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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CAVRH), and variable volume with reheat (VAVRH), four pipe fan coil unit (FC), four pipe induction unit (FI), and a single zone air conditioning system (SZ). These calculations are presented in spreadsheets that include a running commentary so...

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Observing the Inflationary Reheating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Probing reheating with primordial spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the impacts of reheating temperature on the inflationary predictions of the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio. Assuming that reheating process is very fast, the reheating temperature can be constrained for sinusoidal oscillation within a factor of 10 - 100 or even better with the prospect of future observations. Beyond this, we find that the predictions can also be insensitive to the reheating temperature in certain models, including the Higgs inflation.

Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Leung, Godfrey

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume...

5

SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy, Office of Buildings and Community Systems Building Systems Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;2 NOMENCLATURE Neutral level [-]s ELA Effective leakage

6

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS CEC Volume Single Zone Unitary Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Systems (Page 1 of 4) Project Name CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS CEC-MECH-3A (Revised 08

7

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study 11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy...

8

GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Superheated steam power plant with steam to steam reheater. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A desuperheater is disposed in a steam supply line supplying superheated steam to a shell and tube reheater.

Silvestri, G.J.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Curvaton reheating in a logamediate inflationary model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a logamediate inflationary universe model we introduce the curvaton field in order to bring this inflationary model to an end. In this approach we determine the reheating temperature. We also outline some interesting constraints on the parameters that describe our models. Thus, we give the parameter space in this scenario.

Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon; Saavedra, Joel; Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc; Rojas, Efrain [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000, Xalapa Veracruz (Mexico)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Comparison of Two Ventilation Systems in a Chinese Commercial Kitchen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical simulation of an indoor thermal environment in a Chinese commercial kitchen has been carried out using indoor zero-equation turbulence model. Two different ventilation systems in a Chinese commercial kitchen have been simulated...

Wan, X.; Yu, L.; Hou, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Energy-efficient lighting for kitchens and bathrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet intended for the consumer explains ways to make kitchen and bathroom lighting more energy efficient.

Baker, W.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Primordial magnetic field amplification from turbulent reheating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the possibility of primordial magnetic field amplification by a stochastic large scale kinematic dynamo during reheating. We consider a charged scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. During inflation this field is assumed to be in its vacuum state. At the transition to reheating the state of the field changes to a many particle/anti-particle state. We characterize that state as a fluid flow of zero mean velocity but with a stochastic velocity field. We compute the scale-dependent Reynolds number Re(k), and the characteristic times for decay of turbulence, t{sub d} and pair annihilation t{sub a}, finding t{sub a} << t{sub d}. We calculate the rms value of the kinetic helicity of the flow over a scale L and show that it does not vanish. We use this result to estimate the amplification factor of a seed field from the stochastic kinematic dynamo equations. Although this effect is weak, it shows that the evolution of the cosmic magnetic field from reheating to galaxy formation may well be more complex than as dictated by simple flux freezing.

Calzetta, Esteban [Departamento de Física, FCEyN-UBA and IFIBA-CONICET, Cdad. Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kandus, Alejandra, E-mail: calzetta@df.uba.ar, E-mail: kandus@uesc.br [LATO - DCET - UESC. Rodovia Ilhéus-Itabuna, km 16 s/n, CEP: 45662-900, Salobrinho, Ilhéus-BA (Brazil)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Saving Fuel Energy in the Kitchen.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulletin] Saving Fuel Energy in the Kitchen Marilyn A. Haggard* Rising fuel costs encourage consumers to take steps to reduce energy use, especially in the home. In home food preparation accounts for 16 percent of the energy used in the food system.... Food preparation, storage and cleanup provide opportunities to save fuel energy. Energy saving measures must be practiced daily to have a positive effect on utility costs. Small Appliances Use the smallest appliances possible for preparing small...

Haggard, Marilyn A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities Case study details the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Exchange (formerly the Army and Air Force...

16

Ameren Illinois (Electric)- Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ameren offers several programs targeted at grocery stores, convenience stores, refrigerated warehouses or spaces, and commercial kitchens. These programs are designed to improve the energy...

17

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture and pollutants SOLUTION: * Install and use extra exhaust ventilation in kitchen OPTIMAL SOLUTION: *...

18

Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

Singer, Brett

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

Singer, Brett

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina Butler Tina-Butler.jpg Tina L.DuctsKitchen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Kitchen and Dining Facilities - Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial kitchens usually require a large amount of ventilation air and high ventilation rates. Today's typical kitchens and dining facilities are often equipped with Make-up Air Fans (MAF) or dedicated Make-up Air Units (MUA) to make up about 50...

Chen, Q.; Deng, S.; Li, H.; Xu, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Automatic Control System of Car-Bottom Reheating Furnace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At present China has large quantities of two-regenerator gas reheating furnaces which are old in fashion and low in calorific efficiency. Therefore, the question how to increase the calorific efficiency is very much concerned on condition...

Xueqiao, M.; Weilian, X.; Hongchen, Z.

23

Reheating-volume measure in the landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I recently proposed the "reheating-volume" (RV) prescription as a possible solution to the measure problem in "multiverse" cosmology. The goal of this work is to extend the RV measure to scenarios involving bubble nucleation, such as the string theory landscape. In the spirit of the RV prescription, I propose to calculate the distribution of observable quantities in a landscape that is conditioned in probability to nucleate a finite total number of bubbles to the future of an initial bubble. A general formula for the relative number of bubbles of different types can be derived. I show that the RV measure is well-defined and independent of the choice of the initial bubble type, as long as that type supports further bubble nucleation. Applying the RV measure to a generic landscape, I find that the abundance of Boltzmann brains is always negligibly small compared with the abundance of ordinary observers in the bubbles of the same type. As an illustration, I present explicit results for a toy landscape containing four vacuum states and for landscapes with a single high-energy vacuum and a large number of low-energy vacua.

Sergei Winitzki

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study details the Exchange (formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service), which took a leadership role in kitchen appliance upgrades to improve water efficiency by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization's overall sustainability plan and objectives.

25

Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooking and cooking burners emit pollutants that can adversely affect indoor air quality in residences and significantly impact occupant health. Effective kitchen exhaust ventilation can reduce exposure to cooking-related air pollutants as an enabling step to healthier, low-energy homes. This report identifies barriers to the widespread adoption of kitchen exhaust ventilation technologies and practice and proposes a suite of strategies to overcome these barriers. The recommendations have been vetted by a group of industry, regulatory, health, and research experts and stakeholders who convened for two web-based meetings and provided input and feedback to early drafts of this document. The most fundamental barriers are (1) the common misconception, based on a sensory perception of risk, that kitchen exhaust when cooking is unnecessary and (2) the lack of a code requirement for kitchen ventilation in most US locations. Highest priority objectives include the following: (1) Raise awareness among the public and the building industry of the need to install and routinely use kitchen ventilation; (2) Incorporate kitchen exhaust ventilation as a requirement of building codes and improve the mechanisms for code enforcement; (3) Provide best practice product and use-behavior guidance to ventilation equipment purchasers and installers, and; (4) Develop test methods and performance targets to advance development of high performance products. A specific, urgent need is the development of an over-the-range microwave that meets the airflow and sound requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Stratton, J. Chris; Singer, Brett C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Exploring Maximum Humidity Control and Energy Conservation Opportunities with Single Duct Single Zone Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humidity control for single-duct single-zone (SDSZ) constant volume air handling units is known to be a challenge. The operation of these systems is governed by space temperature only. Under mild weather conditions, discharge air temperature can get...

Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Teh report describes methods of reheating of steel billets and slabs for hot rolling or forging without forming steel scale.

Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Parametric analyses of single-zone thorium-fueled molten salt reactor fuel cycle options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses of fuel cycle options based on thorium-fueled Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) have been performed in support of fuel cycle screening and evaluation activities for the United States Department of Energy. The MSR options considered are based on thermal spectrum MSRs with 3 different separations levels: full recycling, limited recycling, and 'once-through' operation without active separations. A single-fluid, single-zone 2250 MWth (1000 MWe) MSR concept consisting of a fuel-bearing molten salt with graphite moderator and reflectors was used as the basis for this study. Radiation transport and isotopic depletion calculations were performed using SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. New methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) enables MSR analysis using SCALE, modeling material feed and removal by taking user-specified parameters and performing multiple SCALE/TRITON simulations to determine the resulting equilibrium operating conditions. Parametric analyses examined the sensitivity of the performance of a thorium MSR to variations in the separations efficiency for protactinium and fission products. Results indicate that self-sustained operation is possible with full or limited recycling but once-through operation would require an external neutron source. (authors)

Powers, J.J.; Worrall, A.; Gehin, J.C.; Harrison, T.J.; Sunny, E.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Steel project fact sheet: Steel reheating for further processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steel reheating is an energy-intensive process requiring uniform temperature distribution within reheating furnaces. Historically, recuperators have ben used to preheat combustion air, thereby conserving energy. More recent innovations include oxygen enrichment and the use of regenerative burners, which provide higher preheat air temperatures than recuperators. These processes have limitations such as equipment deterioration, decreasing energy efficiency over time, high maintenance costs, and increased NO{sub x} emissions with increased air preheat temperature, unless special equipment is used. Praxair, Inc., supplier of oxygen and other industrial gases to the steel industry, proposes to introduce an innovative oxy-fuel burner technology (using 100% oxygen) to the steel reheating industry. Oxy-fuel combustion reduces or eliminates nitrogen in combustion air and substantially reduces waste heat carried out with flue gas. Based on technology currently used in the glass, hazardous waste, and aluminum industries, Praxair has developed and patented low temperature, oxy-fuel burners that can be used in high temperature industrial furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical and extremely low NO{sub x} emissions are desired. The technical goal of the project is to demonstrate the use of oxy-fuel burners in a slab reheat furnace while reducing energy consumption by 45% and NO{sub x} emissions by 90% within the converted furnace zones. Successful implementation of this technology also will eliminate the need to periodically replace recuperators and install NO{sub x} removal equipment.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reheating via a generalized nonminimal coupling of curvature to matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, one shows that a generalized nonminimal coupling between geometry and matter is compatible with Starobinsky inflation and leads to a successful process of preheating, a reheating scenario based on the production of massive particles via parametric resonance. The model naturally extends the usual preheating mechanism, which resorts to an ad hoc scalar curvature-dependent mass term for a scalar field {chi}, and also encompasses a previously studied preheating channel based upon a nonstandard kinetic term.

Bertolami, Orfeu; Frazao, Pedro; Paramos, Jorge [Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Plasmas e FuSao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Benefits of ceramic fiber for saving energy in reheat furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refractory ceramic fiber products offer thermal insulation investment in reheat furnaces by helping to keep operating cost low and product quality high. These products are used in a range of applications that include: furnace linings; charge and discharge door insulation; skidpipe insulation; and furnace repair and maintenance. The many product forms (blankets, modules, boards, textiles, and coatings) provide several key benefits: faster cycling, energy savings and personnel protection.

Norris, A. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollutants that can adversely affect indoor air quality in residences and significantly impact occupant health. Effective kitchen exhaust ventilation can reduce exposure to cooking-related air pollutants Development, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070

34

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is a joint military activity and the U.S. Department of Defense?s (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization?s overall sustainability plan and objectives.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles » AlternativeUpDrain-Water HeatElementsEnergyHoliday Kitchen

36

Wavelength dependence of prepulse laser beams on EUV emission from CO2 reheated Sn plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelength dependence of prepulse laser beams on EUV emission from CO2 reheated Sn plasma J. R. The expanding plume was then reheated by a 35 ns CO2 laser operating at 10.6 m. The role of prepulse wavelength, Tanaka et al.11 demonstrated the advantages of using a CO2 laser for generating higher CE. The CO2 LPP

Harilal, S. S.

37

Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are disclosed for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom. 2 figs.

Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Bannister, R.L.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Web-based user-oriented tool for universal kitchen design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic constraints to the professional design practice limit customized solutions to the very wealthy, and thus most of the kitchens in current development housing projects are still generic. With aging baby boomers and ...

Ma, Xiaoyi, 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Kitchen layout and dimensions for the ambulatory and wheelchair-bound elderly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KITCHEN LAYOUT AND DIMENSIONS FOR THE Al&ULATORY AND WHEELCHAIR-BOUND ELDERLY A Thesis ANITA JANICE RESENDIZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August ' 9BS Major Subject: Industrial Engineering KITCHEN LAYOUT AND DIMENSIONS FOR THE AMBULATORY AND WHEELCHAIR-BOUND ELDERLY A Thesis by ANITA JANICE RESENDIZ Approved as to style and content by: R. D. uchings n (Chairman) G. Bayliss...

Resendiz, Anita Janice

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Our Visit To The Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen: Touching Real People With Real Stories By Ashley Olson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instructor was in charge of greeting people at the entryway. Many times she saw guests give hugs and kissesOur Visit To The Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen: Touching Real People With Real Stories By Ashley Olson Our visit to the Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen defined my experience in New York City. People came from

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Energy Efficiency Improvement by Measurement and Control: A Case Study of Reheating Furnaces in the Steel Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT BY MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL A case study of reheating furnaces in the steel industry Anders Mlirtensson Department of Environmental and Energy Systems Studies Lund University S-22362 Lund Sweden ABSTRACT... of process studied, as a result of approach using steel reheating furnaces as a case study. investments in information technology; it is also concluded that The steel industry is a large user of energy: in Sweden it used such investments are cost...

Martensson, A.

43

Analytical modeling in support of the development of fiber reinforced ceramic composite materials for re-heater burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of Continuous Fiber reinforced Ceramic Composite (CFCC) materials is a process of identifying components which will benefit from CFCC properties, and defining appropriate composite constructions which will provide materials which will meet the structural and thermal requirements of the application. Materials Sciences Corporation (MSC) has been providing analytical support to Textron Specialty Materials in the development of re-heated tubes for metal reheating furnaces. As part of this support, a study has been made of the sensitivity of composite properties to fiber orientation as well as a number of matrix properties which control the stress-strain behavior of the composite.

Kibler, J.J. [Materials Sciences Corp., Fort Washington, PA (United States); DiPietro, S.G. [Textron Specialty Materials, Lowell, MA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessment of existing H2/O2 chemical reaction mechanisms at reheat gas turbine conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides detailed comparisons of chemical reaction mechanisms of H2 applicable at high preheat temperatures and pressures relevant to gas turbine and particularly Alstom's reheat gas turbine conditions. It is shown that the available reaction mechanisms exhibit large differences in several important elementary reaction coefficients. The reaction mechanisms are assessed by comparing ignition delay and laminar flame speed results obtained from CHEMKIN with available data, however, the amount of data at these conditions is scarce and a recommended candidate among the mechanisms can presently not be selected. Generally, the results with the GRI-Mech and Leeds mechanisms deviate from the Davis, Li, O'Conaire, Konnov and San Diego mechanisms, but there are also significant deviations between the latter five mechanisms that altogether are better adapted to hydrogen. The differences in ignition delay times between the dedicated hydrogen mechanisms (O'Conaire, Li and Konnov) range from approximately a maxim...

Weydahl, Torleif; Seljeskog, Morten; Haugen, Nils Erland L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Using Less Energy in the Kitchen on Thanksgiving | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEMUsedUserUsing Less Energy in the Kitchen

46

KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRS25RV*) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRS25RV*)

47

HVAC ENERGY EFFICIENCY CASE STUDY "Melink works well in our kitchen--it saves energy, reduces hood noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to condition this air is saved. DEMAND CONTROL KITCHEN VENTILATION Demand ventilation fan speed controller DEMONSTRATION RESULTS UCSB Carillo Dining Commons A single demand ventilation fan speed controller was installed ventilation fan speed controllers: one for the front server cook line exhaust and supply fans and the other

California at Davis, University of

48

Reheating during Hierarchical Clustering in the Universe Dominated by the Cold Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate reheating of the universe by early formation of stars and quasars in the hierarchical clustering scheme of cold dark matter scenario, with perturbation fluctuations normalized by the COBE data. It is found that ionizing uv flux from OB stars with the abundance given by the standard initial mass function is strong enough to ionize the universe from $z\\approx 30$ to the present epoch, if 1--2\\% of the collapsed baryons go into stars. This lessens significantly the CMB anisotropies at a small angular scale. Reionization also increases the Jeans mass to $M_{\\rm luminous}\\approx 10^9M_\\odot$ for $z\\lsim 10$, which leads to a cut-off of the luminosity function of normal galaxies on a faint side. A strong uv flux is expected at $z\\approx 2-5$, and the null result of the Gunn-Peterson test is naturally explained. Early star formation also results in production of heavy elements, and the observational metal abundance sets a strong constraint on the photon energy injection into the intergalactic space.

M. Fukugita; M. Kawasaki

1993-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sterile neutrino dark matter with gauged U(1){sub B-L} and a low reheating temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sterile right-handed neutrinos can be naturally embedded in a low scale gauged U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model. We show that, within a low reheating scenario, such a neutrino can be produced via a novel manner, namely scattering through Z' gauge boson, and becomes an interesting dark matter candidate. In addition, we show that if the neutrino mass is of the order of MeV, then it accounts for the measured dark matter relic density and also accommodates the observed flux of 511 keV photons from the galactic bulge.

Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo, 11566 (Egypt); Seto, Osamu [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

50

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

KITCHENER ST PARLIAMENT STREET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maclaurin ChapelGeorge Fraser Gallery Old Government House Old Government House Lodge Kenneth Myers Centre School of Fine Arts Electrical & Computer Engineering, Dept of ELSAC Engineering Science, Dept of English, School of Examinations External Relations Facilities Management Fale Pasifika Complex Film, Television

Auckland, University of

52

When you go shopping for groceries you sometimes bring home many items which may be used to produce house plants. Not only is it fun, but growing houseplants from kitchen waste is educational for children -caring for plants can help teach them responsibil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

house plants. Not only is it fun, but growing houseplants from kitchen waste is educational for children. Sweet potatoes produce viney stems that are somewhat like philodendrons. You can produce these easily by setting the narrow end of a sweet potato in a container of sand or a glass of water, sup- ported

New Hampshire, University of

53

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

lectric Motors are used to drive tools and machines of all sizes. They move huge pots of molten steel in steel mills; they run mixers in the kitchen and drills in the garage.You may have used model cars or trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of molten steel in steel mills; they run mixers in the kitchen and drills in the garage.You may have usedIon 7 - tEstIng tHE ElEctrIc Motor Testing conditions. Electric motors move huge pots of molten steel in steel mills. #12;How a Magnet Works T ie or tape some thread or fine string to one of the magnets

Weston, Ken

55

Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean CommunitiesEFRCInformation AdministrationEnergy

56

Control Humidity With Single-Duct, Single-Zone, Constant Air Volume System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lecture hall of the Richardson Petroleum Building at Texas A&M University is a large lecture hall, with a total floor area of approximately 2500 ft^2. The lecture hall was served by a constant air volume (CAV) air handling unit (AHU) which had...

Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mary EmilyMary EmilyMary Emily Clinical NutritionClinical NutritionClinical Nutrition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manner including sitting area for consumption of meals. The kitchen functions well as a cook-chill system · Energy expenditure determination · Survey and questionnaire administration Equipment · Hologic Discovery and as such houses refrigeration and reheating stations. The second floor houses an interview room to provide

Barthelat, Francois

58

The investigation of atmospheric humidity control by hot gas reheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number 1, 2, and 3 24 10 Psychrometric Chart with the Processes of Runs Number 1, 2, and 3 Superimposed Upon One Another 25 Nossle Performance Curvos 31 vi LIST OF SM30LS ~Sbol OF ~tit Cubic feet per minute Constant pressure specific heat... tempera- ture L2/T2 in. Hg in, H2O MV PD psig sp gr tdb Inches of mercury Inches of water Pounds mass Pounds mass dry air Pounds mass water vapor Millivolt s Pressure diff'erential (in. Hg) Gage pressure Heat added or re...

Whitlock, Paul Leroy

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

VAV Reheat Versus Active Chilled Beams and DOAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Andrey. Don’t Turn Active Beams Into Expensive Diffusers,added costs of the piping and beams for ACBs are simply too1. Simmonds, Peter. To Beam or not To Beam? , Engineered

Stein, Jeff; Taylor, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThisThe HawaiiNRELAdditional plugSee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

VAV Reheat Versus Active Chilled Beams and DOAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Pollutant Source Control) – This credit is generally achievable with a VAVR system since it requires that all supply air

Stein, Jeff; Taylor, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

63

The Adaptive Code Kitchen: Flexible Tools for Dynamic Application Composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems support then enables loading and linking of native code components, monitoring of performance prevalent in computational science practice. Diverse areas, from nuclear physics, to earth science-guided querying and steering of computa- tional runs [4] to automatic recommender systems that mine performance

Ramakrishnan, Naren

64

PUBLICATION 348-837 Kids Kitchen: Whole Grains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2010 Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine Sources: United States Dietary Guidelines (USDA Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national

Liskiewicz, Maciej

65

PUBLICATION 348-826 Kids Kitchen: What Is Fat?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cake) high-fat dairy products (full-fat cheese, ice cream, whole milk, 2% milk, sour cream) ranch dressing chocolate or candy bars french fries cream sauces gravy made with meat drippings Foods from dressing (olive oil and vinegar) sesame seeds mayonnaise tofu and other soybean products Unsaturated fat

Liskiewicz, Maciej

66

Spatial user interface : augmenting human sensibilities in a domestic kitchen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The real world is not a computer screen. When can augmented reality and ambient interfaces improve the usability of a physical environment? This thesis presents data from design studies and experiments that demonstrate the ...

Lee, Jackie Chia-Hsun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment ofEnergyBeowawe Binary TableBest

68

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoff Meeting for NewDepartment

69

STEAM-SIDE OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION BEHAVIOR IN SUPERHEATERS AND REHEATERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in materials for power plants include not only new materials with higher-temperature capabilities, but also the use of current materials at increasingly higher temperatures. This latter activity builds on extensive experience of the performance of the various alloys, and provides a basis for identifying changes in alloy behavior with increasing temperature as well as understanding the factors that ultimately determine the maximum use temperatures of the different alloy classes. This paper presents results from an effort to model the exfoliation processes of steam-side oxide scales in a manner that describes as accurately as possible the evolution of strains in oxides growing inside small-diameter tubes subjected to large thermal gradients and to thermal transients typical of normal steam boiler operation. One way of portraying the results of such calculations is by plotting the evolving strains in a given oxide scale on an Exfoliation Diagram (of the type pioneered by Manning et al. of the British Central Electricity Research Laboratory) to determine the earliest time at which the trajectory of these strains intersects a criterion for scale failure. Understanding of how such strain trajectories differ among different alloys and are affected by the major variables associated with boiler operation has the potential to suggest boiler operating strategies to manage scale exfoliation, as well as to highlight the mode of scale failure and the limitations of each alloy. Preliminary results are presented of the strain trajectories calculated for alloys T22, T91, and TP347 subjected to the conditions experienced by superheaters under assumed boiler operating scenarios. For all three alloys the earliest predicted scale failures were associated with the increased strains developed during a boiler shut-down event; indeed, in the cases considered it appeared unlikely that scale failure would occur in any practically meaningful time due to strains accumulated during operation in a load-following mode in the absence of a shut down. The accuracy of the algorithms used for the kinetics of oxide growth appeared to be a very important consideration, especially for alloy TP347 for which large effects on oxide growth rate are known to occur with changes in alloy grain size and surface cold work.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is energized in summer mode or de-energized in winter mode, the output of the PRV is 20psi or 15 psi, respectively. AHU#7 AHU#9 AHU#8 AHU#10 W E AHU#6 AHU#4 AHU #2 AHU#5 AHU#3 S Figure 3. Typical Floor Plan of the 1st through the 4th Floors where...

Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Airflow Characteristics of Direct-Type Kitchen Hood Systems in High-Rise Apartment Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Samsung C&T, South Korea 2 Introduction ? Today?s high-rise apartment buildings exhibit high degree of air-tightness. ? They are also subjected to stack effect and seasonal, unpredictable, wind pressure variations. ? Therefore, it is questionable... characteristics for alt0 16 32CMH 0Pa 42CMH 0Pa 74CMH 16Pa 477CMH 984CMH 355CMH 815CMH 173CMH 26Pa 0CMH 0CMH 0CMH 54CMH 0Pa 158CMH 1Pa 35CMH 0Pa 74CMH 18Pa (a)?On?3rd?floor?at?12:00,?Jan?1st 1.5m/s North 50CMH 1Pa 23CMH 0Pa 75CMH 18Pa...

Park, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Kitchen Garden Plant List for the St. Clare Garden St. Clare's Garden at Santa University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swiss Chard) Brassica oleracea Kale Ocimum basilicum Basil Petroselinum crispum Parsley, Our Lady's Lace

Schwarz, Thomas

73

SPRING/SUMMER 2014 Volume 32, Nos. 1 & 2 recall standing at the kitchen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is for identification only and does not imply endorsement or criticism of products. oN tHE CoVEr: A positive test fo (517)355-0123. Permission to reprint material in this issue is granted, provided the meaning is not changed. Credit given to the publication as the source of the material is appreciated. Use of trade names

74

When Her Thousand Chimneys Smoked: Virginia's Enslaved Cooks and Their Kitchens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they had access to poison, food and trust; the idealThe idea of poisoning goes hand-in-hand with food productionfood. Similarly, in April of 1849 an enslaved man named Billy was charged with poisoning

Deetz, Kelley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Scrub-resistance Characteristics of Kitchen and Bathroom Wall-surfacing Materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-resistance characteristics discussed. an abrasive cleanser. Loss of gloss continued bv: A statistical analysis was made to evaluate the at a much slower rate as the scrubbing progressed, gloss differences which resulted from 30-minute Ceramic tile, porcelain...-on-stee: ceramic tile and stainless steel showed the leas' change in gloss, following 30 minutes of scrubbing These materials showed significantly less changs than the other materials subjected to the same scrubbing operations. Plastic tiles, flexible rubber...

Hobgood, Price; Kunze, O. R.; Stewart, B. R.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Annual Update Inspiration for Action Classrooms Extend to Kitchens Once Upon a Time[line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Kellogg House: One of the Oldest Buildings on Campus Reborn · Williams Embraces Solar Energy · Emissions Cricket Creek Farm in Williamstown on a sunny May morning. Real Food Williams, a student group advocating make one stride forward on sustainability--installing solar panels, reducing a waste stream, buying

Aalberts, Daniel P.

77

When Her Thousand Chimneys Smoked: Virginia's Enslaved Cooks and Their Kitchens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identity ed. Charles Orser Jr. (Salt Lake City: UniversityCharles. Race and the Archaeology of Identity. Salt Lake City:

Deetz, Kelley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Beyond Salad: How to Save Energy in the Kitchen During the Summer |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFApril 2015CommerceDepartment of Energy Beyond

79

How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi National AcceleratorMemoranda andEnergy andIt goes

80

How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi National AcceleratorMemoranda andEnergyEnergy Dr.Departmentof

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Make muscle pain a memory with ginger 20 Pain Cures You Can Find in Your Kitchen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

researchers asked achy people to jazz up their diets with ginger, it eased muscle and joint pain, swelling women is struggling with arthritis, gout or chronic headaches. If you're one of them, a daily bowl

Jagannatham, Aditya K.

82

SP.287 / 5.S15 / ESG.SP287 Kitchen Chemistry, Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course includes Special topic seminars and independent study projects. Seminars are run by a staff member or supervised undergraduate instructor and meet weekly. Independent study projects require approval and regular ...

