wild and other hatchery fish outside

38

Wenatchee Subbasin Plan Hatchery Information for Subbasin Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the final salmon and steelhead 4(d) rule (July 10, 2000; 65 FR 42422) as a mechanism for addressing the take take permits. Completed HGMPs may also be used for regional fish production and management planning that enhance depressed stocks of wild anadromous salmonids through hatchery supplementation, reduction

39

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

Bluff, Stanley

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous salmonid hatcheries Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution and Plants 2 Review of Artificial Production of Anadromous and Resident Fish Summary: performance might be among the anadromous salmonid hatchery fish. These...

45

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Some trends in hatchery effects So e t e ds atc e y e ects Northwest Fisheries Science Center,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Societal interactions ­ Take money and effort away from habitat problemsproblems ­ Overharvest of wild stocks ­ May stocks and depend on hatchery productionon hatchery production · Conservation benefits S l i

47

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

APPARATUS AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPARATUS AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY By G. M. Dannevig AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY. ~ By G. M. DANNEVIG, Director Fliidevig is situated on the seacoast near Arendal, Norway. The principal parts are a main building, having on the lower

50

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

Nenema, David

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A comparison of prey capture kinematics in hatchery and wild Micropterus salmoides floridanus: effects of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. hatchery Florida largemouth bass feeding on pelleted foods and wild indi- viduals capturing live fish prey largemouth bass compare to those of hatchery fish feeding on novel live prey? (3) How long does it take largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides floridanus captured live prey with very rapid movements and large

Motta, Philip J.

52

Design, construction and operation of an inland red drum hatchery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The surface area of the filter cloth was sufficient so that water could be puinped through the incubator and out the standpipe without sigtuficant water velocity that would impinge planktonic eggs or larvae. Lab and F d pre ara' n Area The remote location... 15 16 19 Critique of Internship LIST OF FIGURES 1 Hatchery Floor Plan 23 2 Water Flow Diagram 3 Spawn Tank Elevation and Plan View 25 4 Incubation Platform 5 Maturation Regime 27 ABSTRACT My Master of Agriculture internship was served...

Turner, John M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers PointEnergyJingneng861°Open Energy Information Hatchery

54

Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

An internship at Blue Dog Lake State Fish Hatchery, Waubay, South Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

culture production capabilities at Blue Dog Lake State Fish Hatchery Table 2. Summary of pond culture at Blue Dog Lake State Fish Hatchery Table 3. Walleye production results (1983) 12 Table 4. Northern pike production results (1983) 13 Table 5... at Blue Dog Lake State Fish Hatchery (as set by the Dept, of Game, Fish and Parks). ~Seci es ~mhe or F e mh r of Fi crt ih o methoe walleye northern pike muskellunge largemouth bass smallmouth bass chinook salmon * panfish l25, 000, 000 25, 000...

LaBomascus, David C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

Bluff, Stanley

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Physiological Assessment of Wild and Hatchery Juvenile Salmonids : Final Report, 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally held that hatchery-reared salmonids are of inferior quality and have lower smolt-to-adult survival compared to naturally-reared salmon. The overall objectives of the work performed under this contract were the following: (1) Characterize the physiology and development of naturally rearing juvenile salmonids to: (2) Allow for the design of effective rearing programs for producing wild-like smolts in supplementation and production hatchery programs. (3) Examine the relationship between growth rate and size on the physiology and migratory performance of fish reared in hatchery programs. (4) Examine the interaction of rearing temperature and feed rate on the growth and smoltification of salmon for use in producing a more wild-like smolt in hatchery programs.

Larsen, Donald A.; Beckman, Brian R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

59

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

62

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

63

Diet-induced phenotypic plasticity in the skull morphology of hatchery-reared Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for many fish species, Florida largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides flor- idanus (LeSeuer), reared, was retarded at this size. Post-release, the skulls of hatchery fish converged towards those of wild bass bass, Micropterus salmoides floridanus Un resumen en espan~ol se incluye detra´s del texto principal de

Motta, Philip J.

64

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

Contrasting survival strategies of hatchery and wild red drum: implications for stock enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Marshall Kirk O. Winemiller James L. Pinckney Gregory W. Stunz Head of Department, Thomas E. Lacher May 2008 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences iii ABSTRACT Contrasting Survival Strategies of Hatchery and Wild Red Drum... of the Rooker Lab. Many thanks to my committee members, Dr. Christopher Marshall, Dr. Kirk Winemiller, Dr. James Pinckney, and Dr. Gregory Stunz, for their insight and suggestions which greatly improved the content and quality of my dissertation research...

Beck, Jessica Louise

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed, naturally spawning populations in the Columbia River Basin. As a consequence of that BO, NOAA recommended - as a reasonable and prudent alternative (RPA) - that federal and state agencies phase out non-native broodstocks of steelhead and replace them with native broodstocks. However, NOAA provided no guidance on how to achieve that RPA. The development of native broodstocks of hatchery steelhead can potentially pose unacceptable biological risks to naturally spawning populations, particularly those that are already listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The traditional method of initiating new hatchery broodstocks of anadromous salmonid fishes is by trapping adults during their upstream, spawning migration. However, removing natural-origin adults from ESA listed populations may not be biologically acceptable because such activities may further depress those populations via 'broodstock mining'. In addition, trapping adult steelhead may be logistically unfeasible in many subbasins due to high water flows in the spring, when steelhead are moving upstream to spawn, that will often 'blow out' temporary weirs. Additional risks associated with trapping adults include genetic founder effects and difficulties meeting minimum, genetic effective number of breeders without 'mining' the wild population to potential extinction. As a result, alternative methods for developing native broodstocks are highly desired. One alternative for developing native broodstocks, particularly when the collection of adults is logistically unfeasible or biologically unacceptable, is captive rearing of natural-origin juveniles to sexual maturity. In this approach, pre-smolt juveniles are collected from the stream or watershed for which a native broodstock is desired, and those juveniles are raised to sexual maturity in a hatchery. Those hatchery-reared adults then become the broodstock source for gametes and initial progeny releases. Such a captive rearing program offers many genetic advantages over traditional adult-trapping programs for developing native

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS AND...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Complex Program, Klickitat and Yakima Counties, Washington Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Yakama...

77

Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fish Research Project, Oregon : Evaluation of the Success of Supplementing Imnaha River Steelhead with Hatchery Reared Smolts: Phase One : Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two streams in the Imnaha River subbasin (Camp Creek and Little Sheep Creek) and eight streams in the Grande Ronde River subbasin (Catherine, Deer, Five Points, Fly, Indian, Lookingglass, Meadow, and Sheep creeks) were selected as study streams to evaluate the success and impacts of steelhead supplementation in northeast Oregon. The habitat of the study streams was inventoried to compare streams and to evaluate whether habitat might influence the performance parameters we will measure in the study. The mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 1-salts returning to Little Sheep Creek fish facility in 1990 and 1991 ranged from 3,550 to 4,663 eggs/female; the mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 2-salts ranged from 5,020 to 5,879 eggs/female. Variation in length explained 57% of the variation in fecundity of natural steelhead, but only 41% to 51% of the variation in fecundity of hatchery steelhead. Adult steelhead males had an average spermatocrit of 43.9% at spawning. We were also able to stain sperm cells so that viable cells could be distinguished from dead cells. Large, red disc tags may be the most useful for observing adults on the spawning grounds. The density of wild, juvenile steelhead ranged from 0 fish/l00{sup 2} to 35.1 (age-0) and 14.0 (age-1) fish/l00m{sup 2}. Evidence provided from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests that hatchery and wild fish within a subbasin are genetically similar. The long-term experimental design is presented as a component of this report.

Carmichael, Richard W.; Whitesel, Timothy A.; Jonasson, Brian C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led to subsequent investigations at Lower Granite Dam (Ralph Elston 1996) and Lookingglass Hatchery. The results of the Lookingglass investigations are reported here.

Groberg, Warren J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

Way, Andy

83

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

88

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Complex Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Dynamics Bernardo Da Costa, Koushik Ramachandran, Jingjing Qu, and I had a two semester learning seminar in complex analysis and potential ...

90

Klickitat County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood,George

91

PUD No 1 of Klickitat County | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPP Equipment Corporation JumpCowlitz

92

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Managing Complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Complexity in Big History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spier, Fred. “How Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

Spier, Fred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hyper Space Complex Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

Shanguang Tan

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Quantum Complex Minkowski Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

Complexity, Ecology, Finance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

HARD CLAM HYBRIDS FOR FLORIDAAQUACULTURE: HATCHERY CULTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Florida have reported higher than expected mortality, which may be caused by high water temperatures by thermal stimulation. Southern hard clams seemed to spawn as water cooled from peak temperature, or other stressors (e.g., rapid salinity changes caused by excessive rain), during the prolonged hot

Florida, University of

102

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Stability and Complexity in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and complexity of a commu- nity of interacting plants and animals, following the food web as a clue. Contrary in power. Stability and Complexity in Model Ecosystems played a key role in introducing nonlinear thinking, and current threats to biodiversity have made questions about the role of ecosystem complexity

Landweber, Laura

104

U1A Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

U1A Complex  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

Exponential Random Simplicial Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exponential random graph models have attracted significant research attention over the past decades. These models are maximum-entropy ensembles under the constraints that the expected values of a set of graph observables are equal to given values. Here we extend these maximum-entropy ensembles to random simplicial complexes, which are more adequate and versatile constructions to model complex systems in many applications. We show that many random simplicial complex models considered in the literature can be casted as maximum-entropy ensembles under certain constraints. We introduce and analyze the most general random simplicial complex ensemble $\\mathbf{\\Delta}$ with statistically independent simplices. Our analysis is simplified by the observation that any distribution $\\mathbb{P}(O)$ on any collection of objects $\\mathcal{O}=\\{O\\}$, including graphs and simplicial complexes, is maximum-entropy under the constraint that the expected value of $-\\ln \\mathbb{P}(O)$ is equal to the entropy of the distribution. W...

Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Complex System Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

Magee, Christopher

2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

EIS-0397: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Falls Fishway in Klickitat County, near Lyle, Washington. The improvements would ease fish passage to upstream high quality habitat in the Klickitat Basin and improve...

109

Hydridomethyl iridium complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Synchronization in complex networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

Complex Systems and Brain Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Charles E. Schmidt College of Science www.ccs.fau.edu #12;Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Our Mission The mission of the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences is to understand the principles and mechanisms underlying complex behavior

Fernandez, Eduardo

113

APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Transforms, Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Appendix F Transforms, Complex Analysis This appendix discusses Fourier and Laplace transforms as they are used in plasma physics and this book. Also, key properties of complex variable theory that are needed for understanding and inverting these transforms

Callen, James D.

114

Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Complexity Science for Simpletons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we shall describe some of the most interesting topics in the subject of Complexity Science for a general audience. Anyone with a solid foundation in high school mathematics (with some calculus) and an elementary understanding of computer programming will be able to follow this article. First, we shall explain the significance of the P versus NP problem and solve it. Next, we shall describe two other famous mathematics problems, the Collatz 3n+1 Conjecture and the Riemann Hypothesis, and show how both Chaitin's incompleteness theorem and Wolfram's notion of "computational irreducibility" are important for understanding why no one has, as of yet, solved these two problems.

Craig Alan Feinstein

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Autonomicity vs. Complexity Stefan Schmid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ and hopefully not that many · Autonomicity introduces complexity (and hence CAPEX ­ but only initially for the 1

Stavrakakis, Ioannis

117

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY, AND AUTONOMOUS William Bechtel and Adele- nomological framework and its focus on laws as the primary explanatory vehicle; for them, a scientific

Bechtel, William

119

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f), and that Q E (f) # D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Computer Science Division University of California . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

Aaronson, Scott

120

electronic properties of complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Towards electronic properties of complex systems C. Giorgetti Interest in Photovoltaic Conductance within ab initio framework size of the systems limited but predicative can include many-body effectsTowards electronic properties of complex systems C. Giorgetti Towards electronic properties

Giraud, Olivier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Competing complexity metrics and adults' production of complex sentences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The adequacy of 11 metrics for measuring linguistic complexity was evaluated by applying each metric to language samples obtained from 30 different adult speakers, aged 60-90 years. The analysis then determined how well ...

Kemper, Susan; Cheng, Hintat

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Architecting complex systems for robustness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust design methodologies are frequently utilized by organizations to develop robust and reliable complex systems. The intent of robust design is to create systems that are insensitive to variations from production, the ...

Slagle, Jason C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(f) # D (f ), and that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f). 1 If f is partial (i.e. S #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Abstract Given a Boolean function f , we study two . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

Aaronson, Scott

126

Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

Williams, Rube B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

127

Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies Chapter, Encyclopedia Importance II. Introduction to Computational Complexity III. Computational Complexity of Mechanical Devices and their Movement Problems IV. Concrete Mechanical Computing Devices V. Future Directions VI. Bibliography Glossary

Reif, John H.

128

INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Production Advisory Committee PNFHPC: Pacific Northwest Fish Health Protection Committee PP&L: Paafic Power

129

PIT Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_PIT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A hydro passage performance Hydro passage conditions adult passage standards and targets Conditions of in

130

Coded Wire Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro No current technologies(2013-1-4)_FTF_CWT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon 3A Fish in draft tubes and in fishways Salmon and steelhead juvenile and adult hydro passage performance Hydro

131

Coded Wire Tag Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Tag Type ? ? ? ? ? (2013-3-4)_FTF_CWT_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon 3A tubes and in fishways Salmon and steelhead juvenile and adult hydro passage performance Hydro passage

132

Genetic Mark Elimination from Management Questions Hatchery .............................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................1 Habitat................................................2 Hydro Genetic Acoustic CWT No current technologies(2013-1-4)_FTF_Genetic_Elimination 2 #12;Hydro 5A Age one hydro passage performance Hydro passage conditions adult passage standards and targets Conditions of in

133

TESTS OF HATCHERY FOODS FOR BLUEBACK SALMON 1951  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

>eooeoooooooooeooeoo XX 1"63, U*^ V XSCGrS^JTLG&X L/OnX'rOX ·oooaaeoooeop^^ooooooooooooooooooeoeeoe XX Air-Lift Dried at the Leavenworth Laboratory to develop adequate diets for the artificial propagation of salmon

134

Sacramento River Steelhead: Hatchery vs. Natural Smolt Outmigration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that made it to the Golden Gate Bridge listening station diddetected passing the Golden Gate Bridge over a more thanfish detected at the Golden Gate Bridge were from two groups

Sandstrom, Phil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

TESTS OF HATCHERY FOODS FOR BLUEBACK SALMON 1944-48  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0000000000009000000000000000000000000000 L- ^J Potential Production Diets .............................. 29 The Effect of Cold Storage

136

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Marine growth of Columbia River hatchery Chinook salmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Release Date Fish Released (millions) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 51 42 31 25 46 40 Weight(g) WestCSp Will

138

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement | Department of333 FederalTheMilton-Freewater,

139

EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement | Department of333Energy SUMMARYCounties,

140

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi GtelHomer, Alaska:Horace, NorthHorvatic Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fish Bulletin 164. Trout and Salmon Culture (Hatchery Methods)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of air through hoses and carborundum stones. As the airplaneair through hoses and carborundum stones to each can of

Leitritz, Earl; Lewis, Robert C

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods, Illinois: EnergyCity County, Virginia:North|

143

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Jump to: navigation,SercelOregon. Its

144

advance hatchery reform: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Private Insurance Market Renewable Energy Websites Summary: SUMMARY s national health care reform efforts go forward, it is instructive to review states' experience INTRODUCTION...

