National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kitchen single-zone reheat

  1. Single casing reheat turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsushima, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Shigeo

    1999-07-01

    For conventional power plants, regenerative reheat steam turbines have been accepted as the most practical method to meet the demand for efficient and economical power generation. Recently the application of reheat steam turbines for combined cycle power plant began according to the development of large-capacity high temperature gas turbine. The two casing double flow turbine has been applied for this size of reheat steam turbine. The single casing reheat turbine can offer economical and compact power plant. Through development of HP-LP combined rotor and long LP blading series, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. had developed a single casing reheat steam turbine series and began to use it in actual plants. Six units are already in operation and another seven units are under manufacturing. Multiple benefits of single casing reheat turbine are smaller space requirements, shorter construction and erection period, equally good performance, easier operation and maintenance, shorter overhaul period, smaller initial investment, lower transportation expense and so on. Furthermore, single exhaust steam turbine makes possible to apply axial exhaust type, which will lower the height of T/G foundation and T/G housing. The single casing reheat turbine has not only compact and economical configuration itself but also it can reduce the cost of civil construction. In this paper, major developments and design features of the single casing reheat turbine are briefly discussed and operating experience, line-up and technical consideration for performance improvement are presented.

  2. Guide to Kitchen Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    This fact sheet tells you how to buy and maintain energy-efficient kitchen appliances, including refrigerators, freezers, and dishwashers, to save energy and money.

  3. Reheating Closed String Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Green

    2007-10-02

    Protecting the inflationary potential from quantum corrections typically requires symmetries that constrain the form of couplings of the inflaton to other sectors. We will explore how these restrictions affect reheating in models with UV completions. In particular, we look at how reheating occurs when inflation is governed by closed strings, using N-flation as an example. We find that coupling the inflaton preferentially to the Standard Model is difficult, and hidden sectors are typically reheated. Observational constraints are only met by a fraction of the models. In some working models, relativistic relics in the hidden sector provide dark matter candidates with masses that range from keV to PeV, with lighter masses being preferred.

  4. Probing reheating with primordial spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong; Shi Pi; Godfrey Leung

    2015-05-11

    We study the impacts of reheating temperature on the inflationary predictions of the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio. Assuming sinusoidal oscillations and that reheating process is very fast, the reheating temperature can be constrained for sinusoidal oscillation within a factor of 10 - 100 or even better with the prospect of future observations. Beyond this, we find that the predictions can also be insensitive to the reheating temperature in certain models, including Higgs inflation.

  5. Probing reheating with primordial spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Leung, Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    We study the impacts of reheating temperature on the inflationary predictions of the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio. Assuming that reheating process is very fast, the reheating temperature can be constrained for sinusoidal oscillation within a factor of 10 - 100 or even better with the prospect of future observations. Beyond this, we find that the predictions can also be insensitive to the reheating temperature in certain models, including the Higgs inflation.

  6. SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dominates and total ventilation can be calculated by treating other effects (i.e., wind and small fansSINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy, Office of Buildings and Community Systems Building Systems Division of the U.S. Department

  7. Dissipative effects on reheating after inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori, E-mail: mukaida@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    The inflaton must convert its energy into radiation after inflation, which, in a conventional scenario, is caused by the perturbative inflaton decay. This reheating process would be much more complicated in some cases: the decay products obtain masses from an oscillating inflaton and thermal environment, and hence the conventional reheating scenario can be modified. We study in detail processes of particle production from the inflaton, their subsequent thermalization and evolution of inflaton/plasma system by taking dissipation of the inflaton in a hot plasma into account. It is shown that the reheating temperature is significantly affected by these effects.

  8. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  9. Rolling in the modulated reheating scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Erickcek, Adrienne L. E-mail: takeshi@cita.utoronto.ca

    2014-01-01

    In the modulated reheating scenario, the field that drives inflation has a spatially varying decay rate, and the resulting inhomogeneous reheating process generates adiabatic perturbations. We examine the statistical properties of the density perturbations generated in this scenario. Unlike earlier analyses, we include the dynamics of the field that determines the inflaton decay rate. We show that the dynamics of this modulus field can significantly alter the amplitude of the power spectrum and the bispectrum, even if the modulus field has a simple potential and its effective mass is smaller than the Hubble rate. In some cases, the evolution of the modulus amplifies the non-Gaussianity of the perturbations to levels that are excluded by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background. Therefore, a proper treatment of the modulus dynamics is required to accurately calculate the statistical properties of the perturbations generated by modulated reheating.

  10. Superheated steam power plant with steam to steam reheater. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvestri, G.J.

    1981-06-23

    A desuperheater is disposed in a steam supply line supplying superheated steam to a shell and tube reheater.

  11. Commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, A.B. )

    1993-05-01

    This article addresses design requirements for commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems. The topics of the article include design considerations, toilet exhaust, dishwasher exhaust, grease hood exhaust, codes and standards, design concerns, common problems, and fire suppression. A side bar on ducts, plenums and housings is also included.

  12. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department of Defense Exchange Facilities Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department of...

  13. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About Us Shirley AnnResources Technical ofThe InsideDepartmentThriftKitchen

  14. Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett

    2014-05-13

    For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

  15. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 Timeline of Events: 1938-1950Insulation Tips:Kitchen

  16. Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Kitchen and Dining Facilities - Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Q.; Deng, S.; Li, H.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial kitchens usually require a large amount of ventilation air and high ventilation rates. Today's typical kitchens and dining facilities are often equipped with Make-up Air Fans (MAF) or dedicated Make-up Air Units (MUA) to make up about 50...

  17. Automatic Control System of Car-Bottom Reheating Furnace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xueqiao, M.; Weilian, X.; Hongchen, Z.

    1985-01-01

    At present China has large quantities of two-regenerator gas reheating furnaces which are old in fashion and low in calorific efficiency. Therefore, the question how to increase the calorific efficiency is very much concerned on condition...

  18. Dehumidification Without Re-heat Using Face and Bypass Dampers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warila, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    Installations with chill water cooling, needing constant air volume and dehumidification, traditionally use a draw through air handling unit with a cooling coil and a re-heat coil. Dehumidification is achieved by overcooling the discharge air...

  19. A Smart Kitchen for Nutrition-Aware Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jen-Hao

    The paper discusses a kitchen that intelligently senses cooking activities and provides realtime nutritional information helps facilitate healthy cooking by letting family cooks make informed decisions. It creates opportunities ...

  20. Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, J. Chris; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    Cooking and cooking burners emit pollutants that can adversely affect indoor air quality in residences and significantly impact occupant health. Effective kitchen exhaust ventilation can reduce exposure to cooking-related air pollutants as an enabling step to healthier, low-energy homes. This report identifies barriers to the widespread adoption of kitchen exhaust ventilation technologies and practice and proposes a suite of strategies to overcome these barriers. The recommendations have been vetted by a group of industry, regulatory, health, and research experts and stakeholders who convened for two web-based meetings and provided input and feedback to early drafts of this document. The most fundamental barriers are (1) the common misconception, based on a sensory perception of risk, that kitchen exhaust when cooking is unnecessary and (2) the lack of a code requirement for kitchen ventilation in most US locations. Highest priority objectives include the following: (1) Raise awareness among the public and the building industry of the need to install and routinely use kitchen ventilation; (2) Incorporate kitchen exhaust ventilation as a requirement of building codes and improve the mechanisms for code enforcement; (3) Provide best practice product and use-behavior guidance to ventilation equipment purchasers and installers, and; (4) Develop test methods and performance targets to advance development of high performance products. A specific, urgent need is the development of an over-the-range microwave that meets the airflow and sound requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  1. Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, J. Chris; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    Cooking and cooking burners emit pollutants that can adversely affect indoor air quality in residences and significantly impact occupant health. Effective kitchen exhaust ventilation can reduce exposure to cooking-related air pollutants as an enabling step to healthier, low-energy homes. This report by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory identifies barriers to the widespread adoption of kitchen exhaust ventilation technologies and practice and proposes a suite of strategies to overcome these barriers. The recommendations have been vetted by a group of industry, regulatory, health, and research experts and stakeholders who convened for two meetings and provided input and feedback to early drafts of this document. The most fundamental barriers are (1) the common misconception, based on a sensory perception of risk, that kitchen exhaust when cooking is unnecessary and (2) the lack of a code requirement for kitchen ventilation in most U.S. locations. Highest priority objectives include the following: (1) Raise awareness among the public and the building industry of the need to install and routinely use kitchen ventilation; (2) Incorporate kitchen exhaust ventilation as a requirement of building codes and improve the mechanisms for code enforcement; (3) Provide best practice product and use-behavior guidance to ventilation equipment purchasers and installers, and; (4) Develop test methods and performance targets to advance development of high performance products. A specific, urgent need is the development of an over-the-range microwave that meets the airflow and sound requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  2. Entropy mode loops and cosmological correlations during perturbative reheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma E-mail: seymakutluk@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that during preheating the entropy modes circulating in the loops, which correspond to the inflaton decay products, meaningfully modify the cosmological correlation functions at superhorizon scales. In this paper, we determine the significance of the same effect when reheating occurs in the perturbative regime. In a typical two scalar field model, the magnitude of the loop corrections are shown to depend on several parameters like the background inflaton amplitude in the beginning of reheating, the inflaton decay rate and the inflaton mass. Although the loop contributions turn out to be small as compared to the preheating case, they still come out larger than the loop effects during inflation.

  3. Waste heat from kitchen cuts hot water electricity 23%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1984-05-21

    Heat recovered from the Hamburger Hamlet's kitchen in Bethesada, Maryland and used to pre-heat the million gallons of hot water used annually reduced hot water costs 23% and paid off the investment in 1.5 years. Potomac Electric initiated the installation of an air-to-water heat pump in the restaurant kitchen above the dishwasher at a cost of about $5300, with the restaurant obliged to reimburse the utility if performance was satisfactory. Outside water recirculates through storage tanks and the ceiling heat pump until it reaches the required 140/sup 0/F. The amount of electricity needed to bring the preheated water to that temperature was $3770 lower after the installation. Cooled air exhausted from the heat pump circulates throughout the kitchen.

  4. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.E. Lippert; D.M. Bachovchin

    2004-03-31

    Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. In addition to kinetic modeling and experimental task, CFD modeling (by Texas A&M) of airfoil injection and its effects on blade aerodynamics and turbine performance. This report discusses validation of the model against single-vane combustion test data from Siemens Westinghouse, and parametric studies of injection reheat in a modern turbine. The best location for injection is at the trailing edge of the inlet guide vane. Combustion is incomplete at trailing edges of subsequent vanes. Recommendations for further development are presented.