Christie, Patricia Dianne, 1967-

83

KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRG25FVMS*) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |

84

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer Somers AboutEnergyKansas|Services

85

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthorOwnershipCategoryInformation

86

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | OpenInformation

87

A Space for Living: Region and Nature in the Bay Area, 1939-1969  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Ruth Oldenziel and Karin Zachmann. Cold War Kitchen,1938. Oldenziel, Ruth and Karin Zachmann. Cold War Kitchen,see Ruth Oldenziel and Karin Zachmann, Cold War Kitchen,

Allen, Peter Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF 3C 288—REHEATING THE COOL CORE OF A 3 keV CLUSTER FROM A NUCLEAR OUTBURST at z = 0.246  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from a 42 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of the transitional FR I/FR II radio galaxy 3C 288 at z = 0.246. We detect ~3 keV gas extending to a radius of ~0.5 Mpc with a 0.5-2.0 keV luminosity of 6.6 × ...

Lal, D. V.

89

Influence of metal process micronic and submicronic particles on vegetables quality and ecosystems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sativa) and parsley (Petroselinum crispum), vegetables currently cultivated in kitchen gardens with high

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air  quality,  kitchen,  oven,  nitrogen  dioxide,  pollutant   emissions,  range  hood,  residential,  source  control,  

Singer, Brett C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

MSSV FAQ 2013-14 Q1 How close is Murano to the University?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a kitchen with a cooker, fridge/freezer, microwave, toaster and kettle. Each large flat (10/12 persons) has a #12;kitchen with 2 cookers, 2 fridges and freezers, microwave, kettle, toaster. Ironing equipment

Glasgow, University of

93

Extension Comings and Goings June 2013 1 Directions for UF/IFAS Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grant Highlights! 2 From Computer to Kitchen 5 Stitches that Serve! 6 AIAEE 2013 Conference 6 Kudzu Bugs

Jawitz, James W.

94

Umea University Education Short-Term Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refrigerators, freezers and kitchen utensils that you can share. The housing with IHO includes: · Private room

Viglas, Anastasios

95

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performanc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Practice Case Study 11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental...

96

International Student Arrival Guide 2013/14 1 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

£12.50/hour. They will clean ensuites, bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchens and cookers. This can be offered

Birmingham, University of

97

MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY Cost and Effectiveness of Community-Wide Integrated Pest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apartments with poor sanitation conditions. Dust samples were collected from kitchen Ã?oors of 72 cockroach

Wang, Changlu

98

M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Tutorial 5 1 ENSC 461 Tutorial, Week#6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to represent the system Intercooler Regenerator Combustor Reheat CombustorCompressor 1 Compressor 2 Turbine 1 are heat inputs at the combustor AND the reheat combustor) as shown in Eq1. Note: the heat input volumes (combustor and reheat combustor), similar to what was done in Eq2 and Eq3, to obtain Eq4

Bahrami, Majid

99

Field usage and its impact on energy consumption of refrigerator/freezers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the effect of door openings and kitchen environment on the energy consumption of nine household refrigerator/freezers (R/Fs) in the field. The factors under consideration include fresh food and freezer door openings, length of door openings, ambient kitchen temperature, and kitchen relative humidity (RH). Average daily energy consumption for the nine units ranged from 1.7 to 5.3 kWh/day. Energy consumption was found to correlate with kitchen temperature and the number of door openings. No dependence on kitchen relative humidity was found. In general, the magnitude of the door opening component of energy consumption was higher for the more efficient units.

Gage, C.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Computer Modeling VRF Heat Pumps in Commercial Buildings using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are increasingly used in commercial buildings in the United States. Monitored energy use of field installations have shown, in some cases, savings exceeding 30% compared to conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A simulation study was conducted to identify the installation or operational characteristics that lead to energy savings for VRF systems. The study used the Department of Energy EnergyPlus? building simulation software and four reference building models. Computer simulations were performed in eight U.S. climate zones. The baseline reference HVAC system incorporated packaged single-zone direct-expansion cooling with gas heating (PSZ-AC) or variable-air-volume systems (VAV with reheat). An alternate baseline HVAC system using a heat pump (PSZ-HP) was included for some buildings to directly compare gas and electric heating results. These baseline systems were compared to a VRF heat pump model to identify differences in energy use. VRF systems combine multiple indoor units with one or more outdoor unit(s). These systems move refrigerant between the outdoor and indoor units which eliminates the need for duct work in most cases. Since many applications install duct work in unconditioned spaces, this leads to installation differences between VRF systems and conventional HVAC systems. To characterize installation differences, a duct heat gain model was included to identify the energy impacts of installing ducts in unconditioned spaces. The configuration of variable refrigerant flow heat pumps will ultimately eliminate or significantly reduce energy use due to duct heat transfer. Fan energy is also studied to identify savings associated with non-ducted VRF terminal units. VRF systems incorporate a variable-speed compressor which may lead to operational differences compared to single-speed compression systems. To characterize operational differences, the computer model performance curves used to simulate cooling operation are also evaluated. The information in this paper is intended to provide a relative difference in system energy use and compare various installation practices that can impact performance. Comparative results of VRF versus conventional HVAC systems include energy use differences due to duct location, differences in fan energy when ducts are eliminated, and differences associated with electric versus fossil fuel type heating systems.

Raustad, Richard

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EA-1662: Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: EnergyConservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens)

102

Best Management Practice #7: Faucets and Showerheads  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most federal buildings have faucets in restrooms, kitchens, and laboratories. Many federal installations have showers, including barracks, family housing, recreation facilities, and locker rooms....

103

Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and fracturing associated with dome emplacement, and localized zones of extensive hydraulic fracturing. Wells in the Devil's Kitchen area have encountered fluids in excess of...

104

antifungal food preservative: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

writers and columnists, Good Food Epicure features industry news, restaurant, bar and wine reviews, recipes, the latest kitchen Peters, Richard 198 Data Preservation in High...

105

WHATTOBRING(ATICAMPUS)CONSIDERCONSULTINGWITHROOMATESTOAVOIDDUPLICATES THINGS YOU MAY NOT BRING WITH YOU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BICYCLE IRON/IRONING BOARD STORAGE CONTAINERS OUTSIDE CHAIRS COUCH, SOFA, LOVESEAT GAMES / PLAYING CARDS SILVERWARE GLASSES DISHES MICROWAVE DISHTOWELS KITCHEN ITEMS: BATTERIES TELEVISION GRILL & PROPANE (1 PER

106

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evacuated Tube thermal collectors on the Community Center to provide solar heated hot water for the Head Start and Kitchen facilities. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom chip based Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modern technology--from airplanes and computers, to everyday kitchen Summary: of nanotechnology with atom trapping and cooling to produce such a chip-based cavity QED system....

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - aln-based atom chips Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modern technology--from airplanes and computers, to everyday kitchen Summary: of nanotechnology with atom trapping and cooling to produce such a chip-based cavity QED system....

109

The Do's & Don'ts of Saving Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the many tips in this publication you'll learn how to save water in the bathroom, kitchen and landscape....

Dozier, Monty

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Control Ventilation (DCV) for kitchen hoods incorporates technology that uses an infrared beam to measure changes in cooking surface temperatures. The control system uses the...

111

Blue Lake Rancheria's Bold Action on the Climate Front Pays Dividends...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to pursue other leading-edge clean energy solutions. Current initiatives include a biodiesel project that converts waste oil from the Tribe's kitchen to fuel the tribal transit...

112

June 26, 2014 The Graduate School of Frontier Sciences (GSFS) provides furnished housing at the Kashiwanoha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 June 26, 2014 The Graduate School of Frontier Sciences (GSFS) provides furnished housing: Kitchen 11 Inquiries International Liaison Office Graduate School of Frontier Sciences The University

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

113

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Procedures for Water Heaters; Kitchen Ranges, Ovens,Use of Residential Water Heaters. Lawrence Berkeley NationalEnergy Use of Residential Water Heaters. Lawrence Berkeley

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RL-721 REV4 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

wall board on all walls in the bathrooms and kitchen * Install new HLAN cable and ports * Replace all six (6) HVAC units * Replace six (6) HVAC disconnects * Install...

115

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

116

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offers the Energy Right Solutions Program for commercial and industrial facilities. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen...

117

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

118

University of Birmingham International Student Arrival Guide 2013 / 14 1 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, kitchens and cookers. This can be offered as a regular service or a one-off clean. Our staff are highly

Birmingham, University of

119

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibiotic producing actinomycete Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bern Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 15 If you compost your kitchen waste, you may know that Summary: of marine actinomycetes, dubbed MAR4, that produce a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dark world and the standard model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

???????????..?????????..?.?.1 II COSMOLOGY, DARK ENERGY AND REHEATING??.???.?.??..5 Reheating??????????????????????????. 9 Particle Production Due to Elementary Theory????....??.?11 Particle Production Due to Parametric Resonance???...???.12 Dark Matter.... Both of them can be described by scalar field. One objective of my thesis is to try to unify these two different fields into one field but at different stages of universe. In reheating theory, the simplest form of potential...

Zhao, Gang

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most residential heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed to treat the home as a single zone. Single zone control consists of one thermostat, in a central area of the house that controls the HVAC operation. In a single...

Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25 Air Handlers Replacement Replacement of three AHUs, three exhaust fans, reheat boiler, and all ancillary equipment for B-25. Joseph P. Kanosky Digitally signed by Joseph P....

124

The GTE Ceramic Recuperator for High Temperature Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steel Bllffalo Metal Casting Standard St.eel N.ati_onal Forge Ladish Co. Pr.Jt.t & \\.fllitney Ama", Specl."11t.v Metals Bethlehem Steel Cape Ann Forge Staolev Spring (TRw) Box Forge Reheat, Steel Box Forge Reheat, Steel 1 Box Forge Reheat...,807 1.9 1.8 31 St.andard Steel Burnham, PA Box forge. Reheat, Steel 32 National Forge Erie, PA Ladle Preheater. Steel :,.} Lad isb Co. Cyntbiaca, ....'Y Box Heat Treat, Steell 188.426 77,527 3. Pra t t & \\.on i tney East Hart.ford, CT Box...

Dorazio, R. E.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Ferri, J. L.; Rebello, W. J.; Ally, M. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CX-006093: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Onesteel Grinding Systems - Steel Reheat Furnace Recuperator Energy Efficiency Retrofit CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date:...

126

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reheat furnaces Waste heat recovery from cooling watergas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer canintroduction of blow down waste heat recovery. If there is a

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced rankine cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

two-tank molten... C. Figure 6. Temperature-entropy diagram for a reheat-regenerative subcritical ... Source: Australian National University, Department of Engineering, Solar...

128

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal Equipment (nuclear plant) Turbine Building ClosedCooling Water System (nuclear plant) SteamReheater (nuclear plant) Inspection Water Induction

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha -particle fission Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermal history Summary: -feldspar ages (214 Ma) from the Jiazishan syenites. A titanite fission-track age of 166 8 Ma (closure... cooling and reheating event is indicated...

130

After a Fire, Is the Food Safe? esidential fires are, unfortunately, a common  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to salvage their lives and belongings. Whether it is the whole house involved or just a fire in the kitchen The American Red Cross recommends that you: s Make your home fire-safe by installing battery-powered smoke- guisher in the kitchen. s Plan two emergency escape routes from each room in the house. Have rope or chain

131

9/2/08 9:41 AMWhat's Lurking in Your Countertop? -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html Tony Cenicola/The New York Times TESTING Reports of granite emitting Liebert measures the radiation and radon emanating from granite like that in Lynn Sugarman's kitchen tracks in the kitchen, which had richly grained cream, brown and burgundy granite countertops. His Geiger

Llope, William J.

132

Final Report-Lux Greeners GO GREEN!! SAVE EARTH!!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, even people separate plastic, it is only restricted to plastic bottles (water bottles, soft drink a regular practice in our residence that people separate the total garbage into plastic, paper, glass in every kitchen from all the floors. In some kitchens some people separate plastic from other waste

van der Torre, Leon

133

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hyperglue : an infrastructure for human-centered computing in distributed, pervasive, intelligent environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As intelligent environments (IEs) move from simple kiosks and meeting rooms into the everyday offices, kitchens, and living spaces we use, the need for these spaces to communicate not only with users, but also with each ...

Peters, Stephen Leslie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cornucopia: The Concept of Digital Gastronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The authors present a new concept of digital gastronomy—Cornucopia, a futuristic cooking methodology based on digital technologies. They discuss how they have merged kitchen tools with science fiction and actual technologies ...

Zoran, Amit Shlomo

136

Monitoring & Analysis Program of Prison Sites for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000-bed prison units recording the energy use patterns of the administration, kitchen, laundry, medical, training, and inmate housing units. Specialized software has been developed that will allow TDCJ personnel to customize the data presentation...

Eggebracht, J. A.; Heneghan, T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A 2D + 3D rich data approach to scene understanding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On your one-minute walk from the coffee machine to your desk each morning, you pass by dozens of scenes - a kitchen, an elevator, your office - and you effortlessly recognize them and perceive their 3D structure. But this ...

Xiao, Jianxiong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutant Carbon monoxide Nitrogen dioxide Averaging time 1ppm) ~g/m (0.05 ppm) Nitrogen dioxide levels in kitchens ofNitrogen Paper No. 76-17.03, presented at the 69th Dioxide

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard I[ o Fig. 2. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in aCritical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards,with gas appliances. Nitrogen dioxide levels in kitchens of

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

School of Information Summer Internship Survey 2011 This annual report includes information pertaining to the MIMS students' internship search process, salary, employer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Lab ­ India, The Kitchen Sisters, LG Electronics, Location Labs, MobileWorks, Inc., National Parks in the increased interest. Fifty-seven percent are in Technology (including Software and Electronics). There were

Militzer, Burkhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Newsletter 5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interest in science. Depicted is an experiment where a kitchen battery powers a light emitting diode (LED). The Parkers found that an incandescent light bulb would not light, but...

142

Courtyard Hanover Lebanon 10 Morgan Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Meeting spaces· Pool entrances· Restaurants and lounges· Self-operating lifts· Service animals allowed: HBO· Cable/satellite TV· Color TV· Wet bar· Kitchen Amenities Microwave oven· Silverware· Business

Myers, Lawrence C.

143

Easy Efficiency Steps Pay Off | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

my housemates and I got serious about improving the air seal of our house. We hung a plastic sheet across the archway between our kitchen and mudroom, which was where we were...

144

Welcome to Residential Services and Support 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and kitchen safety 14 Refuse and recycling 14 Licence Agreement 16 Cancelling the licence agreement 16 Moving instructions 22 Parking 22 Personal contact details 22 Pets 22 Post 22 Postal addresses 23 Posters and display

Chittka, Lars

145

Computer with surge protection power bar Earplugs (recommended)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Garbage bags and recycling bags Slippers for walking around residence Reusable coffe/tea mug Reusable. Mattresses Pets Pipes,hookahs and bongs Subwoofers and amps Traditional Residences: Kitchen appliances

Haykin, Simon

146

Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area in the Coso rhyolite dome field and the large arcuate fracture system previously postulated to represent a stage of incipient caldera formation were...

147

Context in object and scene perception  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the world, objects and settings tend to co-occur. Cars usually appear on streets with other vehicles, not in kitchens next to refrigerators. The present studies provide evidence that the semantic consistency of an object ...

Davenport, Jodi L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The effects of ethical climate and faculty-student relationships on graduate student stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these relationships in an ethically responsible manner (i.e. Biaggio, Paget, Chenoweth, 1997; Blevins-Knabe, 1992; Goodyear, Crego, & Johnston, 1992; Hogan and Kimmel, 1992; Johnson & Huwe, 2002; Johnson & Nelson, 2000; Kitchener, 2000; Matthews, 1991; Needels...

Kempner, Kimberly Pruitt

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Key Event Spaces Use Protocols Facilities and Services Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

persons (and must not be an additional 480 persons to those in ATC154) iv. A detailed security plan may security plan may be required depending on the nature of the proposed event. vi. The ATC kitchen may

Liley, David

150

Shutout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opens his phone to answer. Hello? JASON FIELDS (O.S. ) Reed.kitchen counter, answers. Hello? MARTHA INTERCUT ROWDY BARdoc. DENNIS DOCTOR WHITELY Hello, Mr. and Mrs. Reed. And

Beshwate, Keith Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Articulated pose estimation via over-parametrization and noise projection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outside the factory, robots will often encounter mechanical systems with which they need to interact. The robot may need to open and unload a kitchen dishwasher or move around heavy construction equipment. Many of the ...

Brookshire, Jonathan David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cressler, USGS). G, Sheep at water trough on the open range (photo by Saeid Tadayon, USGS). H, Bingham Canyon Mine, Salt Lake County, Utah (photo by Alan Cressler, USGS). I, Domestic water use in the kitchen

Torgersen, Christian

153

PRESSURIZATION TEST RESULTS: BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION ENERGY CONSERVATION STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~"(- Submeters for water heaters, space heating equipment,the "point-of- use" water heaters under the kitchen sinks,with sub-meters for water heaters and space heating and

Krinkel, D.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

SustainabilityCouncil MinutesandIAPProgress Nov6,2013 P.1 The University of Winnipeg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency boilers (hot water for kitchens) reflector project ­ decided not to proceed, hope to relocate ­ completed in-house boiler ­ off-seasonal steam boiler was hogging natural gas, replaced and using high

Martin, Jeff

155

Relation Among Efficacy of Insecticides, Resistance Levels, and Sanitation in the Control of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- roach populations in multiunit apartment complexes, the relationship between sanitation and cockroach of the German cockroach. Two mo- lasses baited sticky monitoring traps (Roach Pot) were placed in the kitchen

156

Microsoft Word - Letter to region - delay in DSI Lookback - 072009...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bcc: 3 S. Wright - A-7 A. Burns - D-7 C. Brannon - DK-7 CCIS Authentication - KSC-4 R. Roach - L-7 J. Wright - LP-7 S. Cannady - PT-5 H. Clark - PTL-5 L. Kitchen - PTL-5 Official...

157

Our plumbing, ourselves : a public bath house  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cleansing for being well Cleansing for well being. This thesis will consider: --how developments in plumbing and sewage and their related fixtures, kitchens and baths, parallel cultural changes throughout history. Though ...

Merceret, Honor

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

My Roommate is a Hitman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

END EPISODE “PRESSURE COOKER” Teaser INT. KITCHEN - DAY Aceturkey into a pressure cooker. ACE I know what I’m doing.They stare at the pressure cooker. The flesh of the bird

Ivers, Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Family, Home & Garden Education Center practical solutions to everyday questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about feeding on a variety of houseplants and organic materials, such as kitchen waste. In the garden they may damage dahlias, zinnias, butterfly bush, lettuce, strawberry, celery, potatoes and seedling beans

New Hampshire, University of

160

Using finished compost is a way of returning organic matter to the soil in a usable form. Soil organic matter benefits plant growth by improving the moisture and nutrient-holding capacity of sandy soils, by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crops against a wide range of common plant diseases, ranging from late blight on potatoes and tomatoes that you keep making compost from a wide range of available ingredients: kitchen and yard wastes, weeds

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLUTIONS OF SYSTEMS OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS A Thesis By CLAUDE EVANS KITCHENS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967... Major Subject: Mathematics SOLUTIONS OF SYSTEMS OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS A Thesis By CLAUDE EVANS KITCHENS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi e) (Nember (Hea of Departmen (H er May 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish...

Kitchens, Claude Evans

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Adapting the Home for Independent Living for the Elderly and Handicapped.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sills of this height are low enough for a person to see out from a sitting or prone position. They also provide an easy escape from fire. Kitchen Simple precautions can reduce kitchen accidents and make food storage, preparation and serving more.... Generally, air conditioning is not needed or desired by the elderly, except in extreme cli mates. Bathroom Bathrooms are the site of many home accidents be cause of limited space for movement, slippery bathtubs and floors, and hard surfaces which cause...

Young, Sue

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Use of a Direct Search Algorithm in the Process Design of Material ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 2, 2014 ... ing processes developed for conventional products (i.e. reheated slabs). .... hot air that should be introduced into the BF will be a function of the ...

Le Digabel

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - airbone trace metals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Loss of Heavy Metals from Experimental Salt Marsh Plots Summary: L of 12 M trace metal grade hydrochloric acid (HCl) and reheated the samples to 65-80 C in a water bath......

165

Ignition Delay Times of Natural Gas/Hydrogen Blends at Elevated Pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of natural gases that contain high levels of hydrogen have become a primary interest in the gas turbine market. For reheat gas turbines, understanding of the ignition delay times of high-hydrogen natural gases is important for two...

Brower, Marissa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Crustal thickness along the western Galapagos Spreading Center and the compensation of the Galapagos hotspot swell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uplift are [7]: (1) thermal reheating of the lithosphere by magma injection; (2) thermal expansion of hot a small increase in mantle potential temperature of V30C. The associated thermal expansion and increase

Ito, Garrett

167

Continuous Commissioning of Public Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and two elementary schools, one of which also includes a community center. Major CC measures implemented include resetting supply air temperature, duct static pressure, chilled and hot water loop ?P setpoints, condenser water temperature, and reheat water...

Joo, I. S.; Turner, W. D.; Song, L.; Dong, D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Napper, G.; Wei, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

 Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) cost study: analysis of first cost tradeoffs in UFAD systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is served by VAV fan coil units (FCU) with variable speedwith regard to terminal fan coil unit costs. Since the modelfan powered boxes with hot water reheat coils. Because it is a constant volume unit,

Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy performance of underfloor air distribution systems part V: energy plus development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating coil (fan outlet, coil inlet); the unit air outletVS) fan and reheat coil is an air system terminal unitfan is upstream of the heating coil (this is a blow-through unit).

Buhl, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

aux explosions nucleaires: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

essentially undisturbed, even if the explosion is strong enough to blow away all the gas located inside the halo at the onset of the explosion and reheat the IGM surrounding...

171

Glass Forming Ability and Relaxation Behavior of Zr Based Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by using an annealing induced relaxation approach. The thermal relaxation was studied by measuring specific heat of the samples using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and calculating the enthalpy recovery on reheating in the BMG samples...

Kamath, Aravind Miyar

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sub-lithospheric Small-scale Convection and Its Implications for the Residual Topography at Old Ocean Basins and the Plate Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal heating accounts for >~60% of the total heat output, the trapped heat may provide sufficient heat supply to preferentially reheat old lithosphere via SSC while maintaining uniform mantle temperature. We

Zhong, Shijie

173

Sub-lithospheric Small-scale Convection and Its Implications for the Residual Topography at Old Ocean Basins and the Plate Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal heating account for >~60% of the total heat output, the trapped heat may provide sufficient heat supply to preferentially reheat old lithosphere via SSC while maintaining uniform mantle temperature. We

Zhong, Shijie

174

Optimization of supply air temperature reset schedule for a single duct VAV systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a single duct variable air volume (SDVAV) system, the supply air temperature is usually set as a constant value. Since this constant setpoint is selected to satisfy the maximum cooling load conditions, significant reheat will occur once...

Fan, Wenshu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Severe Maintenance Problems as Your First Indicator of Big Potential Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout 1994 and 1995, Algoma Steel Inc. conducted several modifications to their No.5 Reheat Furnace Combustion Air System during a major rebuild of the furnace. This involved a redesigned five pass recuperator, a replacement section of ductwork...

Kaufman, S. G.; Martin, V.; Lynn, J.

176

Metrics and Benchmarks for Energy Efficiency in Laboratories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tons/gsf), boiler efficiency (%), pump- ing efficiency (hp/F W/gpm H7 Reheat Energy Use Factor Boiler Rated EfficiencyBoiler Part Load Efficiency Energy Recovery System

Mathew, Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Lessons learned in modeling Underfloor Air Distribution system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminal unit (TU) cooling design supply air temperature (due to the low supply airflow at low cooling load conditioncontrol the cooling air flow rate or reheated supply air to

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Bauman, Fred; Feng, Jingjuan; Hoyt, Tyler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

POTLUCK FOOD SAFETY 1. Definition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chaffing dishes, ice pans, holding cabinets or ice chests. The food coordinator should monitor necessarily be made "safe" by reheating. Please note that some bacteria produce toxins that cannot

179

Innovative Self- Generating Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam Driven Cooling Water Pump Blast Furnace Coke Plant Flares Boilers Steam Header Electric Cooling Water Pump (Back-up) Process Steam (Main Plant) Coal Hot Mill Reheat Furnace COG Bunker Oil ESL-IE-13-05-06 Proceedings... Driven Cooling Pump (New Back-up) Blast Furnace Coke Plant Flares Boilers Parastic Loads Natural Gas Turbine Steam Header Electric Cooling Water Pump (with Power Meter) Net ElectricityG Process Steam (Main Plant) Coal Hot Mill Reheat...

Kelly, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

4-H Favorite Foods Unit 1.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this unit: 1. Prepare and serve one food from each of these groups olte time or more. Candy Snacks Desserts Main dishes Breads Salads Drinks Vegetables Fruit Set the table five times or more. Help serve meals five times or more. Plan, prepare... and other equipment in the kitchen. 7. Learn to work safely. 8. Learn the best way to wash dishes and clean up the kitchen. 0 Learn to eat the foods listed on the Texas Food Standard. Keep your food record up to date. Exhibit one food you learned...

Cox, Maeona; Mason, Louise; Reasonover, Frances; Tribble, Marie

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Improving the Efficient of Ernie Turner Center. Final Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to complete the specifications and drawings for a variable speed kitchen exhaust system and the boiler heating system which when implemented will improve the heating efficiency of the building. The design work was focused in two key areas: kitchen ventilation and heating for the Ernie Turner Center building (ETC). RSA completed design work and issued a set of 100% drawings. RSA also worked with a cost estimator to put together a detailed cost estimate for the project. The design components are summarized.

Fredeen, Amy

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioning: General Guidance and Site Considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dehumidification or latent cooling in buildings is an area of growing interest that has been identified as needing more research and improved technologies for higher performance. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems typically expend excessive energy by using overcool-and-reheat strategies to dehumidify buildings. These systems first overcool ventilation air to remove moisture and then reheat the air to meet comfort requirements. Another common strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove moisture from the air more efficiently; however, these systems increase fan energy consumption because of the high airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors and can add heat of absorption to the ventilation air. Alternatively, liquid desiccant air-conditioning (LDAC) technology provides an innovative dehumidification solution that: (1) eliminates the need for overcooling and reheating from traditional cooling systems; and (2) avoids the increased fan energy and air heating from solid desiccant rotor systems.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Testing erosion-resistant chromium carbide plasma coatings on the TVA Paradise Unit-2 intermediate pressure turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid particle erosion (SPE) is caused by oxide particles in steam. Hard oxide particles exfoliate from the inside surfaces of boiler tubes and steam lines and are carried by the steam to the turbine where they impact and erode stationary and moving turbine parts (nozzles, moving blades, stationary blades, seal strips, and shrouds around the blades). The first stages of the high pressure (HP) and intermediate pressure (IP) turbines experience the greatest amount of SPE. Though many owners experience erosion in the first stages of both HP (main steam) and IP (reheat steam) turbines, TVA's principal erosion experience is in the IP or reheat steam turbines. This report is limited to the first few stages of IP turbines, referred to as ''first reheat stages.'' Hard chromium carbide plasma coatings have been developed. The coating was installed in Paradise Unit-2 IP turbine, 9th and 10th stages. Pretest inspection report is given.

Karr, O.F.; Frank, R.L.; Gaston, D.E. Jr.; Bradford, T.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Interpenetrative and transverse growth process of self-catalyzed ZnO nanorods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for short-wavelength optoelectronics [1] and transparent con- ducting windows for solar cells [2 evaporation process in a horizontal tube furnace. Commercial grade ZnO powder was place in the center of a single zone tube furnace and evacuated for several hours to purge oxygen in the chamber. Polycrystalline

Wang, Zhong L.