145

Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman Lance Fortnow Ilan Newman Nikolai Vereshchagin b(n, l) denote the binomial sum: b(n, l) = n 0 + n 1 + · · · + n l . Theorem 2 (Harper). Let J 2n . Take all the strings with less than l ones and take J - l first strings with l ones

Fortnow, Lance

146

Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(f) R0 (f), and that QE (f) D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) = {0, 1}n ), then Q2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson Computer Science Division University of California for all i S then f (Y ) = f (X). Then CX (f) is the mini- mum size of a certificate for X, and C (f

Aaronson, Scott

148

Complex Forces Affect China's Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global efforts have been put into biodiversity conservation, but biodiversity loss continues rapidly in biodiversity conservation to the global level and help protect biodiversity in other developing countries Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;208 ConservationBiology COMPLEXITY OF INTERACTING FORCES AFFECTING BIODIVERSITY

149

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 (f) R 2 (f) R 0 (f) D (f) n, that QE (f) D (f), and that Q0 (f) R0 (f).1 If f is partial (i.eQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson Abstract Given a Boolean function f, we study two/2, and otherwise outputs "I don't know" (it can never output an incorrect value). If we require the algorithm

Aaronson, Scott

150

Materials and Fuels Complex Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions called symbols. Generali* *zing this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection

Shoj, Toshiaki

152

Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Partitioning Complexity in Air Traffic Management Task  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive complexity is a term that appears frequently in air traffic control (ATC) research literature, yet there is little principled investigation of the potential sources of cognitive complexity. Three distinctly ...

Cummings, M. L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

155

Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing Design Kasidit Leoviriyakit and Antony@stanford.edu and jameson@baboon.stanford.edu This paper focuses on aerodynamic design methodology. It discusses challenges and complexity of aerodynamic wing design for a transonic aircraft, which arise from the complex nature of flow

Jameson, Antony

156

EIS-0421: Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

BPA is proposing to build a new 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County, Washington and a new substation in Klickitat County. The new BPA transmission line...

157

Integration of Biomass processes in an existing Petrochemical ComplexPetrochemical Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Biomass processes in an existing Petrochemical ComplexPetrochemical Complex Debalina · Biomass conversion processes · Integration in existing plant complex l i· Conclusions #12;Sustainability;Overview · Biomass based processes integrated into a chemical production complex. Utili b di id f i th l

Pike, Ralph W.

158

DOE outlines complex cleanup options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Department said last week it will consider four different strategies for cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex in a draft programmatic environmental impact statement due for release this summer. In an implementation plan released for public comment February 17, DOE also said the EIS would look at centralized, decentralized and regional approaches to management of six types of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Other issues to be addressed in the EIS are development of innovative cleanup technology, budgeting and prioritization, job cutbacks and worker retraining, waste minimization and community involvement in cleanup decisions. However, DOE said it had decided not to address spent nuclear fuel storage in the EIS, as had been previously planned. Instead, spent fuel storage options will be reviewed in another environmental study being done under court order for DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Findings from the INEL study will be incorporated in the department-wide EIS for environmental restoration and waste management.

Lobsenz, G.

1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

Mehrdad Massoudi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington

163

Physical mapping of complex genomes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred embodiments, the cosmid clones are arranged in a three dimensional matrix, pooled and compared in threes according to intersecting planes of the three dimensional matrix. Arrangements corresponding to geometries of higher dimensions may also be prepared and used to simultaneously identify overlapping clones in highly complex libraries with relatively few hybridization reactions.

Evans, Glen A. (Encinitas, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten Complexes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten Complexes Having an N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand to Give the Isolable 17 Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten...

166

Models of organometallic complexes for optoelectronic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organometallic complexes have potential applications as the optically active components of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). Development of more effective complexes may be aided by understanding their excited state properties. Here we discuss two key theoretical approaches to investigate these complexes: first principles atomistic models and effective Hamiltonian models. We review applications of these methods, such as, determining the nature of the emitting state, predicting the fraction of injected charges that form triplet excitations, and explaining the sensitivity of device performance to small changes in the molecular structure of the organometallic complexes.

A. C. Jacko; Ross H. McKenzie; B. J. Powell

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

CORRELATION PROFILES AND MOTIFS IN COMPLEX NETWORKS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Networks have recently emerged as a unifying theme in complex systems research [1]. It is in fact no coincidence that networks and complexity are so heavily intertwined. Any future definition of a complex system should reflect the fact that such systems consist of many mutually interacting components. These components are far from being identical as say electrons in systems studied by condensed matter physics. In a truly complex system each of them has a unique identity allowing one to separate it from the others. The very first question one may ask about such a system is which other components a given component interacts with? This information system wide can be visualized as a graph, whose nodes correspond to individual components of the complex system in question and edges to their mutual interactions. Such a network can be thought of as a backbone of the complex system. Of course, system's dynamics depends not only on the topology of an underlying network but also on the exact form of interaction of components with each other, which can be very different in various complex systems. However, the underlying network may contain clues about the basic design principles and/or evolutionary history of the complex system in question. The goal of this article is to provide readers with a set of useful tools that would help to decide which features of a complex network are there by pure chance alone, and which of them were possibly designed or evolved to their present state.

MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.ALON,U.

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Localized domain patterns in complex polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Localized domain patterns in complex polymers abstract. Block copolymers are macromolecules that can form variety of microstructures as a result of incomplete

169

Draft Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

which analyzed programmatic alternatives for the weapons complex in the absence of nuclear testing. NNSA maintains the safety, security, and reliability of nuclear weapons...

170

A COMPLEXITY THEORY OF CONSTRUCTIBLE FUNCTIONS AND ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 1, 2014 ... very naturally in the algebraic geometry over real and complex .... construction of a sequence of parametrized polynomial systems with a ...

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Controlling Complex Systems and Developing Dynamic Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the highly complex interconnectivity found in biologicalnon-trivial effects of interconnectivity [Sim62, Str01] thatas a result of interconnectivity. The simulation was also

Avizienis, Audrius Victor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems because they explicitly take into account the complexity caused by the feedback between particles (crystal, bubble, or pyroclast) and the continuous phase (liquid or...

173

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Characterization of the bovine major histocompatibility complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are involved in immune response to infectious agents, tumor metastasis, stress response, gametogenesis, and development, including embryogenesis. Therefore, characterization...

McArthur, Monica

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department of Mathematics Science University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278­8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions of classical groups this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection groups G(e, 1, n), and study

Shoj, Toshiaki

176

ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

Gibson, P. L.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- phosphaadamantane, PTA, coordinates to the Fe centers forming the disubstituted complex (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)2PTA]2, which presents one PTA in each iron in a transoid arrangement. Substitution of one CO ligand in the (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)3]2 parent complex forms the asymmetric (m-pdt)[Fe...

Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities Gesa A. B¨ohme 1 and Thilo Gross 2 1 Max of Engineering Mathematics, Bristol, UK Keywords: metacommunities, food webs, predator-prey interactions, geo diversity and food web complexity. Recently Pillai et al. proposed a simple modeling framework

179

Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

California at Santa Barbara, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Complexity Boundaries for Generalized Guarded Existential Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the conjunctive query entail- ment problem for classes of existential rules (also called Tuple-Generating, namely (weakly) frontier- guarded rules. We provide a generic algorithm for query entailment with gbts complexity. Secondly, we classify several gbts classes, whose complexity was unknown, namely frontier

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

182

Physical mapping of complex genomes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

Evans, G.A.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Predictive Complex Event Processing: A conceptual framework for combining Complex Event Processing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beszedes@inf.u- szeged.hu Hunor Demeter Nokia Siemens Network Hungary hunor.demeter@nsn.com Lóránt Farkas Nokia Siemens Network Hungary lorant.farkas@nsn.com ABSTRACT Complex Event Processing deals, transforming, cor- relating and aggregating them into complex events. Examples of complex events are: the 2009

Beszedes, Árpád

184

Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity Procedural memory effects in categorization: evidence for multiple systems or task complexity? Safa R. Zaki and Dave College Williamstown, MA 10267 413-597-4594 Email: szaki@williams.edu #12;Multiple systems or task

Stoiciu, Mihai

185

ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.

W.M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optimization in Geometric Graphs: Complexity and Approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider several related problems arising in geometric graphs. In particular, we investigate the computational complexity and approximability properties of several optimization problems in unit ball graphs and develop algorithms to find exact...

Kahruman-Anderoglu, Sera

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS. A generalization of Macdonald o* *perators is also constructed, and we characterize such functions by making use of * *Macdonald operators, assuming a certain conjecture

Shoj, Toshiaki

188

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department version of the above Hall-Littlewood functions, as a generalization of Macdonald functions associated to symmetric groups. A generalization of Macdonald operators is also constructed, and we characterize

Shoj, Toshiaki

189

Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels 20-24 June 2011 (All and issues Theme: Biofuel systems and issues (Chair: Nigel Burroughs) 13 (Bielefeld) Biofuels from algae- challenges for industrial levels

Rand, David

191

The Complexity of Agreement Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Agreement Scott Aaronson # Abstract A celebrated 1976 theorem of Aumann asserts the computations needed for that conversation be performed e#ciently? This paper answers both questions in the a

Aaronson, Scott

192

The Complexity of Agreement # Scott Aaronson +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Agreement # Scott Aaronson + ABSTRACT A celebrated 1976 theorem of Aumann asserts his information and e#ort. Yet according to well­ known theory, such honest disagreement is im

Aaronson, Scott

193

Symptoms of complexity in a tourism system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism destinations behave as dynamic evolving complex systems, encompassing numerous factors and activities which are interdependent and whose relationships might be highly nonlinear. Traditional research in this field has looked after a linear approach: variables and relationships are monitored in order to forecast future outcomes with simplified models and to derive implications for management organizations. The limitations of this approach have become apparent in many cases, and several authors claim for a new and different attitude. While complex systems ideas are amongst the most promising interdisciplinary research themes emerged in the last few decades, very little has been done so far in the field of tourism. This paper presents a brief overview of the complexity framework as a means to understand structures, characteristics, relationships and explores the implications and contributions of the complexity literature on tourism systems. The objective is to allow the reader to gain a deeper appreciatio...

Baggio, R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula, as shown in the accompanying diagrams, wherein n, m, R, R{sup 1}, R{sup 2} and L are defined in the specification.

Troutner, D.E.; John, C.S.; Pillai, M.R.A.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula: ##STR1## wherein n, m, R, R.sup.1, R.sup.2 and L are defined in the specification.

Troutner, David E. (Phoenixville, PA); John, Christy S. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pillai, Maroor R. A. (Vashi, IN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-4414E Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional, January 21, 2011. 1 Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using (BSDFs) to model the daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (CFS), enabling greater

197

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei early papers, D. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical attempt to analyze the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics

Ward, Karen

198

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei early papers, D. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical first serious attempt to analyze the rela­ tion between computational complexity and foundations

Ward, Karen

199

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich1 and Andrei M. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical theories serious attempt to analyze the rela- tion between computational complexity and foundations of physics

Ward, Karen

200

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one which occurs in three dimensions. We present our recent results on restricted diffusion. We look into the role of geometrical complexity at different levels, from boundary microroughness to hierarchical structure and connectivity of the whole diffusion-confining domain. We develop a new approach which consists in combining fast random walk algorithms with spectral tools. The main focus is on studying diffusion in model complex geometries (von Koch boundaries, Kitaoka acinus, etc.), as well as on developing and testing spectral methods. We aim at extending this knowledge and at applying the accomplished arsenal of theoretical and numerical tools to structures found in nature and industry.

Denis Grebenkov

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

antigen-antibody complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

203

anopheles punctulatus complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

204

acute complex type: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

time complexity Physics Websites Summary: computational complexity in terms of Turing Machine. Second, it shows that this natural class can be easilyInterpretation of...

205

auricomus polyploid complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

206

atherosclerotic lesion complexity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

207

anopheles dirus complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

208

auricomus complex ranunculaceae: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

209

antibody m18 complexed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

210

aids-related complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

211

argonaute-containing ribonucleoprotein complexes: Topics by E...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

212

Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

213

Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12...

214

Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014 Site-Level Exercise - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014...

215

Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 May 2013 Appraisal of the Uranium Processing...

216

Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2014 March 2014 Review of the Uranium Processing Facility...

217

Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

218

Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control...

219

Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome. Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome. Abstract: Prokaryotic genomes can...

220

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Oversight Reports - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project...

222

active complex lesions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. INTRODUCTION In magnetic resonance imaging, after Fourier or non- Fourier Rowe, Daniel B. 44 Complexity CERN Preprints Summary: The term complexity derives etymologically...

223

Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

224

Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex...