  5. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is a joint military activity and the U.S. Department of Defense?s (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization?s overall sustainability plan and objectives.

  6. Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

    2011-01-27

    The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

  7. When Her Thousand Chimneys Smoked: Virginia's Enslaved Cooks and Their Kitchens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deetz, Kelley

    2010-01-01

    between wealth and waste. The food, as such, becamewaste away from the kitchen; however, the lingering smell of dishwater, rotting food

  8. Improving the efficiency and availability analysis of a modified reheat regenerative Rankine cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassily, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    Reheating in a reheat regenerative steam power cycle increases efficiency by increasing the average temperature of heat reception, but also increases the irreversibility of feed water heaters by raising the temperature of the superheated steam used for the regenerative process. This paper introduces some modifications to the regular reheat regenerative steam power cycle that reduce the irreversibility of the regenerative process. An availability analysis of the modified cycle and the regular reheat regenerative cycle as well as a comparison study between both cycles is done. The results indicate that a gain in energy efficiency of up to 2.5% as the steam generator pressure varies is obtained when applying such modifications at the same conditions of pressure, temperature's number of reheating stages, and feed water heaters. The availability analysis showed that such increase in efficiency is due to the reduction of the irreversibility of the regeneration process of the modified cycle.

  9. Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUSEnergy| Department ofEnergy Commercial kitchen

  10. Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Bannister, R.L.

    1999-08-10

    A system and method are disclosed for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom. 2 figs.

  11. Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Wen-Ching (Export, PA); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

    1999-01-01

    A system and method for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom.

  12. Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Langford “A” building houses the College of Architecture on TAMU campus. There are ten singleduct variable air volume (VAV) air-handling units (AHUs) without reheat serving the building. The local pneumatic thermostats modulate the dampers...

  13. Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

    2001-01-01

    This report contains engineering calculations for seven (7) air-side, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems (HVAC) systems, including: dual duct constant volume (DDCAV), dual duct variable volume (DDVAV), ...

  14. On finite density effects on cosmic reheating and moduli decay and implications for Dark Matter production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drewes, Marco

    2014-11-01

    We study the damping of an oscillating scalar field in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime by perturbative processes, taking into account the back-reaction of the plasma of decay products on the damping rate. The scalar field may be identified with the inflaton, in which case this process resembles the reheating of the universe after inflation. It can also model a modulus that dominates the energy density of the universe at later times. We find that the finite density corrections to the damping rate can have a drastic effect on the thermal history and considerably increase both, the maximal temperature in the early universe and the reheating temperature at the onset of the radiation dominated era. As a result the abundance of some Dark Matter candidates may be considerably larger than previously estimated. We give improved analytic estimates for the maximal and the reheating temperatures and confirm them numerically in a simple model.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement by Measurement and Control: A Case Study of Reheating Furnaces in the Steel Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martensson, A.

    1992-01-01

    is on energy use in steel reheating furnaces for rolling mills. The demands on the reheating process and the operational conditions that are essential for its control are described. An analysis is made of possible reductions in energy use as a result...

  16. Field performance of a nephelometer in rural kitchens: effects of high humidity excursions and correlations to gravimetric analyses (Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Susan L; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2006-01-01

    to indoor air pollution from biomass combustion in Kenya.pollution in rural kitchens in which small-scale combustion

  17. Microwave palaeointensities from a recent Mexican lava ow, baked sediments and reheated pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Microwave palaeointensities from a recent Mexican lava Łow, baked sediments and reheated pottery H form 10 June 2003; accepted 10 June 2003 Abstract Microwave palaeointensity (PI) estimates have been to overestimate the correct values. In addition to lava samples, microwave PIs were also determined from pottery

  18. Reheating signature in the gravitational wave spectrum from self-ordering scalar fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Takashi Hiramatsu; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2015-09-28

    We investigate the imprint of reheating on the gravitational wave spectrum produced by self-ordering of multi-component scalar fields after a global phase transition. The equation of state of the Universe during reheating, which usually has different behaviour from that of a radiation-dominated Universe, affects the evolution of gravitational waves through the Hubble expansion term in the equations of motion. This gives rise to a different power-law behavior of frequency in the gravitational wave spectrum. The reheating history is therefore imprinted in the shape of the spectrum. We perform $512^3$ lattice simulations to investigate how the ordering scalar field reacts to the change of the Hubble expansion and how the reheating effect arises in the spectrum. We also compare the result with inflation-produced gravitational waves, which has a similar spectral shape, and discuss whether it is possible to distinguish the origin between inflation and global phase transition by detecting the shape with future direct detection gravitational wave experiments such as DECIGO.

  19. Reheating signature in the gravitational wave spectrum from self-ordering scalar fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the imprint of reheating on the gravitational wave spectrum produced by self-ordering of multi-component scalar fields after a global phase transition. The equation of state of the Universe during reheating, which usually has different behaviour from that of a radiation-dominated Universe, affects the evolution of gravitational waves through the Hubble expansion term in the equations of motion. This gives rise to a different power-law behavior of frequency in the gravitational wave spectrum. The reheating history is therefore imprinted in the shape of the spectrum. We perform $512^3$ lattice simulations to investigate how the ordering scalar field reacts to the change of the Hubble expansion and how the reheating effect arises in the spectrum. We also compare the result with inflation-produced gravitational waves, which has a similar spectral shape, and discuss whether it is possible to distinguish the origin between inflation and global phase transition by detecting the shape with future direc...

  20. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

  1. Inflation, baryogenesis and gravitino dark matter at ultra low reheat temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunori Kohri; Anupam Mazumdar; Narendra Sahu

    2009-05-11

    It is quite possible that the reheat temperature of the universe is extremely low close to the scale of Big Bang nucleosynthesis, i.e. $T_{R}\\sim 1-10$ MeV. At such low reheat temperatures generating matter anti-matter asymmetry and synthesizing dark matter particles are challenging issues which need to be addressed within a framework of beyond the Standard Model physics. In this paper we point out that a successful cosmology can emerge naturally provided the R-parity violating interactions are responsible for the excess in baryons over anti-baryons and at the same time they can explain the longevity of dark matter with the right abundance.

  2. More on loops in reheating: non-gaussianities and tensor power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katirci, Nihan; Kaya, Ali; Tarman, Merve E-mail: ali.kaya@boun.edu.tr

    2014-06-01

    We consider the single field chaotic m{sup 2}?{sup 2} inflationary model with a period of preheating, where the inflaton decays to another scalar field ? in the parametric resonance regime. In a recent work, one of us has shown that the ? modes circulating in the loops during preheating notably modify the (??) correlation function. We first rederive this result using a different gauge condition hence reconfirm that superhorizon ? modes are affected by the loops in preheating. Further, we examine how ? loops give rise to non-gaussianity and affect the tensor perturbations. For that, all cubic and some higher order interactions involving two ? fields are determined and their contribution to the non-gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} and the tensor power spectrum are calculated at one loop. Our estimates for these corrections show that while a large amount of non-gaussianity can be produced during reheating, the tensor power spectrum receive moderate corrections. We observe that the loop quantum effects increase with more ? fields circulating in the loops indicating that the perturbation theory might be broken down. These findings demonstrate that the loop corrections during reheating are significant and they must be taken into account for precision inflationary cosmology.

  3. IL NUOVO CIMENTO VOL. 111 B, N. 5 Maggio 1996 Temperature at the first stage of reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scudellaro, Paolo

    - Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw, Poland (6) N. Copernicus Polish Astronomical Foundation - AL Ujazdowskie 4, 00 at the first stage of reheating looks like evaporation of a Bose condensate. They are described by the equation to a condensate of zero-momentum cf-particles of mass M- MGUT, effectively described by a dust equation of state p

  4. Reheating and dangerous relics in pre-big bang string cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Buonanno; Martin Lemoine; Keith A. Olive

    2000-09-27

    We discuss the mechanism of reheating in pre-big bang string cosmology and we calculate the amount of moduli and gravitinos produced gravitationally and in scattering processes of the thermal bath. We find that this abundance always exceeds the limits imposed by big-bang nucleosynthesis, and significant entropy production is required. The exact amount of entropy needed depends on the details of the high curvature phase between the dilaton-driven inflationary era and the radiation era. We show that the domination and decay of the zero-mode of a modulus field, which could well be the dilaton, or of axions, suffices to dilute moduli and gravitinos. In this context, baryogenesis can be accomodated in a simple way via the Affleck-Dine mechanism and in some cases the Affleck-Dine condensate could provide both the source of entropy and the baryon asymmetry.

  5. Assessment of existing H2/O2 chemical reaction mechanisms at reheat gas turbine conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weydahl, Torleif; Seljeskog, Morten; Haugen, Nils Erland L

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides detailed comparisons of chemical reaction mechanisms of H2 applicable at high preheat temperatures and pressures relevant to gas turbine and particularly Alstom's reheat gas turbine conditions. It is shown that the available reaction mechanisms exhibit large differences in several important elementary reaction coefficients. The reaction mechanisms are assessed by comparing ignition delay and laminar flame speed results obtained from CHEMKIN with available data, however, the amount of data at these conditions is scarce and a recommended candidate among the mechanisms can presently not be selected. Generally, the results with the GRI-Mech and Leeds mechanisms deviate from the Davis, Li, O'Conaire, Konnov and San Diego mechanisms, but there are also significant deviations between the latter five mechanisms that altogether are better adapted to hydrogen. The differences in ignition delay times between the dedicated hydrogen mechanisms (O'Conaire, Li and Konnov) range from approximately a maxim...

  6. MeV sterile neutrinos in low reheating temperature cosmological scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelmini, Graciela; Osoba, Efunwande [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pascoli, Silvia, E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu, E-mail: eosoba@ucla.edu, E-mail: sergio.palomares-ruiz@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)] [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    It is commonly assumed that the cosmological and astrophysical bounds on the mixings of sterile with active neutrinos are much more stringent than those obtained from laboratory measurements. We point out that in scenarios with a very low reheating temperature T{sub RH}<<100 MeV at the end of (the last episode of) inflation or entropy creation, the abundance of sterile neutrinos becomes greatly suppressed with respect to that obtained within the standard framework. Thus, in this case cosmological bounds become much less stringent than usually assumed, allowing sterile neutrinos to be 'visible' in future experiments. Here, we concentrate on massive (mostly sterile) neutrinos with masses m{sub s}>1 MeV for T{sub RH}{<=}m{sub s}.