185

Typical Problems of AHU and Air Movement in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occupied zones #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? Wrong Air Handling Process and ControlWrong Air Handling Process and Control #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? TP4: Dislike fresh air?TP4: Dislike fresh air? #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? TP5: Reheat of VAVBOX at partial load time in summerTP5: Reheat... of VAVBOX at partial load time in summer #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? Unexpected Air Movement in BuildingsUnexpected Air Movement in Buildings #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? TP6: Chimney effect leading to fresh air intake in highTP6: Chimney effect leading to fresh air intake in high...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Field evaluation of cofiring gas with coal for quantifying operational benefits and emissions trim in a utility boiler. Volume 2. Topical report, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume consists of 14 appendixes to accompany volume 1 of the report, and covers the following test data: analysis of coal, fylash, and bottom ash samples; cleanliness factors; slagging observation record sheets; stack opacity measurements; stack sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides measurements; total coal flow; fuel gas flow; furnace exit gas temperature; percent oxygen at economizer outlet; percent excess air; bulk steam temperatures at secondary superheater and reheater outlets; secondary superheater and reheater tube outlet leg temperatures; unit heat rate; and models used for data interpretation.

Clark, K.J.; Torbov, T.S.; Impey, R.J.; Hara, K.G.; Burnett, T.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Trends in furnace control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper relates Italimpianti's experiences over the past few years in the area of control of reheat furnaces for the steel industry. The focus is on the level 1 area; specifically on the use of PLC-based systems to perform both combustion control and mechanical/hydraulic control. Some topics to be discussed are: overview of reheat furnace control system requirements; PLC only control vs separate PLC and DCS systems; PLC hardware requirements; man machine interface (MMI) requirements; purge, light-on and safety logic; implementation of more sophisticated level 1 control algorithms; furnace temperature optimization: look up tables vs full thermal modeling; and recent trends including integrated PLC/DCS system.

McDonald, T.J.; Keefe, M.D. (Italimpianti of America, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Dept.)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Best Management Practice #8: Steam Boiler Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Boilers and steam generators are commonly used in large heating systems, institutional kitchens, or in facilities where large amounts of process steam are used. This equipment consumes varying amounts of water depending on system size, the amount of steam used, and the amount of condensate returned.

189

HOURS & ADMISSION Discover the Arboretum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), model landscapes on the home scale, even a green maze. SHRUB & TREE COLLECTIONS Organized by type. Savor to manage stormwater on the home scale. Green roof, rain garden, rain barrels 4 HERB GARDENS (g11) Kitchen) Garden with 400 varieties of tea roses Ankeny-Lang 10 ROSE wALK (H11) Promenade of newer rose varieties

Weiblen, George D

190

Composting with Worms Worm composting (or vermicomposting) is a natural and efficient way to recycle your  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composting with Worms Worm composting (or vermicomposting) is a natural and efficient way to recycle your organic kitchen scraps. And it sure beats plowing through knee-high snowdrifts to the compost project to do with kids; it's easy to make compost using worms as long as you have the right container

New Hampshire, University of

191

Tips for Reducing Asthma Triggers in Indoor Environments The goal of parents who have children with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products and pesticides can add pollutants to the indoor air. Keep your home well ventilated when using these #12;products. Consider using less toxic products. Keep foods "in the kitchen" for easier cleaning allergens in the indoor air. Buildings need to have a sufficient amount of outdoor air to dilute and remove

192

Best Management Practice #8: Boiler and Steam Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Boilers and steam generators are commonly used in large heating systems, institutional kitchens, or in facilities where large amounts of process steam are used. This equipment consumes varying amounts of water depending on system size, the amount of steam used, and the amount of condensate returned.

193

6 BOSTONIA Summer 2014 Two Metropolitan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Community Service Center. Foodblessed op- erates two soup kitchens in the city and delivers food boxes OntheRise Bringing Food to Needy Lebanese and Syrians Amy Robertson (CAS'94) and her daughter, Fran- cesca Renda, age nine, packed up food for the hunger-relief initiative food- blessed in Beirut, Lebanon

194

Basha's Lebanese Grill 217-5288, 3748 Vestal Parkway, Vestal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heaven 217-7188, 217 Main St., Binghamton "Friendly service and delicious crepes," says Tara. Cyber food; order online and they'll deliver fresh sushi to campus," says Harolyn. Grande's Bella Cucina 772 the street from campus." Lemongrass Kitchen 785-0688, 1550 Vestal Parkway E., Vestal "The great Thai food

Suzuki, Masatsugu

195

360 De Neve Drive Los Angeles, CA 90095-1495  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Private Home/Room for Services Listing ($15 for 30 day listing) LISTER INFORMATION: Name Bathroom Kitchen Privileges Listing Category (please circle one): All UCLA students/staff/faculty UCLA In Unit Hook-Ups Parking (circle one): Garage On street Off street Gated Carport Utilities Included

Grether, Gregory

196

Indian Academy of Sciences NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for catering services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

197

Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations for catering services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations for catering services 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for Catering Services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

198

The History of Oyster Farming in Australia JOHN A. NELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The History of Oyster Farming in Australia JOHN A. NELL Introduction and Sydney rock oysters were collected for consumption byAborigines along the Oyster production in Australia, in- coastal regions of easternAustralia; some volves five species, namely the Sydney of the shell deposits inAboriginal kitchen

199

Contract-Open ITT Invitation to Tender  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract-Open ITT Invitation to Tender for Toilet, kitchen and office space cleaning at Westonbirt Arboretum 2012 ­ 2015 Contract No: FC/WE/CLEAN/12-15 #12;Contract-Open ITT 6e. Contract-Open ITT | 2 on our website at www.forestry.gov.uk 1 Type and term of contract We will be awarding a contract

200

Fifth Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 5106 5107 5108 5109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 5110 5111 5112 5113 5206 5208 5207 5209 Bathroom Bathroom 5210 Student Advisor 5211 5301 5303 5305 5307 5302 5304 5309 5411 5018 Restroom 5016 Lounge 5017 Kitchen 5015 Data Closet Elevator 54085406 54095407 Student Advisor

Gering, Jon C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Third Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 3106 3107 3108 3109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 3110 3111 3112 3113 3206 3208 3207 3209 Bathroom Bathroom 3210 Student Advisor 3211 3301 3303 3305 3307 3302 3304 3309 3411 3018 Restroom 3016 Lounge 3017 Kitchen 3015 Mechanical Elevator 34083406 34093407 Student Advisor

Gering, Jon C.

202

Fourth Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 4106 4107 4108 4109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 4110 4111 4112 4113 4208 4207 4209 Bathroom Bathroom 4210 Student Advisor 4211 4301 4303 4305 4307 4302 4304 4309Bathroom Restroom 4016 Lounge 4017 Kitchen Elevator 44084406 44094407 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 44044402

Gering, Jon C.

203

Yes Please No Thanks Drinks bottles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

film / Cling-film · Food pots, punnets, trays and packaging · Sandwich packaging · Plant pots and trays jars · Window panes and mirrors · Glass cookware METAL CANS / TINS · Aerosols (fully discharged · Directories (inc Yellow Pages) · Envelopes (inc windows) · Kitchen and tissue paper (even clean) · Jiffy bags

Capdeboscq, Yves

204

VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA --Much of the previous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49 NOTES VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA mortality (Beale 1978, Barrett 1984, Gregg et al. 2001) and social behavior (Kitchen 1974, Autenrieth. The pronghorn was reintroduced into Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in 1914 and thus, has been maintained

205

Michael Cooney, a researcher with the UH Manoa Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, in his lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

King Founder & Owner Pacific Biodiesel Technologies, LLC. 808.877.3144 info@biodiesel.com Renewable at Manoa are working with Maui based company Pacific Biodiesel to develop a way to make water from Biodiesel Technologies, LLC. Wastewater from dishwashing and cleaning kitchens would clog sewer lines

206

Joseph Skowronek, '06 Khao Lak, Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the rest of the trip. We went to the volunteer center to talk to them about where they needed the most help. This is when we decided to work construction in a village called Laem Pom, where the majority of the Tsunami in the construction work; rather they cooked in a community kitchen. The women got together and prepared all

207

Does Future Home Networking Look Blue? David Cypher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology, the marketing by manufacturers, and the acceptance by the consumers. The challenges to home Information Technology Laboratory #12;Devices in the home · Anything that runs on electricity ­ Obvious/dryer · kitchen appliances #12;Why connect devices in the home · Cable replacement · Lack of access · Movement

208

A Machine-to-Machine Architecture to Merge Semantic Sensor Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route des Colles, BP 145, 06903 Sophia Antipolis Cedex. + 33 (0) 4.93.95.51.87. karima Paso, Texas USA ACM 978-1-4503-2038-2/13/05. Weather forecasting M2M area network Health M2M area network Smart home & smart kitchen M2M area network M2M application: Suggest a recipe according the mood

Gesbert, David

209

Duties of a Custodian Custodians Do: Custodians Do Not  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and urinals; clean partitions Damp wipe/ vacuum vents � Sort through recycling containers to separate paper stations are found near kitchens and lounges, and in public areas · Dedicated recycling containers for cans, glass, and plastic are also located near central waste stations · Blue boxes at Queen's University

Abolmaesumi, Purang

210

Flight Canceled? How to Get a Cot, Food--and the Fastest Flight Out -WSJ.com http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703951704576091923287595948.html[1/25/2011 1:00:59 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Dallas- Fort Worth International Airport. "This is the new reality," said James Crites, DFW's executive Authority, which oversees Boston's Logan Airport, has an arrangement with flight kitchens to cook up lots their schedules and are running at capacity. As a result, passengers should prepare for the dreaded airport

Huang, Jianyu

211

Compost Tips for the Home Gardener1 Sydney Park Brown2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension. What Is Compost? Compost is a dark, crumbly material created when micro- organisms break down organic matter such as leaves, grass clippings and kitchen waste brew it in water to make a compost "tea" for plants. What Can Be Composted? Two types of materials

Jawitz, James W.

212

Weather Radar and Hydrology (Proceedings of a symposium held in Exeter, UK, April 2011) (IAHS Publ. 3XX, 2011).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refractivity changes in Numerical Weather Prediction models could help improve the representation of near new data source for assimilation into Numerical Weather Prediction models, particularly with respect Weather Prediction J. C. NICOL1 , K. BARTHOLEMEW1 , T. DARLINGTON2 , A. J. ILLINGWORTH1 , & M. KITCHEN2 1

Reading, University of

213

ISFV14 -14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLOWS: HVAC-BOS Michael J. Hargather and Gary S. Settles Gas Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical & Nuclear airflow patterns in the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) field. We propose background-dimensional. Finally, BOS lends itself well to certain HVAC chores such as the diagnosis of commercial kitchen

Settles, Gary S.

214

Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 76, No. 12, 2013, Pages 21322140 doi:10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-126  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2132 Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 76, No. 12, 2013, Pages 2132­2140 doi:10.4315/0362-028X the kitchen (defined as the manager) using a standard questionnaire about food safety policies, hamburger preparation policies, and use of irradiated ground beef. Interviews were followed by observations of ground

215

CRP 6270-001 KENDAL PROJECT: SCENARIO 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials and labor, and the various wholesale and retail items necessary for restaurant operations (kitchen in three main economic sectors of Tompkins County and other regions: 1) Construction, 2) Wholesale Trade required to build the structure and labor costs. Wholesale trade includes additives that need

216

20-20 Technologies NEWS & EVENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus on the Kitchen manufacturing industry. "Additionally, with 20-20's electronic data integration-20 Technologies Inc. (TSX: TWT), the world leader in 3D interior design and furniture manufacturing software, announced today that Wellborn Forest Products, a manufacturer of custom and semi- custom frameless

217

Learning Organizational Principles in Human Environments Martin J. Schuster, Dominik Jain, Moritz Tenorth and Michael Beetz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Organizational Principles in Human Environments Martin J. Schuster, Dominik Jain, Moritz demonstrate the use of learned models of organizational principles in a kitchen environment on a real robot. In this work, we consider the problem of identifying the organizational structure within an environment, i

218

26 McCormick / spring ALL IN A DAY'S WORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fumes out of the kitchen and into the cold air. Malin has come to Edzo's to conduct an energy audit involved with energy audits. Working with professional energy consultants, Malin and other ESW members have, an assessment that determines how much energy a building uses and suggests ways to lower consumption

MacIver, Malcolm A.

219

Table of Contents flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......Kitchen Table Science How to make an electromagnet of your own, step by step. PG. 0......Great experiments ­ everything from the mechanics of cancer to the behavior of particles that make up matter in its most to building and mentoring the next generation of scientists. At the heart of the Magnet Lab's mission

Weston, Ken

220

UMR is excited to welcome you to 318 Commons!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-halogen desk, floor and bedside lamps (the bedrooms do not have a top light) ·Miscellaneous Items · Coax Cable should be kept in the kitchen and a refrigerator has been provided there. This also keeps the wattage strain down in your apartment) ·Halogen or torchiere lamps ·Illegal substances or paraphernalia ·Firearms

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Some Things Can"t Be Fixed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as his own. air, yrfllr. I-Ie?d spent the nighl a' Hutch?s, because Hutch was- Hutch was- I?fu tch was whist ling in the kitchen as he tossed ingredients into a grayish-white liquid in his blender. Starsky sat up and shook his head, then gave a...

Hutchrules3

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

"The Energy Commission's review of our loan requests confirmed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The Energy Commission's review of our loan requests confirmed that the projects are technically to reduce the city's annual energy cost by $72,000. The cost of $348,000 will be recovered in 4.8 years due to the total energy savings. Commission Energy Annual Energy Loan Savings Cost Savings Museum Kitchen $ 18

223

Green cottage design in the New Forest Two new timber cottages in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

timber frame. Solar energy The kitchen maximises passive solar design, with floor to ceiling windows standards. It took less than a year (from planning consent to completion) to build the timber-framed energy · Achieved Code for Sustainable Homes Level Four. · 100% sustainably sourced timber. · 100% low energy

224

Biodiesel Engine Testing MECH-457 Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel Engine Testing MECH-457 Final Report Submitted to Jon Mikkelsen April 11, 2005 Darren at UBC has begun producing biodiesel fuel from waste cooking oils acquired from campus kitchens. Using biodiesel in a four-cylinder, 30 hp Kubota engine (V1305). This engine was chosen because it is used

225

Numerical simulation of air/water multiphase flows for ceramic sanitary ware design by multiple GPUs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and kitchen fittings. Facing the increasing demands for saving energy and water, TOTO has always targeted schemes and port the code to the GPU platforms to accelerate the large scale computations for real** Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of energy sciences Numerical simulation of air

Furui, Sadaoki

226

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is compiled by: A. Cooper Tank crew: A. Cooper, Gareth Crook, J. Heighway, T. Kitchen, N. Lobanov, A. MuirheadV insulation test of the column. Perform electrical and mechanical tests and inspect all idlers, chains the 14UD was OK and compliant with the Confined Space regulations. · The platform was deployed

Chen, Ying

227

BOILING CRISIS:THEORY,SIMULATION,AND EXPERIMENTSBOILING CRISIS: THEORY, SIMULATION, AND EXPERIMENTS Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid heat carrier. We discuss the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that separates the liquid from the heater. Film boiling can be also observed in the kitchen by sprinkling water onto a hot frying pan. In spite of the large temperature of the heater (the pan) the water drops Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid heat carrier. We discuss

Nikolayev, Vadim S.

228

SHASTA COUNTY The Shasta County Jail is a 115,035 square-foot facility located in Redding. Built in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified ways to improve the comfort and reduce operating costs of the jail through energy efficiency by 1997. PROJECTS IMPLEMENTED The County Jail received a comprehensive efficiency makeover that included: · Replacing the electric boiler with a natural gas-fired boiler to provide hot water for domestic, kitchen

229

Ecology, 90(7), 2009, pp. 19001909 2009 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for further restoration management and experimentation which will refine transition and threshold concepts-state succession in wetlands: a novel use of state and transition models C. L. ZWEIG 1 AND W. M. KITCHENS Florida develop a general, nonspatial state and transition (S and T) succession conceptual model for wetlands

230

Polymer Surface Modification Using Microwave-Oven-Generated Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, diameter 160 mm) are from Fisher Scientific. Compressed oxygen and ethanol (100%) are from Air Products with plasma is a frequently used technique to accomplish surface modifi- cations that affect chemical products. Our approach relies on an unmodified "kitchen microwave oven" and standard laboratory glassware

Steinbock, Oliver

231

ECOVILLAGE FACTS The complex includes 50 apartments (18 original and 32 new)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiant floor heating o Structurally insulated panels (SIPs) · In additional to individual garden plots of the Ecovillage apartments include: o solar tubes and compact fluorescent lighting o low-flow toilets, community gatherings o Kitchen o Playroom o Dryers for Ecovillage residents o Solar water heater o Solar

Baltisberger, Jay H.

232

Beechenhurst visitor centre A new environmentally-friendly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiently. The rest of the building has under floor heating which runs on LPG. Solar Four solar thermal, is the sole source of heating for the shop. It operates using clean-burn technology which produces heat more panels mounted on the roof provide hot water to the hand basins in the toilets and kitchen. Water

233

Tufts University Office of Residential Life & Learning ver.11.2013 Tufts University Office of Residential Life & Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tufts University ­ Office of Residential Life & Learning ver.11.2013 Tufts University ­ Office of Residential Life & Learning Residence Hall Lounge & Kitchen Policies for Use Please review the following each policy.* Quiet Hours Please remember that each residence hall is primarily a residential facility

Tufts University

234

STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING CEC-CF-6R-LTG-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-LTG-01 Residential Lighting (Page 1 of 6) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: 2008 Residential Compliance Forms August 2009 1. Kitchen Lighting Does project

235

Spatial, Temporal, and Habitat-Related Variation in Abundance of Pelagic Fishes in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico: Potential Implications of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Jay R. Rooker1,2 *, Larissa L. Kitchens in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) before (2007­2009) and after (2010) the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Four in Abundance of Pelagic Fishes in the Gulf of Mexico: Potential Implications of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Rooker, Jay R.

236

Sonoma State University Top 10 Reasons Students Love SSU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] Sustainability SSU is known as a model for sustainability and has won several national awards for sustainable practices. The University manages 4,000 acres of wilderness preserve where students study sustainable and inviting common areas with modern kitchens provide comfortable living. The Princeton Review ranked SSU

Ravikumar, B.

237

Updated October 24, 2011 Illinois Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated October 24, 2011 Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services Student posters, paper, tape, sticky tack, etc from all surfaces; · Wipe clean all walls and furniture; · If living in an apartment, wipe clean the kitchen appliances, cabinets, and floor; and clean the bathroom

Heller, Barbara

238

Updated March 12, 2012 Illinois Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 12, 2012 Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services Student posters, paper, tape, sticky tack, etc from all surfaces; · Wipe clean all walls and furniture; · If living in an apartment, wipe clean the kitchen appliances, cabinets, and floor; and clean the bathroom

Heller, Barbara

239

Updated September 26, 2013 Illinois Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated September 26, 2013 Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services Student beds, etc); · Remove posters, paper, tape, sticky tack, etc from all surfaces; · Wipe clean all walls and furniture; · If living in an apartment, wipe clean the kitchen appliances, cabinets, and floor; and clean

Heller, Barbara

240

Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Illinois Institute of Technology Housing & Residential Services Student Guide to 20102011 & assemble beds, etc); · Remove posters, paper, tape, sticky tack, etc from all surfaces; · Wipe clean all walls and furniture; · If living in an apartment, wipe clean the kitchen appliances, cabinets

Heller, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

T H E I N F O R M A T I O NO F F I C E RETURN POSTAGEGUARANTEED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 cafeteriaand commissary kitchenwill ease the shortage ofeatingfacilities on the campus inthecoming year is a commissary kitchen which will preparefoodfortransportationto fourothermajorfood c,enters on the campus. UBC of the campus. FatherDavidBauer will ice his CanadianOlympic hockeyteam on Friday,October 25, for a game against

Farrell, Anthony P.

242

2009 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 2901-9012 Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feet from house. · Bathroom ventilation fan with humidistat or timer vented to exterior. · Kitchen, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. ENERGY SERIES: What Can Builders Do to Help Energy and Environmental Building Association's Water Management Guide specifications. Roof · Roof slope

Liskiewicz, Maciej

243

25shift SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES AT UBC'S OKANAGAN CAMPUS 25shift SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES AT UBC'S OKANAGAN CAMPUS Anyone who has been at UBC's Okanagan campus for any  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

program collects 2,000 pounds of kitchen organics each month, plus another 1,000 pounds of organic waste the years as he spends his days gathering recyclable materials that are then sent to area recycling plants and is a key contributor to the campus-wide recycling program. Peter works at UBC's Okanagan campus through

Pulfrey, David L.

244

Lonnie Oral History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if we can swing it. We get a lot of our wood donated, so that helps with the heating bill. We have solar panels on the roof here, 60% of the power... guess.” I didn’t know about a lot of the soup kitchens then. And I walked through Washington Park, a light rain was falling and I was just miserable. This was...

Kolavalli, Chhaya; ---, Lonnie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., 2004. All rights reserved. Freescale Semiconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a refrigerator to store the most commonly used items, and saves himself some trips to the supermarket is the large amount of RAM in a system, the cache is the refrigerator, and the list is the cache directory the ultimate in freshness, every time an order comes into the kitchen, the cook runs out to the supermarket

Moreno Maza, Marc

246

Campus Planning Committee April 24, 2012 2:00-4:00 p.m.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all departments. Renovation at the small scale will continue in order to keep up with faculty will upgrade fire and life safety systems, exterior windows, floor finishes, lighting, and window and wall coverings. The project also provides low voltage data/communication and cable TV wiring and kitchen upgrades

California at Santa Barbara, University of

247

KIM HALL & JENNIFER MORGAN, 9/18/2014: Slavery and the Sweet Taste of Empire A blog by Pamela Kierejczyk Thielman, PhD Student, Theatre, Graduate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, deal with the role of women in the slave economy of the English colonies. The evening was decidedly and overworked Artisans who have refined our Sweet tastes from the cane fields to the Kitchens of the New World on the Occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant). Hall said that her current work focuses

Rosen, Jay

248

An Object-Oriented Method for ASCET Max Fuchs and Dieter Nazareth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

98MF19 BMW-ROOM An Object-Oriented Method for ASCET Max Fuchs and Dieter Nazareth BMW AG, 80788 Munich Maximilian.Fuchs,Dieter.Nazareth@bmw.de Dirk Daniel and Bernhard Rumpe Department of Computer kitchen without a cooking book. Plans to employ the tool for BMW vehicle software sparked off demand

249

GREETINGS FROM THE CHAIR www.engr.wisc.edu/bme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's disease over the last 15 years. She would love to again be able to enjoy cooking in her kitchen and to regain the ability to complete everyday tasks. Complications from her condition cause her to be severely that can be worn to help hold her upright while also increasing her mobility.The students'hope is to allow

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

250

Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in rural women of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for refining disease burden assessments attributable to household biomass combustion Priscilla Johnson1 January and May 2007. COPD assessments were done using a combination of clinical examination spend !2 hours/day in the kitchen involved in cooking. Use of solid fuel was associated with higher risk

Silver, Whendee

251

Enzyme and Microbial Technology 51 (2012) 396401 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, especially in hot water pipes, heaters, boilers, kitchens, bathtubs, and other units [4,5]. Therefore, prior electricity-driven water softening system Mary A. Arugulaa , Kristen S. Brastada , Shelley D. Minteerb , Zhen August 2012 Keywords: Hardness Water softening Enzymatic biofuel cell Electricity Desalination a b s t r

252

Reliability, Safety, and Security in Everyday Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lives. From automobiles to elevators, kitchen appliances to televisions, and water heaters to cell. A domestic hot water heater that overheats water, causing scalding burns on a child. A thermostat that doesn't turn on heat when needed, causing household water pipes to freeze and burst. A microwave oven

Koopman, Philip

253

Latest advances in steam turbine design, blading, repairs, condition assessment, and condenser interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at a conference on power generation. Topics covered include: a life extension approach for steam turbine blading in Electricite de France fossil plants, and on site 430 MW high pressure reheat turbine shell cracking and distortion repairs.

Rasmussen, D.M. (Turbine Consultants, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Master Thesis: Collaboration between Utility Systems and Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Electricity Natural GasElectricity Generation (Power Plant) 1. Abbreviations: CO (coke oven), SP (sinter plant and LF) Casting (CC) Storage (SY) Reheating (RF) Rolling (HSM) Meltshop Hot Rolling Mill Coal Iron Ore) Meltshop Hot Rolling Mill Coal Iron Ore Slabs CO and BF Gas BOF Gas Given: Hot rolling mill produces set

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

255

Operational and environmental benefits of oxy-fuel combustion in the steel industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the high flame temperature of conventional oxygen-fuel burners, these burners have typically not been used in reheat furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical. Praxair has developed a number of burners and associated control systems that have been successfully operated in a variety of reheat furnaces beginning in 1980. The burners have also recently been used for ladle preheating. All burners have been operated with 100% oxygen. The patented burners have designs that result in flame temperatures equivalent to conventional air-fuel burners. Flexible flame patterns are possible, resulting in uniform temperature distribution. In addition, the low flame temperature combined with minimal nitrogen in the furnace results in very low NO{sub x} emissions. The design of the control systems insure safe and reliable operation. In the following sections, oxygen-fuel combustion will be described, with a discussion of fuel savings and other benefits. Unique designs will be discussed along with the features which make them applicable to reheat applications and which result in lower emissions. Other equipment provided with the burners to complete the oxy-fuel combustion system will be described briefly. There will also be a short discussion of how both the fuel and oxygen price can affect the economics of fuel saving. Results from the commercial retrofit installations in continuous and batch reheat furnaces, soaking pits and ladle preheaters will be described. Finally, NO{sub x} emissions data will be discussed.

Farrell, L.M. [Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States); Pavlack, T.T. [Praxair, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States); Rich, L. [North American Manufacturing Co., Coraopolis, PA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

202 IEEE TRANS.4CTIONS Oh'AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. AC-18,NO. 3, J U K E 1973 Design and Analysis of Boiler-Turbine-Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Boiler-Turbine-Generator Controls Using Optimal Linear Regulator Theory JOHN P. McDOKALD AND HARRY G of a nonlinear mathematical model of a drum-type, twin furnace, reheat boiler-turbine-generator (RBTG) system- tiveoperatingandcontrolstrategies for boiler-t.urbine- generator systems to meet different, system operating ob- jectives. Among

Kwatny, Harry G.

257

January 2011: ME 533-Energy Conversion Dr. William M. Carey, Professor of Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Vapor Power Systems, Gas Power Systems, Refrigeration and Heat Pump Systems 2. Thermodynamic Relations.) Gas Power Systemsl-Brayton-regenerative gas turbines with reheat and inter cooling 3.) Refrigeration, and Solar Energy Conversion Systems employing vapor power and gas power cylces.2.) The analysis of renewable

258

2012: ME 533-Energy Conversion Dr. William M. Carey, Professor of Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Vapor Power Systems, Gas Power Systems, Refrigeration and Heat Pump Systems 2. Thermodynamic Relations.) Gas Power Systemsl-Brayton-regenerative gas turbines with reheat and inter cooling 3.) Refrigeration, and Solar Energy Conversion Systems #12;employing vapor power and gas power cylces.2.) The analysis

259

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steam turbines (538 o C/1815 psia/ 538 o C / 400 psia / 65 psia), de-aerator, condenser,steam turbine selected to match this cycle is a two-casing, reheat, double-flow (exhaust) machine, exhausting downward to the condenser.