225

Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

Sun, Wen [School of Information and Mathematics, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)] [School of Information and Mathematics, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); Lü, Jinhu [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, Shihua [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)] [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Xinghuo [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Design tools for complex dynamic security systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of tools for complex dynamic security systems is not a straight forward engineering task but, rather, a scientific task where discovery of new scientific principles and math is necessary. For years, scientists have observed complex behavior but have had difficulty understanding it. Prominent examples include: insect colony organization, the stock market, molecular interactions, fractals, and emergent behavior. Engineering such systems will be an even greater challenge. This report explores four tools for engineered complex dynamic security systems: Partially Observable Markov Decision Process, Percolation Theory, Graph Theory, and Exergy/Entropy Theory. Additionally, enabling hardware technology for next generation security systems are described: a 100 node wireless sensor network, unmanned ground vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Rigdon, James Brian; Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Laguna, Glenn A.; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Groom, Kenneth Neal; Wilson, David Gerald; Bickerstaff, Robert J.; Harrington, John J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light harvesting components of photosynthetic organisms are complex, coupled, many-body quantum systems, in which electronic coherence has recently been shown to survive for relatively long time scales despite the decohering effects of their environments. Within this context, we analyze entanglement in multi-chromophoric light harvesting complexes, and establish methods for quantification of entanglement by presenting necessary and sufficient conditions for entanglement and by deriving a measure of global entanglement. These methods are then applied to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein to extract the initial state and temperature dependencies of entanglement. We show that while FMO in natural conditions largely contains bipartite entanglement between dimerized chromophores, a small amount of long-range and multipartite entanglement exists even at physiological temperatures. This constitutes the first rigorous quantification of entanglement in a biological system. Finally, we discuss the practical utilization of entanglement in densely packed molecular aggregates such as light harvesting complexes.

Mohan Sarovar; Akihito Ishizaki; Graham R. Fleming; K. Birgitta Whaley

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one whic...

Grebenkov, Denis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Complex geometry and pre-metric electromagnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intimate link between complex geometry and the problem of the pre-metric formulation of electromagnetism is explored. In particular, the relationship between 3+1 decompositions of R4 and the decompositions of the vector space of bivectors over R4 into real and imaginary subspaces relative to a choice of complex structure is emphasized. The role of the various scalar products on the space of bivectors that are defined in terms of a volume element on R4 and a complex structure on the space of bivectors that makes it C-linear isomorphic to C3 is discussed in the context of formulation of a theory of electromagnetism in which the Lorentzian metric on spacetime follows as a consequence of the existence of electromagnetic waves, not a prior assumption.

D. H. Delphenich

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Locomotion in complex fluids: Integral theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biological fluids encountered by self-propelled cells display complex microstructures and rheology. We consider here the general problem of low-Reynolds number locomotion in a complex fluid. {Building on classical work on the transport of particles in viscoelastic fluids,} we demonstrate how to mathematically derive three integral theorems relating the arbitrary motion of an isolated organism to its swimming kinematics {in a non-Newtonian fluid}. These theorems correspond to three situations of interest, namely (1) squirming motion in a linear viscoelastic fluid, (2) arbitrary surface deformation in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid, and (3) small-amplitude deformation in an arbitrarily non-Newtonian fluid. Our final results, valid for a wide-class of {swimmer geometry,} surface kinematics and constitutive models, at most require mathematical knowledge of a series of Newtonian flow problems, and will be useful to quantity the locomotion of biological and synthetic swimmers in complex environments.

Eric Lauga

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

LEARNING COMPLEX DOMAINS AND COMPLEX TASKS, THE PROMISE OF SIMULATION BASED TRAINING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEARNING COMPLEX DOMAINS AND COMPLEX TASKS, THE PROMISE OF SIMULATION BASED TRAINING Ton de Jong in the sense that they have just emerged, but simulation learning environments help to realize these approaches in new type of contexts. The design of such simulation learning environments is a multifaceted endeavour

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Does network complexity help organize Babel's library?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we study properties of texts from the perspective of complex network theory. Words in given texts are linked by co-occurrence and transformed into networks, and we observe that these display topological properties common to other complex systems. However, there are some properties that seem to be exclusive to texts; many of these properties depend on the frequency of words in the text, while others seem to be strictly determined by the grammar. Precisely, these properties allow for a categorization of texts as either with a sense and others encoded or senseless.

Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Benito, Rosa María; Losada, Juan Carlos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m[sup 3] of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Complexity of Optical Computations Akhilesh Tyagi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Complexity of Optical Computations Akhilesh Tyagi and John H. Reif Abstract This paper provides lower bounds on the energy consumption and demonstrates an energy-time trade-off in optical ­ shifting. Since the energy consumption in an optical transmission is a non-linear function of the distance

Reif, John H.

235

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes Ali Raissi Florida Solar Energy Center;Advantages of Ammonia Costs about $150 per short ton or less than $6.25 per million BTU of H2 contained and utilization Stores 30% more energy by liquid volume than LH2 Easily reformed using 16% of the energy

237

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Gravity in Complex Hermitian Space-Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generalized theory unifying gravity with electromagnetism was proposed by Einstein in 1945. He considered a Hermitian metric on a real space-time. In this work we review Einstein's idea and generalize it further to consider gravity in a complex Hermitian space-time.

Ali H. Chamseddine

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Understanding complexity in the human brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding complexity in the human brain Danielle S. Bassett1 and Michael S. Gazzaniga2 1 the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its work- ings of mind­brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neu- roscientific studies are coupled

Gazzaniga, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Validating Complex Agent Behavior Scott A. Wallace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavior by Scott A. Wallace Chair: John E. Laird Developing software agents that replicate human behaviorValidating Complex Agent Behavior by Scott A. Wallace A dissertation submitted in partial) in The University of Michigan 2003 Doctoral Committee: Professor John E. Laird, Chair Associate Professor William P

Wallace, Scott

242

Construction of the noncommutative complex ball  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the construction of the noncommutative complex ball whose commutative analog is the Hermitian symmetric space D = SU(m, 1)/U(m), with the method of coherent state quantization. In the commutative limit, we obtain the standard manifold. We also consider a quantum field theory model on the noncommutative manifold.

Wang, Zhituo, E-mail: zhituo@mat.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Roma Tre Largo S. L. Murialdo 1, 00146 Roma (Italy)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

244

Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture Koji KAWAMURA1,2 ,Laurence HIBRAND´e, FRANCE , 2. Department of Environmental Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Ohmiya, Asahi architecture is a crit- ical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

245

CHAPLIN - Complex Harmonic Polylogarithms in Fortran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new Fortran library to evaluate all harmonic polylogarithms up to weight four numerically for any complex argument. The algorithm is based on a reduction of harmonic polylogarithms up to weight four to a minimal set of basis functions that are computed numerically using series expansions allowing for fast and reliable numerical results.

Stephan Buehler; Claude Duhr

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Multifaceted Mathematical Approach for Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applied mathematics has an important role to play in developing the tools needed for the analysis, simulation, and optimization of complex problems. These efforts require the development of the mathematical foundations for scientific discovery, engineering design, and risk analysis based on a sound integrated approach for the understanding of complex systems. However, maximizing the impact of applied mathematics on these challenges requires a novel perspective on approaching the mathematical enterprise. Previous reports that have surveyed the DOE's research needs in applied mathematics have played a key role in defining research directions with the community. Although these reports have had significant impact, accurately assessing current research needs requires an evaluation of today's challenges against the backdrop of recent advances in applied mathematics and computing. To address these needs, the DOE Applied Mathematics Program sponsored a Workshop for Mathematics for the Analysis, Simulation and Optimization of Complex Systems on September 13-14, 2011. The workshop had approximately 50 participants from both the national labs and academia. The goal of the workshop was to identify new research areas in applied mathematics that will complement and enhance the existing DOE ASCR Applied Mathematics Program efforts that are needed to address problems associated with complex systems. This report describes recommendations from the workshop and subsequent analysis of the workshop findings by the organizing committee.

Alexander, F.; Anitescu, M.; Bell, J.; Brown, D.; Ferris, M.; Luskin, M.; Mehrotra, S.; Moser, B.; Pinar, A.; Tartakovsky, A.; Willcox, K.; Wright, S.; Zavala, V.

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

Ishihara, Osamu [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

February 22, 1998 Clustering ECG Complexes Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LU TP 98­1 February 22, 1998 Clustering ECG Complexes Using Hermite Functions and Self Transactions on Biomedical Engineering Abstract: An integrated method for identifying and classifying ECG for analysis and interpretation of ECGs have been subject to intense research for nearly four decades

Lunds Universitet,

249

1) Introduction 1 1. 1) Complexity Theory 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents Preface i 1) Introduction 1 1. 1) Complexity Theory 1 1. 2) Boolean functions and Boolean algebra 7 1. 3) Boolean networks 18 Bibliographic notes 25 2) Combinational Network Complexity 27 2. 1 on combinational complexity 100 Bibliographic notes 115 3) Monotone Network Complexity 117 #12;3. 1) Bounds

Atkinson, Katie

250

Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems F. Zonca - Complex behaviors ENEA, Frascati, Italy #12;Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems F. Zonca-heating) of charged fusion products balances power losses #12;Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex

Zonca, Fulvio

251

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Group 4 Metalloporphyrin diolato Complexes and Catalytic Application of Metalloporphyrins and Related Transition Metal Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the first examples of group 4 metalloporphyrin 1,2-diolato complexes were synthesized through a number of strategies. In general, treatment of imido metalloporphyrin complexes, (TTP)M=NR, (M = Ti, Zr, Hf), with vicinal diols led to the formation of a series of diolato complexes. Alternatively, the chelating pinacolate complexes could be prepared by metathesis of (TTP)MCl{sub 2} (M = Ti, Hf) with disodium pinacolate. These complexes were found to undergo C-C cleavage reactions to produce organic carbonyl compounds. For titanium porphyrins, treatment of a titanium(II) alkyne adduct, (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh), with aromatic aldehydes or aryl ketones resulted in reductive coupling of the carbonyl groups to produce the corresponding diolato complexes. Aliphatic aldehydes or ketones were not reactive towards (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh). However, these carbonyl compounds could be incorporated into a diolato complex on reaction with a reactive precursor, (TTP)Ti[O(Ph){sub 2}C(Ph){sub 2}O] to provide unsymmetrical diolato complexes via cross coupling reactions. In addition, an enediolato complex (TTP)Ti(OCPhCPhO) was obtained from the reaction of (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh) with benzoin. Titanium porphyrin diolato complexes were found to be intermediates in the (TTP)Ti=O-catalyzed cleavage reactions of vicinal diols, in which atmospheric oxygen was the oxidant. Furthermore, (TTP)Ti=O was capable of catalyzing the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and {alpha}-hydroxy ketones to benzaldehyde and {alpha}-diketones, respectively. Other high valent metalloporphyrin complexes also can catalyze the oxidative diol cleavage and the benzyl alcohol oxidation reactions with dioxygen. A comparison of Ti(IV) and Sn(IV) porphyrin chemistry was undertaken. While chelated diolato complexes were invariably obtained for titanium porphyrins on treatment with 1,2-diols, the reaction of vicinal diols with tin porphyrins gave a number of products, including mono-, bis-alkoxo, and chelating diolato complexes, depending on the identity of diols and the stoichiometry employed. It was also found that tin porphyrin complexes promoted the oxidative cleavage of vicinal diols and the oxidation of {alpha}-ketols to {alpha}-diketones with dioxygen. In extending the chemistry of metalloporphyrins and analogous complexes, a series of chiral tetraaza macrocyclic ligands and metal complexes were designed and synthesized. Examination of iron(II) complexes showed that they were efficient catalysts for the cyclopropanation of styrene by diazo reagents. Good yields and high diastereoselectivity were obtained with modest enantioselectivity. A rationalization of the stereoselectivity was presented on the basis of structural factors in a carbene intermediate.

Guodong Du

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Second Quantized Quantum Turing Machine and Kolmogorov Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kolmogorov complexity of a physical state is the minimal physical resources required to reproduce that state. We define a second quantized quantum Turing machine and use it to define second quantized Kolmogorov complexity. There are two advantages to our approach - our measure of second quantized Kolmogorov complexity is closer to physical reality and unlike other quantum Kolmogorov complexities it is continuous. We give examples where second quantized and quantum Kolmogorov complexity differ.

Caroline Rogers; Vlatko Vedral

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... by MICHAEL EUGENE HOOFARD Approved as to style and content by: a ter . enry (Chairman of Committee) %~5 44 c5 c usan gur c (Member) ona . oc ing (Member) ames . cogg (Head of Department) August 1986 ABSTRACT Nesoscale Convective Complex vs. Non...

Hoofard, Michael Eugene

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Complexity of the Local Hamiltonian Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The k-local Hamiltonian problem is a natural complete problem for the complexity class QMA, the quantum analog of NP. It is similar in spirit to MAX-k-SAT, which is NP-complete for k<=2. It was known that the problem is QMA-complete for any k <= 3. On the other hand 1-local Hamiltonian is in P, and hence not believed to be QMA-complete. The complexity of the 2-local Hamiltonian problem has long been outstanding. Here we settle the question and show that it is QMA-complete. We provide two independent proofs; our first proof uses only elementary linear algebra. Our second proof uses a powerful technique for analyzing the sum of two Hamiltonians; this technique is based on perturbation theory and we believe that it might prove useful elsewhere. Using our techniques we also show that adiabatic computation with two-local interactions on qubits is equivalent to standard quantum computation.

Julia Kempe; Alexei Kitaev; Oded Regev

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

SEARCH, blackbox optimization, and sample complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SEARCH (Search Envisioned As Relation and Class Hierarchizing) framework developed elsewhere (Kargupta, 1995; Kargupta and Goldberg, 1995) offered an alternate perspective toward blackbox optimization -- optimization in presence of little domain knowledge. The SEARCH framework investigates the conditions essential for transcending the limits of random enumerative search using a framework developed in terms of relations, classes and partial ordering. This paper presents a summary of some of the main results of that work. A closed form bound on the sample complexity in terms of the cardinality of the relation space, class space, desired quality of the solution and the reliability is presented. This also leads to the identification of the class of order-k delineable problems that can be solved in polynomial sample complexity. These results are applicable to any blackbox search algorithms, including evolutionary optimization techniques.