  7. Dark radiation and dark matter in supersymmetric axion models with high reheating temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, Peter; Steffen, Frank Daniel, E-mail: graf@mpp.mpg.de, E-mail: steffen@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, D–80805 Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies of the cosmic microwave background, large scale structure, and big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) show trends towards extra radiation. Within the framework of supersymmetric hadronic axion models, we explore two high-reheating-temperature scenarios that can explain consistently extra radiation and cold dark matter (CDM), with the latter residing either in gravitinos or in axions. In the gravitino CDM case, axions from decays of thermal saxions provide extra radiation already prior to BBN and decays of axinos with a cosmologically required TeV-scale mass can produce extra entropy. In the axion CDM case, cosmological constraints are respected with light eV-scale axinos and weak-scale gravitinos that decay into axions and axinos. These decays lead to late extra radiation which can coexist with the early contributions from saxion decays. Recent results of the Planck satellite probe extra radiation at late times and thereby both scenarios. Further tests are the searches for axions at ADMX and for supersymmetric particles at the LHC.

  8. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  9. Use of Multiple Reheat Helium Brayton Cycles to Eliminate the Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop for Advanced Loop Type SFRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Samuel E. Bays

    2009-05-01

    The sodium intermediate heat transfer loop is used in existing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plant design as a necessary safety measure to separate the radioactive primary loop sodium from the water of the steam Rankine power cycle. However, the intermediate heat transfer loop significantly increases the SFR plant cost and decreases the plant reliability due to the relatively high possibility of sodium leakage. A previous study shows that helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling for SFRs with reactor outlet temperature in the range of 510°C to 650°C can achieve thermal efficiencies comparable to or higher than steam cycles or recently proposed supercritical CO2 cycles. Use of inert helium as the power conversion working fluid provides major advantages over steam or CO2 by removing the requirement for safety systems to prevent and mitigate the sodium-water or sodium-CO2 reactions. A helium Brayton cycle power conversion system therefore makes the elimination of the intermediate heat transfer loop possible. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design of multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle for an advanced loop type SFR. This design widely refers the new horizontal shaft distributed PBMR helium power conversion design features. For a loop type SFR with reactor outlet temperature 550°C, the design achieves 42.4% thermal efficiency with favorable power density comparing with high temperature gas cooled reactors.

  10. Homology Model for Oncostatin M Based on NMR Structural Data Douglas Kitchen,, Ross C. Hoffman,|, Franklin J. Moy, and Robert Powers*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Homology Model for Oncostatin M Based on NMR Structural Data Douglas Kitchen,,§ Ross C. Hoffman-ray structure, creating homology models may prove to be the most efficient means of providing structural data model for OM was determined from the X-ray structures of human growth hormone (hGH), LIF, and G

  11. Feasibility study for reconstruction of the reheat furnaces for the 2000 Hot Strip Mill (Novolipetsk Steel Works, Lipetsk, Russia): Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a furnace design that would be instrumental in advancing the NLMK 2000 Hot Strip Mill to a level of world class strip mills capable of producing high quality strip with improved energy efficiency and minimal environmental impact. The contents include the following: (1) executive summary; (2) capital cost assessment; (3) project financial analysis; (4) study overview; (5) basic furnace design; (6) silicon design specification; (7) utilities; (8) NOx reduction technologies for reheat furnaces; (9) site investigation and construction schedule; (10) hot connect.

  12. Home Improvement- Kitchen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prairie View University

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a solar energy heat-pump system and analyzes the thermoeconomics. The results show that the solar energy heat-pump system can be operated in different modes and used for room heating in winter and cooling in summer and...

  13. Home Improvement- Kitchen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan

    2009-01-01

    can typically use Rankine cycle (i.e., use a separate heat exchanging loop to produce steam and drive a turbine). Alternatively, the heat engine can be operated in a Stirling cycle to produce electricity. Several configurations and architectures... are used in contemporary CSP stations, which are categorized as ?solar power tower?, ?parabolic trough? and ?dish- Sterling unit? [8]. TES provides several advantages for the economical operation...

  14. The Meissner Effect and Vortex Expulsion in Color-Superconducting Quark stars, and its Role for Re-heating of Magnetars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Niebergal; Rachid Ouyed; Rodrigo Negreiros; Fridolin Weber

    2010-01-29

    Compact stars made of quark matter rather than confined hadronic matter, are expected to form a color superconductor. This superconductor ought to be threaded with rotational vortex lines, within which the star's interior magnetic field is at least partially confined. The vortices (and thus magnetic flux) would be expelled from the star during stellar spin-down, leading to magnetic reconnection at the surface of the star and the prolific production of thermal energy. In this paper, we show that this energy release can re-heat quark stars to exceptionally high temperatures, such as observed for Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs), Anomalous X-Ray pulsars (AXPs), and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs). Moreover, our numerical investigations of the temperature evolution, spin-down rate, and magnetic field behavior of such superconducting quark stars suggest that SGRs, AXPs, and XDINs may be linked ancestrally. Finally, we discuss the possibility of a time delay before the star enters the color superconducting phase, which can be used to estimate the density at which quarks deconfine. From observations, we find this density to be of the order of five times that of nuclear saturation.

  15. Warm Dark Matter via Ultra-Violet Freeze-In: Reheating Temperature and Non-Thermal Distribution for Fermionic Higgs Portal Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John McDonald

    2015-12-20

    Warm dark matter (WDM) of order keV mass may be able to resolve the disagreement between structure formation in cold dark matter simulations and observations. The detailed properties of WDM will depend upon its energy distribution, in particular how it deviates from the thermal distribution usually assumed in WDM simulations. Here we focus on WDM production via the Ultra-Violet (UV) freeze-in mechanism, for the case of fermionic Higgs portal dark matter $\\psi$ produced the portal interaction $\\overline{\\psi}\\psi H^{\\dagger}H/\\Lambda$. We show that the reheating temperature must satisfy $T_{R} \\gtrsim 0.3 $ TeV in order to account for the observed dark matter density when $m_{\\psi} \\approx 2 $ keV, where the lower bound on $T_{R}$ corresponds to the limit where the fermion mass is entirely due to electroweak symmetry breaking via the portal interaction. The corresponding bound on the interaction scale is $\\Lambda \\gtrsim 1.5 \\times 10^{10}$ GeV. We introduce a new method to simplify the computation of the non-thermal energy distribution of dark matter from freeze-in. We show that the non-thermal energy distribution from UV freeze-in is much broader and flatter than the corresponding thermal distribution.

  16. Reheating and Cosmic String Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xian Gao; Miao Li; Wei Song; Yushu Song

    2008-01-04

    We compute the string production rate at the end of inflation, using the string spectrum obtained in \\lss in a near-de Sitter space. Our result shows that highly excited strings are hardly produced, thus the simple slow-roll inflation alone does not offer a cosmic string production mechanism.

  17. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  18. From (p)reheating to nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten Jedamzik

    2001-12-10

    This article gives a brief qualitative description of the possible evolution of the early Universe between the end of an inflationary epoch and the end of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. After a general introduction, establishing the minimum requirements cosmologists impose on this cosmic evolutionary phase, namely, successful baryogenesis, the production of cosmic dark matter, and successful light-element nucleosynthesis, a more detailed discussion on some recent developments follows. This latter includes the physics of preheating, the putative production of (alternative) dark matter, and the current status of Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  19. KITCHEN VENTURE LAB Policies and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    OF PARKING LOT USE, REGARDLESS OF UNIVERSITY AFFILIAT. Any damage to the technology will result in the user being charged for replacement. Parking: Parking is arranged and payment made to campus parking services. PARKING MUST BE PURCHASED BY ANY ORGANIZATION IN NEED

  20. Saving Fuel Energy in the Kitchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggard, Marilyn A.

    1980-01-01

    This project was requested by the Air Force Institute of Environment Safety and Health Risk Analysis to evaluate personal exposure to turbine engine exhaust. Quantifiable indicators of exhaust exposure were identified ...

  1. Commercial and Industrial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: All equipment must be installed on or after January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. The documentation must be received no later than March 31, 2016. 

  2. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Most of the energy used by a dishwasher is for water heating. The EnergyGuide label estimates how much power is needed per year to run the appliance and to heat the water...

  3. Tips: Kitchen Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    uses 3-7 gallons of hot water each use. Let your dishes air dry; if you don't have an automatic air-dry switch, turn off the control knob after the final rinse and prop the door...

  4. Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments response NAESB

  5. Control Humidity With Single-Duct, Single-Zone, Constant Air Volume System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    The lecture hall of the Richardson Petroleum Building at Texas A&M University is a large lecture hall, with a total floor area of approximately 2500 ft^2. The lecture hall was served by a constant air volume (CAV) air handling unit (AHU) which had...

  6. Exploring Maximum Humidity Control and Energy Conservation Opportunities with Single Duct Single Zone Air-Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.

    2006-01-01

    the outside air. However, it also involves major ductwork changes. 2.3 Variable speed control of supply airflow A variable speed drive (VFD) saves fan power by slowing down the fan speed and delivering less supply air to the conditioned space during... by adjusting the supply fan speed. However, if the space cooling load drops below the point where the supply airflow reaches the minimum flow required for proper ventilation, the supply air temperature has to be raised to keep the space temperature from...

  7. On the Single-Zone Modeling for Optimal Climate Control of a Real-Sized Livestock Stable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    . As a typical modern and large-sized stable system, the considered stable uses hybrid ventilation and low described. The models for air inlets, outlets and their driving systems as well as the heating systems, one climate control systems. A typical modern stable system is usually equipped with a hybrid ventilation [3

  8. Reheating dynamics affects non-perturbative decay of spectator fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: rose.lerner@helsinki.fi

    2013-11-01

    The behaviour of oscillating scalar spectator fields after inflation depends on the thermal background produced by inflaton decay. Resonant decay of the spectator is often blocked by large induced thermal masses. We account for the finite decay width of the inflaton and the protracted build-up of the thermal bath to determine the early evolution of a homogeneous spectator field ? coupled to the Higgs Boson ? through the term g{sup 2}?{sup 2}?{sup 2}, the only renormalisable coupling of a new scalar to the Standard Model. We find that for very large higgs-spectator coupling g?>10{sup ?3}, the resonance is not always blocked as was previously suggested. As a consequence, the oscillating spectator can decay quickly. For other parameter values, we find that although qualitative features of the thermal blocking still hold, the dynamics are altered compared to the instant decay case. These findings are important for curvaton models, where the oscillating field must be relatively long lived in order to produce the curvature perturbation. They are also relevant for other spectator fields, which must decay sufficiently early to avoid spoiling the predictions of baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis.