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Astrophysical Journal, 722:17351743, 2010 October 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/722/2/1735 C 2010. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or continuously supplied to cluster cores to prevent the formation of cooling flows. A primary candidate--REHEATING THE COOL CORE OF A 3 keV CLUSTER FROM A NUCLEAR OUTBURST at z = 0.246 D. V. Lal1 , R. P. Kraft1 merger event. The temperature across the discontinuities is roughly constant with no signature of a cool

Evans, Dan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cool, Dry, Quiet Dehumidification with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CDQ unit, dewpoint is 3 to 8 degrees lower than a coil-only unit. An enhanced CDQ unit can have, or 100-percent dedicated outdoor air unit. Mixed air goes through an optional preheat coil, CDQ wheel, supply fan, cooling coil, optional reheat coil, optional final filters. A CDQ system in a Custom Climate

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

262

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, supplirnentau n012, Tome 46, ddcernbre 1985 page C8-635  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure. The liquid heat capacity c (T) and the glass heat capacity c,(T) were extrapolated. 1 - Enthalpy and heat capacity vs. temperature plots for a glass cooled and then reheated through%. The heat impedance is defined as Z = T e o '/Qo an6 thef complex heat capacity becomes c = l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

263

DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200454 Mechanical Activation of CaO-Based Adsorbents for CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ical treatment. The mechanical milling intensity and conditions of grinding (e.g., wet vs. dry avoid several gas cooling and reheating steps.[8] Among high-temperature CO2 adsorbents, CaO-based mate examined two common high- energy ball milling techniques (vibratory and planetary) in wet The reversible

Suslick, Kenneth S.

264

w Ris Report No. 318 J-Danish Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1. A Ten-shell Section Fuel Model 11 3.2. A Two-point Fuel Model 13 4. The Primary Circuit generator, and on the secondary side a turbine with a reheater be- tween the high and low pressure section

265

g Ris Report No. S Danish Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristic of Steam Turbines for Nuclear Power Plants 17 3.1. Stage with Moisture Trap 17 3.2. Determination PUMPS STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS STEAM CONDENSES STEAM TURBINES T CODES UDC 621.039.S24.4-97: 611.3.06 #12 turbine, a low-pressure steam turbine, a moisture separator, a reheater, a condenser, feedwater heaters

266

arXiv:astro-ph/0602622v128Feb2006 Magnetic Fields in the Center of the Perseus Cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the linearly polarized emission from 3C 84, and from them we determine a Faraday rotation measure (RM) ranging is required to re-heat the gas. Since massive flows of material are not observed, 1 University of New Mexico in modifying the energy transport and dissipation in the center of the cluster (Fabian et al. 2005). Compar

Taylor, Greg

267

Ris-M-2190 DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER PLANT MODEL BWR-PLASIM OUTLINED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 2. THE REACTOR MODEL 6 2.1. Neutron kinetics 6 2.2. Fuel dynamics 13 2.3. Hydraulic dynamics coolant flow 28 3. THE TURBINE AND FEEDWATER HEATERS 30 3.1. Flow and pressure calculations for the turbine . 33 3.2. Enthalpy and power calculations for the turbine 35 3.3. The reheater model 37 3

268

Pervaporation assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A (Fairfield, CA)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Pervaporation process and assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

g Rise Report No. 336 Danish Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TYPE REACTORS FEEDWATER FEEDWATER HEATERS HEATERS MATHEMATICAL MODELS NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS ONE Technology Abstract A dynamic model of a nuclear power plant, including a boiling water reactor, high- and low-pressure turbines, moisture separator, reheater, condenser, feedwater heaters and feedwater pump

271

HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Synthesis and characterization of single-crystal indium nitride nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in visible light range, and high-efficiency solar cells.2 Furthermore, InN has distinct advantages over Ga-solid (VLS) approach using a single-zone furnace at 500 °C,6 and a diameter distribution from 40 to 80 nm-zone furnace for InN nanowire synthe- sis. This technique allowed us to use a high-temperature zone (700 °C

Zhou, Chongwu

273

General engineering specifications for 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains specifications for architectural features of buildings for the SRC-1 Demonstration Plant: skylights, ventilators, sealants, doors, mirrors, furring and lathing, gypsum plaster, lightweight plaster, wallboard, ceramic tile, acoustic ceiling systems, resilient flooring, carpeting, brick flooring, architectural painting, vinyl wall covering, chalkboards, tackboards, toilets, access flooring, lockers, partitions, washroom accessories, unit kitchens, dock levels, seals, shelters, custom casework, auditorium seats, drapery tacks, prefabricated buildings, stairs, elevators, shelves, etc. (LTN).

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Open Control Networking Systems for Smarter Building Operations-Fundamentals of System Architecture and Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Installation Standards ICEBO Oct 18-20, 2011 15 LonMark Standards?? ISO/IEC 14908 ANSI/EIA/CEA?709.1?Protocol ? An?open?standard?protocol?for?control?applications ? Reference?document?available?from?Global?Engineering ? Protocol?implementations...?Network ? Standardized ? Compatible?products ? Interchangeable ? Interoperable ? Customizable ? Cost?efficient ? Multi?vendor? ? Freedom?of?choice ICEBO Oct 18-20, 2011 ISO Standard 14908 Further Standards Adoption ? Buildings, Gas Stations, Kitchen Equipment...

Gibson, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

Rama Govindarajan; Manikandan Mathur; Ratul DasGupta; N. R. Selvi; Neena Susan John; G. U. Kulkarni

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

Innovative Water Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management 1.Rain gardens 2.Porous pavement 3.Green roofs Hydrologic Cycle ISSUES ? Water Conservation ? Is there enough? ? Can conservation make a difference? ? Water Quality ? Contamination/pollution due to runoff Eagle...-drought conditions ? A breakdown of energy use by department shows that the Austin Water Utility uses 60% of the total amount of energy used by the City of Austin. What Can We Do? ? Water Conservation ? Indoors ? Bathrooms ? Kitchen ? Showers ? Laundry...

Jaber, F. H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Energy-conservation program: notice of proposed rulemaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A notice of proposed rulemaking, proposing energy efficiency standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment (not including furnaces) kitchen ranges and ovens, and central air conditioners ispresented. Comments are invited and the procedure for public comment is detailed. Issues included and presented in the proposed rulemaking are: determination of energy efficiency levels, macro-economic analysis, certification and enforcement, effect on other law, small business exemptions, environmental assessment, and regulatory analysis. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Machine-to-Machine Architecture to Merge Semantic Sensor Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.bonnet@eurecom.fr Laboratoire I3S-CNRS/UNSA. 930 Route des Colles, BP 145, 06903 Sophia Antipolis Cedex. + 33 (0) 4.93.95.51-1-4503-2038-2/13/05. Weather forecasting M2M area network Health M2M area network Smart home & smart kitchen M2M area network M area network Figure 1: Merge heterogeneous M2M area networks. such as home monitoring [19], vehicular

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

Paraje (de Fra Cristobal): investigations of a Territorial period Hispanic village site in southern New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and interest in the project was definitely an asset. Al so, thanks to David Snow, who examined sampl es and provided advice on Hispanic ceramics, and to Gary DeMarcay, who analyzed the faunal material, and John Jones, who analyzed the vegetal material.... 1. Artifacts from LA 1124. Table 7. 2. Kitchen or Tableware Ceramics from LA 1124. . . . . . Table 7. 3. Vessel forms of the Ceramics from LA 1124. . . . . . . Table 7. 4. Classification of the Assemblage I Artifacts. . . . Table 7. 5...

Boyd, Douglas Kevin

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A DSP based real time power quality measurement system with voltage distortion improvement capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. (August 1992) Jian Gou, B. S. E. E. , Shanghai Jiao Tong Ilniversity Chair of Advisory Committee. Dr. P. Enjeti The general drive towards automation has increased the use of harmonic generating loads both by residential as well as industrial consumers... The examples of these loads in home and industry are: heating ventilation and air conditioning equipment (HVAC); electric kitchen apphances; electric arc furnaces; variable speed dc and ac drives, etc Since the equipment of this kind provides the users...

Gou, Jian

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Refrigerator design for the ambulatory and wheelchair-using elderly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of limitations snd their higher degree of dependence on products. An important arse in product design which has seldom been considered is that of kitchen appliances, and, more specifically, rafr igerators. Refrigerator design has changed little in the last... For the elderly or disabled is a relatively unexplored ares. The present research is an attempt to rectify this neglect. LITERATURE REVIEW Ther s is a striking lack of information in the literature specifically concerned with refrigerators. Those few studies...

Mills, Mary Sue

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Scale-invariance as the origin of dark radiation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent cosmological data favour R^2-inflation and some amount of non-standard dark radiation in the Universe. We show that a framework of high energy scale invariance can explain these data. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry provides gravity with the Planck mass and particle physics with the electroweak scale. We found that the corresponding massless Nambu--Goldstone bosons -- dilatons -- are produced at reheating by the inflaton decay right at the amount needed to explain primordial abundances of light chemical elements and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background. Then we extended the discussion on the interplay with Higgs-inflation and on general class of inflationary models where dilatons are allowed and may form the dark radiation. As a result we put a lower limit on the reheating temperature in a general scale invariant model of inflation.

Dmitry Gorbunov; Anna Tokareva

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy-momentum tensor of bouncing gravitons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a model of 3-brane with matter embedded in 5D space-time conditions for gravitons emitted from the brane to the bulk to return back to the brane are found. For a given 5-momentum of graviton falling back to the brane the interval between emission and detection times is calculated. A method to calculate contribution to the energy-momentum tensor from multiple graviton bouncings is developed. Explicit expressions for the energy-momentum tensors of gravitons which have made one, two and three bounces are obtained and their magnitudes are numerically calculated. These expressions are used to solve the evolution equation for dark radiation. A relation connecting reheating temperature and the scale of extra dimension is obtained. For the reheating temperature $T_R\\sim 10^6 GeV$ we estimate the scale of extra dimension to be of order $10^{-9}\\div 10^{-10} GeV$.

Iofa, Mikhail Z

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Late-time Entropy Production from Scalar Decay and Relic Neutrino Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entropy production from scalar decay in the era of low temperatures after neutrino decoupling will change the ratio of the relic neutrino temperature to the CMB temperature, and, hence, the value of N_eff, the effective number of neutrino species. Such scalar decay is relevant to reheating after thermal inflation, proposed to dilute massive particles, like the moduli and the gravitino, featuring in supersymmetric and string theories. The effect of such entropy production on the relic neutrino temperature ratio is calculated in a semi-analytic manner, and a recent lower bound on this ratio, obtained from the WMAP satellite and 2dF galaxy data, is used to set a lower bound of ~ 1.5 x 10^-23 Gev on the scalar decay constant, corresponding to a reheating temperature of about 3.3 Mev.

Paramita Adhya; D. Rai Chaudhuri; Steen Hannestad

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

Blue-tilted Tensor Spectrum and Thermal History of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate constraints on the spectral index of primordial gravitational waves (GWs), paying particular attention to a blue-tilted spectrum. Such constraints can be used to test a certain class of models of the early Universe. We investigate observational bounds from LIGO+Virgo, pulsar timing and big bang nucleosynthesis, taking into account the suppression of the amplitude at high frequencies due to reheating after inflation and also late-time entropy production. Constraints on the spectral index are presented by changing values of parameters such as reheating temperatures and the amount of entropy produced at late time. We also consider constraints under the general modeling approach which can approximately describe various scenarios of the early Universe. We show that the constraints on the blue spectral tilt strongly depend on the underlying assumption and, in some cases, a highly blue-tilted spectrum can still be allowed.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Tomo Takahashi; Shuichiro Yokoyama

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

Coburn, T.T.

1988-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solid oxide fuel cell steam reforming power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reforming Power System that utilizes adiabatic reforming of reformate within this system. By utilizing adiabatic reforming of reformate within the system the system operates at a significantly higher efficiency than other Solid Oxide Reforming Power Systems that exist in the prior art. This is because energy is not lost while materials are cooled and reheated, instead the device operates at a higher temperature. This allows efficiencies higher than 65%.

Chick, Lawrence A.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen CROSS EFFECTS, TOTAL SYSTEM LAY-OUT 13.6.2001 10-1 Figure 10.1 Typical pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber + baghouse filter for SO2 and particulate For a conventional pulverised coal-fired power plant a set-up is shown in Figure 10.1, with a gas clean-up system scrubber (pH ~ 6) 60 - 70 7 Re-heater 350 - 400 8 SCR DeNOx 300 - 400 9 Active coke bed 100 - 150 Figure 10

Zevenhoven, Ron

292

Sterile neutrino dark matter in B-L extension of the standard model and galactic 511 keV line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sterile right-handed neutrinos can be naturally embedded in a low scale gauged U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model. We show that, within a low reheating scenario, such a neutrino is an interesting dark matter candidate. We emphasize that if the neutrino mass is of the order of MeV, then it accounts for the measured dark matter relic density and also accommodates the observed flux of 511 keV photons from the galactic bulge.

Khalil, Shaaban [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt)] [Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, PO Box 43 (Egypt); Seto, Osamu, E-mail: skhalil@bue.edu.eg, E-mail: seto@physics.umn.edu [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)] [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

An Exact Calculation of the Energy Density of Cosmological Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we calculate the Bogoliubov coefficients and the energy density of the stochastic gravitational wave background for a universe that undergoes inflation followed by radiation domination and matter domination, using a formalism that gives the Bogoliubov coefficients as continous functions of time. By making a reasonable assumption for the equation of state during reheating, we obtain in a natural way the expected high frequency cutoff in the spectral energy density.

L. E. Mendes; A. B. Henriques; R. G. Moorhouse

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/cm^3, for 150 GeV winos current data constrains the reheat temperature to be above 1.4 GeV. As a result, for models in which the wino mass is a loop factor below the gravitino mass, the data favor moduli that are more than an order of magnitude heavier than the gravitino. We discuss some of the sobering implications of this result for the status of supersymmetry. We also comment on other neutralino dark matter scenarios, in particular the case of mixed bino/higgsino dark matter. We show that in this case, direct and indirect searches are complementary to each other and could potentially cover most of the parameter space.

JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

295

Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

Visinelli, Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Emerging Opportunities in Industrial Electrification Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fired cupola (USA): Iron melting ? Plasma Energy Corporation (USA): ladle reheating ? CAM/Stelco (Belgium/Canada): blast furnace retrofit ? S~F Plasmasmelt (Sweden): Iron reduction ? SKF Plasmared (Sweden): Iron reduction (DRI) ? ElRED (Sweden): Iron... in arc furnace and membrane process developments; Sweden leads in large-scale application of plasma metallurgy; and Electricite' de France and the Electricity Council in the U.K. have long had aggressive and successful electrotechnology development...

Schmidt, P. S.

297

Applying DDC and VFD to Central Chilled Water Plants for Profits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

continuous series of improvements, serves over 3 million square feet utilizing less chiller capacity and less boiler capacity than was used in 1974. The energy usage per square foot of facility served has been reduced by at least 65% and the value... less than 25% on a per square foot basis. The cost avoidances were generated primarily by the elimination of reheat for space conditioning and modifications and improvements to the central heating and cooling equipment. The remainder of this paper...

Utesch, A. L.

298

Effective Transfer of Waste Heat Recovery Technology: A Case Study of GTE Products Corporation's Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ~J Investlne'nt Die Reheat, Tunnel 93,203 62,387 17.9 l7,nl J.5 3.2 V1 23 HO\\oWet Turbi-;-~ Whitehall, HI Investment Die Rehe:tt, Tunnetl 11I,~d'l 80,762 2~ !!.-.!: ion.! Yo.!..&! Irvine. PA Cacbauo", Forge Reht. Stf"cl 675,318 149,443 43.7 109...

Gonzalez, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TT P Enthalpies at other states and the fractions of steam extracted from the turbines can Condenser 14 2 19 15 High-P Turbine 3 4 56 7 8 910 11 12 17 18 Closed FWH I Closed FWH II Open FWH P IP II P it without permission. 10-109 10-104 A steam power plant operating on the ideal reheat-regenerative Rankine

Bahrami, Majid

300

Phase transformations in welded supermartensitic stainless steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ferrite phase, and the development of a model to facilitate the choice of a suitable post-weld heat-treatment temperature. The microstructural examination of a variety of welds revealed the presence of retained ?-ferrite in dual-phase and grain... -coarsened HAZ regions. Under normal welding conditions, ?-ferrite retention was more pronounced in dual-phase HAZ and in molybdenum containing alloys. However, in multipass welds, ?-ferrite distribution was non-uniform as a result of reheating effects. A number...

Carrouge, Dominique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Primordial black holes from temporally enhanced curvature perturbation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scalar field with generalized kinetic interactions metamorphoses depending on its field value, ranging from cosmological constant to stiff matter. We show that such a scalar field can give rise to temporal enhancement of the curvature perturbation in the primordial Universe, leading to efficient production of primordial black holes while the enhancement persists. If the inflation energy scale is high, those mini-black holes evaporate by the Hawking radiation much before Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the effective reheating of the Universe is achieved by the black hole evaporation. Dominance of PBHs and the reheating by their evaporation modify the expansion history of the primordial Universe. This results in a characteristic feature of the spectrum of primordial tensor modes in the DECIGO frequency band, opening an interesting possibility of testing PBH reheating scenario by measuring the primordial tensor modes. If the inflation energy scale is low, the PBH mass can be much larger than the solar mass. In this case, PBH is an interesting candidate for seeds for supermassive black holes residing in present galaxies.

Teruaki Suyama; Yi-Peng Wu; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

302

In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/...

Fan, JiJi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cost-Effective Energy Efficiency Measures for Above Code (ASHRAE 90.1-2001 and 2007) Restaurant Buildings in the City of Arlington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) EPLUS file, Deru et al. 2011 c) College Station Restaurant SurveyPackaged single zone units w/ gas fired furnace Static pressure : 2.5 in-wc Fan efficiency: Overall Eff: 55% (Motor eff. @1800rpm: 87.5) Service Hot Water Peak Hot Water Flow Rate - 133....1 2001 Table 9.4.5 ASHRAE 90.1 2007 Extra Power Allowance N.A 5% Section 9.4.5 ASHRAE 90.1 2007 Equipment Electric Equipment in Dining Space Table 9, Deru et al., 2011 HVAC Systems Zoning HVAC System Type HVAC Efficiency ?240,000 Btu/hr and < 760...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Monthly Indices: A Procedure for Energy Use Display Creating Monthly Indices for Comparing the Energy Consumption of Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by individual hydronic fan coil units. The first floor is heated/cooled by a hydronic air handler, and there are single air handlers on floors two through four to supply outside air to each floor. The two story Unit B contains the auditorium, choir Energy... operate whenever the hydronic air handler does not provide cooling, in order to prevent humidity problems. Unit C is a single story building which contains the cafeteria and kitchen. It is heated/cooled by hydronic fan-coil units (six in the cafeteria, two...

Landman, D. S.; Haberl, J. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Leave A Light On For Me  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

poppedher head out ofthe kitchen opening, watching the two men. Starsky hadn't remembered to shutthe door, and Hutchreached behindhim to pushit shut. Starsky didn't loosen his grip on his partner in the slightest. "So glad you're here." Starsky's emotion... to LA, like you always do!" "No-" "With him!" Both partners straightened up as one at that. "Yes, with him," Starsky said, his voice dangerously low as he stared at Nick. "But that's got nothing -" "You never cared for us! Once you got your fancy...

Multiple Contributors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Heart and Soul Issue 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pinched my cheek as she walked by me. "It's no wonder he's grumpy in the mornings, if he has you for a partner. Your father used to make me grumpy in the mornings, and you're a lot like him." I blinked at her as she went into the kitchen. I was always... discouraging to a fan writer than total silence after putting so much effort into creating a story and bringing it to print. If you enjoy what you're reading - in any fandom - make sure the people who bring those stories to you know how you feel. I can't speak...

Frost, C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The New European GreenBuilding Programme to Promote Energy Efficiency Investments in non-Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

redesigned based on a concept that maximises comfort and efficiency. Fresh air 8 Source: P. Campanile -CRF Italy #0;5#0;5 Renewable Energies CRF Canteen: Efficiency of the climatisation Cogenerator 32-41% (*)2,3-3,1 tep3,4-5,2 tepPrimary energy monthly10...-13% due to the desiccant22-28% improved plant efficiencySolar roofEnthalpicwheelTo the kitchenHeat PumpFresh airAir treatment unit 10 Source: P. Campanile -CRF Italy #0;5#0;5 Renewable Energies CorsoVeneziaMilano?VRF (Variable Refrigerant Flow) inverter...

Adnot, J.; Bertoldi, P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the plans design wly airflow was 8,850 ch. 'Ihe kitchen air handler has 1,075 &I -ly air flow. ?he plans shmd a design airflow of 2,700 cfm. Ihe following are abservatians and pmblelr6 which wxe related to the mildew pmblan. . 'Ihe twb chilled water... in Texas schaols will be the indoor envFranment. 5-1s enaxraged to be m aggressive in preventive maintermme and plan for irdaar air quality and energy efficiency in school air- conditianimg retrofits. A cpalitative investigation of problems reported...

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Roses Are Red  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

slap on the back. In fact, this being a slash story, his partner had responded with a brood- ing silence, a meaningful look and an artfully sexy pose, propped up against the nearest wall. #30;e harsh light of the wash room #29;ooded over him... violent thump, heard something tear, and then the door was swinging free. Odd, that, he thought, picking up the things from behind the door and heading for the kitchen. Only two letters and a pile of torn photographs?no, not photographs, colour prints...

Glasgow, M.F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Kiwis Take Home Engineering Win for Solar Home 'First Light' | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRS25RV*)of

311

Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program (KCTP) "Newly Created"  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral

312

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Key Radiation Protection Positions at DOE Facilities  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR ReferralDOE-STD-1107-97

313

Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR

314

Kristina Johnson | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STARKristin Swineford

315

Kurt-C^3-final.pptx  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STARKristin SwinefordCeramic

316

L  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STARKristin

317

L  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STARKristinPOLICY FLASH

318

LATA KY WEA-2012-01  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid: ENERGY STARKristinPOLICYLANL

319

Laughlin Meeting Transcripts | A  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*) KitchenAid:MeetsLakeDepartmentSuperior

320

How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground HawaiiWasteDepartmentHoney,in the Kitchen? How

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism,” has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism,” has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 “acidic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by “basic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Baryon Asymmetry in Neutrino Mass Models with and without ?_13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the comparative studies of cosmological baryon asymmetry in different neutrino mass models with and without {\\theta}_13 by considering the three diagonal form of Dirac neutrino mass matrices, down-quark (4,2), up-quark (8,4) and charged lepton (6,2). The predictions of any models with {\\theta}_13 are consistent in all the three stages of leptogenesis calculations and the results are better than the predictions of any models without {\\theta}_13 which are consistent in a piecemeal manner with the observational data. For the best model, the normal hierarchy Type-IA for charged lepton (6,2) without {\\theta}_13, the predicted inflaton mass required to produce the observed baryon asymmetry is found to be 3.6x10 to the power 10 GeV corresponding to reheating temperature TR 4.5x10 to the power 6 GeV, while for the same model with {\\theta}_13, the inflaton mass is 2.24x10 to the power 11 GeV, TR 4.865x10 to the power 6 GeV and weak scale gravitino mass m(2 divided by 3) 100 GeV without causing the gravitino problem. These values apply to the recent discovery of Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV. The relic abundance of gravitino is proportional to the reheating temperature of the thermal bath. One can have the right order of relic dark matter abundance only if the reheating temperature is bounded to below 10 to the power 7 GeV.

Ng. K. Francis

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Study on grain boundary character and strain distribution of intergranular cracking in the CGHAZ of T23 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intergranular reheat cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of T23 steel was produced by strain to fracture tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermal–mechanical simulator. Then the grain boundary character, as well as the strain distribution after reheat crack propagation, was studied by electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that incoherent ?3 boundaries were seldom found on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Therefore, only the type of random high-angle boundaries played a crucial role in the intergranular cracking. Microstructurally cavities and small cracks were preferentially initiated from high-angle grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries and high-angle ones with misorientation angles less than 15° were more resistant to the cracking. More importantly, the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increased with the plastic strain induced by both temperature gradient and stress in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone, which contributed to the crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, the strain distributions in the vicinity of cavities and cracks revealed the accommodation processes of plastic deformation during stress relaxation. It also reflected the strength differences between grain interior and grain boundary at different heat-treated temperatures, which had a large influence on the cracking mechanism. - Highlights: • The coincidence site lattice boundaries play little role in the reheat cracking. • Cavity and crack occur at high-angle grain boundaries rather than low-angle ones. • The strain leads low-angle grain boundaries to transform to high-angle ones. • Strain distribution differs for cavity and crack zones at different temperatures.

Jin, Y.J.; Lu, H., E-mail: shweld@sjtu.edu.cn; Yu, C.; Xu, J.J.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

HCCl Combustion: Analysis and Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work. On analysis, we have developed two powerful tools: a single zone model and a multi-zone model. The single zone model has proven very successful in predicting start of combustion and providing reasonable estimates for peak cylinder pressure, indicated efficiency and NOX emissions. This model is being applied to develop detailed engine performance maps and control strategies, and to analyze the problem of engine startability. The multi-zone model is capable of very accurate predictions of the combustion process, including HC and CO emissions. The multi-zone model has applicability to the optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions to achieve controlled combustion at high efficiency and low emissions. On experimental work, we have done a thorough evaluation of operating conditions in a 4-cylinder Volkswagen TDI engine. The engine has been operated over a wide range of conditions by adjusting the intake temperature and the fuel flow rate. Satisfactory operation has been obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. Cylinder-to-cylinder variations play an important role in limiting maximum power, and should be controlled to achieve satisfactory performance.

Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Au, M; Girard, J

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

325

HCCI Combustion: Analysis and Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work. On analysis, we have developed two powerful tools: a single zone model and a multi-zone model. The single zone model has proven very successful in predicting start of combustion and providing reasonable estimates for peak cylinder pressure, indicated efficiency and NOX emissions. This model is being applied to develop detailed engine performance maps and control strategies, and to analyze the problem of engine startability. The multi-zone model is capable of very accurate predictions of the combustion process, including HC and CO emissions. The multi-zone model h as applicability to the optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions to achieve controlled combustion at high efficiency and low emissions. On experimental work, we have done a thorough evaluation of operating conditions in a 4-cylinder Volkswagen TDI engine. The engine has been operated over a wide range of conditions by adjusting the intake temperature and the fuel flow rate. Satisfactory operation has been obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. Cylinder-to-cylinder variations play an important role in limiting maximum power, and should be controlled to achieve satisfactory performance.

Salvador M. Aceves; Daniel L. Flowers; Joel Martinez-Frias; J. Ray Smith; Robert Dibble; Michael Au; James Girard

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

Kozubal, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Air- and Oxy-Fired Fireside Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work was to examine the corrosion effects from flue gas composition changes arising from oxy?combustion. At 700°C, increased SO{sub X}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O contents in the gas phase arising from various oxy?combustion flue gas recirculation scenarios, while maintaining constant ash deposit chemistry, do not increase corrosion in superheater or reheater tubing. At 400°C, for both oxidative and reducing conditions, the corrosion rates were lower than at 700°C.

Holcomb, G. R.; Tylczak, J.; Carney, C.; Laughlin, D.; Zhu, J.; Wise, A.

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

329

Operational and environmental benefits of oxy-fuel combustion in the steel industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of patented, field-tested 100% oxy-fuel burner systems have been developed which provide fuel savings, reduced emissions (CO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]) and improved operational performances. These systems can be applied to high-temperature continuous and batch reheat furnaces, soaking pits and ladle preheaters. Fuel consumption and carbon dioxide and NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced by 40 to 60%. Burner design (including nonwater cooled models), commercial experience, measured and projected emissions reductions, and additional operating benefits associated with new and retrofitted applications are described.

Farrell, L.M. (Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)); Pavlack, T.T. (Praxair, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States). Linde Division); Rich, L. (North American Mfg. Co., Coraopolis, PA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Combined fast valving and braking resistor application to improve transient stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In many cases, power plants and load centers are connected through long transmission lines. Furthermore, the development over the years of improved methods of' cooling generators and of designing low pressure turbine stages have resulted in a reduction... power input to the turbogenerator is measured with a reheater pressure transducer and the electrica1 power output from the generator is measured with a kw transducer. When the 10 0 V 0 C4 4 0) f-4 H m Cd . A ) N Cd VII &D '0 (U Ctd cd cdm OE...