Kargupta, H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computational Science Methods Div.; Goldberg, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of General Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Refiners Switch to RFG Complex Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On January 1, 1998, domestic and foreign refineries and importers must stop using the "simple" model and begin using the "complex" model to calculate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic air pollutants (TAP), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from motor gasoline. The primary differences between application of the two models is that some refineries may have to meet stricter standards for the sulfur and olefin content of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) they produce and all refineries will now be held accountable for NOx emissions. Requirements for calculating emissions from conventional gasoline under the anti-dumping rule similarly change for exhaust TAP and NOx. However, the change to the complex model is not expected to result in an increase in the price premium for RFG or constrain supplies.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

Griffin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Biologic response to complex blast waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small, bare charges were detonated inside an M59 armored personnel carrier (APC) in an attempt to simulate the complex blast waves generated by the jets from shaped-charge warheads penetrating into armored vehicles. Anesthetized sheep were placed inside the APC at 92- and 122-cm ranges from 57- or 113-g pentolite charges. Pressure-time was measured by pressure transducers either mounted on the animals or free standing at comparable ranges on the opposite side of the vehicle. In general, the waveforms were characterized by an initial shock wave of less than 1-msec duration followed by repeated reflections of decreasing magnitude. No deaths nor lung hemorrhages were observed, but all the animals sustained severe ear injury. Animals subjected to peak overpressures of 1.2 to 2.3 bar from the 113-g explosions also received slight non-auditory blast injuries to the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; those exposed to peak overpressures of just under 1 bar from the 57-g charges did not. The non-auditory blast injuries inside the APC were more severe than those sustained by sheep at comparable distances from 113-g charges in the open. The results suggested that the biological consequences of a complex wave of the type encountered in this study can be equated approximately to a Friedlander wave with a peak overpressure equal to that of the complex wave and with a total impulse equal to the impulse over the first 2 to 3 msec of the complex wave. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Richmond, D.R.; Yelverton, J.T.; Fletcher, E.R.; Phillips, Y.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Superluminal transformations in complex Minkowski spaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the mixing of real and imaginary components of space and time under the influence of superluminal boots in the x direction. A unique mixing is determined for this superluminal Lorentz transformation when we consider the symmetry properties afforded by the inclusion of three temporal directions. Superluminal transformations in complex six-dimensional space exhibit unique tachyonic connections which have both remote and local space--time event connections.

Ramon, C.; Rauscher, E.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Travel and tourism: Into a complex network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is discussed how the worldwide tourist arrivals, about 10% of world's domestic product, form a largely heterogeneous and directed complex network. Remarkably the random network of connectivity is converted into a scale-free network of intensities. The importance of weights on network connections is brought into discussion. It is also shown how strategic positioning particularly benefit from market diversity and that interactions among countries prevail on a technological and economic pattern, questioning the backbones of traveling driving forces.

Miguens, J I L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Trends in modeling Biomedical Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributed to the understand- ing of specific aspects of the disease process and to the development of diagnostic and prognostic clinical applications. Cardiovascular obesity, diabetes, autoim- mune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders are some... intelligence, are inherently multifactor- ial, and also many common diseases, such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, asthma, cancers, mental retardation aging related diseases, cardiovascular diseases and obesity, tend to be multifactorial. As an example of complex...

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The response of complex networks to perturbations is of utmost importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response, and cell reprogramming. A fundamental property of networks is that the perturbation of one node can affect other nodes, in a process that may cause the entire or substantial part of the system to change behavior and possibly collapse. Recent research in metabolic and food-web networks has demonstrated the concept that network damage caused by external perturbations can often be mitigated or reversed by the application of compensatory perturbations. Compensatory perturbations are constrained to be physically admissible and amenable to implementation on the network. However, the systematic identification of compensatory perturbations that conform to these constraints remains an open problem. Here, we present a method to construct compensatory perturbations that can control the fate of general networks under such constraints. Our approach accounts for the full nonlinear behavior of real complex networks and can bring the system to a desirable target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Applications to genetic networks show that compensatory perturbations are effective even when limited to a small fraction of all nodes in the network and that they are far more effective when limited to the highest-degree nodes. The approach is conceptually simple and computationally efficient, making it suitable for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of large complex networks in various domains.

Sean P. Cornelius; William L. Kath; Adilson E. Motter

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Analysis of complex networks using aggressive abstraction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler (but equivalent) representation, the required analysis is performed using the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit abstractions that are simultaneously dramatically simplifying and property preserving - we call these aggressive abstractions -- and which can therefore be analyzed using the proposed approach. We then introduce and develop two forms of aggressive abstraction: 1.) finite state abstraction, in which dynamical networks with uncountable state spaces are modeled using finite state systems, and 2.) onedimensional abstraction, whereby high dimensional network dynamics are captured in a meaningful way using a single scalar variable. In each case, the property preserving nature of the abstraction process is rigorously established and efficient algorithms are presented for computing the abstraction. The considerable potential of the proposed approach to complex networks analysis is illustrated through case studies involving vulnerability analysis of technological networks and predictive analysis for social processes.

Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM; Willard, Gerald [Department of Defense, Ft. Meade, MD

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Multivariable controller increased MTBE complex capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capacity increased by more than 4.6% when one dynamic matrix multivariable controller began operating in Valero Refining Company`s MTBE production complex in Corpus Christi, Texas. This was on a plant that was already running well above design capacity due to previously made process changes. A single controller was developed to cover an isobutane dehydrogenation (ID) unit and an MTBE reaction and fractionation plant with the intermediate isobutylene surge drum. The overall benefit is realized by a comprehensive constrained multivariable predictive controller that properly handles all sets of limits experienced by the complex, whether limited by the front-end ID or back-end MTBE units. The controller has 20 manipulated, 6 disturbance and 44 controlled variables, and covers widely varying dynamics with settling times ranging from twenty minutes to six hours. The controller executes each minute with a six hour time horizon. A unique achievement is intelligent surge drum level handling by the controller for higher average daily complex capacity as a whole. The ID unit often operates at simultaneous limits on reactor effluent compressor capacity, cold box temperature and hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio, and the MTBE unit at impurity in butene column overhead as well as impurity in MTBE product. The paper discusses ether production, isobutane dehydrogenation, maximizing production, controller design, and controller performance.

Robertson, D.; Peterson, T.J.; O`Connor, D. [DMC Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Payne, D.; Adams, V. [Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments, FELIX, was used to study the wavelength-resolved multiphoton dissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO22+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The apparent uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide or acetate, S was water, ammonia, acetone or acetonitrile, and n = 0-2. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations using B3LYP predicted values that were 30 – 40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis set and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which resulted only very modest changes to the uranyl frequency, and did not universally shift values lower. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

Gary S. Groenewold; Anita K. Gianotto; Michael E. McIlwain; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Michael Kullman; Travis J. Cooper; David T. Moore; Nick Polfer; Jos Oomens; Ivan Infante; Lucas Visscher; Bertrand Siboulet; Wibe A. de Jong

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30–40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Alkyne metathesis by molybdenum and tungsten alkylidyne complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alkyne metathesis by molybdenum and tungsten alkylidyne complexes is now ~45 years old. Progress in the practical aspects of alkyne metathesis reactions with well-defined complexes, as well as applications, in the last ...

Schrock, Richard Royce

271

Assessing and reducing product portfolio complexity in the pharmaceutical industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overly complex product portfolios lead to inefficient use of resources and limit an organization's ability to react quickly to changing market dynamics. The challenges of reducing portfolio complexity are defining excess ...

Leiter, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation Steven Noel Center a framework for managing network attack graph complexity through interactive visualization, which includes hierarchical aggregation of graph elements. Aggregation collapses non-overlapping subgraphs of the attack graph

Noel, Steven

273

Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex modulus is one of the key parameters in the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG). The purpose of this study is to implement an accurate and high-efficiency mechanical method to measure and calculate the complex modulus...

Ling, Meng

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation...

275

Use of partner agents in training systems for complex tasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex tasks are an important part of the world today, but training people to perform complex tasks is difficult. These kinds of tasks usually have variable cognitive loads on the trainee, and, once trained, different people have different...

Sims, Joseph Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

High Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension. In this snapshot of the simulation, the stress on each...

277

A Note on Fuzzy Real and Complex Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the concept of fuzzy field, we have considered the fuzzy field of real and complex numbers and thereafter we have established a few standard results of real and complex numbers with respect to a membership function.

T. K. Samanta

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the...

279

acid dehydrogenase complexes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ternary terbium p-aminobenzoic acid complexes Gao, Song 23 The distribution of boron and boric acid complexes in the sea Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: LIBRARY A a m...

280

acid dehydrogenase complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ternary terbium p-aminobenzoic acid complexes Gao, Song 23 The distribution of boron and boric acid complexes in the sea Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: LIBRARY A a m...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Baton Rouge Complex Steam Real Time Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baton Rouge Complex Steam Real Time Optimization IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana Tope Iyun ExxonMobil Chemical Company May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-32 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20... were generated by or on behalf of ExxonMobil Chemical Company. Legal Disclosures ©2014 ExxonMobil. To the extent the user is entitled to disclose and distribute this document, the user may forward, distribute, and/or photocopy this copyrighted...

Iyun, T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Geometric Structure of Complex Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops the theory of affine Euler-Poincar\\'e and affine Lie-Poisson reductions and applies these processes to various examples of complex fluids, including Yang-Mills and Hall magnetohydrodynamics for fluids and superfluids, spin glasses, microfluids, and liquid crystals. As a consequence of the Lagrangian approach, the variational formulation of the equations is determined. On the Hamiltonian side, the associated Poisson brackets are obtained by reduction of a canonical cotangent bundle. A Kelvin-Noether circulation theorem is presented and is applied to these examples.

François Gay-Balmaz; Tudor S. Ratiu

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

Nuclear Advances | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurity ComplexNormanNovemberAdvances Nuclear

285

An investigation of bentonite-organic complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DTA curves are shown in Figure 7- Using a slowly flowing atmosphere, an exothermic reaction was observed starting at about 560*C and reaching a maximum around VfO*. With a more rapid nitrogen flow, the exothermic peak was decreased by still apparent.... Even with a rate of gas flow so rapid that a considerable drift in base line resulted, the exothermic reaction may not have been completely suppressed although in this case the DTA curve was too complex for reliable interpretation. Analyses...

Seymour, Keith Goldin

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThreeEnergyDepartment0: DOE512: Alaska EM| DepartmentComplex

287

Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pseudofunctorial behavior of Cousin complexes on formal schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contemporary Mathematics. Pseudofunctorial behavior of Cousin complexes on formal schemes. Joseph Lipman, Suresh Nayak, and Pramathanath Sastry.

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

adamantine-dicarboxylate coordination complexes: Topics by E...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multiagent systems, Coordination, Planning, Resource Kropf, Peter 25 Optical Design of Reflectionless Complex Media by Finite Embedded Coordinate Transformations...

290

The chemical properties and biological significance of gossypol protein complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................. 2 III. REVIEW OF LITERATURE ......................... 4 1. Cottonseed Proteins ....................... 4 2. Evaluation of Proteins ................... 5 5. The Pigments of Cottonseed.............. 11 4. The Physiological Significance of Free...-Protein Complexes . 59 5. Chemical Analysis of Cottonseed Meal and Gossypol-Protein Complexes .......... 59 4. Biological Evaluation ..................... 44 5. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Gossypol-Protein Complexes............................. 46 6. Bibliography...

Baliga, Bantval Prabhakara

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Content-Based Document Image Retrieval in Complex Document Collections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Content-Based Document Image Retrieval in Complex Document Collections G. Agama, S. Argamona, O address the problem of content-based image retrieval in the context of complex document images. Complex document are documents that typically start out on paper and are then electronically scanned. These docu

292

Interactive Control of Nonlinear Projection for Complex Animated Scenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This thesis presents techniques for creating interactive nonlinear projections of complex scene geometryInteractive Control of Nonlinear Projection for Complex Animated Scenes by Patrick Coleman A thesis of Nonlinear Projection for Complex Animated Scenes Patrick Coleman Master of Science Graduate Department

Toronto, University of

293

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich1 and Andrei M. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical theories the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics was in the early 1970s, when both Dima

Ward, Karen

294

Constructing Simplicial Complexes over Topological Spaces Milka Doktorova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complex to model relationships between entities. Graphs and hyper- graphs have been used traditionally complexes, in turn, may be used as a model of recursive relation- ships that extend down to subsets. WeConstructing Simplicial Complexes over Topological Spaces Milka Doktorova Afra Zomorodian

Zomorodian, Afra

295

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Vladik Kreinovich1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich1 and Andrei M. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical theories the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics was in the early 1970s, when both Dima

Ward, Karen

296

Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

Reiterer, Harald

297

Interactive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects dealing with entire cars, ships, buildings, and processing plants. The complexity of such modelsInteractive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models Ingo Wald, Philipp Slusallek, Carsten- ulation of huge and complex 3D environments. Examples include large structural and mechanical engineering

Wald, Ingo

298

Filing Holes in Complex Surfaces Using Volumetric Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Method for Building Complex Models From range Images, '96) ­ Applies line of sight constraints based components ­ Complex hole geometry Construction of an arbitrary mesh can result in non-manifold surfaceFiling Holes in Complex Surfaces Using Volumetric Diffusion J. Davis, S. Marschner, M. Garr and M

Kazhdan, Michael

299

Manifold Homotopy via the Flow Complex Bardia Sadri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling though much of the mathematical foundations behind the flow complex were well-explored priorManifold Homotopy via the Flow Complex Bardia Sadri Abstract It is known that the critical points versus those of deep critical points, in a filtration of the flow complex based on the distance

Toronto, University of

300

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems C. Ringhofer Abstract We emphasis is given to the implementation of service rules for complex systems, involving multiple product flow type models for complex production systems. Traffic flow models represent, in some sense

Ringhofer, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Energy Complexity Model for Algorithms Swapnoneel Roy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Energy Complexity Model for Algorithms Swapnoneel Roy Department of CSE University at Buffalo by the importance of energy and algorithmic complexity models do not capture the energy consumed by an algorithm. In this paper, we propose a new complexity model to ac- count for the energy used by an algorithm. Based

Rudra,, Atri

302

The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP , Sangxia Huang2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP Modulo k Heng Guo1 , Sangxia Huang2 , Pinyan Lu3@gmail.com Abstract We prove a complexity dichotomy theorem for counting weighted Boolean CSP modulo k for any similar to the one for the complex weighted Boolean #CSP, found by [Cai, Lu and Xia, STOC 2009]. Then we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

Biosorption of anionic metal complexes Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

containing toxic heavy metals, often in anionic complex forms such as anionic chromate (CrO4 2- ), vanadate1 Biosorption of anionic metal complexes Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky* http Street, MONTREAL, Canada H3A 2B2 *corresponding author Anionic metal complexes, are very effectively

Volesky, Bohumil

304

Original article Lignin-carbohydrate complexes in forages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Lignin-carbohydrate complexes in forages: structure and consequences) Summary ― Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCS) are recognised as key structures in forage microorganisms are discussed. lignin-carbohydrate complexes I cell wall I forage I digestibility Résumé

Boyer, Edmond

305

Complex Systems: A Survey M. E. J. Newman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Systems: A Survey M. E. J. Newman Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 and Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 A complex system is a system composed of many interacting parts, often called agents, which displays

Newman, Mark

306

A New Route to Azadithiolato Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti(SH){sub 2}] with cyclic imines with the formula (CH{sub 2}NR){sub 3} gives 2-aza-1,3-dithiolato chelate complexes [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NR}] (1, R = Ph; 2, R = Me; 3, R = CH{sub 2}Ph). These compounds demonstrate that azadithiolate ligands can exist on mononuclear metal centers. The complexes were characterized by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Variable-temperature {sup 1}H NMR studies reveal that the dithiolate ligands undergo ring inversion like other dithiatitanacyclohexanes. Treatment of [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NPh}] (1) with [Fe(benzylideneacetone)(CO){sub 3}] afforded [Fe{sub 2}{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NPh}(CO){sub 6}] in good yield.