  9. Enabling Calorie-Aware Cooking in a Smart Kitchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    of the American Medical Association (2003) proper calorie time of cooking (loss of nutrition) amounts of salt + oil 90kcal + ...=930kcal decrease beef beef calorieunit calorieweightitem 140g 390 kcal 546 oil 10gUser performs an action pour oil "oil 90kcal" persuade to cook within proper calorie real-time calorie awareness

  10. Comparison of Two Ventilation Systems in a Chinese Commercial Kitchen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, X.; Yu, L.; Hou, H.

    2006-01-01

    . The results calculated for two different models show the airflow, temperature distribution and human thermal comfort index-PMV and PPD value. The simulation results indicate that both methods are capable of enhancing the capture and containment performance...

  11. Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    money. | Photo courtesy of Bethany Sparn, NREL 25545 Energy-Efficient Home Appliances Can Save You Money FACT: Consumers are saving more than 62 billion a year as a result of the...

  12. Spatial user interface : augmenting human sensibilities in a domestic kitchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jackie Chia-Hsun

    2005-01-01

    The real world is not a computer screen. When can augmented reality and ambient interfaces improve the usability of a physical environment? This thesis presents data from design studies and experiments that demonstrate the ...

  13. Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratton, J. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Design (LEED) for Homes Passive House Institute US (PHIUS)by a LEED for Homes Green Rater 20 . Passive House InstituteUS (PHIUS) Passive House certification is solely

  14. Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor Innovative Solar PowerTribesDepartmentEnergyNovemberOurinyour

  15. Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy andandBeforeofOhio87-2007 June 2007Energy

  16. Commercial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment ofCommercial Grade Dedication (CGD) is to

  17. Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y AEfficiency RebateFederalDepartment of

  18. Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKey Meeting TakeawaysDepartment ofof

  19. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)ofkitchens are often

  20. STEAM-SIDE OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION BEHAVIOR IN SUPERHEATERS AND REHEATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Shingledecker, John P.; Wright, Ian G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in materials for power plants include not only new materials with higher-temperature capabilities, but also the use of current materials at increasingly higher temperatures. This latter activity builds on extensive experience of the performance of the various alloys, and provides a basis for identifying changes in alloy behavior with increasing temperature as well as understanding the factors that ultimately determine the maximum use temperatures of the different alloy classes. This paper presents results from an effort to model the exfoliation processes of steam-side oxide scales in a manner that describes as accurately as possible the evolution of strains in oxides growing inside small-diameter tubes subjected to large thermal gradients and to thermal transients typical of normal steam boiler operation. One way of portraying the results of such calculations is by plotting the evolving strains in a given oxide scale on an Exfoliation Diagram (of the type pioneered by Manning et al. of the British Central Electricity Research Laboratory) to determine the earliest time at which the trajectory of these strains intersects a criterion for scale failure. Understanding of how such strain trajectories differ among different alloys and are affected by the major variables associated with boiler operation has the potential to suggest boiler operating strategies to manage scale exfoliation, as well as to highlight the mode of scale failure and the limitations of each alloy. Preliminary results are presented of the strain trajectories calculated for alloys T22, T91, and TP347 subjected to the conditions experienced by superheaters under assumed boiler operating scenarios. For all three alloys the earliest predicted scale failures were associated with the increased strains developed during a boiler shut-down event; indeed, in the cases considered it appeared unlikely that scale failure would occur in any practically meaningful time due to strains accumulated during operation in a load-following mode in the absence of a shut down. The accuracy of the algorithms used for the kinetics of oxide growth appeared to be a very important consideration, especially for alloy TP347 for which large effects on oxide growth rate are known to occur with changes in alloy grain size and surface cold work.

  1. SP.287 / 5.S15 / ESG.SP287 Kitchen Chemistry, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christie, Patricia Dianne, 1967-

    This course includes Special topic seminars and independent study projects. Seminars are run by a staff member or supervised undergraduate instructor and meet weekly. Independent study projects require approval and regular ...

  2. Airflow Characteristics of Direct-Type Kitchen Hood Systems in High-Rise Apartment Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, M.

    2011-01-01

    25 Conclusions (1) In the case of the reference model, when the exhaust hood is not in operation, both infiltration and leakage airflow are observed due to wind pressure and stack effect. When the exhaust hood system is in operation, the exhaust... stream_source_info ESL-IC-11-10-12.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4866 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IC-11-10-12.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Airflow...

  3. Kitchen layout and dimensions for the ambulatory and wheelchair-bound elderly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resendiz, Anita Janice

    1985-01-01

    -ups placed above the countertop and six placed below it. The Individual Shelf Pullout and the Door Shelf Pullout Combination were recommended over the Door Shelf Combination, Lazy Susan Pullout Pop- up Lazy Susan, and the Control (standard cabinet...) for the bottom cabinets for use by the ambulatory. The Full Shelf Pullout Pop&own and the Door Shelf Pullout Pop-down Combination were recommended over the Individual Shelf Pullout, Door Shelf Combination, Lazy Susan Pullout PopMown, and the Control (standard...

  4. When Her Thousand Chimneys Smoked: Virginia's Enslaved Cooks and Their Kitchens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deetz, Kelley

    2010-01-01

    such as butter, flour, simmer etc. This sort of partialAllum Salt Petre and Honey simmer it over a slow fire untilto a half pint of Brandy Simmer it over a slow fire, when

  5. Scrub-resistance Characteristics of Kitchen and Bathroom Wall-surfacing Materials. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobgood, Price; Kunze, O. R.; Stewart, B. R.

    1960-01-01

    . an abrasive cleanser. Loss of gloss continued bv: A statistical analysis was made to evaluate the at a much slower rate as the scrubbing progressed, gloss differences which resulted from 30-minute Ceramic tile, porcelain-on-steel, stainlesq stet: I... and that produced by scrubbing with an abrasive cleanser. Both abrasive cleansers produced essentially the same results on the materials. There was no significant difference between them. Prefinished wallboard, enameled steel and plastic tiles experienced most...

  6. THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Kitchen wastes, such as fruits, vegetables,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    dresser drawer, a 5-gallon plastic bucket, or from wood. A wooden box should be approximately 2 ft. X 2 ft into garden soil to improve structure and to provide nutrients, can be used as mulch, or as a potting soil mix

  7. The TUM Kitchen Data Set of Everyday Manipulation Activities for Motion Tracking and Action Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a table or filling a dishwasher. For these applications, it is crucial to be able to model and recognize

  8. Autonomous Semantic Mapping for Robots Performing Everyday Manipulation Tasks in Kitchen Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to acquire and use knowledge about where the task-relevant objects, such as the dishwasher and the oven

  9. Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at U.S. Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety Standards Implementation JulyTheKEY RENEWABLE00PM-6054Defense

  10. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2LargeKitchens | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardeeEnergyInformationOpen

  11. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterlyInformation Misc

  12. How Do You Save Energy in the Kitchen? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdate Webinar Slidess g n i r pHow Do You Save

  13. How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdate Webinar Slidess g nHow doHow to Apply

  14. KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRG25FVMS*) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)ofkitchens are

  15. KitchenAid: ENERGY STAR Referral (KSRS25RV*) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)ofkitchens areKSRS25RV*)

  16. Using Less Energy in the Kitchen on Thanksgiving | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin theNuclear EnergyPotomacCoolGeneratorsUsing Less Energy

  17. Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S. DOE Office of99Saving Gift Ideas for|

  18. Beyond Salad: How to Save Energy in the Kitchen During the Summer |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers atDayWhenBethany Sparn, M.S.Logo.jpg

  19. State and national household concentrations of PM2.5 from solid cookfuel use: Results from measurements and modeling in India for estimation of the global burden of disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    P-value Intercept Fuel: kerosene vs. LPG Fuel: dung vs.LPG Fuel: wood vs.LPG Kitchen: SOK vs. ODK Kitchen: IWPK vs. ODK Kitchen:

  20. Matching CAD Object Models in Semantic Mapping Sven Albrecht, Thomas Wiemann, Martin Gunther, Joachim Hertzberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    with a dishwasher is probably a kitchen) or the function of objects (a kitchen table has other functions than

  1. The Toughest Cook in the Kitchen: Gender, Authority, and Working-Class Discourse(s) in a Hypermasculine Restaurant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droz, Patricia

    2015-05-04

    The hypermasculine culture of haute cuisine has been traditionally limiting to women, who tend to leave the restaurant industry or stagnate in their professional growth. With interpretive and descriptive discourse analysis, ...

  2. Our Visit To The Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen: Touching Real People With Real Stories By Ashley Olson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasch, Audrey P.

    years. New York City had a 21 percent poverty rate in 2012, the highest rate since 2005. (Rodriguez, Sept) Many of those living in poverty work one or two jobs, many full-time. Because of hard economic, is struggling to support himself in New York City. The realization that poverty can affect anyone was solidified

  3. Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 72, No. 2, 2009, Pages 384391 Certified Kitchen Managers: Do They Improve Restaurant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . PENNE,1 CARMILY N. STONE,2 JUDY E. HARRISON,3 AND VINCENT J. RADKE4 1RTI International, 3040: 919-541-6683; E-mail: scc@rti.org. The findings and conclusions in this manuscript are those

  4. A Tradeoff between Compositionality and Complexity in the Semantics of Dimensional Adjectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The refridgerator is about 60 cm wide. b. The cupboard is about as deep as the refridgerator is wide. c. The kitchen than the refridgerator is wide. c. The kitchen table is short (for a kitchen table). d. The oven

  5. What can we learn from high-frequency appliance-level energy metering? Results from a field experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, VL; Delmas, MA; Kaiser, WJ; Locke, SL

    2015-01-01

    Plug load Refrigerator Dishwasher Other kitchen Std. Dev.Lighting Plug load Fridge Dishwasher Kitchen Average dailymicrowave, stove, dishwasher, and garbage disposal. Except

  6. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    il er Isuperh eated Superheated steam (78SoK) Condensate (to reheater (636°K) Superheated steam (B1SoK) & reheated1-4----dI gas (867°K) Superheated steam (819°K) & Reheated

  7. Field performance of a nephelometer in rural kitchens: effects of high humidity excursions and correlations to gravimetric analyses (Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Susan L; Koshland, Catherine P.