Chen, Jen-Yeu Thomas

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effects of barley flour and beta-glucans in corn tortillas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements. Pliability had higher R2 and lower coefficients of variation compared to rollability. Sensory evaluation was conducted using reheated 14-day-old tortillas of control, 825 MAU with 0.25% CMC, 0.12% ? -glucans, 0.18% ? -glucan with 0.375% CMC..., and 0.24% ? -glucan with 0.25% CMC. All tortillas had similar appearance, flexibility, gumminess, flavor and overall quality. Softness and chewiness of treatments with 0.12% ? -glucan or 0.24% ? -glucan with 0.25% CMC were similar to control. Other...

Silva, Laura

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Dark radiation from the axino solution of the gravitino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current observations of the cosmic microwave background could confirm an increase in the radiation energy density after primordial nucleosynthesis but before photon decoupling. We show that, if the gravitino problem is solved by a light axino, dark (decoupled) radiation emerges naturally in this period leading to a new upper bound on the reheating temperature T_R < 10^{11} GeV. In turn, successful thermal leptogenesis might predict such an increase. The Large Hadron Collider could endorse this opportunity. At the same time, axion and axino can naturally form the observed dark matter.

Jasper Hasenkamp

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Piping retrofit reduces valve-damaging flow vibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how excessive flow-induced vibration was escalating safety relief valve maintenance at an alarming pace until simple piping modifications eliminated the problem. Public Service Co. of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Station Unit 4 had been experiencing excessive hot and cold reheat safety valve maintenance. From 1990 through 1993, expenditures exceeded $150,000, including a complete refurbishing in 1990. Furthermore, from 1990 to 1992 the incurred costs of contracting VR certificate repairs accumulated to more than $50,000. Such exorbitant maintenance costs were unique among PSCO's generating system.

Webb, M.; Ellenberger, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Cooking with Ground Pork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to thaw. Even when cooked, pork that has been thawed at room temperature can make you sick. Cooking ground pork safely For dishes that contain ground pork, cook the pork before mixing it with other ingredients. How to store cooked ground pork Leftover... dishes made with ground pork should be stored in a covered dish in the refrigerator right away to prevent spoilage. Use it within 3 days. Reheat foods with ground pork until they are steaming hot, bubbling, or at 165 degrees. Other uses Use cooked...

Anding, Jenna

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

Report of Energy Efficiency Study and Metering/Utilities Profile for Electricity Deregulation at Texas A&M University – Kingsville (TAMU–K) Kingsville, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature was 53?F. Room thermostats control the terminal reheat boxes. The SDCV units serve the 3rd floor with room temperatures of 67?F. For the DDVAV units, the static pressure setpoint was 2" and 2.4" with VAV control provided through inlet vanes... which provide chilled water (ChW) through two separate primary loops to the campus. The current ChW capacity for both energy plants is 4200 tons. The HVAC systems in most buildings are controlled by pneumatic controllers. Only one building was controlled...

Zhu, Y.; Bryant, J.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method for harvesting single crystals from a peritectic melt  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing single crystals is disclosed. The method of preparation involves preparing precursor materials of a particular composition, heating the precursor material to achieve a peritectic mixture of peritectic liquid and crystals, cooling the peritectic mixture to quench directly the mixture on a porous, wettable inert substrate to wick off the peritectic liquid, leaving single crystals on the porous substrate. Alternatively, the peritectic mixture can be cooled to a solid mass and reheated on a porous, inert substrate to melt the matrix of peritectic fluid while leaving the crystals unmelted, allowing the wicking away of the peritectic liquid. 2 figs.

Todt, V.R.; Sengupta, S.; Shi, D.

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method for harvesting single crystals from a peritectic melt  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing single crystals. The method of preparation involves preparing precursor materials of a particular composition, heating the precursor material to achieve a peritectic mixture of peritectic liquid and crystals, cooling the peritectic mixture to quench directly the mixture on a porous, wettable inert substrate to wick off the peritectic liquid, leaving single crystals on the porous substrate. Alternatively, the peritectic mixture can be cooled to a solid mass and reheated on a porous, inert substrate to melt the matrix of peritectic fluid while leaving the crystals unmelted, allowing the wicking away of the peritectic liquid.

Todt, Volker R. (Lemont, IL); Sengupta, Suvankar (Columbus, OH); Shi, Donglu (Cincinnati, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Method for harvesting rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing high temperature superconductor single crystals. The method of preparation involves preparing precursor materials of a particular composition, heating the precursor material to achieve a peritectic mixture of peritectic liquid and crystals of the high temperature superconductor, cooling the peritectic mixture to quench directly the mixture on a porous, wettable inert substrate to wick off the peritectic liquid, leaving single crystals of the high temperature superconductor on the porous substrate. Alternatively, the peritectic mixture can be cooled to a solid mass and reheated on a porous, inert substrate to melt the matrix of peritectic fluid while leaving the crystals melted, allowing the wicking away of the peritectic liquid.

Todt, Volker R. (Lemont, IL); Sengupta, Suvankar (Columbus, OH); Shi, Donglu (Cincinnati, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee`s Sun Oven  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160{degrees}C (320{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperatures to 80{degrees}C, (175{degrees}F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Testing of the Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove Solar Oven  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 115{degrees}C (240{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80{degrees}C (175{degrees}F) in about two hours. Observations were made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on the operation of the solar oven were also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Relic gravitational waves and the cosmic accelerated expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of reconstructing the whole history of the scale factor of the Universe from the power spectrum of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) makes the study of these waves quite interesting. First, we explore the impact of a hypothetical era -right after reheating- dominated by mini black holes and radiation that may lower the spectrum several orders of magnitude. Next, we calculate the power spectrum of the RGWs taking into account the present stage of accelerated expansion and an hypothetical second dust era. Finally, we study the generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics applied to the present era of accelerated expansion of the Universe.

German Izquierdo

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

High-energy neutrinos and hard $?$-rays in coincidence with Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observations suggest that $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by jets of relativistic cannonballs (CBs), emitted in supernova (SN) explosions. The CBs, reheated by their collision with the SN shell, emit radiation and Doppler-boost it to the few-hundred keV energy of the GRB's photons. Chaperoning the GRB, there should be an intense flux of neutrinos of a few hundreds of GeV energy, made in $\\pi^\\pm$ decays: the SN shell acts as a dump of the beam of CBs. The $\

A. De Rujula

2001-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

Particle Production and Dissipative Cosmic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large amplitude oscillation of cosmic field that may occur right after inflation and in the decay process of weakly interacting fields gives rise to violent particle production via the parametric resonance. In the large amplitude limit the problem of back reaction against the field oscillation is solved and the energy spectrum of created particles is determined in a semi-classical approximation. For large enough coupling or large enough amplitude the resulting energy spectrum is broadly distributed, implying larger production of high energy particles than what a simple estimate of the reheating temperature due to the Born formula would suggest.

H. Fujisaki; K. Kumekawa; M. Yamaguchi; M. Yoshimura

1995-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

346

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermodynamic analysis and comparison on oxy-fuel power generation process - article no. 053001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, pressurized oxy-fuel combustion power generation processes are modeled and analyzed based on a 350 MW subcritical reheat boiler associated with a condensing steam turbine. The performance results are obtained. Furthermore, the influences of slurry concentration and coal properties on power plant performance are investigated. An oxy-fuel configuration operating at ambient pressure is studied to compare the performance with pressurized oxy-fuel configuration. Thermodynamic analysis reveals the true potentials of the pressurized oxy-fuel process. Based on the system integration, an improved configuration is proposed in which plant efficiency of pressurized oxy-fuel process is increased by 1.36%.

Deng, S.M.; Hynes, R. [Hatch Energy, Oakville, ON (Canada)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1939 2262 2585 2908 3231 AmbientF AmbientRH Return F Return RH Figure 11. One Month MODEL C Operational Data. Set Points Are 76 F and 45 % RH. Each Data Point Represents A 15 Minute Average. The Fan Is Set on “Auto”, That Is, It Cycles On and Off... with the better humidistat. The MODEL C unit provided excellent humidity control at the 45% RH set point, with occasional overcooling at night of several degrees (when the building is unoccupied). No reheat was used. For control, the unit was cycled...

Cromer, C. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Load frequency control of interconnected power systems with system constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responses D. Generating Unit Characteristics E. The State Variable Representation of the Dynamic F. LFC System Data . 1. Power System Data 2. Controller Gains 3. The Reheat-turbine Prime-Mover Data Model . 6 7 8 10 11 12 15 15 18 23 23 25... 56 25 LFC system response with VSS control. Area 1 fails to respond for a load change of APnr ? 0, 01 p. u. 57 26 LFC system response with conventional controL Area 1 fails to respond for the same load disturbance as in Fig. 26. . . 58 27...

Choudhury, Md Ershadul H

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Report of Energy Efficiency Study and Metering/Utilities Profile for Electricity Deregulation at Texas A&M University -- Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC) Corpus Christi, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and three single duct constant volume (SDCV) AHUs with HW reheat serve the building. For the SDVAVs, the fan speeds were from 27Hz to 45Hz. The static pressure setpoints ranged from 1" to 1.38". The discharge air temperature setpoints were 50?F for AHU-4... the static pressure reset schedule and discharge temperature setpoints. 4. Optimize the operating hours for some systems to satisfy the comfort and reduce operating costs. 5. Replace the gauges for the temperature and pressure in the pump room. Center...

Zhu, Y.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Effects of Al-5Ti-1B master alloy on the microstructural evaluation of a highly alloyed aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of Al-5Ti-1B master alloy on the structural characteristics of Al-12Zn-3 Mg-2.5Cu aluminum alloy. The optimum amount of Ti containing master alloy for proper grain refining was selected as 6 wt.%. A modified strain-induced, melt-activated (SIMA) process for semi-solid processing of alloys was proposed. In order to examine the effectiveness of the modified SIMA process, the recrystallized microstructures of the Al alloy (Al-12Zn-3 Mg-2.5Cu) prepared by the modified SIMA processes were macroscopically. The modified SIMA process employed casting, warm multi-forging, recrystallization and partial melting instead of the conventional process. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. The microstructure evolution of reheated Al-12Zn-3 Mg-2.5Cu aluminum alloy was characterized by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) and optical microscopy. In this study the relation between the induced strain with size and shape of grain size has been studied. Results indicated that with the increase of strain sphericity of particles, their size decreases and sphericity takes place in less reahiting time.

Alipour, M.; Emamy, M.; Azarbarmas, M.; Karamouz, M. [Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Predicting Young’s Modulus of Glass/Ceramic Sealant for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Considering the Combined Effects of Aging, Micro-Voids and Self-Healing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the temperature dependent Young’s modulus for the glass/ceramic seal material used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs). With longer heat treatment or aging time during operation, further devitrification may reduce the residual glass content in the seal material while boosting the ceramic crystalline content. In the meantime, micro-voids induced by the cooling process from the high operating temperature to room temperature can potentially degrade the mechanical properties of the glass/ceramic sealant. Upon reheating to the SOFC operating temperature, possible self-healing phenomenon may occur in the glass/ceramic sealant which can potentially restore some of its mechanical properties. A phenomenological model is developed to model the temperature dependent Young’s modulus of glass/ceramic seal considering the combined effects of aging, micro-voids, and possible self-healing. An aging-time-dependent crystalline content model is first developed to describe the increase of the crystalline content due to the continuing devitrification under high operating temperature. A continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model is then adapted to model the effects of both cooling induced micro-voids and reheating induced self-healing. This model is applied to model the glass-ceramic G18, a candidate SOFC seal material previously developed at PNNL. Experimentally determined temperature dependent Young’s modulus is used to validate the model predictions

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Retrofitting the heating system for NASA's space shuttle engine test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John C. Stennis Space Center is one of nine NASA field installations and is the second largest NASA Center, occupying 13,480 acres (55 km{sup 2}) and surrounded by a 125,327-acre (507 km{sup 2}) unpopulated buffer zone. Since its beginnings, the center has been the prime NASA installation for static firing. This paper reports that because of the critical nature of the center's missions, precise instrumentation and comfortable personnel environments must be constantly and efficiency maintained. When the site was built nearly 30 years ago, two main boiler plants were installed. One was in the base area (which houses administrative and engineering offices) and the second was in the test area where the test stands and test support buildings are located. These two boiler plants generated high pressure, high temperature water (400{degrees} F, 400 psi; 204{degrees} C, 2,756 kPa) that was used for heating, reheating and absorption cooling. This high temperature hot water (HTHW) was circulated by pumps to various buildings on the site through an underground piping network. Once in the buildings, the HTHW passed through absorption chillers for cooling and high temperature-to-medium temperature water converters for heating and reheating.

Arceneaux, T.W. (NASA, St. Louis, MO (US))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mass spectrum of primordial black holes from inflationary perturbation in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld: a limit on blue spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass spectrum of the primordial black holes formed by density perturbation in the radiation-dominated era of the Randall-Sundrum type-2 cosmology is given. The spectrum coincides with standard four-dimensional one on large scales but the deviation is apparent on smaller scales. The mass spectrum is initially softer than standard four-dimensional one, while after accretion during the earliest era it becomes harder than that. We also show expected extragalactic diffuse photon background spectra varying the initial perturbation power-law power spectrum and give constraints on the blue spectra and/or the reheating temperature. The most recent observations on the small scale density perturbation from WMAP, SDSS and Lyman-\\alpha Forest are used. What we get are interpreted as constraints on the smaller scale inflation on the brane connected to the larger one at the scale of Lyman-\\alpha Forest. If we set the bulk curvature radius to be 0.1 mm and assume the reheating temperature is higher than 10^6 GeV, the scalar spectral index from the smaller scale inflation is constrained to be n \\lesssim 1.3. Typically, the constraints are tighter than standard four-dimensional one, which is also revised by us using the most recent observations.

Yuuiti Sendouda; Shigehiro Nagataki; Katsuhiko Sato

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Task 8.8 -- Low cost ceramic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This subtask was originally titled ``Reheat Combustor Materials`` and was proposed in anticipation of the addition of a reheat combustor to the ICR gas turbine cycle. When the emphasis of ATS became the optimized recuperated cycle, the goal of the subtask was changed to the evaluation of low cost materials for gas turbine combustor liners. It now supplements similar work being conducted by Solar under DOE Contract No.DE-ACO2-92-CE40960, titled ``Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) Development.`` The use of a ceramic combustor liner in gas turbines contributes to emissions reductions by freeing cooling air for use as primary combustion air and by allowing higher wall temperatures, which contribute to more complete combustion of hydrocarbons. Information from a literature survey, manufacturer`s data, and Solar`s experience was used to select three materials for testing. In addition to material properties requirements for selection, subscale combustor liner cost was required to be at least half of the high modulus continuous fiber reinforced composite part cost. The three materials initially selected for evaluation are listed in Table 1. Four hour subscale rig tests were planned for eight inch diameter liners made from each material. Upon successful completion of each four hour test, a fifty hour test was planned.

NONE

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz (Rolls-Royce Allison); S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann (Consultant)

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Comparisons of HVAC Simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares HVAC simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for data centers. The HVAC systems studied in the paper are packaged direct expansion air-cooled single zone systems with and without air economizer. Four climate zones are chosen for the study - San Francisco, Miami, Chicago, and Phoenix. EnergyPlus version 2.1 and DOE-2.2 version 45 are used in the annual energy simulations. The annual cooling electric consumption calculated by EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 are reasonablely matched within a range of -0.4percent to 8.6percent. The paper also discusses sources of differences beween EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 runs including cooling coil algorithm, performance curves, and important energy model inputs.

Hong, Tianzhen; Sartor, Dale; Mathew, Paul; Yazdanian, Mehry

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Indoor air pollution in rural China: Cooking fuels, stoves, and health status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid fuels are a major source of indoor air pollution, but in less developed countries the short-term health effects of indoor air pollution are poorly understood. The authors conducted a large cross-sectional study of rural Chinese households to determine associations between individual health status and domestic cooking as a source of indoor air pollution. The study included measures of health status as well as measures of indoor air-pollution sources, such as solid cooking fuels and cooking stoves. Compared with other fuel types, coal was associated with a lower health status, including negative impacts on exhaled carbon monoxide level, forced vital capacity, lifetime prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, and health care utilization. Decreasing household coal use, increasing use of improved stove technology, and increasing kitchen ventilation may decrease the short-term health effects of indoor air pollution.

Peabody, J.W.; Riddell, T.J.; Smith, K.R.; Liu, Y.P.; Zhao, Y.Y.; Gong, J.H.; Milet, M.; Sinton, J.E. [Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Foundation House, New York, geothermal heat pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Foundation House, planned to house half a dozen nonprofit foundations, will be constructed on 64th Street just east of Central Park in Manhattan, New York. It is in a Landmark District and designed by the architectural firm of Henry George Greene, AIA of Scarsdale, NY (project architect, David Wasserman). The 20,000-square foot building of five floors above ground and two below, will illustrate how energy-savings technology and environmentally sensitive construction methods can be economical. The heating and cooling system, including refrigeration requirements for the freezers and refrigerators in the commercial kitchen, will be provided by geothermal heat pumps using standing column wells. The facility is the first building on the island of Manhattan to feature geothermal heating and cooling. The mechanical system has been the assistance of Carl Orio`s firm of Water & Energy Systems corporation of Atkinson, New Hampshire. The two 1550-foot standing column wells were drilled by John Barnes of Flushing, NY.

Lund, J.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

An Assessment of the U.S. Residential Lighting Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides background data upon which residential lighting fixture energy conservation programs can be built. The current stock of residential lighting is described by usage level, lamp wattage, fixture type, and location within the house. Data are discussed that indicate that 25% of residential fixtures are responsible for 80% of residential lighting energy use, and that justify targeting these fixtures as candidates for retrofit with energy-efficient fixtures. Fixtures determined to have the highest energy use are hardwired ceiling fixtures in kitchens, living/family rooms, dining rooms, and outdoors. An assessment of the market for residential fixtures shows that nearly half of new residential fixtures are imported, 61% of new fixtures sold are hardwired, and about half of all new fixtures sold are for ceiling installation.

Jennings, Judy; Brown, Rich; Moezzi, Mithra; Mills, Evan; Sardinsky, Robert

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A TEM study of soot, carbon nanotubes, and related fullerene nanopolyhedra in common fuel-gas combustion sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticle aggregates collected by thermophoretic precipitation from natural gas-air and propane-air kitchen stove top flame exhausts, natural gas-air water heater roof-top exhausts, and other common fuel-gas combustion sources were observed by transmission electron microscopy to consist of occasional aggregates of mostly turbostratic carbon spherules, aggregates of crystalline graphite nanoparticles mixed with other fullerene nanoforms; and aggregates of various sizes of multiwall carbon nanotubes and other multishell, fullerene polyhedra for optimal blue-flame combustion. The carbon nanotube structures and end cap variations as well as fullerene polyhedral structures were observed to be the same as those for arc-evaporation produced nanoaggregates. Nanoparticle aggregation or the occurrence of carbon nanoforms always occurred as aggregates with nominal sizes ranging from about 0.5 {mu}m to 1.5 {mu}m.

Murr, L.E. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)]. E-mail: fekberg@utep.edu; Soto, K.F. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Human Activity Detection from RGBD Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Being able to detect and recognize human activities is important for making personal assistant robots useful in performing assistive tasks. The challenge is to develop a system that is low-cost, reliable in unstructured home settings, and also straightforward to use. In this paper, we use a RGBD sensor (Microsoft Kinect) as the input sensor, and present learning algorithms to infer the activities. Our algorithm is based on a hierarchical maximum entropy Markov model (MEMM). It considers a person's activity as composed of a set of sub-activities, and infers the two-layered graph structure using a dynamic programming approach. We test our algorithm on detecting and recognizing twelve different activities performed by four people in different environments, such as a kitchen, a living room, an office, etc., and achieve an average performance of 84.3% when the person was seen before in the training set (and 64.2% when the person was not seen before).

Sung, Jaeyong; Selman, Bart; Saxena, Ashutosh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Issues in federal preemption of state appliance energy efficiency regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The findings and conclusions of the analysis of the various issues involved in the federal preemption of state regulations for the DOE no standard rule on covered appliances are summarized. The covered products are: refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, kitchen ranges and ovens, water heaters (excluding heat pump water heaters), room air conditioners, central air conditioners (excluding heat pumps), and furnaces. A detailed discussion of the rationale for the positions of groups offering comment for the record is presneted. The pertinent categories of state and local regulations and programs are explained, then detailed analysis is conducted on the covered products and regulations. Issues relating to the timing of preemption of state regulations are discussed, as well as issues relating to burden of proof, contents of petitions for exemptions from preemption, criteria for evaluating petitions, and procedural and other issues. (LEW)

Fang, J.M.; Balistocky, S.; Schaefler, A.M.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

Tolvanen, Outi K. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]. E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Forecast Constraints on Inflation from Combined CMB and Gravitational Wave Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, BBO (Big Bang Observer), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parameterization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Christopher Gordon; Joseph Silk; Naoshi Sugiyama

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fluidized bed boiler having a segmented grate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluidized bed furnace (10) is provided having a perforate grate (9) within a housing which supports a bed of particulate material including some combustibles. The grate is divided into a plurality of segments (E2-E6, SH1-SH5, RH1-RH5), with the airflow to each segment being independently controlled. Some of the segments have evaporating surface imbedded in the particulate material above them, while other segments are below superheater surface or reheater surface. Some of the segments (E1, E7) have no surface above them, and there are ignitor combustors (32, 34) directed to fire into the segments, for fast startup of the furnace without causing damage to any heating surface.

Waryasz, Richard E. (Longmeadow, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Operating experience of Pyroflow boilers in a 250 MWe unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cedar Bay Cogeneration project is a 250 MWe unit owned and operated by US Generating Company. This plant has one turbine rated at 250 MWe net which is supplied by three Pyroflow CFB boilers that operate in parallel while supplying a paper mill with steam on an uninterruptible basis. Compared to similar size CFB boilers the Cedar Bay boilers have certain unique features. First, these are reheat boilers which must continue to supply process steam even when the steam turbine is down. Second, the SO{sub 2} control operates at a very low Ca/S molar ratio by optimizing the process conditions and flyash reinjection. Third, the NO{sub x} reduction process utilizes aqueous ammonia injection. This paper presents the operating data at full load in terms of boiler efficiency, and the ability to limit gaseous emissions with minimum limestone and ammonia usage. Unique features relating to the multiple boiler installation are also discussed.

Chelian, P.K.; Hyvarinen, K. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method for producing catalysis from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method for producing catalysts from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

Experimental Study of Effect of Aging and Self-healing Behavior of Glass/Ceramic Sealant on Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in SOFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells require that sealant must function at high temperature between 600o and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. In this paper, experiment tests were implemented to investigate the effect of aging time and self-healing behavior of the glass ceramic sealant used in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) on its mechanical properties. With longer heat treatment or aging time during operation, further crystallization may reduce the residual glass content while boosting the ceramic crystalline content. Meanwhile, the micro-damage was induced by the cooling down process from the operating temperature to the room temperature, which can potentially degrade the mechanical properties of the glass/ceramic sealant. During the reheat of the SOFC to the operating temperature, the glass/ceramic sealant exhibits the possible self-healing characterization, which can restore the mechanical performance of the glass/ceramic sealant.

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

The use of tracers to analyze the effects of reinjection into fractured geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of tracers as a reservoir engineering tool in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The principle concern in injecting cooler spent fluids into a fractured reservoir is that the fluids may move through high permeability channels and return to the production wells after contacting a relatively small volume of rock. As a consequence of this rapid transport, the fluids will be only partially reheated and after a short period time will effectively mine the heat from the limited volume of rock. The production wells will then experience a rapid and premature reduction in thermal output. Tracers can be used to infer the existence of high mobility conduits between injection and production wells and to monitor chemical changes of an injected fluid. Since tracer arrival precedes thermal breakthrough, tracer tests are a very useful forecasting tool.

Horne, R.N.; Johns, R.A.; Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Stiger, S.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quantum Gravity and Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some perturbative results obtained in quantum gravity in an accelerating cosmological background. We then describe a class of non-local, purely gravitational models which have the correct structure to reproduce the leading infrared logarithms of quantum gravitational back-reaction during the inflationary regime. These models end inflation in a distinctive phase of oscillations with slight and short violations of the weak energy condition and should, when coupled to matter, lead to rapid reheating. By elaborating this class of models we exhibit one that has the same behaviour during inflation, goes quiescent until the onset of matter domination, and induces a small, positive cosmological constant of about the right size thereafter. We also briefly comment on the primordial density perturbations that this class of models predict.

M. G. Romania; N. C. Tsamis; R. P. Woodard

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

G-Bounce Inflation: Towards Nonsingular Inflation Cosmology with Galileon Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a nonsingular bounce inflation model, which can drive the early universe from a contracting phase, bounce into an ordinary inflationary phase, followed by the reheating process. Besides the bounce that avoided the Big-Bang singularity which appears in the standard cosmological scenario, we make use of the Horndesky theory and design the kinetic and potential forms of the lagrangian, so that neither of the two big problems in bouncing cosmology, namely the ghost and the anisotropy problems, will appear. The cosmological perturbations can be generated either in the contracting phase or in the inflationary phase, where in the latter the power spectrum will be scale-invariant and fit the observational data, while in the former the perturbations will have nontrivial features that will be tested by the large scale structure experiments. We also fit our model to the CMB TT power spectrum.

Qiu, Taotao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Testing a non-minimal coupling between matter and curvature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most interesting and current phenomenological extensions of General Relativity is the so-called $f (R)$ class of theories; a natural generalization of this includes an explicit non-minimal coupling between matter and curvature. The purpose of this work is to present a unified view of the applicability of the latter to various contexts, ranging from astrophysical matter distributions to a cosmological setting. Various results are discussed, including the impact of this non-minimal coupling in the choice of Lagrangian density, a mechanism to mimic galactic dark matter and a Cosmological Constant at a astrophysical scale, the possibility of accounting for the accelerated expansion of the Universe and modifications to post-inflationary reheating. The equivalence between a model exhibiting a non-minimal coupling and multi-scalar-theories is also discussed.

J. Páramos

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Bose and Fermi gases in the early Universe with self-gravitational effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the self-gravitational effect on the equation of state (EoS) of Bose and Fermi gases in thermal equilibrium at the end of reheating, the period after quark-hadron transition and before big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). After introducing new grand canonical partition functions based on the work of Uhlenbeck and Gropper, we notice some interesting features of the newly developed EoSs with distinct behaviors of relativistic and nonrelativistic gases under self-gravity. The usual negligence of the self-gravitational effect when solving the background expansion of the early Universe is justified with numerical results, showing the magnitude of the self-gravitational modification of the state constant to be less than O(10{sup -78}). This helps us to clarify the background thermal evolution of the primordial patch. Such clarification is crucial in testing gravity theories, evaluating inflation models and determining element abundances in BBN.

Niu Yuezhen; Huang Junwu; Ma Boqiang [School of Physics and State Keye Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Center for History and Philosophy of Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Seminar on dissimilar welds in fossil-fired boilers: proceedings. [Often ferritic and austenitic steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Failure of dissimilar metal welds (DMW) in superheater and reheater sections is a major cause of forced outage of boilers. Research and development has been in progress at several organizations throughout the world including a major project, RP 1874, sponsored by EPRI. As a result of these efforts the causes of DMW failures are now better known than before. Several viable remedies have been identified. The effects of plant operational variables on damage to the DMWs have been quantified. Methods for assessing the condition of DMWs in the field have been developed. A seminar was organized for the purpose of reviewing and consolidating all the information available relating to failure causes and remedies for the DMW failure problems. The proceedings from the seminar are presented in this report. The papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Viswanathan, R.; Roberts, D.A. (eds.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

HVAC systems in the current stock of U. S. K-12 schools. Final report, May 91-Mar 92  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes information on heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems commonly found in U.S. school buildings and the effect that operating these systems has on indoor radon levels. The report describes the ability of various HVAC systems to pressurize and ventilate classroom spaces, how they operate, and how they are controlled. Some information is given to compare systems from the standpoint of energy use, cost, and their ability to maintain stable levels of static pressure in classrooms and/or to adequately ventilate the spaces. There do not appear to be any well defined trends in types of HVAC systems involved in current school building construction and modification. Systems looked at include those using reheat and/or mixing, unit ventilators (UVs), and two-fan, dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) systems.