Angamuthu, R.; Carroll, M.E.; Ramesh, M.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Statistical Complexity of Sampled Chaotic Attractors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the statistical complexity vs. entropy plane-representation of sampled chaotic attractors as a function of the sampling period {\\tau}. It is shown that if the Bandt and Pompe procedure is used to assign a probability distribution function (PDF) to the pertinent time series, the statistical complexity measure (SCM) attains a definite maximum for a specific sampling period tM. If the usual histogram approach is used instead in order to assign the PDF to the time series, the SCM remains almost constant at any sampling period {\\tau}. The significance of tM is further investigated by comparing it with typical times given in the literature for the two main reconstruction processes: the Takens' one in a delay-time embedding, and the exact Nyquist-Shannon reconstruction. It is shown that tM is compatible with those times recommended as adequate delay ones in Takens' reconstruction. The reported results correspond to three representative chaotic systems having correlation dimension 2 < D2 < 3. One recent experiment confirms the analysis presented here.

Luciana De Micco; Juana Graciela Fernández; Hilda Angela Larrondo; Angelo Plastino; Osvaldo Anibal Rosso

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Inferring Network Topology from Complex Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inferring network topology from dynamical observations is a fundamental problem pervading research on complex systems. Here, we present a simple, direct method to infer the structural connection topology of a network, given an observation of one collective dynamical trajectory. The general theoretical framework is applicable to arbitrary network dynamical systems described by ordinary differential equations. No interference (external driving) is required and the type of dynamics is not restricted in any way. In particular, the observed dynamics may be arbitrarily complex; stationary, invariant or transient; synchronous or asynchronous and chaotic or periodic. Presupposing a knowledge of the functional form of the dynamical units and of the coupling functions between them, we present an analytical solution to the inverse problem of finding the network topology. Robust reconstruction is achieved in any sufficiently long generic observation of the system. We extend our method to simultaneously reconstruct both the entire network topology and all parameters appearing linear in the system's equations of motion. Reconstruction of network topology and system parameters is viable even in the presence of substantial external noise.

Srinivas Gorur Shandilya; Marc Timme

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks. When the complex dynamical networks could be synchronized up to an equilibrium or periodic orbit, a hybrid feedback controller is designed to realize the different component of vector of node could be synchronized up to different desired scaling function in complex dynamical networks with time delay. Hybrid function projective synchronization (HFPS) in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and HFPS in complex dynamical networks with time-varying coupling delay are researched, respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xing-yuan, E-mail: wangxy@dlut.edu.cn; Hu, Xiao-peng [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessing complexity by means of maximum entropy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a characterization of complexity based on successive approximations of the probability density describing a system by means of maximum entropy methods, thereby quantifying the respective role played by different orders of interaction. This characterization is applied on simple cellular automata in order to put it in perspective with the usual notion of complexity for such systems based on Wolfram classes. The overlap is shown to be good, but not perfect. This suggests that complexity in the sense of Wolfram emerges as an intermediate regime of maximum entropy-based complexity, but also gives insights regarding the role of initial conditions in complexity-related issues.

Chliamovitch, Gregor; Velasquez, Lino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Natural Conjugate Gradient on Complex Flag Manifolds for Complex Independent Subspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conjugate gradient method yields better convergence compared to the natural gradient geodesic search method is the natural gradient geodesic search method (NGS), and the other is the natural conjugate gradient method (NCG the natural gradient or the Newton's method on complex manifolds, however, the behavior of the conjugate

Plumbley, Mark

313

The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center and the Nuclear Materials Information Program Library, a premier manufacturing facility operated by B&W Y-12 for NNSA, plays a vital role in DOE's Nuclear Security a safe and reliable US nuclear weapons deterrent. The complex also retrieves and stores nuclear materials

Pennycook, Steve

314

Alan Turing and the Origins of Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 75th anniversary of Turing's seminal paper and his centennial year anniversary occur in 2011 and 2012, respectively. It is natural to review and assess Turing's contributions in diverse fields in the light of new developments that his thoughts has triggered in many scientific communities. Here, the main idea is to discuss how the work of Turing allows us to change our views on the foundations of Mathematics, much like quantum mechanics changed our conception of the world of Physics. Basic notions like computability and universality are discussed in a broad context, making special emphasis on how the notion of complexity can be given a precise meaning after Turing, i.e., not just qualitative but also quantitative. Turing's work is given some historical perspective with respect to some of his precursors, contemporaries and mathematicians who took up his ideas farther.

Miguel-Angel Martin-Delgado

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Alan Turing and the Origins of Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 75th anniversary of Turing's seminal paper and his centennial year anniversary occur in 2011 and 2012, respectively. It is natural to review and assess Turing's contributions in diverse fields in the light of new developments that his thoughts has triggered in many scientific communities. Here, the main idea is to discuss how the work of Turing allows us to change our views on the foundations of Mathematics, much like quantum mechanics changed our conception of the world of Physics. Basic notions like computability and universality are discussed in a broad context, making special emphasis on how the notion of complexity can be given a precise meaning after Turing, i.e., not just qualitative but also quantitative. Turing's work is given some historical perspective with respect to some of his precursors, contemporaries and mathematicians who took up his ideas farther.

Martin-Delgado, Miguel-Angel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

Meacham, J.E.; and others

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

Collective dynamics of active filament complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures and they support various biological functions. Previous studies have largely investigated the collective dynamics of rod-like biofilaments; however, the shapes of actual subcelluar componensts are often more elaborate. In this study, we investigated an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents a progression from rod-like biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects and observed several types of dynamics depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, moving density bands that we named 'moving smectic' are reported here for the first time. By using statistical analyses of the orbits of individual objects and the interactions among them, the mechanisms underlying the rise of these dynamics patterns in the system were determined. This study...

Nogucci, Hironobu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Exploratory study of complexant concentrate waste processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this exploratory study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, was to determine the effect of applying advanced chemical separations technologies to the processing and disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) stored in underground tanks. The major goals of this study were to determine (1) if the wastes can be partitioned into a small volume of HLW plus a large volume of low-level waste (LLW), and (2) if the activity in the LLW can be lowered enough to meet NRC Class LLW criteria. This report presents the results obtained in a brief scouting study of various processes for separating radionuclides from Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) waste.

Lumetta, G.J.; Bray, L.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Morrey, J.R.; Swanson, J.L.; Wester, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Y-12 National Security Complex Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y 12 National Security Complex (Y 12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y 12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements that could be applied not only at Y-12 but at other Federal facilities as well. FEMP selected Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to coordinate and manage the water assessment. PNNL contracted Water Savers, LLC to lead the technical aspects of the water assessment. Water Savers provided key technical expertise in water auditing, metering, and cooling systems. This is the report of that effort, which concluded that the Y-12 facility could realize considerable water savings by implementing the recommended water efficiency opportunities.

Elam, Shana E.; Bassett, P.; McMordie Stoughton, Kate

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

B Plant Complex preclosure work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preclosure work plan describes the condition of the dangerous waste treatment storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit after completion of the B Plant Complex decommissioning Transition Phase preclosure activities. This description includes waste characteristics, waste types, locations, and associated hazards. The goal to be met by the Transition Phase preclosure activities is to place the TSD unit into a safe and environmentally secure condition for the long-term Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Phase of the facility decommissioning process. This preclosure work plan has been prepared in accordance with Section 8.0 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1996). The preclosure work plan is one of three critical Transition Phase documents, the other two being: B Plant End Points Document (WHC-SD-WM-TPP-054) and B Plant S&M plan. These documents are prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its contractors with the involvement of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The tanks and vessels addressed by this preclosure work plan are limited to those tanks end vessels included on the B Plant Complex Part A, Form 3, Permit Application (DOE/RL-88-21). The criteria for determining which tanks or vessels are in the Part A, Form 3, are discussed in the following. The closure plan for the TSD unit will not be prepared until the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process is initiated, which follows the long-term S&M Phase. Final closure will occur during the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process. The Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) is excluded from the scope of this preclosure work plan.

ADLER, J.G.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinocene complexes ann8-c8h82 Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their Summary: Mapping Complexity Sources in Nuclear Power Plant Domains Understanding the sources of complexity... of complexity in the NPP...

328

Mathematical approaches for complexity/predictivity trade-offs in complex system models : LDRD final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to examine foundational methods, both computational and theoretical, that can improve the veracity of entity-based complex system models and increase confidence in their predictions for emergent behavior. The strategy was to seek insight and guidance from simplified yet realistic models, such as cellular automata and Boolean networks, whose properties can be generalized to production entity-based simulations. We have explored the usefulness of renormalization-group methods for finding reduced models of such idealized complex systems. We have prototyped representative models that are both tractable and relevant to Sandia mission applications, and quantified the effect of computational renormalization on the predictive accuracy of these models, finding good predictivity from renormalized versions of cellular automata and Boolean networks. Furthermore, we have theoretically analyzed the robustness properties of certain Boolean networks, relevant for characterizing organic behavior, and obtained precise mathematical constraints on systems that are robust to failures. In combination, our results provide important guidance for more rigorous construction of entity-based models, which currently are often devised in an ad-hoc manner. Our results can also help in designing complex systems with the goal of predictable behavior, e.g., for cybersecurity.

Goldsby, Michael E.; Mayo, Jackson R.; Bhattacharyya, Arnab (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA); Armstrong, Robert C.; Vanderveen, Keith

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Random complex dynamics and devil's coliseums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the random dynamics of polynomial maps on the Riemann sphere and the dynamics of semigroups of polynomial maps on the Riemann sphere. In particular, the dynamics of a semigroup $G$ of polynomials whose planar postcritical set is bounded and the associated random dynamics are studied. In general, the Julia set of such a $G$ may be disconnected. We show that if $G$ is such a semigroup, then regarding the associated random dynamics, the chaos of the averaged system disappears in the $C^{0}$ sense, and the function $T_{\\infty}$ of probability of tending to $\\infty$ is continuous on the Riemann sphere and varies only on the Julia set of $G$. Moreover, the function $T_{\\infty}$ has a kind of monotonicity. It turns out that $T_{\\infty}$ is a complex analogue of the devil's staircase, and we call $T_{\\infty}$ a "devil's coliseum." We investigate the details of $T_{\\infty}$ when $G$ is generated by two polynomials. In this case, $T_{\\infty}$ varies precisely on the Julia set of $G$, which is a thin frac...

Sumi, Hiroki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Time Centrality in Dynamic Complex Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is an ever-increasing interest in investigating dynamics in time-varying graphs (TVGs). So far, however, the notion of centrality in TVG scenarios usually refers to metrics that assess the relative importance of nodes along the temporal evolution of the network. Nevertheless, for some TVG scenarios, more important than identifying the central nodes under a given definition is identifying the \\emph{key time instants} for taking certain actions. In this paper, we introduce the notion of \\emph{time centrality} in TVGs. Analogously to node centrality, time centrality evaluates the relative importance of time instants in dynamic complex networks. We present two time centrality metrics related to diffusion processes. We evaluate the two defined metrics using a real-world dataset representing a in-person contact dynamic network. We validate the concept of time centrality showing that diffusion starting at the best classified time instants (i.e. the most central ones), according to our metrics, can perform a fa...

Costa, Eduardo Chinelate; Wehmuth, Klaus; Ziviani, Artur; da Silva, Ana Paula Couto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Alarm system for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Console for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya, E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com; Ratnavelu, K., E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com [Network Science Research Group, Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

New Snake River sockeye hatchery to produce up to 1 million smolts a year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn CyberNeutrons usedDOE Project Taps

336

MORPHOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT OF HATCHERY-CULTURED AMERICAN SHAD, ALOSA SAPIDISSIMA (WILSON)I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mary, Gloucester, Va.; present address: Environmental Affairs Department, Rio BIan- co Oil Shale

337

Microsoft Word - XX 13 Colville Tribe to celebrate opening of Chief Joseph Hatchery - EDITSES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program Preliminary Needs535:UFC5, 2010UPDATES:3 13 BONNEVILLE POWER

338

Microsoft Word - XX 13 Public scoping Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook HatcherySES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program Preliminary Needs535:UFC5, 2010UPDATES:3 13 BONNEVILLE75 13

339

SciTech Connect: Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex Systems using a Fuzzy based Fusion of Support Vector Regressors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anticipatory Monitoring...

340

Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News.....  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Anson Franklin, 202586-7371 September 21, 2001 NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex John Gordon, Administrator of the Department of Energy's...

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341

High-Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to develop a fundamental framework to understand important physical mechanisms that control the flow of such complex fluid systems. Results from this study will advance the...

342

Identifying Attributes of  Perception of Project Complexity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? There is a common belief amongst those who are involved in projects that as project complexity increases the difficulty to manage a project increases… (more)

Rakhman, Eries

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Nov. 13. Rooftop solar panels provide 27 percent of the facility's energy. Maricopa County officials estimate the complex is 42 percent more energy efficient than many modern...

344

Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation) Re-direct Destination: Fungal free enzymes and bacterial...

345

The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countrysidea shift to renewable energy production. Even if politicaldifficulties. Renewable energy production as a new economic

Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

Anderson, Daniel J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet) Re-direct Destination: NREL has developed a tool -- the System Advisor Model (SAM) -- that can help...

348

acid complexation behavior: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Elicit Complex Attachments Judith Donath To appear in The Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior, edited by Marc Bekoff. Greenwood Press. Artificial pets are robotic toys with...

349

Optimization Online - On the evaluation complexity of composite ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 8, 2011 ... On the evaluation complexity of composite function minimization with applications to nonconvex nonlinear programming. C Cartis (coralia.cartis ...