    2006-01-01

    burning liquid petroleum gas (LPG), coal gas, or natural gashigher (pLPG-burning and improved-stoveor augmenting space heating, LPG stoves, and producer gas 2

  8. Adapted by George Gollin from "Thai Home Cooking from Kamolmal's Kitchen," William Crawford and Kamolmal Pootaraksa, ISBN 0-453-00494-6, New American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    /4 cup fish sauce 1/4 cup + 2 T sugar 1/4 cup + 2 T white (unflavored) vinegar 1 T ketchup 4 scallions 3 ten minutes to soften them. Drain. 2. Combine the fish sauce, sugar, vinegar, and ketchup, stir

  9. When spinning a disk-shaped object (such as a frisbee or a kitchen plate), there is some wobbliness associated with its angular speed. Spinning a disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    do you even begin to set up problems that include calculus? How does the wind blow? 1. What't the light be hitting you more directly? For example, standing at the north pole at an equinox, you would

  10. Seymour Marine Discovery Center--Facility Use Guidelines 1. The client is responsible for all clean-up including kitchen area, refrigerator, trash & recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    scraps, ice, oil, etc. anywhere except the garbage. Liquids must be put. If there is dancing in the La Feliz room, you must rent and use a dance floor. 14

  11. How to Make an Atomic Blog in Your Own Kitchen. Summary of the Workshop: Uncertainties in Atomic Data and How They Propagate in Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luridiana, Valentina; Aggarwal, Kanti; Bautista, Manuel; Bergemann, Maria; Delahaye, Franck; del Zanna, Giulio; Ferland, Gary; Lind, Karin; Manchado, Arturo; Mendoza, Claudio; Delgado, Adal Mesa; Díaz, Manuel Núńez; Shaw, Richard A; Wesson, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This workshop brought together scientists (including atomic physicists, theoretical astrophysicists and astronomers) concerned with the completeness and accuracy of atomic data for astrophysical applications. The topics covered in the workshop included the evaluation of uncertainties in atomic data, the propagation of such uncertainties in chemical abundances, and the feedback between observations and calculations. On a different level, we also discussed communication issues such as how to ensure that atomic data are correctly understood and used, and which forum is the best one for a fluid interaction between all communities involved in the production and use of atomic data. This paper reports on the discussions held during the workshop and introduces AstroAtom, a blog created as a platform for timely and open discussions on the needs and concerns over atomic data, and their effects on astronomical research. The complete proceedings will be published on http://astroatom.wordpress.com/.

  12. Boston College Facilities Management Summer Projects 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Commons Boiler Upgrades: Replace the boiler that provides steam for the food service kitchen equipment

  13. Room Plans for Fall of 2015 March 21, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kitchens, laundry facilities, air conditioning, etc. (All things that our new residence hall will have.) We

  14. FONDAZIONE COLLEGIO UNIVERSITARIO S. CATERINA DA SIENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    a fully equipped kitchen with hob, cooker, refrigerator, dishwasher, and a television. Students have

  15. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    loop helium or nitrogen Brayton cycle with multiple reheat and intercooling stages for a high temperature

  16. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

  17. Housing sexuality: domestic space and the development of female sexuality in the fiction of Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Samantha E.

    2005-08-29

    Meals, Breaking Deals: Mothers, Daughters, and Kitchens," discusses the kitchen as the site of the production of domestic comfort. An analysis of who has primary responsibility for the production of comfort and whose comfort is privileged often reveals...

  18. Philosophy of Science Retreat James Reserve, San Jacinto Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    with a couple of toilets and one or two showers. Wireless is available, so if you must, you can check your email. The kitchen has all the usual kitchen tools. There is electricity. A Few Rules · Everyone, participants

  19. Title: Satellite Streetview: Canadian Cities and Regions Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Hamilton, Kitchener, St. Catharines, Quebec City, Montreal, Jonquiere, Halifax, Fredericton, St. Johns, Ontario; Cornwall, Ontario; Hamilton, Ontario; Kitchener, Ontario; St, Catherines, Ontario; Quebec City, Quebec; Montreal, Quebec; Jonquiere, Quebec; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Fredericton, New Brunswick; St. John

  20. Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photo courtesy of Chris Gunn, NREL. Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia Test your energy-saving knowledge with our holiday kitchen trivia. November 19, 2012 Save time and money on...

  1. ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES AND THE UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE: Rethinking Bok’s “Underachieving Colleges” Thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven Brint and Allison M. Cantwell

    2011-01-01

    s “Underachieving Colleges” Thesis March 2011 Steven Brintevidence in support of a thesis (see King & Kitchener 1994).

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a... Eligibility: Commercial,...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ameren Illinois (Electric)- Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Ameren Illinois offers several incentives specific to grocery stores, convenience stores, refrigerated...

  4. Educational/Research Arts Research Centre 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purver, Matthew

    Drapers Bar and Kitchen 8 Canalside 63 Ground Café 33 The Hive 24 Infusion 9 IT Services 19 Mucci's 29

  5. UCSC Injury and Illness Prevention Program Revised 10/01 University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    ) Shops (5) Mechanical/Boiler Rooms (6) Kitchens #12;UCSC Injury and Illness Prevention Program (rev 04

  6. The NRS Transect 7:2 (spring 1989)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UC Natural Reserve System

    1989-01-01

    and solar showers. A screened dining hall and kitchen equipped with pro- pane refrigerators, stoves,and ovens

  7. SHASTA COUNTY The Shasta County Jail is a 115,035 square-foot facility located in Redding. Built in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Replacing the electric boiler with a natural gas-fired boiler to provide hot water for domestic, kitchen

  8. Understanding the Market for Secondary Units in the East Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegmann, Jake; Chapple, Karen

    2012-01-01

    street  parking,  dishwashers  and  on-­?site  laundry  facilities  (%)   Dishwasher  (%)   Microwave  (%)  + FREE _ LAUND + MICROW + DISHWASHER   +FULL _ KITCHEN +

  9. HOUSING LIST Roommates Wanted/Rooms for Rent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    -15 minute drive to Medical Center. Large kitchen with dishwasher. Washer and dryer. Parking in front. Quiet

  10. Model Predictive Control of Regulation Services from Commercial Buildings to the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    functions correspond- ing to steam chest, piping system, re-corresponds to that of the steam chest. For non- reheat

  11. Copyright 2006 DLA. All rights reserved see http://spec.lib.vt.edu/policies/conditions.html for our conditions of use. I'VE BEEN WORKING IN THE KITCHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Copyright 2006 DLA. All rights reserved see http://spec.lib.vt.edu/policies/conditions.html for our see http://spec.lib.vt.edu/policies/conditions.html for our conditions of use. #12;I'VE BEEN WORKING rights reserved see http://spec.lib.vt.edu/policies/conditions.html for our conditions of use. #12;I

  12. Harvest time had College ofAgriculture and Life Sciences' experts talking all things edible: From how the threatened government shutdown could affect your kitchen table, to groundbreaking new technology on the Geneva campus,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    technology on the Geneva campus, to the science behind your favorite foods. Plus, much more. Food & Energy-changing high pressure processing unit that puts the Geneva station at the forefront of this new technology Rodewald,natural resources,on the coming wave of `climate migrants' in the wake of current political

  13. Computer Modeling VRF Heat Pumps in Commercial Buildings using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raustad, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are increasingly used in commercial buildings in the United States. Monitored energy use of field installations have shown, in some cases, savings exceeding 30% compared to conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A simulation study was conducted to identify the installation or operational characteristics that lead to energy savings for VRF systems. The study used the Department of Energy EnergyPlus? building simulation software and four reference building models. Computer simulations were performed in eight U.S. climate zones. The baseline reference HVAC system incorporated packaged single-zone direct-expansion cooling with gas heating (PSZ-AC) or variable-air-volume systems (VAV with reheat). An alternate baseline HVAC system using a heat pump (PSZ-HP) was included for some buildings to directly compare gas and electric heating results. These baseline systems were compared to a VRF heat pump model to identify differences in energy use. VRF systems combine multiple indoor units with one or more outdoor unit(s). These systems move refrigerant between the outdoor and indoor units which eliminates the need for duct work in most cases. Since many applications install duct work in unconditioned spaces, this leads to installation differences between VRF systems and conventional HVAC systems. To characterize installation differences, a duct heat gain model was included to identify the energy impacts of installing ducts in unconditioned spaces. The configuration of variable refrigerant flow heat pumps will ultimately eliminate or significantly reduce energy use due to duct heat transfer. Fan energy is also studied to identify savings associated with non-ducted VRF terminal units. VRF systems incorporate a variable-speed compressor which may lead to operational differences compared to single-speed compression systems. To characterize operational differences, the computer model performance curves used to simulate cooling operation are also evaluated. The information in this paper is intended to provide a relative difference in system energy use and compare various installation practices that can impact performance. Comparative results of VRF versus conventional HVAC systems include energy use differences due to duct location, differences in fan energy when ducts are eliminated, and differences associated with electric versus fossil fuel type heating systems.

  14. Ability - Not Disability: Wheelchairs. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1981-01-01

    The Texas A&M University System .Jf Texas Agricu~tural Extension Service Daniel C. Plannstiel . Director College Station ABILITY NOT DISABILITY . W'heelchairs 8-1254 '! y [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] .~ ... ABILITY - NOT DISABILITY...: WHEELCHAIRS For the homemaker in a wheelchair, the key to running a home well is to have an efficient and usable kitchen and laundry area. Not everyone can build a new kitchen, but alterations can make chores easier. Rearranging the Kitchen All counters...

  15. BETSRG Report 2002-1 September 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -r and EnergyPlus program. The tests consist of single zone tests and multi-zone tests. The single zone tests Analytical Testing Results of ESP-r and EnergyPlus ..........22 ESP-r Analytical Testing Results ............................................23 EnergyPlus Analytical Testing Results....................................97 #12;BETSRG Report 2002

  16. Silver Lake Adjacent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Yvette Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Back in her kitchen over green tea, she told him she wasbare. “Come have a cup of green tea,” she said, pulling him

  17. APPLICATION OF FAULT TREE ANALYSIS TO IGNITION OF FIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teresa Ling, W.C.

    2011-01-01

    Fig. 11 The Probability of Each Fire Scenario in a Kitchen ~Globerson, S. (1971). Berkeley Fire Incident Survey Initial1977. Evaluation of the Fire Hazard Household Fire Survey.