Parker, J.D.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method for harvesting rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing high temperature superconductor single crystals is disclosed. The method of preparation involves preparing precursor materials of a particular composition, heating the precursor material to achieve a peritectic mixture of peritectic liquid and crystals of the high temperature superconductor, cooling the peritectic mixture to quench directly the mixture on a porous, wettable inert substrate to wick off the peritectic liquid, leaving single crystals of the high temperature superconductor on the porous substrate. Alternatively, the peritectic mixture can be cooled to a solid mass and reheated on a porous, inert substrate to melt the matrix of peritectic fluid while leaving the crystals melted, allowing the wicking away of the peritectic liquid. 2 figs.

Todt, V.R.; Sengupta, S.; Shi, D.

1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

382

Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard) solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report also discusses plant performance, operations and maintenance, development, and facility cost estimate and economic analysis.

Not Available

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Cogeneration using a thermionic combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermionic energy conversion is well adapted to cogeneration with high temperature processes which require direct heating. Such processes are found in the metals, glass and petroleum industries. A case study has been made for applying thermionic energy converters to a walking beam steel slab reheat furnace. The objective is to replace the present burners with thermionic combustors which provide electricity while supplying direct heat at the same temperature and heat release conditions as the original burners. The combustor utilizes a thermionic converter design which has demonstrated stable output for long periods using a natural gas burner. Combustion air is used to cool the collectors. A computer program was formulated to facilitate the analysis of the thermionic combustor. The design of the thermionic combustor is described. The performance of the thermionic modules is calculated based on varying furnace production rates.

Miskolczy, G.; Lieb, D.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Apparatus for generating coherent infrared energy of selected wavelength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tunable source (11) of coherent infrared energy includes a heat pipe (12) having an intermediate region (24) at which cesium (22) is heated to vaporizing temperature and end regions (27, 28) at which the vapor is condensed and returned to the intermediate region (24) for reheating and recirculation. Optical pumping light (43) is directed along the axis of the heat pipe (12) through a first end window (17) to stimulate emission of coherent infrared energy which is transmitted out through an opposite end window (18). A porous walled tubulation (44) extends along the axis of the heat pipe (12) and defines a region (46) in which cesium vapor is further heated to a temperature sufficient to dissociate cesium dimers which would decrease efficiency by absorbing pump light (43). Efficient generation of any desired infrared wavelength is realized by varying the wavelength of the pump light (43).

Stevens, Charles G. (Danville, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Microfabricated therapeutic actuators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

Dr Felix Jegede

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

Non-equilibrium electroweak baryogenesis from preheating after inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a novel scenario for baryogenesis in a hybrid inflation model at the electroweak scale, in which the Standard Model Higgs field triggers the end of inflation. One of the conditions for successful baryogenesis, the departure from thermal equilibrium, is naturally achieved at the stage of preheating after inflation. The inflaton oscillations induce large occupation numbers for long-wavelength configurations of Higgs and gauge fields, which leads to a large rate of sphaleron transitions. We estimate this rate during the first stages of reheating and evaluate the amount of baryons produced due to a particular type of higher dimensional CP violating operator. The universe thermalizes through fermion interactions, at a temperature below critical, $T_{rh} < 100$ GeV, preventing the wash-out of the produced baryon asymmetry. Numerical simulations in (1+1) dimensions support our theoretical analysis.

Juan Garcia-Bellido; Dmitri Grigoriev; Alexander Kusenko; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

A new map of neutrino cosmology - revised bounds on the number of neutrino species and the cosmological lepton asymmetry from WMAP data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed a thorough analysis of the constraints which can be put on neutrino parameters from cosmological observations, most notably those from the WMAP satellite and the 2dF galaxy survey. In terms of the relativistic energy density in neutrinos or other weakly interacting species we find, in units of equivalent number of neutrino species, N_nu, that N_nu = 2.1+1.6-1.8 (95% conf.). This limit on relativistic energy density can be translated into a bound on the neutrino lepton asymmetry of |eta| 5% conf), assuming that the asymmetry is entirely in one flavour. When BBN constraints are added, the bound on N_nu is 2.5 +- 0.5 (95% conf), suggesting that N_nu could possibly be lower than the standard model value of 3. this can for instance be the case in models with very low reheating temperature and incomplete neutrino thermalization.

Hannestad, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B., E-mail: Narendra.Dahotre@unt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1150 Union Circle, 305310 Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Continuous Commissioning® of the Austin City Hall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas. AHUs 5, 6 and 9 have cooling and reheat coils on the mixed air duct to maintain the discharge air temperature, as seen on Figure 2. The VFD modulates to maintain the duct static pressure setpoint. AHUs 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 have the main preheat...?t possess duct static pressure sensors. Of all 10 major AHUs, AHUs 1 and 9 are required to run 24/7. H o t W a t e r P u m p 2 H o t W a t e r P u m p 1 H o t W a t e r R e t u r n H o t W a t e r S u p p l y B o i l e r B y p a s s V...

Yagua, C.; Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Deng, S.; Turner, D.; Parker, J.

391

Quantum Smearing in Hybrid Inflation with Chaotic Potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the impact of one-loop radiative corrections in a non-supersymmetric model of hybrid inflation with chaotic (polynomial-like) potential, $V_0 + \\lambda_p \\phi^p$. These corrections can arise from the possible couplings of inflaton with other fields which may play active role in the reheating process. The tree-level predictions of these models are shown to lie outside of the Planck's latest bounds on the scalar spectral index $n_s$ and the tensor to scalar ratio $r$. However, the radiatively corrected version of these models, $ V_0 + \\lambda_p \\phi^p + A \\phi^4 \\ln \\phi$, is fully consistent with the Planck's data. More specifically, fermionic radiative correction ($A<0$) reduces the tensor to scalar ratio significantly and a red-tilted spectral index $n_s<1$, consistent with Planck's data, is obtained even for sub-Planckian field-values.

Ahmed, Waqas; Rehman, Mansoor Ur

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Proposed finding of no significant impact for the Sakakawea Medical Center coal-fired heating plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (the Department) has prepared an environmental assessment (Assessment) (DOE/EA-0949) to identify and evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposed action at the Sakakawea Medical Center (the Center) in Hazen, North Dakota. The proposed action would replace the existing No. 2 fuel oil-fired boilers supplemented by electric reheat with a new coal-fired hot water heating plant, using funds provided from a grant under the Institutional Conservation Program. Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-0949, the Department has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (Finding).

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

A hypothetical profile of ordinary steam turbines with reduced cost and enhanced reliability for contemporary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power steam turbines should be characterized with the reduced cost and enhanced reliability and designed on the basis of experience in steam turbine design and operation accumulated in the world`s practice for the latest years. Currently, such turbines have to be particularly matched with requirements of operation for deregulated power systems; so they should be capable of operating in both base-load and cycling modes. It seems reasonable to have such turbines with the single capacity about 250--400 MW, supercritical main steam pressure, and single steam reheat. This makes it possible to design such turbines with the minimum specific metal amount and length, with the integrated HP-IP and one two-flow LP cylinders. With existing ferritic and martensitic-class steels, the main and reheat steam temperatures can be chosen at the level of 565--580 C (1050--1075 F) without remarkable supplemental expenditures and a sacrifice of reliability. To reduce the capital cost and simplify operation and maintenance, the turbine`s regenerative system can be designed deaeratorless with motor-driven boiler-feed pumps. Such turbines could be used to replace existing old turbines with minimum expenditures. They can also be combined with large high-temperature gas-turbine sets to shape highly efficient combined-cycle units. There exist various design and technological decisions to enhance the turbine reliability and efficiency; they are well worked up and verified in long-term operation practice of different countries. For reliable and efficient operation, the turbine should be furnished with advanced automatic and automated control, diagnostic monitoring, and informative support for the operational personnel.

Leyzerovich, A.S. [Actinium Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, Michael F.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Implications of the B-mode Polarization Measurement for Direct Detection of Inflationary Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prospects for direct measurements of inflationary gravitational waves by next generation interferometric detectors inferred from the possible detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background are studied. We compute the spectra of the gravitational wave background and the signal-to-noise ratios by two interferometric detectors (DECIGO and BBO) for large-field inflationary models in which the tensor-to-scalar ratio is greater than the order of 0.01. If the reheating temperature $T_{\\rm RH}$ of chaotic inflation with the quadratic potential is high ($T_{\\rm RH}>7.9\\times10^6$ GeV for upgraded DECIGO and $T_{\\rm RH}> 1.8\\times 10^{6}$ GeV for BBO), it will be possible to reach the sensitivity of the gravitational background in future experiments at $3\\sigma$ confidence level. The direct detection is also possible for natural inflation with the potential $V(\\phi)=\\Lambda^4 [1-\\cos(\\phi/f)]$, provided that $f>4.2 M_{\\rm pl}$ (upgraded DECIGO) and $f>3.6 M_{\\rm pl}$ (BBO) with $T_{\\rm RH}$ higher than $10^8$ GeV. The quartic potential $V(\\phi)=\\lambda \\phi^4/4$ with a non-minimal coupling $\\xi$ between the inflaton field $\\phi$ and the Ricci scalar $R$ gives rise to a detectable level of gravitational waves for $|\\xi|$ smaller than the order of 0.01, irrespective of the reheating temperature.

Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Shinji Tsujikawa; Takeshi Chiba; Naoshi Sugiyama

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project are to investigate the behavior of sulfur and chlorine during pyrolysis and combustion of Illinois coals, the chemistry and mineralogy of boiler deposits, the effects of combustion gases on boiler materials, and remedial measures to reduce the sulfur and chlorine compounds in combustion gases. Replicate determinations of chlorine and sulfur evolution during coal pyrolysis-gas combustion were conducted using a pyrolysis apparatus in conjunction with a quadrupole gas analyzer. HCl is the only gaseous chlorine species measured in combustion gases. Pyrolysis of coal IBC-109 spiked with NaCl solution shows a strong peak of HCl evolution above 700C. The absence of this peak during pyrolysis of Illinois coal indicates that little chlorine in Illinois coal occurs in the NaCl form. Evolution of sulfur during coal pyrolysis was studied; the sulfur evolution profile may be explained by the sulfur forms in coal. To determine the fate of sulfur and chlorine during combustion, a set of six samples of boiler deposits from superheater and reheater tubes of an Illinois power plant was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy shows microscopic calcium sulfate droplets on cenospheres. Superheater deposits are high in mullite, hematite, and cristobalite, whereas a reheater deposit is enriched in anhydrite. The chlorine content is very low, indicating that most of the chlorine in the feed coal is lost as volatile HCl during he combustion process. The profiles of SO{sub 2} released during combustion experiments at 825 C indicate that calcium hydroxide added to the coal has a significant effect on reducing the SO{sub 2} vapors in combustion gases.

Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Cao, J.; Moore, D.M.; Xu, J.; Ruch, R.R. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Pan, W.P.; Upchurch, M.L.; Cao, H.B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance. Validation of the TDL measurement on the EAF was confirmed by comparison with extractive sampling CO measurements.

VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High-Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California. Although the mechanically vented homes were six times as airtight as non-mechanically ventilated homes (medians of 1.1 and 6.1 ACH50, n=11 and n=8, respectively), their use of mechanical ventilation systems and possibly window operation meant their median air exchange rates were almost the same (0.30 versus 0.32 hr-1, n=8 and n=8, respectively). Pollutant levels were also similar in vented and unvented homes. These similarities were achieved despite numerous observed faults in complex mechanical ventilation systems. More rigorous commissioning is still recommended. Cooking exhaust systems were used inconsistently and several suffered from design flaws. Failure to follow best practices led to IAQ problems in some cases. Ambient nitrogen dioxide standards were exceeded or nearly so in four homes that either used gas ranges with standing pilots, or in Passive House-style homes that used gas cooking burners without venting range hoods. Homes without active particle filtration had particle count concentrations approximately double those in homes with enhanced filtration. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials; consistent with this, formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional, new CA homes built before 2008. Emissions of ultrafine particles (with diameters <100 nm) were dramatically lower on induction electric cooktops, compared with either gas or resistance electric models. These results indicate that high performance homes can achieve acceptable and even exceptional IAQ by providing adequate general mechanical ventilation, using low-emitting materials, providing mechanical particle filtration, incorporating well-designed exhaust ventilation for kitchens and bathrooms, and educating occupants to use the kitchen and bath ventilation.

Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Multiwavelength observations of GRB 110731A: GeV emission from onset to afterglow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst \\GRB, by the \\Fermi and \\Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that \\GRB shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by \\Fermi during the first 3 years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparenc...

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Investigation of HCCI Combustion of Diethyl Ether and Ethanol Mixtures Using Carbon 14 Tracing and Numerical Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the rapid combustion typically experienced in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), components in fuel mixtures do not ignite in unison or burn equally. In our experiments and modeling of blends of diethyl ether (DEE) and ethanol (EtOH), the DEE led combustion and proceeded further toward completion, as indicated by {sup 14}C isotope tracing. A numerical model of HCCI combustion of DEE and EtOH mixtures supports the isotopic findings. Although both approaches lacked information on incompletely combusted intermediates plentiful in HCCI emissions, the numerical model and {sup 14}C tracing data agreed within the limitations of the single zone model. Despite the fact that DEE is more reactive than EtOH in HCCI engines, they are sufficiently similar that we did not observe a large elongation of energy release or significant reduction in inlet temperature required for light-off, both desired effects for the combustion event. This finding suggests that, in general, HCCI combustion of fuel blends may have preferential combustion of some of the blend components.

Mack, J H; Dibble, R W; Buchholz, B A; Flowers, D L

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Design and tuning of robust PID controller for HVAC systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper concerns the development of a new design and tuning method for use with robust proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) controllers that are commonly used in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) fields. The robust PID controller is designed for temperature control of a single-zone environmental space. Although the dynamics of environmental space are described by higher-order transfer functions, most HVAC plants are approximated by first-order lag plus deadtime systems. Its control performance is examined for this commonly approximated controlled plant. Since most HVAC plants are complex with nonlinearity, distributed parameters, and multivariables, a single set of PID gains does not necessarily yield a satisfactory control performance. For this reason, the PID controller must be designed as a robust control system considering model uncertainty caused by changes in characteristics of the plant. The PID gains obtained by solving a two-disk type of mixed sensitivity problem can be modified by contrast to those tuned by the traditional Ziegler-Nichols rule. The results, which are surprisingly simple, are given as linear functions of ratio of deadtime to time constant for robustness. The numerical simulation and the experiments on a commercial-size test plant for air conditioning suggest that the robust PID controller proposed in this paper is effective enough for practical applications.

Kasahara, Masato; Matsuba, Tadahiko; Kuzuu, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Takanori; Hashimoto, Yukihiro; Kamimura, Kazuyuki; Kurosu, Shigeru

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Awakening of The High Redshift Blazar CGRaBS J0809+5341  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CGRaBS J0809+5341, a high redshift blazar at z = 2.144, underwent a giant optical outburst on 2014 April 19 when it brightened by $\\sim$5 mag and reached an unfiltered apparent magnitude of 15.7 mag. This implies an absolute magnitude of -30.5 mag, making it one of the brightest quasars in the Universe. This optical flaring triggered us to carry out observations during the decaying part of the flare covering a wide energy range using the {\\it Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array}, {\\it Swift}, and ground based optical facilities. For the first time, the source is detected in $\\gamma$-rays by the Large Area Telescope onboard the {\\it Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope}. A high optical polarization of $\\sim$10\\% is also observed. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, accretion disk luminosity and black hole mass are estimated as $1.5 \\times 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and $10^{8.4}~M_{\\odot}$ respectively. Using a single zone leptonic emission model, we reproduce the spectral energy distribution of the source du...

Paliya, Vaidehi S; Stalin, C S; Fabian, A C; Ramya, S; Covino, S; Tagliaferri, G; Sahayanathan, S; Ravikumar, C D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The High Redshift Blazar S5 0836+71: A Broadband Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A broadband study of the high redshift blazar S5 0836+71 (z = 2.172) is presented. Multi-frequency light curves show multiple episodes of X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray flares, while optical-UV fluxes show little variations. During the GeV outburst, the highest $\\gamma$-ray flux measured is (5.22 $\\pm$ 1.10) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the range of 0.1-300 GeV, which corresponds to an isotropic $\\gamma$-ray luminosity of (1.62 $\\pm$ 0.44) $\\times$ 10$^{50}$ erg s$^{-1}$, thereby making this as one of the most luminous $\\gamma$-ray flare ever observed from any blazar. A fast $\\gamma$-ray flux rising time of $\\sim$3 hours is also noticed which is probably the first measurement of hour scale variability detected from a high redshift (z > 2) blazar. The various activity states of S5 0836+71 are reproduced under the assumption of single zone leptonic emission model. In all the states, the emission region is located inside the broad line region, and the optical-UV radiation is dominated by the accretion dis...

Paliya, Vaidehi S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

CONSTRAINING THE BULK LORENTZ FACTOR OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OUTFLOW IN THE MAGNETIC-DOMINATED JET MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observations by the Fermi-LAT showed that there are delayed arrivals of GeV photons relative to the onset of MeV photons in some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to avoid a large optical depth, the minimal value of the Lorentz factor has been estimated to be higher than 1000 in some of the brightest bursts. In this paper, we present a detailed calculation of the time delay between the MeV and GeV photons in the framework of the magnetic-dominated jet model. We find that the time delay strongly depends on the saturated bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. Inspired by this fact, we use this model to calculate the Lorentz factors of the four brightest Fermi bursts. The results indicate that the Lorentz factors are much smaller than those obtained from the 'single-zone' scenario. The short burst GRB 090510 has a minimal Lorentz factor of 385, while the three long bursts, GRB 080916c, GRB 090902b, and GRB 090926, have almost the same Lorentz factors with an average value near 260. Another interesting result is that, for long bursts, GeV photons are emitted after the bulk Lorentz factor saturates. For the short GRB, however, MeV and GeV photons are emitted at the same phase, i.e., either in the expansion phase or in the coasting phase.

Chang Zhe; Lin Hainan; Jiang Yunguo, E-mail: changz@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: linhn@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangyg@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF SIX BRIGHT, HARD-SPECTRUM FERMI-LAT BLAZARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on VERITAS very high energy (VHE; E {>=} 100 GeV) observations of six blazars selected from the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog (1FGL). The gamma-ray emission from 1FGL sources was extrapolated up to the VHE band, taking gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic background light into account. This allowed the selection of six bright, hard-spectrum blazars that were good candidate TeV emitters. Spectroscopic redshift measurements were attempted with the Keck Telescope for the targets without Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic data. No VHE emission is detected during the observations of the six sources described here. Corresponding TeV upper limits are presented, along with contemporaneous Fermi observations and non-concurrent Swift UVOT and X-Ray Telescope data. The blazar broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are assembled and modeled with a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. The SED built for each of the six blazars shows a synchrotron peak bordering between the intermediate- and high-spectrum-peak classifications, with four of the six resulting in particle-dominated emission regions.

Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: afurniss@ucsc.edu, E-mail: pafortin@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: deirdre@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

Multi-Block Enhancement for Lagrangian Dendritic Mesh setup in Altair5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial mesh setup for an ASC mUlti-physics code at LANL is done using Altair5. Altair5 assumes that the final mesh is composed of logical structured mesh blocks linked together at mesh boundaries to form, ultimately, an unstructured mesh. Within these blocks, meshes may have dendrites, that is, local regions where two zones share common edges (in two-dimensions, or faces in three-dimensions) with a single zone. In many cases, contiguous subsets of the initial set of blocks may have the same material assigned to them, but without smoothing the mesh would form a computationally challenging initial mesh. Some of these blocks may also have zones with nodes on domain boundaries. This paper reports on the implementation of multiblock smoothing in Altair5, which allows for dendrites and for moving boundary nodes. Dendritic nodes are constrained to be located at the average of their neighbor nodes while boundary nodes are constrained to move along the boundary geometry. Two fundamentally different smoothing methods were implemented. First, a variational principle is presented that balances zonal size and distortion via a user selected weighting with constraints imposed using penalty methods for dendritic nodes and Lagrange multipliers for boundary nodes. Second, the Laplace-Beltrami smoother is presented. This is a general elliptic smoother which can easily be modified to give Laplacian and Winslow-Crowley mesh smoothing. Results are shown for several test meshes of interest.

Douglass, Rodney W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

Haghparast, Amin [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourimotlagh, Masoud [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alipour, Mohammad, E-mail: Alipourmo@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 1: Preferred Plant Size, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rankine cycles for commercial parabolic trough solar projects range in capacity from 13.5 MWe at the Solar Electric Generating Station I (SEGS I) plant, to a maximum of 89 MWe at the SEGS VIII/IX plants. The series of SEGS projects showed a consistent reduction in the levelized energy cost due to a combination of improvements in collector field technology and economies of scale in both the Rankine cycle and the operation and maintenance costs. Nonetheless, the question of the optimum Rankine cycle capacity remains an open issue. The capacities of the SEGS VIII/IX plants were limited by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act requirements to a maximum net output of 80 MWe. Further improvements in the Rankine cycle efficiency, and economies of scale in both the capital and the operating cost, should be available at larger plant sizes. An analysis was conducted to determine the effect of Rankine cycle capacities greater than 80 MWe on the levelized energy cost. The study was conducted through the following steps: (1) Three gross cycle capacities of 88 MWe, 165 MWe, and 220 MWe were selected. (2) Three Rankine cycle models were developed using the GateCycle program. The models were based on single reheat turbine cycles, with main steam conditions of 1,450 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F, and reheat steam conditions of 239 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F. The feedwater heater system consisted of 5 closed heaters and 1 open deaerating heater. The design condenser pressure was 2.5 in. HgA. (3) The optimization function within Excelergy was used to determine the preferred solar multiple for each plant. Two cases were considered for each plant: (a) a solar-only project without thermal storage, and (b) a solar-fossil hybrid project, with 3 hours of thermal storage and a heat transport fluid heater fired by natural gas. (4) For each of the 6 cases, collector field geometries, heat transport fluid pressure losses, and heat transport pump power requirements were calculated with a field piping optimization model. (5) Annual electric energy outputs, capital costs, and annual operating costs were calculated for each case using the default methods within Excelergy, from which estimates of the levelized energy costs were developed. The plant with the lowest energy cost was considered the optimum.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

Wendt, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cavallo, James [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

Disaggregating residential hot water use. Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major obstacle to gathering detailed data on end-use hot water consumption within residences and commercial buildings is the cost and complexity of the field tests. An earlier study by the authors presented a methodology that could accurately disaggregate hot water consumption into individual end-uses using only information on the flow of hot water from the water heater. The earlier methodology can be extended to a much larger population of buildings, without greatly increasing the cost and complexity of the data collection and analysis, by monitoring the temperature of the hot water lines that go to different parts of the building. For the three residences studied here, thermocouples /monitored the temperatures of four hot water lines at each site. The thermocouple readings provide a positive indication of when hot water starts to flow in a line. Since the end-uses served by each hot water line are known, the uncertainty in assigning a draw to a particular end-use is greatly reduced. Benefits and limitations for the methodology are discussed in the paper. Using the revised methodology, hot water usage in three residences is disaggregated into the following end-uses: showers, baths, clothes washing, dishwashing, kitchen sink, and bathroom sink. For two residences, the earlier methodology--which does not use the thermocouple data--is also used to disaggregate the same draw data.

Lowenstein, A. [AIL Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Hiller, C.C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1 million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

Liaukus, C.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Investigation on effects of surface morphologies on response of LPG sensor based on nanostructured copper ferrite system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Figure shows the variations in resistance with time for copper ferrite system synthesized in various molar ratio. A maximum variation in resistance was observed for copper ferrite prepared in 1:1 molar ratio. Highlights: ? Evaluation of structural, optical and surface morphologies. ? Significant variation in LPG sensing properties. ? Surface modification of ferric oxide pellet by copper ferrite. ? CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} pellets for LPG sensing at room temperature. -- Abstract: Synthesis of a copper ferrite system (CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) via chemical co-precipitation method is characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface morphology (scanning electron microscope) and optical absorption spectroscopy. These characteristics show their dependence on the relative compositions of the two subsystems. They are further confirmed by the variation in the band gap. A study of gas sensing properties shows the spinel CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized in 1:1 molar ratio exhibit best response to LPG adsorption/resistance measurement. Thus resistance based LPG sensor is found robust, cheap and may be applied for kitchens and industrial applications.

Singh, Satyendra [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India)] [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Yadav, B.C., E-mail: balchandra_yadav@rediffmail.com [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Department of Applied Physics, School for Physical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow 226025, U.P. (India); Gupta, V.D. [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India)] [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Dwivedi, Prabhat K. [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. (India)] [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Genetic classification of petroleum systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors genetic classification of petroleum basins is founded on a working nomenclature that consists of combining qualifiers from each of the following three categories: (1) the charge factor (supercharged, normally charged, or undercharged), (2) the migration drainage style (vertically drained or laterally drained), and (3) the entrapment style (high impedance or low impedance). The charge factor is estimated on the basis of the richness and volumetrics of mature source rocks. The source potential index (SPI), which combines source-rock richness and thickness into a single parameter, is a convenient shortcut for comparing the petroleum potential of different source rocks containing dissimilar kerogen types and for rapidly estimating a basin's regional charging capacity. On a global scale, a general correlation exists between the magnitude of SPI and basinwide petroleum reserves. The dominant migration drainage style can be predicted from the structural and stratigraphic framework of a basin. Recognition of the dominant migration style helps to predict the location of zones of petroleum occurrence in relation to the 'hydrocarbon kitchens.' The entrapment style, which is also dependent on the structural framework and the presence of seals, describes the degree of resistance (i.e. impedance) working against dispersion of the petroleum charge. Application of these working concepts should help significantly reduce geologic risk, particularly in new ventures-type exploration.

Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Demaison, G.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Genetic classification of petroleum basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) – including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances – were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

(Solar clothes dryer and wastewater heat exchanger). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first project investigated the technical possibilities of adapting a domestic electric clothes dryer to utilize solar-heated water as the heat source, replacing electric resistance heat. The second project attempted to extract wastewater heat from a commercial dishwasher to preheat fresh water to be used in the next dish washing cycle. It is felt that the clothes dryer project has met all of intended goals. Although a solar application has some real-world practical problems, the application of a dryer connected directly to the home heating system will prove to be cost-beneficial over the life of a dryer. The additional cost of a heat exchanger is not excessive, and the installation cost, if installed with the initial house plumbing is less than $100. From a practical point of view, the complexity of installing a wastewater heat extracter is considered impractical. The environment in which such equipment must operate is difficult at best, and most restaurants prefer to maintain as simple an operation as possible. If problems were to occur in this type of equipment, the kitchen would effectively be crippled. In conclusion, further research in the concept is not recommended. Recent advances in commercial dishwashers have also considerably reduced the heat losses which accompanied equipment only a few years old.