C Cartis

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dynamic Complexity Theory Revisited Volker Weber Thomas Schwentick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Complexity Theory Revisited Volker Weber Thomas Schwentick Fachbereich Informatik, Universit¨at Dortmund D-44227 Dortmund, Germany {Volker.Weber,Thomas.Schwentick}@udo.edu Abstract Dynamic

Schwentick, Thomas

351

Random complex dynamics and semigroups of holomorphic maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of polynomials. Under certain conditions these functions T are complex analogues of the devil's staircase, Markov process, rational semigroups, polynomial semigroups, Julia sets, fractal geometry, cooperation

Sumi, Hiroki

352

Molybdenum alkylidene complexes : syntheses and applications to olefin metathesis reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Alkylimido Molybdenum Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization and Activity as Chiral Olefin Metathesis Catalysts. Molybdenum olefin metathesis catalysts that contain previously unexplored aliphatic 1- ...

Pilyugina, Tatiana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

ICYMI: Y-12 National Security Complex earns national Best Workplaces...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Complex have in common? They (and other local businesses) recently were recognized by Smart Trips, Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett and City of Knoxville Deputy Mayor Eddie...

354

A note on complexity of multistage stochastic programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 20, 2014 ... A note on complexity of multistage stochastic programs. Marcus de Mendes C. R. Reaiche(mmcr ***at*** impa.br). Abstract: In Shapiro [2006], ...

Marcus de Mendes C. R. Reaiche

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

analysis reveals complexity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey) Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to...

356

The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development of local renewable energy strategies: The casesin Germany to support renewable energies. Published masterThe Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the

Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The nascent Coso metamorphic core complex, east-central California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

complex, east-central California, brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

358

Making biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel | Center...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel 4 Nov 2012 Souvik Roy, graduate student (Subtask 3, laboratory of Anne Jones). "I am involved mostly in mimicking Fe-hydrogenases,...

359

18.112 Functions of a Complex Variable, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The basic properties of functions of one complex variable. Cauchy's theorem, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, residues, contour integrals, conformal mapping. Infinite series and products, the gamma function, the ...

Helgason, Sigurdur, 1927-

360

18.112 Functions of a Complex Variable, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The basic properties of functions of one complex variable. Cauchy's theorem, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, residues, contour integrals, conformal mapping. Infinite series and products, the gamma function, the ...

Helgason, Sigurdur, 1927-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diversifying. In addition to fossil fuel- based power, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and geothermal technologies as well. Each of these technologies has complex...

362

activated prothrombin complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences Websites Summary: A COMPLEX DATA METHOD TO COMPUTE FMRI ACTIVATION Daniel B. Rowe Department of Biophysics Medical. Nearly all fMRI studies derive functional...

363

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Bonneville Power Administration is partnering with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Yakama Nation's YakimaKlickitat Fisheries Project to purchase a...

364

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Klickitat County, Wash. www.bpa.govgoJuniperCanyon Leaning Juniper II-Jones Canyon Substation Expansion Wind Interconnection Project Gilliam County, Ore....

365

A framework for quantifying complexity and understanding its sources : application to tow large-scale systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motivation for this work is to quantify the complexity of complex systems and to understand its sources. To study complexity, we develop a theoretical framework where the complex system of interest is embedded in a ...

Martin, Pierre-Alain J. Y

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Deactivation of the EBR-II complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Low-complexity Video Encoding for UAV Reconnaissance and Surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-complexity Video Encoding for UAV Reconnaissance and Surveillance Malavika Bhaskaranand-complexity decoder. However, applications such as unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance and surveillance in the video sequences is due to the movement of the UAV and the camera mounts which is known. Motivated

Liebling, Michael

368

RANDOMNESS IN PROOF COMPLEXITY Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RANDOMNESS IN PROOF COMPLEXITY by Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim A thesis submitted in conformity of Toronto Copyright c 2005 by Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim #12;Abstract Randomness in Proof Complexity Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Computer Science University of Toronto 2005

Penn, Gerald

369

Diagnosis and prognosis for the maintenance of complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--Diagnosis, prognosis, preventive maintenance, complex systems. I. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, system maintenance is a key to decrease the maintenance cost, it is necessary to perform preventive maintenance [3], [4], [5] which alsoDiagnosis and prognosis for the maintenance of complex systems Pauline Ribot1,2 , Yannick Pencol´e1

Pencolé, Yannick

370

Technology Infusion for Complex Systems: A Framework and Case Study*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Infusion for Complex Systems: A Framework and Case Study* Eun Suk Suh,1, Michael R Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139TECHNOLOGY INFUSION FOR COMPLEX SYSTEMS: CASE STUDY Received 1 July 2008 in today's competitive environment constantly need to develop new technolo- gies and infuse them

de Weck, Olivier L.

371

Bayesian Networks and Evidence Theory to Model Complex Systems Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian Networks and Evidence Theory to Model Complex Systems Reliability Ch. SIMON, Ph. WEBER, E.levrat}@cran.uhp-nancy.fr Abstract-- This paper deals with the use of Bayesian Net- works to compute system reliability of complex systems un- der epistemic uncertainty. In the context of incompleteness of reliability data

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

Complex Embedded Automotive Control Systems DaimlerChrysler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Embedded Automotive Control Systems CEMACS DaimlerChrysler SINTEF Glasgow University Description The high level of complexity in automotive systems requires a new approach to design. Moreover, to achieve higher performance and increased safety a coordination of different automotive control systems

Duffy, Ken

373

The Structure of Complex Networks Sune Lehmann Jrgensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Structure of Complex Networks Sune Lehmann Jørgensen Kgs. Lyngby February 2007 IMM-PHD-2007-176 #12;ii The Structure of Complex Networks Version: June 19, 2007 22:27 Sune Lehmann Jørgensen 2007 #12, 2007 22:27 Sune Lehmann Jørgensen 2007 #12;List of Figures 1.1 A network of 300 nodes

374

An Innovative Framework Supporting SME Networks for Complex Product Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Innovative Framework Supporting SME Networks for Complex Product Manufacturing Luis Maia.kankaanpaa@uwasa.fi, ahsh@uwasa.fi Abstract. Current market dynamics require European SME's to focus on complex products collaboration processes and supporting ICT tools. This paper presents a framework to support SME

Boyer, Edmond

375

On the Complexity of Umbra and Penumbra O. Devillers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Complexity of Umbra and Penumbra J. Demouth O. Devillers H. Everett M. Glisse ¶ S of non-point light sources. A point is in the umbra if it does not see any part of any light source of the umbra. In this paper we prove various bounds on the complexity of the umbra and the penumbra cast

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

Complexity, Capacity, and Capture Nolan McCarty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

financial markets and products are so complex that outgunned agencies lack the capacity to detect systemicComplexity, Capacity, and Capture Nolan McCarty July 13, 2011 Susan Dod Brown Professor: nmccarty@princeton.edu #12;1 Introduction In the debates on financial market reform that followed

377

CONDENSING COMPUTABLE SCENES USING VISUAL COMPLEXITY AND FILM SYNTAX ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSING COMPUTABLE SCENES USING VISUAL COMPLEXITY AND FILM SYNTAX ANALYSIS Hari Sundaram Shih, sfchang}@ctr.columbia.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we present a novel algorithm to condense computable, lighting and sound. We attempt to condense such scenes in two ways. First, we define visual complexity

Chang, Shih-Fu

378

Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments Augusto Celentano and Fabio for in- teractive services in complex physical environments using a knowl- edge based approach to define the relations between the environ- ment and the services, and a visual interface to check the associated

Celentano, Augusto

379

Rigorous Synthesis and Simulation of Complex Distillation Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy-efficient distillation net- works. Complex column networks have substantial potential for energy- thesizing such complex energy-efficient networks. A robust feasibility criterion drives the selection foundations of se st in exploring energy-efficient distillatin exploring energy-efficient distillat ave

Linninger, Andreas A.

380

Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Cancels DOE O 5600.1.

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms Lukasz Wawrzyniak between two regions in terms of the thirteen Allen relations. An index to measure the complexity Work in the modeling of topological relationships often relies on an extension into the spatial domain

Matsakis, Pascal

382

Interactive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Categories and Subject Descriptors: I.3.5 [Com- puter Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object ModelingInteractive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches Naga K. Govindaraju culling in complex 3D environments. An occlusion- switch consists of two GPUs (graphics processing units

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

383

Within architectural design a large variety of complex shaped  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture with complex geometry brings along new challenges for manufacturers of building componentsWithin architectural design a large variety of complex shaped buildings can be found. Free form nowadays allows for modelling of almost any possible shape. With these tools designers can structures

Langendoen, Koen

384

Large-eddy simulation of multiphase flows in complex combustors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-eddy simulation of multiphase flows in complex combustors S. V. Apte1 , K. Mahesh2 , F. Ham1 to accurately predict reacting multi-phase flows in practical combustors involving complex physical phenomena-turbine combustor geometries to evaluate the predictions made for multiphase, turbulent flow. 1 Introduction

Mahesh, Krishnan

385

Rendering Optical Effects Based on Spectra Representation in Complex Scenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rendering Optical Effects Based on Spectra Representation in Complex Scenes Weiming Dong Project ALICE, INRIA Lorraine/Loria, France Weiming.Dong@loria.fr Abstract. Rendering the structural color sensitive phenomena. Achieving the rendering of complex scenes with both the full spectra and RGB light

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development Andrei Kirilyuk be used as a basis for the latter, in the form of "complexity revolution" in information systems-driven IT to various aspects of post-industrial civilisation dynamics, including intelligent communication, context

Boyer, Edmond

387

The Standard Parts Problem and the Complexity of Control Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Standard Parts Problem and the Complexity of Control Communication J. Baillieul & W.S. Wong Abstract The objective of the standard parts optimal control problem is to find a number, m, of control on control communication complexity. In what follows a general formulation of the standard parts optimization

Baillieul, John

388

Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Lost in the Bermuda Triangle: Energy, Complexity, and Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Exotic cooling techniques · e.g. spray-evaporative cooling · Packaging cost and cooling requirements · Verification · Risk · Static vs. Dynamic logic · Verification time · Cooling requirements · Competitiveness... to reduce complexity? #12;Design Complexity Aggressive implementation techniques (speculation, O-o-O, etc

Albonesi, David H.

390

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

Kerekes, John

391

On the Complexity of Finding Second-Best Abductive Explanations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While looking for abductive explanations of a given set of manifestations, an ordering between possible solutions is often assumed. The complexity of finding/verifying optimal solutions is already known. In this paper we consider the computational complexity of finding second-best solutions. We consider different orderings, and consider also different possible definitions of what a second-best solution is.

Liberatore, Paolo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Wagner, Richard W. (Murrysville, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins are disclosed having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Wagner, R.W.

1996-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

Blink, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Halsey, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A QUALITATIVE METHOD TO ESTIMATE HSI DISPLAY COMPLEXITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is mounting evidence that complex computer system displays in control rooms contribute to cognitive complexity and, thus, to the probability of human error. Research shows that reaction time increases and response accuracy decreases as the number of elements in the display screen increase. However, in terms of supporting the control room operator, approaches focusing on addressing display complexity solely in terms of information density and its location and patterning, will fall short of delivering a properly designed interface. This paper argues that information complexity and semantic complexity are mandatory components when considering display complexity and that the addition of these concepts assists in understanding and resolving differences between designers and the preferences and performance of operators. This paper concludes that a number of simplified methods, when combined, can be used to estimate the impact that a particular display may have on the operator's ability to perform a function accurately and effectively. We present a mixed qualitative and quantitative approach and a method for complexity estimation.

Jacques Hugo; David Gertman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Calorimetric studies of curium complexation. 2. Amino carboxylates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calorimetric titrations using the long-lived isotope of curium (curium-248) have been conducted with nitrilotriacetate, trans-1,2-cyclohexanedinitrilotetraacetate, and trimethylenedinitrilotetraacetate. The data plus the stability constants measured previously allowed calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of the 1:1 complexation. Similar titrations were conducted with europium to provide comparison of the lanthanide and actinide trivalent ion behaviors. The enthalpy values for the amino polycarboxylate complexing of Cm(III) are greater than those for Eu(III). However, the entropy values for the complexing of both cations are similar. These results are comparable to the previously reported data for EDTA. 13 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Choppin, G.R.; Rizkalla, E.N.; Sullivan, J.C.

1987-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Complexity measures applied to an applications case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintenance of large applications programs has become the most costly function of many Management Information Systems. As a result, recent research has attempted to objectively determine the qualities of low maintenance software. Related research has been directed toward quantifying the complexity, or unmaintainability of existing software. This paper will reference a case study of a large MIS software application and will discuss current maintenance problems and associated costs. A mathematical model will then be presented which correlates quantifiable complexity measures with actual maintenance costs. Finally, a method for projecting cost savings from the reduced complexity of software will be suggested.

Brice, L.; Connell, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Quantum communication complexity advantage implies violation of a Bell inequality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain a general connection between a quantum advantage in communication complexity and non-locality. We show that given any protocol offering a (sufficiently large) quantum advantage in communication complexity, there exists a way of obtaining measurement statistics which violate some Bell inequality. Our main tool is port-based teleportation. If the gap between quantum and classical communication complexity can grow arbitrarily large, the ratio of the quantum value to the classical value of the Bell quantity becomes unbounded with the increase in the number of inputs and outputs.

Harry Buhrman; Lukasz Czekaj; Andrzej Grudka; Michal Horodecki; Pawel Horodecki; Marcin Markiewicz; Florian Speelman; Sergii Strelchuk

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions and Hall-Littlewoo* *d functions associated to W are introduced, and Green functions are described

Shoj, Toshiaki

402

accrued complex gamma: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sie, da? g p n Gamma Grassl, Markus 8 A Complexity-Brightness Correlation in Gamma Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We observe strong correlations between the...

403

Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

Wilson, Justin Jeff

404

Machine perception and learning of complex social systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of complex social systems has traditionally been an arduous process, involving extensive surveys, interviews, ethnographic studies, or analysis of online behavior. Today, however, it is possible to use the ...

Eagle, Nathan Norfleet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tuning the photophysical properties of amidophosphine complexes of copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of monomeric copper complexes that allow for the tuning of the emission properties is reported. Luminescence lifetimes up to 150 [mu]s are observed in benzene solution at ambient temperature, which are comparable ...

Mickenberg, Seth F. (Seth Fox)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Photochemical reductive elimination of halogen from transition metal complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is focused on the synthesis and study of transition metal complexes that undergo halogen elimination when irradiated with UV and visible light. This chemistry is relevant for solar energy storage schemes in ...

Cook, Timothy R. (Timothy Raymond), 1982-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."Identification of...