  18. Operating and Maintaining Energy Smart Schools Action Plan Template - All Action Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-07-01

    EnergySmart Schools action plan templates for benchmarking, lighting, HVAC, water heating, building envelope, transformer, plug loads, kitchen equipment, swimming pool, building automation system, other.

  19. Ameren Illinois (Gas)- Business Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Specialty Equipment Application offers incentives on steamers, griddles, fryers, and other commercial kitchen equipment. The Steam Trap /Process Steam Incentive Program offers incentives on s...

  20. FrontYard *** UpstairsLand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

    Kitchen log[2] Dining Vegetable Embankment RiverShall OutsidePen InsidePen button FrontBarn Windmill [3

  1. Best Management Practices for Water Efficiency | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Urinals Faucets and Showerheads Steam Boiler Systems Single-Pass Cooling Equipment Cooling Tower Management Commercial Kitchen Equipment Laboratory and Medical Equipment...

  2. Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    faults and fracturing associated with dome emplacement, and localized zones of extensive hydraulic fracturing. Wells in the Devil's Kitchen area have encountered fluids in excess...

  3. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobscheid, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    natural gas cooking burners without venting (kitchen exhaust systems) commonly leads to residential NO 2 concentrations that exceed ambient air quality

  4. Innovative Home Tours Help Homeowners Understand Energy Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Open house signs placed throughout a kitchen with hardwood floors The California Community Savings Initiative is providing an innovative way to learn about energy...

  5. Education in Disguise: Sanctioning Sexuality in Elementary School Halloween Celebrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Erica M.

    2012-01-01

    market – girls are sold Barbies, Bratz dolls, make-up, and Betty Crocker mini kitchen sets while boys get GI Joes, Transformers, and

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and commercial kitchens, including refrigeratorfreezer lighting and controls, and automatic door closers. These are designed to improve the energy efficiency of lighting,...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of an energy audit, including: natural gas heating measures, programmable thermostats, boiler reset controls, steam trap replacements and kitchen equipment. The Commercial High...

  8. EA-1662: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: EnergyConservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens)

  9. Review of Literature for Inputs to the National Water Savings Model and Spreadsheet Tool-Commercial/Institutional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham

    2009-01-01

    D. 2002. Commercial dishwashers: a new frontier in energythey are loaded into a dishwasher. Pre- rinsing kitchen andthey are placed in a dishwasher. To estimate the number of

  10. Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    at the clothes washer, dishwasher, showerhead, and kitchenkitchen sinks, showers, dishwashers, and clothes washers.m (ft) Clothes washer Dishwasher & Kitchen Sink Shower Table

  11. TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

  12. TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities.  In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

  13. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    value and have a lower energy usage. Figure 1 shows thatenergy. Cleanroom reheat energy usage can be significantthe overall facility energy usage intensity. However, such

  14. High-performance commercial building systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    terminal box reheat valve leakage, improper minimum terminalidentified metering and valve leakage problems successfullyidentified re- heat valve leakage problems and later

  15. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion; Industrial Technologies Program ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reheat, soaking pits, ladles Aluminum Melting Copper Smelting and melting Glass Melting Pulp and Paper Lime kilns, black liquor boilers Petroleum Process heaters, crackers Power...

  16. Bandwidth Study on Energy Use and Potential Energy Saving Opportunitie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    require longer reheat times and this increases the energy consumption of the process. Heat treatments and controlled processing may sometimes be performed during the hot...

  17. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01

    2007. Dual pressure recovery boiler. Patent No. : US 7243619Cycle Power or Recovery Boiler into an Existing Pulp Mill".Monacelli. 2009. "Recovery Boiler Reheat Steam Cycle". Paper

  18. Controlling Energy-Efficient Buildings in the Context of Smart Grid: A Cyber Physical System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    functions corresponding to steam chest, piping system, re-corresponds to that of the steam chest. For non-reheat steam

  19. Flexibility of Commercial Building HVAC Fan as Ancillary Service for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    functions corresponding to steam chest, piping system, re-corresponds to that of the steam chest. For non-reheat steam

  20. Instrumentation and Control of a Steam Plant Using a Microprocessor Based Controller 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattes, D. A.; Day, J.

    1979-01-01

    , and two 400 HP boilers and one 300 HP boiler are housed in Plant B. All boilers are fired with #2 oil. The steam pressure generated in Plant A is 60 PSI to provide steam for heating and kitchen load; and 125 PSI in Plant B for laundry, heating and kitchen...

  1. AIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Kitchen Range Hood Kitchen and bath vents provide spot ventilation Annual Energy Costs for 1300 sq. ft AND RENEWABLE ENERGY · U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY #12; W H A T A RAIR SEALING Seal air leaks and save energy! W H A T I S A I R L E A K A G E ? Ventilation is fresh

  2. disaster@cornell.edu emergencypreparedness.cce.cornell.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    as an alternate method of disposing of food waste or simply dispose of food in the garbage. (Kitchen sink drop per second wastes 2,700 gallons of water per year. · Check all plumbing for leaks and have any with the operating parts. · Replace your showerhead with an ultra-low-flow version. KITCHEN · Start a compost pile

  3. Department of Family and Consumer Science News

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    at Millennium Park. Dr. Nancy Nehring, interior design pro- gram coordinator, attended the 2004 Kitchen/Bath Industry Show and Confer- ence (K/BIS) in Chicago. The conference showcases products that change the kitchen and bath industry through their innovation and ability to meet the needs of the market- place. K

  4. Master Thesis: Collaboration between Utility Systems and Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    of surplus byproduct gases Electricity generation Reheating purposes Natural gas consumption for reheating-sensitive Electricity Prices: Assessing the Economic Benefit Case Study: An Integrated Steel Mill Markus Drouven1, Sumit;2 Production Plant Utility System Utility Supply Utility Demand Surplus Electricity Purchased Electricity Power

  5. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Tutorial 5 1 ENSC 461 Tutorial, Week#6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    outnet ccttoutnet (Eq2) Since air is the working fluid, modeled as an ideal gas with constant specific, Reheat & Regeneration A regenerative gas turbine with intercooling and reheat operates at steady state to the individual control volumes to obtain Eq2. Note: The assumptions of steady operating conditions ke & pe 0

  6. Context Objectives Methodology : Thermo-environomic optimization -Systematic framework for process analysis design and optimization.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    improvements identification 90% Post-combustion CO2 capture in natural gas fuelled power plant Q+ LP Q+ reheat recompression integration Pre-combustion CO2 capture in biomass fed power plant System No MVR MVR tot [%] 27 Physical model CO2 capture model Generic reheat GT model T, P, Xi, MFG Q+ Q- Natural gas Biomass Natural

  7. Single pressure steam bottoming cycle for gas turbines combined cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zervos, N.

    1990-01-30

    This patent describes a process for recapturing waste heat from the exhaust of a gas turbine to drive a high pressure-high temperature steam turbine and a low pressure steam turbine. It comprises: delivering the exhaust of the gas turbine to the hot side of an economizer-reheater apparatus; delivering a heated stream of feedwater and recycled condensate through the cold side of the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus to elevate the temperature below the pinch point of the boiler; delivering the discharge from the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine through the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus; driving the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine with the discharge stream of feedwater and recycled condensate which is heated to a temperature below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus; and driving the low pressure steam turbine with the discharged stream of the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine reheated below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus.

  8. Simultaneous Precipitation Reactions in Creep-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sourmail, Thomas

    2002-05-28

    C Preheated steam Reheated steam Burners Superheater and reheater tubes pendants Superheated steam To turbines 600-650 ´Z??0"%????Db"E)b"}OëÚěsíflîđď&ń îVň?óôîşďőó&ěsö ÷ůřsúHű"üůîşý§óßţ ň?ř ????? ńsî??­î ??ý-ň ? ÷ ?ťísüů÷??sî ? ö ??÷ üůîđď?? ň...

  9. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

  10. Accommodation Application for Students with Additional Requirements 2015-2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Accommodation Team Head of Accommodation & Hospitality Services Head of Student Services Head of Security rails Yes No Low kitchen surfaces etc Yes No Motorised door opening device Yes No Small personal fridge

  11. 2015 ENERGY & SUSTAINABILITY BEST PRACTICE AWARD UC Davis Dining Services was awarded the 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    DC's. National Foundation for Celiac Awareness Great Kitchen Gluten-free Certified The first dining sustainable sources: · 27% of all meat and seafood purchases are sustainable · 100% of all eggs are cage-free

  12. Our plumbing, ourselves : a public bath house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merceret, Honor

    1993-01-01

    Cleansing for being well Cleansing for well being. This thesis will consider: --how developments in plumbing and sewage and their related fixtures, kitchens and baths, parallel cultural changes throughout history. Though ...

  13. EA-1662: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) and for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment (Commercial Clothes Washers)

  14. Technology and social process : oscillations in Iron Age copper production and power in Southern Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yosef, Erez

    2010-01-01

    local political powers independent of Egypt (Kitchen, 1986)still included Egypt, but since the balance of power changedEgypt played in the Iron Age metal trade even as a weak power

  15. Water savers: new hardware helps you close the tap on waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    A variety of water-saving devices and the potential for water conservation are discussed. Add-on gadgets for the bath and kitchen, frugal flushers (toilets), and gray-water recyclers are described in detail.

  16. N=1=NPK=KIMCHI=N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Rhim, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    N=1=NPK=KIMCHI=N is a mobile, expandable living unit which consists of a urinal, urine processing system, hydroponic napa cabbage garden, seedling growing area, customized bed, and kitchen table. I tested my urine, modified ...

  17. Enzyme and Microbial Technology 51 (2012) 396401 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    and investigated. Glucose dehydrogenase was coated on a carbon electrode to catalyze glucose oxidation, especially in hot water pipes, heaters, boilers, kitchens, bathtubs, and other units [4,5]. Therefore, prior

  18. Cornucopia: The Concept of Digital Gastronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoran, Amit Shlomo

    The authors present a new concept of digital gastronomy—Cornucopia, a futuristic cooking methodology based on digital technologies. They discuss how they have merged kitchen tools with science fiction and actual technologies ...

  19. New tech could be "Mr. Fusion" for biofuel | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    convert waste from kitchens or latrines into an alcohol that can power diesel engines. New tech could be "Mr. Fusion" for biofuel By Else Tennessen * September 13, 2013 Tweet...

  20. Articulated pose estimation via over-parametrization and noise projection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookshire, Jonathan David

    2014-01-01

    Outside the factory, robots will often encounter mechanical systems with which they need to interact. The robot may need to open and unload a kitchen dishwasher or move around heavy construction equipment. Many of the ...