Baer, B.F.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

Sortino, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche Agrochimiche e delle Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 5, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipasquale, Mauro [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Montoneri, Enzo, E-mail: enzo.montoneri@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Valorizzazione e Protezione delle Risorse Agroforestali, Universita di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Solar process heat technology in action: The process hot water system at the California Correctional Institution at Tehachapi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar process heat technology relates to solar thermal energy systems for industry, commerce, and government. Applications include water preheating and heating, steam generation, process hot air, ventilation air heating, and refrigeration. Solar process heat systems are available for commercial use. At the present time, however, they are economically viable only in niche markets. This paper describes a functioning system in one such market. The California Department of Corrections (CDOC), which operates correctional facilities for the state of California, uses a solar system for providing hot water and space heating at the California Correctional Institute at Tehachapi (CCI/Tehachapi). CCI/Tehachapi is a 5100-inmate facility. The CDOC does not own the solar system. Rather, it buys energy from private investors who own the solar system located on CCI/Tehachapi property; this arrangement is part of a long-term energy purchase agreement. United Solar Technologies (UST) of Olympia Washington is the system operator. The solar system, which began operating in the fall of 1990, utilizes 2677 m{sup 2} (28,800 ft{sup 2}) of parabolic through solar concentrators. Thermal energy collected by the system is used to generate hot water for showers, kitchen operations, and laundry functions. Thermal energy collected by the system is also used for space heating. At peak operating conditions, the system is designed to meet approximately 80 percent of the summer thermal load. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hewett, R. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Gee, R.; May, K. (Industrial Solar Technology, Arvada, CO (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of poly(amidoamine) dendrimer permeability and transport mechanisms across Caco-2 cell monolayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Junction Protein Occludin *34.2 ? 13.4% *14.4 ? 4.0% *56.6 ? 5.9%*50.8 ? 8.6% *51.9 ? 7.5% Control G2NH2 G2OH G1.5COOH G2.5COOH G3.5COOH x y z 60x oil objective 100 ?m pinhole 0.40 ?m z-step size Kitchens et al., Pharm Res, (2006) Mean ? SD (n = 3) * P < 0....05, increase in signal Bars = 100 ?m Influence of PAMAM on Tight Junction Protein Actin *36.1 ? 3.5% 13.1 ? 6.8% *44.6 ? 2.0%*54.8 ? 20.9% *63.3 ? 2.2% Control G2NH2 G2OH G1.5COOH G2.5COOH G3.5COOH x y z Mean ? SD (n = 3) * P < 0.05, increase in signal Bars...

Kitchens, Kelly M.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Economic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) mandated that minimum energy efficiency standards be established for classes of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners, and furnaces. EPCA requires that standards be designed to achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter Two describes the methodology used in the economic analysis and its relationship to legislative criteria for consumer product efficiency assessment; details how the CPES Value Model systematically compared and evaluated the economic impacts of regulation on the consumer, manufacturer and Nation. Chapter Three briefly displays the results of the analysis and lists the proposed performance standards by product class. Chapter Four describes the reasons for developing a baseline forecast, characterizes the baseline scenario from which regulatory impacts were calculated and summarizes the primary models, data sources and assumptions used in the baseline formulations. Chapter Five summarizes the methodology used to calculate regulatory impacts; describes the impacts of energy performance standards relative to the baseline discussed in Chapter Four. Also discussed are regional standards and other program alternatives to performance standards. Chapter Six describes the procedure for balancing consumer, manufacturer, and national impacts to select standard levels. Details of models and data bases used in the analysis are included in Appendices A through K.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SEASONAL AND ANNUAL AVERAGE RADON LEVELS IN 70 HOUSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A year-long, mu1 ti pollutant, indoor air qua1 ity study involving 70 occupied houses in four states was completed in 1987. All of the houses included in the study had a partial or complete basement with a concrete slab floor and block walls. On an approximately quarterly schedule, integrating monitors for short-1 i ved radon progeny, N02, HCHO, and H20 were exposed for one week in each house on both the basement and main 1 eve1 s. At the beginning of the study, a pair of alpha track detectors were placed both on top of the refrigerator in the kitchen (or some other sampling site on the main floor) and at a sampling site in the basement. One detector at each sampl ing site was left in place for a year. The other detector at each sampling site was retrieved after about three month's exposure and replaced with another detector for the next quarter. In addition, short-term samples of radon and radon progeny were made at

C. S. Dudney; A. R. Hawthorne

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P. [Kings College London, London (United Kingdom). Dept. for Public Health Science

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and its association with respiratory illness in Hong Kong  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1985, 362 primary schoolchildren and their 319 mothers were surveyed in Hong Kong to study the possible relationship of air pollution to respiratory illnesses. Using nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) measured by personal samplers as a measure of air pollution, the study aimed to identify the major sources of NO{sub 2} in the indoor environment and see whether its increased presence was associated with respiratory symptoms. The levels of NO{sub 2} among the mothers was found to increase by 21% if dust exposure was reported from the workplace, 18% if they used such cooking fuels as liquid petroleum gas or kerosene, 11% when kitchens did not have ventilating fans, and 10% when incense was burned at home. In terms of respiratory symptoms, an increase in NO{sub 2} levels of 19% was reported among those with allergic rhinitis and 18% among those with chronic cough. The levels of NO2 among children were correlated with levels measured in classrooms, all of which had opened windows so that the NO{sub 2} came from outdoors. No association was found between children's NO{sub 2} levels and respiratory symptoms. With the exception of smoking by the father and the children's NO{sub 2} levels, no association was found between smoking at home and NO{sub 2} levels.

Koo, L.C.; Ho, J.H.; Ho, C.Y.; Matsuki, H.; Shimizu, H.; Mori, T.; Tominaga, S. (Nam Long Hospital (Hong Kong))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. (National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. [National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Improving SFR Economics through Innovations from Thermal Design and Analysis Aspects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving economic competitiveness as compared to LWRs and other Generation IV (Gen-IV) reactors is one of the major requirements for large-scale investment in commercial sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) power plants. Advances in R&D for advanced SFR fuel and structural materials provide key long-term opportunities to improve SFR economics. In addition, other new opportunities are emerging to further improve SFR economics. This paper provides an overview on potential ideas from the perspective of thermal hydraulics to improve SFR economics. These include a new hybrid loop-pool reactor design to further optimize economics, safety, and reliability of SFRs with more flexibility, a multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle to improve plant thermal efficiency and reduce safety related overnight and operation costs, and modern multi-physics thermal analysis methods to reduce analysis uncertainties and associated requirements for over-conservatism in reactor design. This paper reviews advances in all three of these areas and their potential beneficial impacts on SFR economics.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Vincent Mousseau; Per F. Peterson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Thinking outside the halo: Tracing the large-scale distribution of diffuse cosmic metals with semi-analytic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the installation of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, measurements of the metal content of the low redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) are now available. Using a new grid-based model for diffuse gas coupled to the SAGE semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we examine the impact of supernova feedback on the pollution of the IGM. We consider different assumptions for the reheating and ejection of gas by supernovae and their dependence on galaxy circular velocity and gas surface density. Where metals are present, we find the most likely metallicity to be $-1.5 < $log$_{10}$(Z/Z$_{\\odot}$)$< -1.0$ at $z = 0$, consistent with both observations and more sophisticated hydrodynamic simulations. Our model predicts that the regions of the IGM with the highest metallicities will be near galaxies with M$_{\\star} \\sim 10^{10.5}h^{-1}$M$_{\\odot}$ and in environments of densities $\\sim 10 \\times$ the mean. We also find that 90% of IGM metals at $z = 0$ are ejected by galaxies with ...

Shattow, Genevieve M; Bibiano, Antonio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A tool for thermoeconomic analysis and optimization of gas, steam, and combined plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to demonstrate the capability of an original modular simulator tool for the thermoeconomic analysis of thermal-energy systems. The approach employed is based on the Thermoeconomic Functional Analysis (T.F.A.), which, through definition of the functional productive diagram and the establishment of the capital cost function of each component, allows the marginal costs and the unit product costs, i.e., the internal economy, of the functional energy flows to be obtained in correspondence to the optimum point. The optimum design of the system is obtained utilizing a traditional optimization technique, which includes both physical structure of the energy system described in terms of thermodynamic variables and cost model (capital cost of the components, maintenance and amortization factors, unit fuel cost, unit electricity cost, etc.). As an application example to show the practicability of the tool, the thermoeconomic analysis of various complex multipressure combined cycles (with or without steam reheating) is carried out. The results are analyzed and discussed in depth.

Agazzani, A.; Massardo, A.F. [Univ. of Genova (Italy). Ist. di Macchine e Sistemi Energetici

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Fluidized bed combustion of alternate fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) technology offers the opportunity combust a broader range of fuels than previously possible with other technologies. FBC boilers are currently being used throughout the world to dispose of a wide range of solid and semi-solid waste fuels, including municipal and industrial solid wastes and sludges, agricultural wastes, and coal mining or cleaning wastes. FBCs can also accommodate cofiring waste fuels in units designed for coal or other solid fuels with relative ease compared to conventional technology. The capacity and experience base for coal-fired FBCs has increased in recent years so that utility-scale reheat units of 200-300 MWe in size are now commercially available, and larger units are now being considered. As utilities install fluidized bed boilers to generate power, it is anticipated that many will at some point consider cofiring one or more waste fuels either together or with coal to reduce the quantity and cost of the primary fuel, and in many cases, help offset the environmental impact of other disposal options such as landfills. In order to assist the industry in their evaluations, this report summarizes the fuel characteristics, experience base, and technical issues associated with burning selected fuels using FBC technology, including: Municipal Solid Wastes; Biomass; Sewage Sludge; Paper Manufacturing and Recycling Wastes; Scrap Tires; and Automobile Wastes.

Howe, W.C.; Divilio, R.J. [Combustion Systems, Inc., Aptos, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Technical area status report for second-stage destruction and offgas treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was sponsored by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP), which was established by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (OTD). DOE/EM carries the charter to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation throughout the DOE complex. Within EM, the OTD established the MWIP to identify and develop new technologies for treatment of DOE low-level mixed waste. This report represents the second TASR for the Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment technical area. This TASR updates technology information, a design methodology for air pollution control systems for mixed waste treatment, and technology development needs for DOE/EM. The TASRs form the basis of a technology development program that addresses the highest priority DOE environmental needs and is coordinated with other technology development efforts both inside and outside DOE. The main functions of the second-stage destruction and offgas treatment system are to treat the gaseous effluent from the primary treatment process to acceptable levels for release to the atmosphere. Specific functions include (1) destruction of volatile organics; (2) capture of particulate matter; (3) capture of volatile metals; (4) capture and control of volatile, condensed-phase, and solid-phase radionuclides; (5) control of acid gases; (6) NO{sub x} abatement; and (7) gas cooling and reheating as required to perform these functions.

French, N.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Dalton, J.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vavruska, J. [Equinox Ltd., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide regarding energy recovery is one in a series on best practices for laboratories. It was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs 21'), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH - non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 - Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate 'should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory' it specifically indicates that it is intended to 'provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.' The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that provide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories. Various types of energy recovery devices and systems can substantially reduce heating and cooling energy required for conditioning spaces in laboratories. Heating and cooling systems can be downsized when energy recovery is used because these systems reduce peak heating and cooling requirements. Heating and cooling systems can also be downsized by capturing heat generated in high-load spaces and transferring it to spaces requiring reheat. There are many opportunities for energy recovery in laboratories. This guide includes descriptions of several air-to-air energy recovery devices and methods, such as using enthalpy wheels (Figure 1), heat pipes, or run-around loops in new construction. These devices generally recover energy from exhaust air. This recovered energy is used to precondition supply air during both cooling and heating modes of operation. In addition to air-to-air energy recovery options, this guide includes a description of a water-to-water heat recovery system that collects heat from high-load spaces and transfers it to spaces that require reheat. While air-to-air recovery devices provide significant energy reduction, in some laboratory facilities the amount of energy available in the exhaust air exceeds the pre-heat and pre-cooling needed to maintain supply air conditions. During these periods of time, controls typically reduce the energy recovery capacity to match the reduced load. If the energy recovered in the exhaust is not needed then it is rejected from the facility. By using a water-to-water recovery system, it is possible to significantly reduce overall building energy use by reusing heating or cooling energy generated in the building before it is rejected to the outdoors. Laboratory managers are encouraged to perform a life-cycle cost analysis of an energy-recovery technology to determine the feasibility of its application in their laboratory. Usually, the shortest payback periods occur when the heating and cooling load reduction provided by an energy recovery system allows the laboratory to install and use smaller heating (e.g., hot water or steam) and cooling (e.g., c

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coke oven gas injection to blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Steel has three major facilities remaining in Pennsylvania`s Mon Valley near Pittsburgh. The Clairton Coke Works operates 12 batteries which produce 4.7 million tons of coke annually. The Edgar Thomson Works in Braddock is a 2.7 million ton per year steel plant. Irvin Works in Dravosburg has a hot strip mill and a range of finishing facilities. The coke works produces 120 mmscfd of coke oven gas in excess of the battery heating requirements. This surplus gas is used primarily in steel re-heating furnaces and for boiler fuel to produce steam for plant use. In conjunction with blast furnace gas, it is also used for power generation of up to 90 MW. However, matching the consumption with the production of gas has proved to be difficult. Consequently, surplus gas has been flared at rates of up to 50 mmscfd, totaling 400 mmscf in several months. By 1993, several changes in key conditions provided the impetus to install equipment to inject coke oven gas into the blast furnaces. This paper describes the planning and implementation of a project to replace natural gas in the furnaces with coke oven gas. It involved replacement of 7 miles of pipeline between the coking plants and the blast furnaces, equipment capable of compressing coke oven gas from 10 to 50 psig, and installation of electrical and control systems to deliver gas as demanded.

Maddalena, F.L.; Terza, R.R.; Sobek, T.F.; Myklebust, K.L. [U.S. Steel, Clairton, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Experimental Study of the Aging and Self-Healing of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in SOFCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating temperatures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) require that sealant must function at a high temperature between 600oC and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. This paper describes tests to investigate the temporal evolution of the volume fraction of ceramic phases, the evolution of micro-damage, and the self-healing behavior of the glass ceramic sealant used in SOFCs. It was found that after the initial sintering process, further crystallization of the glass ceramic sealant does not stop, but slows down and reduces the residual glass content while boosting the ceramic crystalline content. Under the long-term operating environment, distinct fibrous and needle-like crystals in the amorphous phase disappeared, and smeared/diffused phase boundaries between the glass phase and ceramic phase were observed. Meanwhile, the micro-damage was induced by the cooling-down process from the operating temperature to the room temperature, which can potentially degrade the mechanical properties of the glass/ceramic sealant. The glass/ceramic sealant self-healed upon reheating to the SOFC operating temperature, which can restore the mechanical performance of the glass/ceramic sealant.

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Investigation of Performance of SCN-1 Pure Glass as Sealant Used in SOFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As its name implies, self-healing glass seal has the potential of restoring its mechanical properties upon being reheated to stack operating temperature, even when it has experienced some cooling induced damage/crack at room temperature. Such a self-healing feature is desirable for achieving high seal reliability during thermal cycling. On the other hand, self-healing glass is also characterized by its low mechanical stiffness and high creep rate at the typical operating temperature of SOFCs. Therefore, from a design’s perspective, it is important to know the long term geometric stability and thermal mechanical behaviors of the self-healing glass under the stack operating conditions. These predictive capabilities will guide the design and optimization of a reliable sealing system that potentially utilizes self-healing glass as well as other ceramic seal components in achieving the ultimate goal of SOFC. In this report, we focused on predicting the effects of various generic seal design parameters on the stresses in the seal. For this purpose, we take the test cell used in the leakage test for compliant glass seals conducted in PNNL as our initial modeling geometry. The effect of the ceramic stopper on the geometry stability of the self-healing glass sealants is studied first. Then we explored the effect of various interfaces such as stopper and glass, stopper and PEN, as well stopper and IC plate, on the geometry stability and reliability of glass during the operating and cooling processes.

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Leptogenesis and the Small-Angle MSW Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lepton asymmetry created in the out-of-equilibrium decay of a heavy Majorana neutrino can generate the cosmological baryon asymmetry when processed through fast anomalous electroweak reactions. In this work I examine this process under the following assumptions: (1) maximal nu_mu/nu_tau mixing (2) hierarchical mass spectrum m_3 >> m_2 (3) small-angle MSW solution to the solar neutrino deficit. Working in a basis where the charged lepton and heavy neutrino mass matrices are diagonal, I find the following bounds on the heavy Majorana masses M_i: (a) for a symmetric Dirac neutrino mass matrix (no other constraints), an asymmetry compatible with BBN constraints can be obtained for min(M_2,M_3)> 10^{11} GeV; (b) if {\\em any} of the Dirac matrix elements vanishes, successful baryogenesis can be effected for a choice of min(M_2,M_3) as low as a few times 10^{9} GeV. The latter is compatible with reheat requirements for supersymmetric cosmologies with sub-TeV gravitino masses.

Haim Goldberg

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Temperature control method for series-connected reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is claimed for controlling the temperature and composition of a vapor feedstream into a second reactor connected in series flow arrangement with a first reactor. The effluent stream from the first reactor containing vapor and liquid fractions is first cooled against a vapor stream and then further cooled against a suitable external fluid, then is phase separated to provide vapor and liquid fractions. The separated vapor fraction is reheated against the first reactor effluent stream and passed at an intermediate temperature into the second reactor. The first reactor is preferably an ebullated bed type catalytic reactor and the second reactor is preferably a fixed bed type catalytic reactor which is operated at an inlet temperature 20/sup 0/-200/sup 0/ F. lower than the first reactor effluent stream temperature. If desired, the effluent stream from the first reactor can be initially phase separated into vapor and liquid factions, and the vapor fraction only passed to the first heat exchange step for cooling to a first lower temperature.

Abrams, L.M.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Development of model reference adaptive control theory for electric power plant control applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this effort includes the theoretical development of a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) Model Reference Control (MRC) algorithm, (i.e., model following control law), Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) algorithm and the formulation of a nonlinear model of a typical electric power plant. Previous single-input, single-output MRAC algorithm designs have been generalized to MIMO MRAC designs using the MIMO MRC algorithm. This MRC algorithm, which has been developed using Command Generator Tracker methodologies, represents the steady state behavior (in the adaptive sense) of the MRAC algorithm. The MRC algorithm is a fundamental component in the MRAC design and stability analysis. An enhanced MRC algorithm, which has been developed for systems with more controls than regulated outputs, alleviates the MRC stability constraint of stable plant transmission zeroes. The nonlinear power plant model is based on the Cromby model with the addition of a governor valve management algorithm, turbine dynamics and turbine interactions with extraction flows. An application of the MRC algorithm to a linearization of this model demonstrates its applicability to power plant systems. In particular, the generated power changes at 7% per minute while throttle pressure and temperature, reheat temperature and drum level are held constant with a reasonable level of control. The enhanced algorithm reduces significantly control fluctuations without modifying the output response.

Mabius, L.E.

1982-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ranking of enabling technologies for oxy-fuel based carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USDOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has begun a process to identify and rank enabling technologies that have significant impacts on pulverized coal oxy-fuel systems. Oxy-fuel combustion has been identified as a potential method for effectively capturing carbon in coal fired power plants. Presently there are a number of approaches for carbon capture via oxy-fuel combustion and it is important to order those approaches so that new research can concentrate on those technologies with high potentials to substantially lower the cost of reduced carbon electricity generation. NETL evaluates these technologies using computer models to determine the energy use of each technology and the potential impact of improvements in the technologies on energy production by a power plant. Near-term sub-critical boiler technologies are targeted for this analysis because: • most of the world continues to build single reheat sub-critical plants; • the overwhelming number of coal fired power plants requiring retrofit for CO2 capture are sub-critical plants. In addition, even in the realm of new construction, subcritical plants are common because they are well understood, easy to operate and maintain, fuel tolerant, and reliable. Following the initial investigation into sub-critical oxy-fuel technology, future investigations will move into the supercritical range.

Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.L.; Ciferno, J.P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Natural cold baryogenesis from strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanism of ''cold electroweak baryogenesis'' has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on any particular UV completion but only on a stage of supercooling ended by a first-order phase transition in the evolution of the universe, which can be natural if there is nearly conformal dynamics at the TeV scale. Besides, baryon-number violation originates from the Standard Model only.

Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine, E-mail: tkonstan@cern.ch, E-mail: geraldine.servant@cern.ch [CERN Physics Department, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Dissimilar-welded failure analysis and development: Volume 6, Weld condition and remaining life assessment manual: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Step-by-step guidelines contained in a new engineering manual explain how to evaluate dissimilar metal weld loadings, assess the current state of damage, and predict remaining weld life. Suggested plant and operational modifications will help utility personnel identify root causes and avoid additional failures in a given boiler. Failure of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) between the austenitic and ferritic steel tubing used in superheaters and reheaters constitutes a major cause of forced outages in fossil boilers. EPRI has undertaken a study of DMWs, reported in volumes 1-6 of this nine-volume series, to provide utilities with a systematic approach for identifying root causes, remedying identified problems, and estimating remaining DMW useful life. This manual follows the three-phase approach outlined in the EPRI guidelines for life extension (report CS-4778). The investigators subjected the samples to detailed metallurgical examination and established correlations among operating conditions, system stresses, and the extent of observed DMW cracking. These correlations were quantified in the PODIS computer code (prediction of damage in service code; EPRI report CS-4252, volume 7). The investigators documented this information in a manual explaining how to carry out life assessment of DMWs. These guidelines describe an analytic procedure that computes the current level of DMW damage based on operating temperature, the number and nature of cycles, and system stresses. They explain a procedure for supplementary destructive examinations to verify the analytic predictions. 10 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Steam generator conceptual design for the modular HTGR - Dissimilar metal weld considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steam generator for the current Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) has evolved from a technology basis developed in U.S. and European gas-cooled reactor programs. The MHTGR steam generator is a vertically-oriented, counterflow, shell-and-tube, once-through, non-reheat, helical heat exchanger with helium on the shell side and water/steam in the tubes. In the MHTGR applications, the normal operating temperatures of the steam generator tubes can be as high as 638/sup 0/C (1180/sup 0/F). Concerns such as cost, creep strength, steam side scaling and stress corrosion cracking often lead to a design decision to use two different tube materials, one for the evaporating portion and another for the superheating portion of the steam generator. The current MHTGR steam generator design utilizes 2 1/4 CR - 1 Mo material for the economizer/evaporator/initial superheater tube section and Alloy 800H material for the finishing superheat tube section. Therefore, a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) is incorporated in each tube circuit. This feature of the design imposes certain important constraints on the steam generator designer. This paper presents an overview of the MHTGR steam generator conceptual design, and then focuses on the DMW considerations and how these have influenced the design configuration.

Spring, A.H.; Basol, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 1. Design description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report discusses in detail the design of the collector system, heat transport system, thermal storage subsystem, heat transport loop, steam generation subsystem, electrical, instrumentation, and control systems, power conversion system, master control system, and balance of plant. The performance, facility cost estimate and economic analysis, and development plan are also discussed.

Not Available

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States)] [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States)] [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Impacts of static pressure set level on HVAC energy consumption and indoor conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air static pressure must be maintained at a certain level leaving the air-handling unit (AHU) to force a suitable amount of air through the terminal boxes. However, an excessive static pressure level is often used due to (1) lack of a control device in a constant-volume (CV) system, (2) a malfunctioning control device in a variable-air-volume (VAV) system, and (3) fear of failure to maintain room temperature. High static pressure often develops excessive damper leakage in older mixing boxes. This results in an appropriate mixing of hot and cold air for dual-duct systems, excessive reheat in single-duct systems, and an excessive amount of air entering the space. Consequently, the actual fan power and heating and cooling energy consumption all become significantly higher than the design values. Even worse, the system may not be able to maintain room conditions due to unwanted simultaneous heating and cooling and may be noisy due to the excessive static pressure. This paper proposed to control the hot duct pressure and the variable-frequency drives (VFDs) to control the fan static, i.e., the cold duct pressure for dual-duct air-handling units. Both a theoretical analysis and results from a case study are presented in this paper.

Liu, M.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D.E. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.; White, E. [UTMB, Galveston, TX (United States). Energy Management Operation

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

Yoder, G.L.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Coupled Boltzmann computation of mixed axion neutralino dark matter in the SUSY DFSZ axion model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supersymmetrized DFSZ axion model is highly motivated not only because it offers solutions to both the gauge hierarchy and strong CP problems, but also because it provides a solution to the SUSY mu problem which naturally allows for a Little Hierarchy. We compute the expected mixed axion-neutralino dark matter abundance for the SUSY DFSZ axion model in two benchmark cases-- a natural SUSY model with a standard neutralino underabundance (SUA) and an mSUGRA/CMSSM model with a standard overabundance (SOA). Our computation implements coupled Boltzmann equations which track the radiation density along with neutralino, axion (produced thermally (TH) and via coherent oscillations (CO)), saxion (TH- and CO-produced), axino and gravitino densities. In the SUSY DFSZ model, axions, axinos and saxions go through the process of freeze-in-- in contrast to freeze-out or out-of-equilibrium production as in the SUSY KSVZ model-- resulting in thermal yields which are largely independent of the re-heat temperature. We find the SUA case with suppressed saxion-axion couplings (\\xi=0) only admits solutions for PQ breaking scale f_a~radiation or violation of BBN constraints. An exception occurs at very large f_a~ 10^{15}-10^{16} GeV where large entropy dilution from CO-produced saxions leads to allowed models.

Kyu Jung Bae; Howard Baer; Andre Lessa; Hasan Serce

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effect of Oxyfuel Combustion on Superheater Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion of coal in an oxygen environment (as opposed to air) will facilitate the sequestering of carbon dioxide by minimizing the amount of nitrogen in the exit gas stream. The presence of higher levels of certain gases associated with oxyfuel combustion (eg, CO2, SO2, and H2O) may impact the corrosion of waterwalls, superheaters, headers, reheaters, and other boiler components. Research is being conducted on bare and ash-embedded boiler tube materials in simulated oxyfuel- combustion and air-combustion environments at a superheater temperature of 675°C. Alloys were exposed at temperature to two different gaseous environments. Preliminary results show: (1) an increase in corrosion rate of bare K02707, K11547, K21590, K91560, K92460, S30409, S34700, and N06617 exposed to the oxyfuel combustion environment when compared to the air combustion environment; (2) an increase in corrosion rate of alloys K21590, K92460, S34700, and N06617, when embedded in ash in comparison to bare exposure; and (3) no effect of gaseous environment on alloy corrosion rate when embedded in ash.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Matthes, S.A.; Bullard, S.J.

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Low energy synthesis gas systems - New technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas steam reforming today covers more than 70% of synthesis gas production. The gas specific consumption has been largely improved during the last thirty years. It has now reached 32 GJ/metric ton of NH/sub 3/ on HHV, from 45 in the sixties. Ammonia is still the major user of synthesis gas. The successive improvements are: thermal energy recovery from the combustion gases at the outlet of the tubular reformer, where only 40% of the energy input is absorbed by the endothermal reaction; better quality of the reforming and conversion catalysts; better CO/sub 2/ removal processes; improved catalyst for ammonia and methanol synthesis and recovery of the H/sub 2/ from the purge gas. One of these processes has been successfully experimented. It involves the suppression of the tubular steam reforming, replaced by a simpler autothermal catalytic reactor and the new REGATE reheater of reactant gases to 1500/sup 0/C under pressure (air + steam for NH/sub 3/, recycled gas + steam for H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/OH). No oxygen is needed. The system is simpler, more efficient (27,0 GJ/metric ton of NH/sub 3/ HHV) and safer.

Julemont, V.; Ribesse, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Microturbines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Microturbines are small combustion turbines, approximately the size of a refrigerator, with outputs of 25-500 kilowatt (kW). They evolved from automotive and truck turbochargers, auxiliary power units for airplanes, and small jet engines and are composed of a compressor, a combustor, a turbine, an alternator, a recuperator, and a generator. Microturbines offer a number of potential advantages over other technologies for small-scale power generation. These include their small number of moving parts, compact size, light weight, greater efficiency, lower emissions, lower electricity costs, and ability to use waste fuels. They can be located on sites with space limitations for the production of power, and waste heat recovery can be used to achieve efficiencies of more than 80%. Turbines are classified by the physical arrangement of their component parts: single-shaft or two-shaft, simple-cycle or recuperated, inter-cooled, and reheat. The machines generally rotate more than 40,000 rotations per minute (rpm). Bearing selection, whether the manufacturer uses oil or air, is dependent on use. Single-shaft is the more common design because it is simpler and less expensive to build. Conversely, the split shaft is necessary for machine drive applications because it does not require an inverter to change the frequency of the AC power.