408

Method and system for producing complex-shape objects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system are provided for producing complex, three-dimensional, net shape objects from a variety of powdered materials. The system includes unique components to ensure a uniform and continuous flow of powdered materials as well as to focus and locate the flow of powdered materials with respect to a laser beam which results in the melting of the powdered material. The system also includes a controller so that the flow of molten powdered materials can map out and form complex, three-dimensional, net-shape objects by layering the molten powdered material. Advantageously, such complex, three-dimensional net-shape objects can be produced having material densities varying from 90% of theoretical to fully dense, as well as a variety of controlled physical properties. Additionally, such complex, three-dimensional objects can be produced from two or more different materials so that the composition of the object can be transitioned from one material to another.

Jeantette, Francisco P. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Joseph A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schanwald, Lee P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

Von Dreele, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrating Bioprocesses into Industrial Complexes for Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Bioprocesses into Industrial Complexes for Sustainable Development Debalina Sengupta1 77710 #12;Introduc)on · Sustainable Development · Overview · Biomass conversion designs "Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without

Pike, Ralph W.

411

Automatic testing of software with structurally complex inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern software pervasively uses structurally complex data such as linked data structures. The standard approach to generating test suites for such software, manual generation of the inputs in the suite, is tedious and ...

Marinov, Darko, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

Kumar, Hans

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Modelling the transition to complex, culturally transmitted communication   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human language is undoubtedly one of the most complex and powerful communication systems to have evolved on Earth. Study of the evolution of this behaviour is made difficult by the lack of comparable communication systems ...

Ritchie, Graham R S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Quantum interference within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. As shown in a previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 250401], complex quantum trajectories display helical wrapping around stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near vortical tubes, these structures being prominent features of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. Here, we further analyze the divergence and vorticity of the quantum momentum function along streamlines near poles, showing the intricacy of the complex dynamics. Nevertheless, despite this behavior, we show that the appearance of the well-known interference features (on the real axis) can be easily understood in terms of the rotation of the nodal line in the complex plane. This offers a unified description of interference as well as an elegant and practical method to compute the lifetime for interference features, defined in terms of the average wrapping time, i.e., considering such features as a resonant process.

Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: chiachun@mail.utexas.ed [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Sanz, Angel S., E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Miret-Artes, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wyatt, Robert E., E-mail: wyattre@mail.utexas.ed [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mathematics of complexity in experimental high energy physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical ideas and approaches common in complexity-related fields have been fruitfully applied in experimental high energy physics also. We briefly review some of the cross-pollination that is occurring.

H. C. Eggers

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analysing complexity of XML Schemas in geospatial web services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XML Schema is the language used to define the structure of messages exchanged between OGC-based web service clients and providers. The size of these schemas has been growing with time, reaching a state that makes its understanding and effective application a hard task. A first step to cope with this situation is to provide different ways to measure the complexity of the schemas. In this regard, we present in this paper an analysis of the complexity of XML schemas in OGC web services. We use a group of metrics found in the literature and introduce new metrics to measure size and/or complexity of these schemas. The use of adequate metrics allows us to quantify the complexity, quality and other properties of the schemas, which can be very useful in different scenarios.

Tamayo, Alain; Huerta, Joaquín

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

418

An integrated strategic sourcing process for complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerospace firms continue to outsource increasingly complex components and systems for access to talent, lower costs, and global presence. In addition to strong competition from Airbus and other emergent companies, Boeing ...

Hsu, David T. (David Ta-wei)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cyclodextrin Cuprate Sandwich-Type Complexes Abdulaziz A. Bagabas,*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porosity of these new complexes. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption studies show that the extended structure, obtained upon crystallization of the Rb+ -based sandwich-type dimers, has the highest CO2 sequestration

420

Efficient Complex Query Support for Multiversion XML Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management system supporting multiple versions of the same document, while avoiding duplicate storage taken by database systems and document management systems have often been different, because complex queries, while document management systems are not, and ­ Databases assume that the order

Zhang, Donghui

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Computational design of a theater complex for Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of a theater complex for Boston is used as a test case for the more integrated use of computers in the design process. In architecture digital media remain mostly tools for efficiency and productivity rather ...

Braude, Talia, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Probabilistic Learning Theory, with Emphasis on Sample Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of computational complexity. This part of the paper is an adaptation of parts of the book (Anthony and Biggs (1992)) by Norman Biggs and the present author; we refer the interested reader there for a more wide

Bielefeld, University of

424

Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

Omary, Mohammad A

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

425

On the Complexity of Matsui's Attack Pascal Junod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Complexity of Matsui's Attack Pascal Junod Security and Cryptography Laboratory Swiss at random and where depends on the key value. Given some plaintext bits Pi1 , . . . , Pir , ciphertext bits

426

EA-1250: Proposed Strategic Computing Complex, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Strategic Computing Complex within the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical...

427

Aligning stakeholder interests : from complex systems to emerging markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design often requires balancing competing objectives from a variety of stakeholders. From the design of large-scale complex engineering systems to the design of end-user products for emerging markets, managing the trade-offs ...

Austin-Breneman, Jesse

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Twisted Tales: Causal Complexity and Cognitive Scientific Explanation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work in biology and cognitive science depicts a variety of target phenomena as the products of a tangled web of causal influences. Such influences may include both internal and external factors, as well as complex ...

Clark, Andy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

ammonia borane complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

w x5-7 . Borane-triethylamine complex Boo, Jin-Hyo 43 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

430

Determining Factors Influencing Nuclear Envelope and Nuclear Pore Complex Structure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Secondly, we found the proteasome, a complex responsible for degrading proteins is involved in NPC assembly. In order to further investigate interactions between the NPC and the proteasome, I combined the proteasomal mutant with 3 classes of nuclear pore...

Gouni, Sushanth

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

Acoustic modes in combustors with complex impedances and multidimensional active  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acoustic modes in combustors with complex impedances and multidimensional active flames F. Nicoud-acoustic modes in combustors. In the case of a non-isothermal reacting medium, the wave equation for the pressure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

432

Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

Oprsal, Ivo

433

Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Radio interferometric gain calibration as a complex optimization problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent developments in optimization theory have extended some traditional algorithms for least-squares optimization of real-valued functions (Gauss-Newton, Levenberg-Marquardt, etc.) into the domain of complex functions of a complex variable. This employs a formalism called the Wirtinger derivative, and derives a full-complex Jacobian counterpart to the conventional real Jacobian. We apply these developments to the problem of radio interferometric gain calibration, and show how the general complex Jacobian formalism, when combined with conventional optimization approaches, yields a whole new family of calibration algorithms, including those for the polarized and direction-dependent gain regime. We further extend the Wirtinger calculus to an operator-based matrix calculus for describing the polarized calibration regime. Using approximate matrix inversion results in computationally efficient implementations; we show that some recently proposed calibration algorithms such as StefCal and peeling can be understood...

Smirnov, Oleg

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Complexity and Valued Landscapes1 Michael M. McCarthy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Identification of different study areas representing a variety of eco- systems and levels of complexity. 2. Data/visual interest of sites within the study areas. 5. Correlation and analysis of relation- ships. METHOD Study

Standiford, Richard B.

436

Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla) Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 Gregory S. Smith Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 Jaroslaw Majewski Manuel

Kuhl, Tonya L.

437

From average case complexity to improper learning [Extended Abstract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is that the standard reduc- tions from NP-hard problems do not seem to apply in this context. There is essentially only.1145/2591796.2591820. Keywords Hardness of improper learning, DNFs, Halfspaces, Average Case complexity, CSP problems, Resolution

Linial, Nathan "Nati"

438

Enforcement Documents - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Violation, BWXT Y-12 - EA-2003-03 Issued to BWXT Y-12, related to Welding Inspection Deficiencies at the Y-12 National Security Complex, June 4, 2003...

439

Accurate complex scaling of three dimensional numerical potentials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex scaling method, which consists in continuing spatial coordinates into the complex plane, is a well-established method that allows to compute resonant eigenfunctions of the time-independent Schroedinger operator. Whenever it is desirable to apply the complex scaling to investigate resonances in physical systems defined on numerical discrete grids, the most direct approach relies on the application of a similarity transformation to the original, unscaled Hamiltonian. We show that such an approach can be conveniently implemented in the Daubechies wavelet basis set, featuring a very promising level of generality, high accuracy, and no need for artificial convergence parameters. Complex scaling of three dimensional numerical potentials can be efficiently and accurately performed. By carrying out an illustrative resonant state computation in the case of a one-dimensional model potential, we then show that our wavelet-based approach may disclose new exciting opportunities in the field of computational non-Hermitian quantum mechanics.

Cerioni, Alessandro [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Horowitz, BP220 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Genovese, Luigi; Duchemin, Ivan; Deutsch, Thierry [Laboratoire de simulation atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble F-38054 (France)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated ...

Zhao, Wei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The linear and nonlinear rheology of multiscale complex fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The microstructures of many complex fluids are typically characterized by a broad distribution of internal length scales. Examples of such multiscale materials include physically and chemically cross-linked gels, emulsions, ...

Jaishankar, Aditya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Dissection of the telomere complex CST in Arabidopsis thaliana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Arabidopsis CST is required for telomere length maintenance, for preventing telomere recombination and chromosome end-to-end fusions. Mutations in the CST complex result in severe genomic instability and stem cells defects. My research also shows that CST...

Leehy, Katherine

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Imitation of complex grammatical constructions by elderly adults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elderly adults (70 to 89 years) and young adults (30 to 49 years) were asked to imitate complex sentences involving embedded gerunds, w/z-clauses, r/ia/-clauses, and relative clauses. The young adults were able to imitate ...

Kemper, Susan

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Complexity cost analysis in a large product line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hewlett-Packard's Industry Standard Servers (ISS) organization offers a large variety of server computers and accessories. The large range of options available to its customers gives way to complex processes and less than ...

Landivar Chávez, José Luis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Kolmogorov Complexity, String Information, Panspermia and the Fermi Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bit strings rather than byte files can be a mode of transmission both for intelligent signals and for travels of extraterrestrial life. Kolmogorov complexity, i.e. the minimal length of a binary coded string completely defining a system, can then, due to its universality, become a key concept in the strategy of the search of extraterrestrials. Evaluating, for illustration, the Kolmogorov complexity of the human genome, one comes to an unexpected conclusion that a low complexity compressed string - analog of Noah's ark - will enable the recovery of the totality of terrestrial life. The recognition of bit strings of various complexity up to incompressible Martin-L\\"{o}f random sequences, will require a different strategy for the analysis of the cosmic signals. The Fermi paradox "Where is Everybody?" can be viewed under in the light of such information panspermia, i.e. a Universe full of traveling life streams.

V. G. Gurzadyan

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

acid nta complexes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 The distribution of boron and boric acid complexes in the sea Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: LIBRARY A a m...

447

Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Origin of complex quantum amplitudes and Feynman's rules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex numbers are an intrinsic part of the mathematical formalism of quantum theory and are perhaps its most characteristic feature. In this article, we show that the complex nature of the quantum formalism can be derived directly from the assumption that a pair of real numbers is associated with each sequence of measurement outcomes, with the probability of this sequence being a real-valued function of this number pair. By making use of elementary symmetry conditions, and without assuming that these real number pairs have any other algebraic structure, we show that these pairs must be manipulated according to the rules of complex arithmetic. We demonstrate that these complex numbers combine according to Feynman's sum and product rules, with the modulus-squared yielding the probability of a sequence of outcomes.

Goyal, Philip; Knuth, Kevin H.; Skilling, John [Perimeter Institute, Waterloo (Canada); University at Albany (SUNY), New York (United States); Maximum Entropy Data Consultants Ltd., Kenmare (Ireland)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Relationship between classifier performance and distributional complexity for small samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a limited number of samples for classification, several issues arise with respect to design, performance and analysis of classifiers. This is especially so in the case of microarray-based classification. In this paper, we use a complexity...

Attoor, Sanju Nair

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Generation of Gradients Having Complex Shapes Using Microfluidic Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of Gradients Having Complex Shapes Using Microfluidic Networks Stephan K. W. Dertinger, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 This paper describes the generation each carrying different concentrations of substances laminarly and side-by-side generated step

Prentiss, Mara

451

Complex muscle architecture described with diffusion weighted MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex array of fiber orientations exhibited by muscles such as the tongue, esophagus, and heart, enable function beyond basic pulling. Among other things, the presence of crossing geometry adds the ability to push ...

Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Our world is made up of complex systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system. _ #12;A river is a system. gloBal water wIthdrawal has Increased sIxfold sInce the 1900s, twTHINK #12; _ Our world is made up of complex systems. _ #12;#12;#12;#12;To extract their full. As with any complex system, you need to analyze how work flows, how people interact and how processes can

453

A methodological approach to the complexity measurement of software designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulffilment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Computer Science A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: Willi m M. L' (Co-Chair of C ittee...

Williams, Clay Edwin

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

2006 Nature Publishing Group A phosphatase complex that dephosphorylates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, dephosphorylation. Here we describe a three-protein complex (HTP-C, for histone H2A phosphatase complex) containingH2AX in vitro. gH2AX is lost from chromatin surrounding a DSB independently of the HTP-C, indicating that the phosphatase targets gH2AX after its displacement from DNA. The dephosphorylation of gH2AX by the HTP

456

Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Quantum entanglement phenomena in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent theoretical calculations of quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. These works establish, for the first time, a manifestation of this characteristically quantum mechanical phenomenon in biologically functional structures. We begin by summarizing calculations on model biomolecular systems that aim to reveal non-trivial characteristics of quantum entanglement in non-equilibrium biological environments. We then discuss and compare several calculations performed recently of excitonic dynamics in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson light harvesting complex and of the entanglement present in this widely studied pigment-protein structure. We point out the commonalities between the derived results and also identify and explain the differences. We also discuss recent work that examines entanglement in the structurally more intricate light harvesting complex II (LHCII). During this overview, we take the opportunity to clarify several subtle issues relating to entanglement in such biomolecular systems, including the role of entanglement in biological function, the complexity of dynamical modeling that is required to capture the salient features of entanglement in such biomolecular systems, and the relationship between entanglement and other quantum mechanical features that are observed and predicted in light harvesting complexes. Finally, we suggest possible extensions of the current work and also review the options for experimental confirmation of the predicted entanglement phenomena in light harvesting complexes.

K. Birgitta Whaley; Mohan Sarovar; Akihito Ishizaki

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Air Traffic Complexity Resolution in Multi-Sector Planning Using CP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Traffic Complexity Resolution in Multi-Sector Planning Using CP Pierre Flener1 Justin Pearson1 Programming for ATC & ATM, Brétigny (France), 2 December 2008 #12;Objective Air Traffic Complexity Complexity Resolution A CP Model Experiments Conclusion Outline 1 Objective 2 Air Traffic Complexity 3 Complexity

Flener, Pierre

462

Symmetrized complex amplitudes for He double photoionization from the time-dependent close coupling and exterior complex scaling methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Symmetrized complex amplitudes for the double photoionization of helium are computed by the time-dependent close-coupling and exterior complex scaling methods, and it is demonstrated that both methods are capable of the direct calculation of these amplitudes. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with each other and in very good agreement with results of other ab initio methods and experiment.