  1. Non-equilibrium structures: How can they be maintained? Signe Kjelstrup,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    a unit in a larger system with an overall order; an order that was maintained by a large geothermal gradient. We need not go to Ireland to see a former dynamic structure. We can do experiments in the kitchen

  2. Monitoring & Analysis Program of Prison Sites for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggebracht, J. A.; Heneghan, T.

    1996-01-01

    ,000-bed prison units recording the energy use patterns of the administration, kitchen, laundry, medical, training, and inmate housing units. Specialized software has been developed that will allow TDCJ personnel to customize the data presentation...

  3. Joseph Skowronek, '06 Khao Lak, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    just roofs. Until then, families had to live in temporary shelters like the one below. #12;Along on earth escaping the monsoon in the village kitchen. I loved working on his house because him and his wife

  4. Fudan University Shanghai, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Gail

    heating is provided by air conditioning units rather than central heating, so it is a good idea to pack and internet access. There is a kitchen on each floor of the hall as well as several dining halls on campus

  5. The COOP : shared space infrastructure for the creative city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Timothy R. (Timothy Richard)

    2011-01-01

    The urban mainstream suffers from a lack of space. Kitchens are too small to hold a gathering of friends. Spare bedrooms, garages, basements, offices and parlors are foregone in the interest of compaction. The Rise of the ...

  6. North Richmond: An American Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rogers, robert h

    2011-01-01

    longtime resident Janet Polk, who is in her 50s, points toroot in the walls and under her kitchen sink, Polk said. “do nothing, nothing,” Polk said of the housing authority. “I

  7. Assistive Devices for the Home 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2002-01-31

    Many simple, inexpensive devices can make daily activities easier and safer for the elderly and those who have physical disablities. This publication suggests products for living and sleeping areas, kitchens and bathrooms. Examples include...

  8. Coping with Hot Work Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28

    Many people work under hot, humid conditions. Summer heat is a particular hazard to agricultural producers who work long hours under the sun. However, other people working in hot yards, gardens, kitchens or industry jobs are also exposed...

  9. Harrington: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SW-28011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Harrington Brass Works finding that kitchen faucet individual model 20-210-026 does not comport with the water conservation standards.

  10. Saving money through energy conservation in manufactured housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Things to look for in buying a new manufactured home are discussed. Site orientation is discussed and energy saving tips for heating, cooling, hot water heating, kitchen, dishwasher, laundry, and lighting are presented. A glossary is included. (MHR)

  11. 2009 The Outcrop 29http://www.geology.wisc.edu (Geology Museum, continued)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Clark M.

    -go-round meant a lesson about centrifugal and centripetal forces. On our kitchen table, we would attempt continuous non-destructive elemental profiles (aluminum to uranium) of rock and sediment cores

  12. Water, Neighborhoods and Urban Design: Micro-Utilities and the Fifth Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Vicki; Fraker, Harrison

    2011-01-01

    some include kitchen waste water in the general designationV. (2010). Blue-Green Waste Water Technologies, the Sageworld by 50 to 85%. Gray Waste Water 1 . Reuse of gray water

  13. Heating Energy Meter Validation for Apartments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, B.; Li, D.; Hao, B.

    2006-01-01

    Bedroom Dining No.1 Toilet room Bedroom Kitchen Dining room No.2 Toilet Kitchen Bedroom Fig 1 Standard cells? illustration 3 RELIABILITY ANALYZING OF HEAT METERS? DATA By the arduous work of workers, project group gain the data of 361 heat meters... and Building Saving Energy [M]. Beijing: Machine Industry Press, 2004.1, 269-414. (In Chinese) [3] Jinglang CAI, Zheng XU, Yingchao LI. Analyzing to Adjacent Rooms? Heat Transfer for Central Heating System [J]. Heating and Ventilating and Air...

  14. Adapting the Home for Independent Living for the Elderly and Handicapped. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Sue

    1979-01-01

    sills of this height are low enough for a person to see out from a sitting or prone position. They also provide an easy escape from fire. Kitchen Simple precautions can reduce kitchen accidents and make food storage, preparation and serving more.... Generally, air conditioning is not needed or desired by the elderly, except in extreme cli mates. Bathroom Bathrooms are the site of many home accidents be cause of limited space for movement, slippery bathtubs and floors, and hard surfaces which cause...

  15. Dynamic Simulators | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of four (4) corner coal burners for a total of twenty-four (24) burners. The main steam turbine is a 3600 RPM tandem compound, single reheat unit. The turbine consist of...

  16. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Assignment 8 1 Assignment #8 (Vapor Power Cycles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Assignment 8 1 ENSC 461 Assignment #8 (Vapor Power Cycles) Assignment date: Due date: Consider a reheat-regenerative vapor power cycle with two feedwater heaters, a closed

  17. Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since terminal boxes do not have a modulation damper in constant volume (CV) air handling unit (AHU) systems, zone reheat coils have to be modulated to maintain the space temperature with constant supply airflow. This conventional control sequence...

  18. Controlling Energy-Efficient Buildings in the Context of Smart Grid: A Cyber Physical System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    associated with steam turbines is T 4 which corresponds tochest. For non-reheat steam turbines, this is the only timeTypical values of steam turbine time constants and fractions

  19. Flexibility of Commercial Building HVAC Fan as Ancillary Service for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maasoumy, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    associated with steam turbines is T 4 which corresponds tochest. For non-reheat steam turbines, this is the only timegrouped into steam and hydro turbines. The transfer function

  20. Ignition Delay Times of Natural Gas/Hydrogen Blends at Elevated Pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brower, Marissa

    2012-10-19

    Applications of natural gases that contain high levels of hydrogen have become a primary interest in the gas turbine market. For reheat gas turbines, understanding of the ignition delay times of high-hydrogen natural gases is important for two...

  1. A Sustainable Focus for Laboratory Design, Engineerign, and Operation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC designs 4. Get real with plug loads: Right-size HVAC systems 5. Just say no to re-heat: Minimize simultaneous heating and cooling Annual electricity use in Louis Stokes...

  2. Analysis of Energy Recovery Ventilator Savings for Texas Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christman, K. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

    2009-01-01

    the energy and costs required to condition outside air to return-air conditions. This analysis does not consider interactions with the air-handling system; therefore the effects of economizers, reheat schemes, variable flow rates and other adaptive components...

  3. Mole Essentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reheat it in a double boiler, to prevent burning. Here's a quick start for a Mole Amarillo: (these proportions will make 2 or 3 cups) (1) 5 costen~o amarillo chiles

  4. Conservation, An In-Plant Energy Resource 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skudneski, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Potential energy savings of 90 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year on existing facilities in basic steel alone are attainable through retrofitting and improvement in operations. Areas covered include reheat furnaces, soaking pits, cover...

  5. An Energy Analysis Of A Large, Multipurpose Educational Building In A Hot Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamranzadeh, Vahideh

    2012-02-14

    In this project a steady-state building load for Constant Volume Terminal Reheat (CVTR), Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCV) and Dual Duct Variable Air Volume (DDVAV) systems for the Zachry Engineering Building has been ...

  6. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile ? Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The recirculating pumps forced heated water out of the tank and up to the rooftop solar collectors at night where it cooled off and had to be reheated with back-up heat. Pulte...

  7. Gravitational particle production in bouncing cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Haro; Emilio Elizalde

    2015-09-03

    It is argued that the Universe reheating in bouncing cosmologies could be explained via gravitational particle production, as due to a sudden phase transition in the contracting regime. To this end, it is shown that gravitational production of massive particles conformally coupled with gravity in a matter-ekpyrotic bouncing Universe, where the sudden phase transition occurs in the contracting regime, yields a reheating temperature which is in good agreement with cosmological observations.

  8. Assessment of particulate concentrations from domestic biomass combustion in rural Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, M.; Bartlett, K.; Regalado-Pineda, J.; Perez-Padilla, R.

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that woodsmoke exposure in developed countries is associated with acute and chronic health impacts. Particulate concentrations were measured in rural Mexican kitchens using biomass combustion for cooking. To investigate differences in indoor particle concentrations between kitchens using different fuels and stove types, measurements were made in eight kitchens using only biomass, six using only liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), six using a combination of biomass and LPG, and three using biomass in ventilated stoves. Outdoor samples were collected at the same time as the indoor samples. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} measurements were made with inertial impactors, and particle light scattering was measured continuously with an integrating nephelometer. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations (mean concentrations of 768 and 555 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively) in the kitchens burning only biomass were greater than in all other types (biomass > biomass + LPG > ventilated > LPG > outdoor). A similar trend was evident for the indoor/outdoor concentration ratio. Based on the short-term measurements estimated from the nephelometer data, PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} cooking period average and 5-min peak concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in kitchens using only biomass than in those using LPG, a combination of LPG and biomass, or a ventilated biomass stove. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Schuchardt, Frank; Li, Guoxue; Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ? The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ? Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ? Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS{sub 2}) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O{sub 2} concentration (p < 0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg{sup ?1} (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%.

  10. Modeling and Control of Passive Chilled Beams with Underfloor Air Distribution of Ventilation in Office Buildings in Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negandhi, Vanita K

    2015-08-10

    other. Finally, summertime stratification measurements were taken in the offices and were combined with a CFD model of a single zone in Star CCM+ 9.04 to establish temperature and airflow profiles in the zones. These comfort studies were conducted...

  11. Multiport Converter Topologies for Distributed Energy System Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawke, Joshua

    2014-07-28

    . Next, three system designs are discussed: single-zone, dual-zone, and multi-zone. Each implements PSC technology and high-frequency isolated full-bridge converters to interface multiple fuel cell sources to a medium voltage grid via a single multilevel...

  12. Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

    2007-01-01

    zone system all of the vent registers are open, distributing air into all areas of the house at once. Single zone control leads to wasted energy for two reasons - all rooms being conditioned when they are not occupied, and conditioning occupied rooms...

  13. Personal audio with a planar bright zone Philip Coleman,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip JB

    Kingdom Jan Abildgaard Pedersenb) Bang & Olufsen A/S, Peter Bangs Vej 15, DK7600, Struer, Denmark 1 #12 re- production do not consider control of the bright zone phase, which may lead to self. Single-zone approaches have considered plane wave reproduction by focusing the sound energy in to a point

  14. Lifecycle Energy Management in the Tohoku Electric Power headquarters building-APCBC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuzawa, H.