463

Gauge-preheating and the end of axion inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the onset of the reheating epoch at the end of axion-driven inflation where the axion is coupled to an Abelian, $U(1)$, gauge field via a Chern-Simons interaction term. We focus primarily on $m^2\\phi^2$ inflation and explore the possibility that preheating can occur for a range of coupling values consistent with recent observations and bounds on the overproduction of primordial black holes. We find that for a wide range of parameters preheating is efficient. In certain cases the inflaton is seen to transfer all its energy to the gauge fields within a few oscillations. We find that the gauge fields on sub-horizon scales end in an unpolarized state, due to the existence of strong rescattering between the inflaton and gauge modes. We also present a preliminary study of an axion monodromy model coupled to $U(1)$ gauge fields, seeing a similarly efficient preheating behavior as well as indications that the coupling strength has an effect on the creation of oscillons.

Adshead, Peter; Scully, Timothy R; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Taming the Runaway Problem of Inflationary Landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wide variety of vacua, and their cosmological realization, may provide an explanation for the apparently anthropic choices of some parameters of particle physics and cosmology. If the probability on various parameters is weighted by volume, a flat potential for slow-roll inflation is also naturally understood, since the flatter the potential the larger the volume of the sub-universe. However, such inflationary landscapes have a serious problem, predicting an environment that makes it exponentially hard for observers to exist and giving an exponentially small probability for a moderate universe like ours. A general solution to this problem is proposed, and is illustrated in the context of inflaton decay and leptogenesis, leading to an upper bound on the reheating temperature in our sub-universe. In a particular scenario of chaotic inflation and non-thermal leptogenesis, predictions can be made for the size of CP violating phases, the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay and, in the case of theories with gauge-mediated weak scale supersymmetry, for the fundamental scale of supersymmetry breaking.

Lawrence J. Hall; Taizan Watari; T. T. Yanagida

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Topping PCFB combustion plant with supercritical steam pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted to develop a new type of coal fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a second generation or topping pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustion (topping PCFB) plant, offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 46 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized coal fired plants with scrubbers. The topping PCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer fuel gas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2,300 F and higher. After completing pilot plant tests of a carbonizer, a PCFB, and a gas turbine topping combustor, all being developed for this new plant, the authors calculated a higher heating value efficiency of 46.2 percent for the plant. In that analysis, the plant operated with a conventional 2,400 psig steam cycle with 1,000 F superheat and reheat steam and a 2.5 inch mercury condenser back pressure. This paper identifies the efficiency gains that this plant will achieve by using supercritical pressure steam conditions.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); White, J. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A model for accelerated expansion of the universe from $\\mathcal{N}=1$ Supergravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a model for accelerated expansion of the universe, both during inflation and the present stage of the expansion, from four dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supergravity. We evaluate the tensor-to-scalar ratio ($r\\approx 0.00034$), the scalar spectral index ($n_s\\approx 0.970$) and the running spetral index ($dn_s/dk\\approx -6\\times10^{-5}$), and we notice that these parameters are in agreement with Planck+WP+lensing data and with BICEP2/Keck and Planck joint analysis, at $95\\%$ CL. The number of e-folds is $50$ or higher. The reheating period has an associated temperature $T_R\\sim10^{12}$ Gev, which agrees with the one required by thermal leptogenesis. Regarding the scalar field as dark energy, the autonomous system for the scalar field in the presence of a barotropic fluid provides a stable fixed point that leads to a late-time accelerated expansion of the universe, with an equation of state that mimics the cosmological constant ($w_\\Phi\\approx -0.997$).

Landim, Ricardo C G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ºC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modeling and experimental results for condensing supercritical CO2 power cycles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Sandia supported research project evaluated the potential improvement that 'condensing' supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) power cycles can have on the efficiency of Light Water Reactors (LWR). The analytical portion of research project identified that a S-CO{sub 2} 'condensing' re-compression power cycle with multiple stages of reheat can increase LWR power conversion efficiency from 33-34% to 37-39%. The experimental portion of the project used Sandia's S-CO{sub 2} research loop to show that the as designed radial compressor could 'pump' liquid CO{sub 2} and that the gas-cooler's could 'condense' CO{sub 2} even though both of these S-CO{sub 2} components were designed to operate on vapor phase S-CO{sub 2} near the critical point. There is potentially very high value to this research as it opens the possibility of increasing LWR power cycle efficiency, above the 33-34% range, while lowering the capital cost of the power plant because of the small size of the S-CO{sub 2} power system. In addition it provides a way to incrementally build advanced LWRs that are optimally designed to couple to S-CO{sub 2} power conversion systems to increase the power cycle efficiency to near 40%.

Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Radel, Ross F.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

Lutz, James D.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass $m_f$. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting configuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to $m_f$. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that $m_f\\simeq 200$ eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

Valerie Domcke; Alfredo Urbano

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

A Computer Program for Simulating Transient Behavior in Steam Turbine Stage Pressure of AHWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is proposed to couple the Advanced Heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, with a desalination plant. The objective of this coupling is to produce system make-up and domestic water. The proposed desalination plant needs about 1.9 kg/sec of steam and the minimum pressure requirement is 3 bars. The desalination plant can be fed with bled steam extracted from a suitable stage in low pressure turbine. As the turbine stage pressure changes with the load, it is essential to know the availability of bled steam at aforesaid pressure for various load condition. The objective of the present study is to identify a suitable extraction point so as to ensure availability of steam at desired condition for desalination plant, even at part load conditions. In order to fulfill the above objective a steam and feed system analysis code was developed which incorporates the mathematical formulation of different components of the steam and feed system such as, high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) turbines, re-heater, feed heaters etc. The dynamic equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the stage pressure at various load conditions. Based on the results obtained, the suitable extraction stage in LP turbine was selected. This enables to determine the lowest possible part load operation up to which availability of desalination plant could be ensured. (authors)

Dutta, Anu; Thangamani, I.; Chakraborty, G.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION AND REGROWTH IN TP347H SUPERHEATER TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an introduction to a comprehensive model being developed to predict and control oxide scale exfoliation from the steam-side of superheater and reheater tubes in steam boilers. The model deals with the main phenomena involved in scale growth and failure in steam, and incorporates major variables related to boiler design and operation. The considerations used to calculate oxide growth under the specific constrains of small diameter tubes carrying high-pressure steam and operating with large temperature gradients under temperature and pressure cycling conditions, as well as the evolution of stresses and strains in the scales, are indicated but only a cursory description is given of the details of the analytical treatments. An example is presented of calculations made with the model to predict the extent of blockage expected in a single superheater loop as a function of time and outlet steam temperature under several realistic service conditions. The results suggest that problems due to scale exfoliation would be expected early in the operating life of superheater tubes made from austenitic steel TP347H.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a steam driven power system by steam mixing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a steam driven power plant wherein addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant results in a surprising increase in plant performance. For Example, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler may be installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA); Prichard, Andrew W. (Richland, WA); Reid, Bruce D. (Pasco, WA); Burritt, James (Virginia Beach, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

476

TNKVNT: A model of the Tank 48 purge/ventilation exhaust system. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste tank purge ventilation system for Tank 48 is designed to prevent dangerous concentrations of hydrogen or benzene from accumulating in the gas space of the tank. Fans pull the gas/water vapor mixture from the tank gas space and pass it sequentially through a demister, a condenser, a reheater, and HEPA filters before discharging to the environment. Proper operation of the HEPA filters requires that the gas mixture passing through them has a low relative humidity. The ventilation system has been modified by increasing the capacity of the fans and changing the condenser from a two-pass heat exchanger to a single-pass heat exchanger. It is important to understand the impact of these modifications on the operation of the system. A hydraulic model of the ventilation exhaust system has been developed. This model predicts the properties of the air throughout the system and the flowrate through the system, as functions of the tank gas space and environmental conditions. This document serves as a Software Design Report, a Software Coding report, and a User`s Manual. All of the information required for understanding and using this code is herein contained: the governing equations are fully developed, the numerical algorithms are described in detail, and an extensively commented code listing is included. This updated version of the code models the entire purge ventilation system, and is therefore more general in its potential applications.

Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines: Experiments and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are being considered as an alternative to diesel engines. The HCCI concept involves premixing fuel and air prior to induction into the cylinder (as is done in current spark-ignition engine) then igniting the fuel-air mixture through the compression process (as is done in current diesel engines). The combustion occurring in an HCCI engine is fundamentally different from a spark-ignition or Diesel engine in that the heat release occurs as a global autoignition process, as opposed to the turbulent flame propagation or mixing controlled combustion used in current engines. The advantage of this global autoignition is that the temperatures within the cylinder are uniformly low, yielding very low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}, the chief precursors to photochemical smog). The inherent features of HCCI combustion allows for design of engines with efficiency comparable to, or potentially higher than, diesel engines. While HCCI engines have great potential, several technical barriers exist which currently prevent widespread commercialization of this technology. The most significant challenge is that the combustion timing cannot be controlled by typical in-cylinder means. Means of controlling combustion have been demonstrated, but a robust control methodology that is applicable to the entire range of operation has yet to be developed. This research focuses on understanding basic characteristics of controlling and operating HCCI engines. Experiments and detailed chemical kinetic simulations have been applied to the characterize some of the fundamental operational and design characteristics of HCCI engines. Experiments have been conducted on single and multi-cylinder engines to investigate general features of how combustion timing affects the performance and emissions of HCCI engines. Single-zone modeling has been used to characterize and compare the implementation of different control strategies. Multi-zone modeling has been applied to investigate combustion chamber design with respect to increasing efficiency and reducing emissions in HCCI engines.

Flowers, D L

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

478

Autoignition of toluene reference fuels at high pressures modeled with detailed chemical kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model for the autoignition of toluene reference fuels (TRF) is presented. The toluene submechanism added to the Lawrence Livermore Primary Reference Fuel (PRF) mechanism was developed using recent shock tube autoignition delay time data under conditions relevant to HCCI combustion. For two-component fuels the model was validated against recent high-pressure shock tube autoignition delay time data for a mixture consisting of 35% n-heptane and 65% toluene by liquid volume. Important features of the autoignition of the mixture proved to be cross-acceleration effects, where hydroperoxy radicals produced during n-heptane oxidation dramatically increased the oxidation rate of toluene compared to the case when toluene alone was oxidized. Rate constants for the reaction of benzyl and hydroperoxyl radicals previously used in the modeling of the oxidation of toluene alone were untenably high for modeling of the mixture. To model both systems it was found necessary to use a lower rate and introduce an additional branching route in the reaction between benzyl radicals and O{sub 2}. Good agreement between experiments and predictions was found when the model was validated against shock tube autoignition delay data for gasoline surrogate fuels consisting of mixtures of 63-69% isooctane, 14-20% toluene, and 17% n-heptane by liquid volume. Cross reactions such as hydrogen abstractions between toluene and alkyl and alkylperoxy radicals and between the PRF were introduced for completion of chemical description. They were only of small importance for modeling autoignition delays from shock tube experiments, even at low temperatures. A single-zone engine model was used to evaluate how well the validated mechanism could capture autoignition behavior of toluene reference fuels in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The model could qualitatively predict the experiments, except in the case with boosted intake pressure, where the initial temperature had to be increased significantly in order to predict the point of autoignition. (author)

Andrae, J.C.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Shell Global Solutions, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Bjoernbom, P. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Cracknell, R.F.; Kalghatgi, G.T. [Shell Global Solutions, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Comparison of Simulated and Experimental Combustion of Biodiesel Blends in a Single Cylinder Diesel HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of biodiesel content on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine performance has been investigated both experimentally and by computer simulation. Combustion experiments were performed in a single cylinder HCCI engine using blends of soy biodiesel in ultra low sulfur diesel, with concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 vol% and equivalence ratios ( ) from 0.38 to 0.48. Data from the engine tests included combustion analysis and exhaust composition analysis with standard gaseous emissions equipment. The engine utilized a custom port fuel injection strategy to provide highly premixed charges of fuel and air, making it possible to compare the results with single zone chemical kinetics simulations that were performed using CHEMKIN III, with a reaction set including 670 species and over 3000 reactions. The reaction mechanism incorporated equations for the combustion of a paraffinic fuel, n-heptane, and an oxygenated component, methyl butanoate, as well as reactions for the formation of NOx. The zero-dimensional model did a reasonably good job of predicting the HCCI combustion event, correctly predicting intake temperature effects on the phasing of both low temperature heat release (LTHR) and the main combustion event. It also did a good job of predicting the magnitude of LTHR. Differences between the simulation and experimental data included the dependence on biodiesel concentration and the duration of both LTHR and the main combustion event. The probable reasons for these differences are the changing derived cetane number (DCN) of the model fuel blend with biodiesel concentration, and the inability of the model to account for stratification of temperature and . The simulation also showed that concentrations of intermediate species produced during LTHR are dependent on the magnitude of LTHR, but otherwise the addition of biodiesel has no discernable effect.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "kitchen single-zone reheat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

BROADBAND JET EMISSION IN YOUNG AND POWERFUL RADIO SOURCES: THE CASE OF THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM QUASAR 3C 186  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the X-ray analysis of a deep ({approx}200 ks) Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum radio-loud quasar 3C 186 (z = 1.06) and investigate the contribution of the unresolved radio jet to the total X-ray emission. The spectral analysis is not conclusive on the origin of the bulk of the X-ray emission. In order to examine the jet contribution to the X-ray flux, we model the quasar spectral energy distribution, adopting several scenarios for the jet emission. For the values of the main physical parameters favored by the observables, a dominant role of the jet emission in the X-ray band is ruled out when a single-zone (leptonic) scenario is adopted, even including the contribution of the external photon fields as seed photons for inverse Compton emission. We then consider a structured jet, with the blazar component that-although not directly visible in the X-ray band-provides an intense field of seed synchrotron photons Compton-scattered by electrons in a mildly relativistic knot. In this case, the whole X-ray emission can be accounted for if we assume a blazar luminosity within the range observed from flat spectrum radio quasars. The X-ray radiative efficiency of such a (structured) jet is intimately related to the presence of a complex velocity structure. The jet emission can provide a significant contribution in X-rays if it decelerates within the host galaxy on kiloparsec scales. We discuss the implications of this model in terms of jet dynamics and interaction with the ambient medium.

Migliori, Giulia; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Celotti, Annalisa, E-mail: migliori@cfa.harvard.edu [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

RADIATION MECHANISM AND JET COMPOSITION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND GeV-TeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P{sub jet}) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L{sub jet}) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L{sub s,jet}) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies ({epsilon}) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L{sub bol,jet}) for FSRQs and with the L{sub jet} for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P{sub jet}-L{sub s,jet} relation of FSRQs. They have lower {epsilon} and L{sub bol,jet} values than FSRQs, and a tentative L{sub bol,jet}-{epsilon} relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters ({sigma}) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with {epsilon} for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with {epsilon} for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

Zhang Jin; Lu Ye; Zhang Shuangnan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liang Enwei; Sun Xiaona [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang Bing, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso GeothermalField  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress inunderstanding geothermal systems by imaging the geometry, bounds andcontrolling structures in existing production, and thereby perhapssuggesting new areas for field expansion. To these ends, a dense grid ofmagnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipolearray profiling has been acquired over the east flank of the Cosogeothermal system. Acquiring good quality MT data in producing geothermalsystems is a challenge due to production related electromagnetic (EM)noise and, in the case of Coso, due to proximity of a regional DCintertie power transmission line. To achieve good results, a remotereference completely outside the influence of the dominant source of EMnoise must be established. Experimental results so far indicate thatemplacing a reference site in Amargosa Valley, NV, 65 miles from the DCintertie, isstill insufficient for noise cancellation much of the time.Even though the DC line EM fields are planar at this distance, theyremain coherent with the nonplanar fields in the Coso area hence remotereferencing produces incorrect responses. We have successfully unwrappedand applied MT times series from the permanent observatory at Parkfield,CA, and these appear adequate to suppress the interference of thecultural EM noise. The efficacy of this observatory is confirmed bycomparison to stations taken using an ultra-distant reference site eastof Socorro, NM. Operation of the latter reference was successful by usingfast ftp internet communication between Coso Junction and the New MexicoInstitute of Mining and Technology, using the University of Utah site asintermediary, and allowed referencing within a few hours of datadownloading at Coso. A grid of 102 MT stations was acquired over the Cosogeothermal area in 2003 and an additional 23 stations were acquired toaugment coverage in the southern flank of the first survey area in 2005.These data have been inverted to a fully three-dimensional conductivitymodel. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data was carried out using 2D MTimaging. An initial 3D conductivity model was constructed from a seriesof 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric fieldmeasurements (Zyx impedance elements) along several measurementtransects. This model was then refined through a 3D inversion process.This model shows the controlling geological structures possiblyinfluencing well production at Coso and correlations with mapped surfacefeatures such as faults and regional geoelectric strike. The 3D modelalso illustrates the refinement in positioning of conductivity contactswhen compared to isolated 2D inversion transects. The conductivity modelhas also been correlated with microearthquake locations, well fluidproduction intervals and most importantly with an acoustic and shearvelocity model derived by Wu and Lees (1999). This later correlationshows the near-vertical high conductivity structure on the eastern flankof the producing field is also a zone of increased acoustic velocity andincreased Vp/Vs ratio bounded by mapped fault traces. South of theDevil's Kitchen is an area of high geothermal well density, where highlyconductive near surface material is interpreted as a clay cap alterationzone manifested from the subsurface geothermal fluids and relatedgeochemistry. Beneath the clay cap, however, the conductivity isnondescript, whereas the Vp/Vs ratio is enhanced over the productionintervals. It is recommended that more MT data sites be acquired to thesouthwest of the Devil's Kitchen area to better refine the conductivitymodel in that area.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

484

High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A performance data network for solar process heat systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar process heat (SPH) data network has been developed to access remote-site performance data from operational solar heat systems. Each SPH system in the data network is outfitted with monitoring equipment and a datalogger. The datalogger is accessed via modem from the data network computer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The dataloggers collect both ten-minute and hourly data and download it to the data network every 24-hours for archiving, processing, and plotting. The system data collected includes energy delivered (fluid temperatures and flow rates) and site meteorological conditions, such as solar insolation and ambient temperature. The SPH performance data network was created for collecting performance data from SPH systems that are serving in industrial applications or from systems using technologies that show promise for industrial applications. The network will be used to identify areas of SPH technology needing further development, to correlate computer models with actual performance, and to improve the credibility of SPH technology. The SPH data network also provides a centralized bank of user-friendly performance data that will give prospective SPH users an indication of how actual systems perform. There are currently three systems being monitored and archived under the SPH data network: two are parabolic trough systems and the third is a flat-plate system. The two trough systems both heat water for prisons; the hot water is used for personal hygiene, kitchen operations, and laundry. The flat plate system heats water for meat processing at a slaughter house. We plan to connect another parabolic trough system to the network during the first months of 1996. We continue to look for good examples of systems using other types of collector technologies and systems serving new applications (such as absorption chilling) to include in the SPH performance data network.

Barker, G.; Hale, M.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the reheating-cooling method (RCM), was developed and validated for measuring mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zones of alloys. The new method captures the brittle nature of aluminum alloys at temperatures close to the nonequilibrium solidus temperature, while specimens tested using the reheating method exhibit significant ductility. The RCM has been used for determining the mechanical properties of alloys at nonequilibrium mushy zone temperatures. Accurate data obtained during this project show that the metal becomes more brittle at high temperatures and high strain rates. (4) The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of the alloy were determined. Constitutive models relating the stress and strain relationship at elevated temperatures were also developed. The experimental data fit the model well. (5) An integrated 3D DC casting model has been used to simulate heat transfer, fluid flow, solidification, and thermally induced stress-strain during casting. A temperature-dependent HTC between the cooling water and the ingot surface, cooling water flow rate, and air gap were coupled in this model. An elasto-viscoplastic model based on high-temperature mechanical testing was used to calculate the stress during casting. The 3D integrated model can be used for the prediction of temperature, fluid flow, stress, and strain distribution in DC cast ingots. (6) The cracking propensity of DC cast ingots can be predicted using the 3D integrated model as well as thermodynamic models. Thus, an ingot cracking index based on the ratio of local stress to local alloy strength was established. Simulation results indicate that cracking propensity increases with increasing casting speed. The composition of the ingots also has a major effect on cracking formation. It was found that copper and zinc increase the cracking propensity of DC cast ingots. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks in DC castings from a current level of 5% down to 2%. This could lead to energy savings

Das, Subodh K.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

488

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

David Rencher

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

492

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

494

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants are a significant part of the nation���¢��������s power generating capacity, currently accounting for more than 55% of the country���¢��������s total electricity production. Extending the reliable lifetimes of fossil fired boiler components and reducing the maintenance costs are essential for economic operation of power plants. Corrosion and erosion are leading causes of superheater and reheater boiler tube failures leading to unscheduled costly outages. Several types of coatings and weld overlays have been used to extend the service life of boiler tubes; however, the protection afforded by such materials was limited approximately one to eight years. Power companies are more recently focused in achieving greater plant efficiency by increasing steam temperature and pressure into the advanced-ultrasupercritical (A-USC) condition with steam temperatures approaching 760�������°C (1400�������°F) and operating pressures in excess of 35MPa (5075 psig). Unfortunately, laboratory and field testing suggests that the resultant fireside environment when operating under A-USC conditions can potentially cause significant corrosion to conventional and advanced boiler materials1-2. In order to improve reliability and availability of fossil fired A-USC boilers, it is essential to develop advanced nanostructured coatings that provide excellent corrosion and erosion resistance without adversely affecting the other properties such as toughness and thermal fatigue strength of the component material.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

496

Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

Rudd, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Postcombustion and its influences in 135 MWe CFB boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the cyclone of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a noticeable increment of flue gas temperature, caused by combustion of combustible gas and unburnt carbon content, is often found. Such phenomenon is defined as post combustion, and it could introduce overheating of reheated and superheated steam and extra heat loss of exhaust flue gas. In this paper, mathematical modeling and field measurements on post combustion in 135MWe commercial CFB boilers were conducted. A novel one-dimensional combustion model taking post combustion into account was developed. With this model, the overall combustion performance, including size distribution of various ashes, temperature profile, and carbon content profiles along the furnace height, heat release fraction in the cyclone and furnace were predicted. Field measurements were conducted by sampling gas and solid at different positions in the boiler under different loads. The measured data and corresponding model-calculated results were compared. Both prediction and field measurements showed post combustion introduced a temperature increment of flue gas in the cyclone of the 135MWe CFB boiler in the range of 20-50{sup o}C when a low-volatile bituminous coal was fired. Although it had little influence on ash size distribution, post combustion had a remarkable influence on the carbon content profile and temperature profile in the furnace. Moreover, it introduced about 4-7% heat release in the cyclone over the total heat release in the boiler. This fraction slightly increased with total air flow rate and boiler load. Model calculations were also conducted on other two 135MWe CFB boilers burning lignite and anthracite coal, respectively. The results confirmed that post combustion was sensitive to coal type and became more severe as the volatile content of the coal decreased. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Shaohua Li; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Qing Liu; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion part-load behavior. Volume I. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests performed during 1980 to determine the part-load characteristics of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor for a combined-cycle power plant and to examine its behavior during load changing are discussed. Part-load operation was achieved by varying the bed temperature by amounts between 200 to 300/sup 0/F and the bed depth from between 9 and 10 ft at rates varying between 0.2 ft/min and 0.5 ft/min. The performance at part-load steady-state conditions and during transient conditions is reported with information on combustion efficiency (99% at full-load with 9 ft bed depth and 1650/sup 0/F bed temperature; 95% with 4 ft depth and 1390/sup 0/F); sulfur retention (95/sup 0/ at full load to 80% at low bed depth and low bed temperature); sulfur emissions (no definitive results); NO/sub x/ emissions (tendency for increase as bed temperature was reduced); alkali emissions (no bed temperature effect detected); and heat transfer. It was demonstrated that load can be altered in a rapid and controlled manner by changing combinations of bed depth temperature and pressure. The most important practical change was the reduction in O/sub 2/ concentration which occurred when the bed height was increased at a rapid rate. The extra energy required to reheat the incoming bed material resulted (in the most extreme case) in a temporary drop in excess air from 65% to 12%. In a full-scale plant the loss of heat from the stored bed material would be much lower and the excess air trough when increasing load would not be as pronounced. Nevertheless, it seems prudent to design full-scale plant for a full load excess air of not less than about 50% when using bed depth as a load control parameter.

Roberts, A. G.; Pillai, K. K.; Raven, P.; Wood, P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development program. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Failure of dissimilar metal welds is a major cause of forced outage in fossil boilers. A research project was carried out to: Develop a clearer understanding of the underlying causes of dissimilar weld failures; develop a methodology for estimating the residual life of service welds; develop a critical discriminatory test to predict the relative performance of welds; and develop guidelines for improved-performance dissimilar welds. The research methodology included review of prior experience as well as evaluation of a large number of failed and unfailed welds obtained from boiler superheaters or reheaters. The evaluations included metallography, mechanical testing and boiler inspections; in many cases, tube loading histories at the dissimilar weld locations were estimated. This work resulted in a clearer understanding of the root cause of weld failures. Furthermore, a quantitative relationship was derived between failure susceptibility and weld metal ''system'' loads, cycles, and temperatures (all critical parameters in weld performance). Accelerated discriminatory tests, including a number of geometries and modes of stressing and thermal cycling, were examined. The shortest time to failure, good reproducibility, and the capability to control loads and monitor cracking were achieved in a test which involved applying four-point bending loads to internally pressurized full-size tubular specimens. Tests at 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F), which involved temperature cycling, had failure times of only 400 h for stainless-steel fillers and 1500 h for nickel-base fillers. Guidelines for improved welds were derived from all the program results. They include and offer guidance on the considerations of weld-filler selection, weld geometry, heat treatment, etc., in relation to expected service conditions and on locating DMWs to optimize service performance. 7 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Integrated flue gas processing method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system and process for flue gas processing to remove both gaseous contaminants such as sulfur dioxide and particulate matter such as flyash integrates spray scrubbing apparatus and wet electrostatic precipitation apparatus and provides for the advantageous extraction and utilization of heat present in the flue gas which is being processed. The integrated system and process utilizes a spray scrubbing tower into which the flue gas is introduced and into which aqueous alkali slurry is introduced as spray for sulfur dioxide removal therein. The flue gas leaves the tower moisture laden and enters a wet electrostatic precipitator which includes a heat exchanger where flyash and entrained droplets in the flue gas are removed by electrostatic precipitation and heat is removed from the flue gas. The cleaned flue gas exits from the precipitator and discharges into a stack. The heat removed from the flue gas finds use in the system or otherwise in the steam generation plant. The wet electrostatic precipitator of the integrated system and process includes a portion constructed as a cross flow heat exchanger with flue gas saturated with water vapor moving vertically upwards inside tubes arranged in a staggered pattern and ambient air being pulled horizontally across the outside of those tubes to cool the tube walls and thereby remove heat from the flue gas and cause condensation of water vapor on the inside wall surfaces. The condensate washes the electrostatically collected flyash particles down from the inside tube walls. The heat that is extracted from the saturated flue gas in the wet electrostatic precipitator heat exchanger may be utilized in several different ways, including: (1) for flue gas reheat after the wet electrostatic precipitator; (2) for preheating of combustion air to the steam generator boiler; and, (3) for heating of buildings.

Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z