Horner, D.A.; Colgan, J.; Martin, F.; McCurdy, C.W.; Pindzola, M.S.; Rescigno, T.N.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp synthase complex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complex Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp synthase complex Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The F0F1-ATP Synthase Complex Contains...

465

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei M. Finkelstein 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei early papers, D. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical attempt to analyze the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics

Ward, Karen

466

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei M. Finkelstein 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei early papers, D. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of di#erent physical attempt to analyze the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics

Kreinovich, Vladik

467

Complex harmonic wave scattering asthe framework for investigation of bounded beam reflection and transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex harmonic wave scattering asthe framework for investigation of bounded beam reflection their pro- files.We will verifythesestatementswith a largenumberof illustrations. I. COMPLEX HARMONIC WAVE REFLECTION AND TRANSMISSION A. Representation of a complex harmonic wave in a viscoelastic medium

468

EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

469

Combustion-related studies using weakly-bonded complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binary van der Waals complexes involving species of interest to combustion research are prepared in supersonic free-jet expansions, and their photochemical and photophysical properties are probed by using IR tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy. In the first phase, geometries and other molecular properties are being determined from vibration-rotational spectra. In the second phase, these complexes will be used as precursors to study photoinitiated reactions in precursor geometry limited environments. Two complementary classes of binary complexes are being investigated. The first involves molecular oxygen and hydrogen containing constituents (e.g. O{sub 2}-HCN, O{sub 2}-HF, O{sub 2}-HCl, O{sub 2}-HBr, O{sub 2}-HI and O{sub 2}-hydrocarbons). These species are interesting candidates for study since upon photodissociating the hydride portion, the reaction H and O{sub 2} via the vibrationally excited HO{sub 2} intermediate can conceivably be studied, (e.g. BrH-O{sub 2} + hv(193 nm) {yields} Br-H-O{sub 2} {yields} Br + HO{sub 2} {yields} Br + OH + O). High resolution IR spectroscopy of such complexes have not been obtained previously and the structural information deriving from IR spectra is certainly very useful for better designing and understanding photoinitiated reactions that occur in these complexes.

Beaudet, R.A. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Complex saddle points in QCD at finite temperature and density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sign problem in QCD at finite temperature and density leads naturally to the consideration of complex saddle points of the action or effective action. The global symmetry $\\mathcal{CK}$ of the finite-density action, where $\\mathcal{C}$ is charge conjugation and $\\mathcal{K}$ is complex conjugation, constrains the eigenvalues of the Polyakov loop operator $P$ at a saddle point in such a way that the action is real at a saddle point, and net color charge is zero. The values of $Tr_{F}P$ and $Tr_{F}P^{\\dagger}$ at the saddle point, are real but not identical, indicating the different free energy cost associated with inserting a heavy quark versus an antiquark into the system. At such complex saddle points, the mass matrix associated with Polyakov loops may have complex eigenvalues, reflecting oscillatory behavior in color-charge densities. We illustrate these properties with a simple model which includes the one-loop contribution of gluons and massless quarks moving in a constant Polyakov loop background. Confinement-deconfinement effects are modeled phenomenologically via an added potential term depending on the Polyakov loop eigenvalues. For sufficiently large $T$ and $\\mu$, the results obtained reduce to those of perturbation theory at the complex saddle point. These results may be experimentally relevant for the CBM experiment at FAIR.

Hiromichi Nishimura; Michael C. Ogilvie; Kamal Pangeni

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project we studied both natural photosynthetic antenna complexes and various artificial systems (e.g. chlorophyll (Chl) trefoils) using high resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy and excitonic calculations. Results obtained provided more insight into the electronic (excitonic) structure, inhomogeneity, electron-phonon coupling strength, vibrational frequencies, and excitation energy (or electron) transfer (EET) processes in several antennas and reaction centers. For example, our recent work provided important constraints and parameters for more advanced excitonic calculations of CP43, CP47, and PSII core complexes. Improved theoretical description of HB spectra for various model systems offers new insight into the excitonic structure and composition of low-energy absorption traps in very several antenna protein complexes and reaction centers. We anticipate that better understanding of HB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (i.e. absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) provides more insight into the underlying electronic structures of these important biological systems. Our recent progress provides a necessary framework for probing the electronic structure of these systems via Hole Burning Spectroscopy. For example, we have shown that the theoretical description of non-resonant holes is more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra. We have demonstrated that simultaneous description of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provides more realistic site energies. We have also developed new algorithms to describe both nonresonant and resonant hole-burn spectra using more advanced Redfield theory. Simultaneous description of various optical spectra for complex biological system, e.g. artificial antenna systems, FMO protein complexes, water soluble protein complexes, and various mutants of reaction centers continues; this work is supported by the new DOE BES grant.

Ryszard Jankowiak, Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, CBC Bldg., Manhattan KS, 66505; Phone: (785) 532-6785

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

472

anticancer goldiii-porphyrin complexes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

473

aminophosphine-based pincer complexes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - austurhorn intrusive complex Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Considering Attack Complexity: Layered Intrusion Tolerance C. Taylor, A.W. Krings, W.S. Harrison, N... , hierarchical approach to intrusion tolerance based on the complexity...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - avium complex lung Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

avium complex in biofilms. Elimination of competitive heterotrophic bacteria on copper pipe... the occurrence of M. avium complex in drinking water biofilms. r 2003 Elsevier Ltd....

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - au complexe entre Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complexe entre Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: au complexe entre Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Contributions runies par Gabriel...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity complex-formation reactions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 27 Definitions CaX(s) + 90 Summary: in crystalline form. Complexation (Complex Formation) - any...

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator research complex Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complex Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accelerator research complex Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 KJKDec. 52002 Opportunities for...

479

analysis cuii8-hydroxyquinoline complex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

series and local fractional Laurent's series of complex functions in complex fractal space, and generalized residue theorems are investigated. Xiao-Jun Yang 2011-06-15 18...

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide halide complexes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It has been observed that complexes of lanthanide, actinide, and transition metal activate... that these actinide alkyl complexes undergo interesting C-H and C-N bond...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "klickitat hatchery complex" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide complexation kinetics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It has been observed that complexes of lanthanide, actinide, and transition metal activate... that these actinide alkyl complexes undergo interesting C-H and C-N bond...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - activator complex polymorphisms Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

complexity of CSPs is now a very active... with (cur- rently) unknown complexity of its CSP. The above ... Source: Stanovsky, David - School of Mathematics, Charles University in...

483

Portsmouth RI/FS Report for the Process Buildings and Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

RIFS Report for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project Portsmouth RIFS Report for the Process Buildings and Complex...

484

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hatchery Operating Under Hatchery Reform Principles From Day 1. Representatives from the Colville was built with hatchery reform as a central tenet, as a way to address conservation and harvest for both the following abstract. Chief Joseph Hatchery: A New Hatchery Operating Under Hatchery Reform Principles From

485

Complexation of lanthanides and actinides by acetohydroxamic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a suitable reagent for the complexant-based, as opposed to reductive, stripping of plutonium and neptunium ions from the tributylphosphate solvent phase in advanced PUREX or UREX processes designed for future nuclear-fuel reprocessing. Stripping is achieved by the formation of strong hydrophilic complexes with the tetravalent actinides in nitric acid solutions. To underpin such applications, knowledge of the complexation constants of AHA with all relevant actinide (5f) and lanthanide (4f) ions is therefore important. This paper reports the determination of stability constants of AHA with the heavier lanthanide ions (Dy-Yb) and also U(IV) and Th(IV) ions. Comparisons with our previously published AHA stability-constant data for 4f and 5f ions are made. (authors)

Taylor, R.J. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Sinkov, S.I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

Id Betan, R. [Rosario Physics Institute, Rosario, Argentina] [Rosario Physics Institute, Rosario, Argentina; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Quantum Clocks and the Origin of Time in Complex Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin and nature of time in complex systems is explored using quantum (or 'Feynman') clocks and the signals produced by them. Networks of these clocks provide the basis for the evolution of complex systems. The general concept of 'time' is translated into the 'lifetimes' of these unstable configurations of matter. 'Temporal phase transitions' mark the emergence of classical properties such as irreversibility, entropy, and thermodynamic arrows of time. It is proposed that the creation of the universe can be modeled as a quantum clock. Keywords: the problem of time, the arrow of time, time asymmetry, the many-body problem, cellular networks, complexity, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, quantum cosmology, and instantons.

Scott Hitchcock

1999-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

488

Complex geometric optics for symmetric hyperbolic systems I: linear theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain an asymptotic solution for $\\ep \\to 0$ of the Cauchy problem for linear first-order symmetric hyperbolic systems with oscillatory initial values written in the eikonal form of geometric optics with frequency $1/\\ep$, but with complex phases. For the most common linear wave propagation models, this kind on Cauchy problems are well-known in the applied literature and their asymptotic theory, referred to as complex geometric optics, is attracting interest for applications. In this work, which is the first of a series of papers dedicated to complex geometric optics for nonlinear symmetric hyperbolic systems, we develop a rigorous linear theory and set the basis for the subsequent nonlinear analysis.

Omar Maj

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

489

Decision support systems and methods for complex networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for automated decision support in analyzing operation data from a complex network. Embodiments of the present invention utilize these algorithms and techniques not only to characterize the past and present condition of a complex network, but also to predict future conditions to help operators anticipate deteriorating and/or problem situations. In particular, embodiments of the present invention characterize network conditions from operation data using a state estimator. Contingency scenarios can then be generated based on those network conditions. For at least a portion of all of the contingency scenarios, risk indices are determined that describe the potential impact of each of those scenarios. Contingency scenarios with risk indices are presented visually as graphical representations in the context of a visual representation of the complex network. Analysis of the historical risk indices based on the graphical representations can then provide trends that allow for prediction of future network conditions.

Huang, Zhenyu (Richland, WA); Wong, Pak Chung (Richland, WA); Ma, Jian (Richland, WA); Mackey, Patrick S (Richland, WA); Chen, Yousu (Richland, WA); Schneider, Kevin P (Seattle, WA)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

490

Complexation effects in the electrodeposition of nickel-iron alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nickel-iron alloy electrodeposition system exhibits a phenomenon known as anomalous codeposition, where the less noble metal (Fe) deposits preferentially to the more noble metal (Ni). One explanation for this behavior is that ferrous hydroxide adsorbs to the surface of the electrode and inhibits the electrodeposition of the nickel. This mechanism is being tested through the use of {open_quotes}selective{close_quotes} complexing agents for Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The complexation behavior of these ions with acetate, chloroacetate,and aminoacetate ions is being characterized by potentiometric titration and polarographic measurements. The effect of these complexants on the electrodeposition of the alloys is also being studied.

Huynh, T.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Complexation effects in the electrodeposition of nickel-zinc alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nickel-zinc alloy electrodeposition system exhibits a phenomenon known as anomalous codeposition, where the less noble metal (Zn) deposits preferentially to the more noble metal (Ni). One explanation for this behavior is that zinc hydroxide adsorbs to the surface of the electrode and inhibits the electrodeposition of the nickel. This mechanism is being tested through the use of {open_quotes}selective{close_quotes} complexing agents for Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. The complexation behavior of these ions with citrate, aspartate and pyrophosphate ions is being characterized by potentiometric titration and polarographic measurements. The effect of these complexants on the electrodeposition of the alloys is also being studied.

Melville, A.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Low Complexity Turbo-Equalization: A Clustering Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a low complexity approach to iterative equalization and decoding, or "turbo equalization", that uses clustered models to better match the nonlinear relationship that exists between likelihood information from a channel decoder and the symbol estimates that arise in soft-input channel equalization. The introduced clustered turbo equalizer uses piecewise linear models to capture the nonlinear dependency of the linear minimum mean square error (MMSE) symbol estimate on the symbol likelihoods produced by the channel decoder and maintains a computational complexity that is only linear in the channel memory. By partitioning the space of likelihood information from the decoder, based on either hard or soft clustering, and using locally-linear adaptive equalizers within each clustered region, the performance gap between the linear MMSE equalizer and low-complexity, LMS-based linear turbo equalizers can be dramatically narrowed.

Kim, Kyeongyeon; Kozat, Suleyman S; Singer, Andrew C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Complexity Classifications for Propositional Abduction in Post's Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate the complexity of abduction, a fundamental and important form of non-monotonic reasoning. Given a knowledge base explaining the world's behavior it aims at finding an explanation for some observed manifestation. In this paper we consider propositional abduction, where the knowledge base and the manifestation are represented by propositional formulae. The problem of deciding whether there exists an explanation has been shown to be \\SigPtwo-complete in general. We focus on formulae in which the allowed connectives are taken from certain sets of Boolean functions. We consider different variants of the abduction problem in restricting both the manifestations and the hypotheses. For all these variants we obtain a complexity classification for all possible sets of Boolean functions. In this way, we identify easier cases, namely \\NP-complete, \\coNP-complete and polynomial cases. Thus, we get a detailed picture of the complexity of the propositional abduction problem, hence highlighting s...

Creignou, Nadia; Thomas, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Kinetics of aluminum fluoride complexation in acidic waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acidic deposition has an important effect on the transport and speciation of soluble aluminum. Toxicity of aqueous aluminum seems to be strongly dependent on aluminum speciation and the presence of complexing ligands such as fluoride. A study is reported of the complex formation kinetics of AlF/sup 2 +/ in the environmentally significant pH range 2.9-4.9. The pH and temperature dependencies of the overall rate of reaction are discussed along with environmental implications for areas subjected to acidic deposition. 22 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.; Cronan, C.S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons by dinuclear iron complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our efforts during the past eight months were directed towards characterizing synthetic complexes that model the electronic and reactivity properties of the active site of methane monooxygenase (MMO), a metalloenzyme found in methanotrophic bacteria responsible for the biological oxidation of methane to methanol. We have investigated the structural/electronic and reactivity properties of a series of dinuclear model complexes that can function as oxygen atom transfer catalysts. In particular, our studies focused on [Fe[sup 2+][sub 2](H[sub 2]Hbab)[sub 2](N-MeIm)[sub 2

Caradonna, J.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z