    2014-01-01

    AHU General Fan General Light General Plug General Sanitary ????EV General Kitchen General Othors ICT HP ICT Equipment ICT Othors 24Hr ??? General 40? R educe Fig 9. Changes in units annual energy consumption (2002-2011) •The energy consumption amount... work by the Energy Conservation Project Team. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 P o w e r [k W] HP Pump AHU Fan Li g ht Plug Sanitary EV Kitchen Othors ICT HP ICT AHU ICT Li g ht ICT Othors 0 500...

  15. Be a Super Snacker: Snack-man Tells You How. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anoymous,

    1982-01-01

    surprise them by preparing your own super snacks? Before you begin to cook, Snack-Man reminds you to follow these rules in the kitchen: ? Wash your hands and clean under your fingernails. ? Put on a clean apron or an old shirt. ? Tie your hair back.... While you are busy in the kitchen , be sure to: ? Wipe spills right away. ? Put milk back In the refrlgerator as soon as '{au are finished using it. After you prepare a secret formula, wash all the dirty dishes in hot, soapy water and rinse well. A...

  16. 4-H Favorite Foods Unit 1. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Maeona; Mason, Louise; Reasonover, Frances; Tribble, Marie

    1958-01-01

    Lettuce leaves or other greens 1. Wash lettuce or other greens. Place in refrigerator. 2. Wash apples and celery. Drain. Chop celery as shown. See drawing for how to dice apples. Put in large mixing bowl. 3. Add nuts. 4. Blend mayonnaise and cream... safely. 8. Learn the best way to wash dishes and clean up the kitchen. 0 Learn to eat the foods listed on the Texas Food Standard. Keep your food record up to date. Exhibit one food you learned to cook at favorite food show. Kitchen Tips for 4-H...

  17. Improving the Efficient of Ernie Turner Center. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredeen, Amy

    2011-03-21

    The objective of this project was to complete the specifications and drawings for a variable speed kitchen exhaust system and the boiler heating system which when implemented will improve the heating efficiency of the building. The design work was focused in two key areas: kitchen ventilation and heating for the Ernie Turner Center building (ETC). RSA completed design work and issued a set of 100% drawings. RSA also worked with a cost estimator to put together a detailed cost estimate for the project. The design components are summarized.

  18. Relic Radio Bubbles and Cluster Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David S. De Young

    2003-05-09

    Recent suggestions that buoyant radio emitting cavities in the intracluster medium can cause significant reheating of cooling flows are re-examined when the effects of the intracluster magnetic field are included. Expansion of the cavity creates a tangential magnetic field in the ICM around the radio source, and this field can suppress instabilities that mix the ICM and the radio source. The onset of instability can be delayed for ~100 million years, and calculation of the actual reheating time shows that this may not occur until about 1Gy after creation of the cavity. These results may explain why the relic radio bubbles are still intact at such late times, and it may imply that the role of radio sources in reheating the ICM should be re-examined. In addition, the existence of relic radio cavities may also imply that the particle content of radio source lobes is primarily electrons and protons rather than electrons and positrons.

  19. A numerical study of pseudoscalar inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Shu-Lin; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study of a pseudoscalar inflation having an axion-photon-like coupling is performed by solving numerically the coupled differential equations of motion for inflaton and photon mode functions from the onset of inflation to the end of reheating. The backreaction due to particle production is also included self-consistently. We find that this particular inflation model realizes the idea of a warm inflation in which a steady thermal bath is established by the particle production. In most cases this thermal bath exceeds the amount of radiation released in the reheating process. In the strong coupling regime, the transition from the inflationary to the radiation-dominated phase does not involve either a preheating or reheating process. In addition, energy density peaks produced near the end of inflation may lead to the formation of primordial black holes.

  20. A numerical study of pseudoscalar inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu-Lin Cheng; Wolung Lee; Kin-Wang Ng

    2015-08-02

    A numerical study of a pseudoscalar inflation having an axion-photon-like coupling is performed by solving numerically the coupled differential equations of motion for inflaton and photon mode functions from the onset of inflation to the end of reheating. The backreaction due to particle production is also included self-consistently. We find that this particular inflation model realizes the idea of a warm inflation in which a steady thermal bath is established by the particle production. In most cases this thermal bath exceeds the amount of radiation released in the reheating process. In the strong coupling regime, the transition from the inflationary to the radiation-dominated phase does not involve either a preheating or reheating process. In addition, energy density peaks produced near the end of inflation may lead to the formation of primordial black holes.

  1. Transitionless Enhanced Confinement and the Role of Radial Electric Field Shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Coppi; D.R. Ernst; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; R.V. Budny; et al

    1999-10-01

    Evidence for the role of radial electric field shear in enhanced confinement regimes attained without sharp bifurcations or transitions is presented. Temperature scans at constant density, created in the reheat phase following deuterium pellet injection into supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [J.D. Strachan, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 (1987) 1004] are simulated using a first-principles transport model. The slow reheat of the ion temperature profile, during which the temperature nearly doubles, is not explained by relatively comprehensive models of transport due to Ion Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence (ITGDT), which depends primarily on the (unchanging) electron density gradient. An extended model, including the suppression of toroidal ITGDT by self-consistent radial electric field shear, does reproduce the reheat phase.

  2. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioning: General Guidance and Site Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.

    2014-09-01

    Dehumidification or latent cooling in buildings is an area of growing interest that has been identified as needing more research and improved technologies for higher performance. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems typically expend excessive energy by using overcool-and-reheat strategies to dehumidify buildings. These systems first overcool ventilation air to remove moisture and then reheat the air to meet comfort requirements. Another common strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove moisture from the air more efficiently; however, these systems increase fan energy consumption because of the high airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors and can add heat of absorption to the ventilation air. Alternatively, liquid desiccant air-conditioning (LDAC) technology provides an innovative dehumidification solution that: (1) eliminates the need for overcooling and reheating from traditional cooling systems; and (2) avoids the increased fan energy and air heating from solid desiccant rotor systems.

  3. Boom and Bust Inflation: a Graceful Exit via Compact Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam R. Brown

    2008-07-03

    A model of inflation is proposed in which compact extra dimensions allow a graceful exit without recourse to flat potentials or super-Planckian field values. Though bubbles of true vacuum are too sparse to uniformly reheat the Universe by colliding with each other, a compact dimension enables a single bubble to uniformly reheat by colliding with itself. This mechanism, which generates an approximately scale invariant perturbation spectrum, requires that inflation be driven by a bulk field, that vacuum decay be slow, and that the extra dimension be at least a hundred times larger than the false vacuum Hubble length.

  4. Trends in furnace control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.J.; Keefe, M.D. (Italimpianti of America, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    This paper relates Italimpianti's experiences over the past few years in the area of control of reheat furnaces for the steel industry. The focus is on the level 1 area; specifically on the use of PLC-based systems to perform both combustion control and mechanical/hydraulic control. Some topics to be discussed are: overview of reheat furnace control system requirements; PLC only control vs separate PLC and DCS systems; PLC hardware requirements; man machine interface (MMI) requirements; purge, light-on and safety logic; implementation of more sophisticated level 1 control algorithms; furnace temperature optimization: look up tables vs full thermal modeling; and recent trends including integrated PLC/DCS system.

  5. Eternal Inflation, past and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Aguirre

    2007-12-04

    Cosmological inflation, if it occurred, radically alters the picture of the `big bang', which would merely point to reheating at the end of inflation. Moreover, this reheating may be only local, so that inflation continues elsewhere and forever, continually spawning big-bang-like regions. This chapter reviews this idea of `eternal inflation', then focuses on what this may mean for the ultimate beginning of the universe. In particular, I will argue that given eternal inflation, the universe may be free of a cosmological initial singularity, might be eternal (and eternally inflating) to the past, and might obey an interesting sort of cosmological time-symmetry.

  6. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: hooshyar.assadullahi@port.ac.uk, E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@mail.ipm.ir, E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk [Yukawa Institute for theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  7. Materials Science/Crystallography 30m SANS Measurements on Intercalated and Delaminated Phenolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science/Crystallography 30m SANS Measurements on Intercalated and Delaminated Phenolic Resin/Clay Dispersions and Nanocomposites Yoonessi, M.725 , Toghiani, H.725 , Pittman, C.725 A SANS on AOT Reverse Micelle Dynamics in Liquid, Compressed and Supercritical Alkanes Measured by SANS Kitchens

  8. Logistic Growth The logistic equation is a model of limited population growth. The exponential growth model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikenaga, Bruce

    9­28­1998 Logistic Growth The logistic equation is a model of limited population growth of organisms runs out of food, encounters predators, or fouls its own environment with waste. The logistic the carrying capacity. Example. A population of roaches grows logistically in Calvin Butterball's kitchen

  9. 15 December 1999 Z .Optics Communications 172 1999 9396

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prepared using tap water filtered with a ceramic filter and kitchen salt, at the pressure of air in water trajectories. Most of the research on single-bubble sonoluminescence was done with water. The intensity for the liquids of lower than water solidification tempera- ture, it should be possible to obtain sonolumines

  10. Hydrocarbon filling history from diagenetic evidence: Brent Group, UK North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    in oxygen isotopic composition with depth, and the trend displays a conspicuous shift at the Mid-Ness Shale ambiguous because there are no direct methods of dating petroleum migration. Analysis of diagenetic minerals will predict either the timing of oil migration or, at least, the time when the kitchen areas become mature

  11. Best Management Practice #7: Faucets and Showerheads

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most federal buildings have faucets in restrooms, kitchens, and laboratories. Many federal installations have showers, including barracks, family housing, recreation facilities, and locker rooms. Significant opportunity for water and energy savings exists for these fixtures when upgrading to efficient technology and employing conservation practices.

  12. VOL. 55 NO. 218 JANUARY 2005 On the Composition of the Prototractatus Jinho Kang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the butler was in the conservatory at the time of the murder, and I know that if the butler was in the conservatory at the time of the murder then he was not at the scene of the crime (the kitchen, say); hence I

  13. Servants and hands: Representing the working classes in Victorian factory novels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Dorice Williams

    2000-01-01

    EARLY IN Frances Trollope’s 1839 novel The Life and Adventures of Michael Armstrong, the Factory Boy, the title character is introduced into the kitchen of Sir Matthew Dowling’s home. The assembled servants, rigidly organized into their own...

  14. ENCAPSULATION EFFECTS ON CARBONACEOUS AEROSOL LIGHT ABSORPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes

  15. LIGHT ABSORPTION BY COATED SOOT Sedlacek III, A. J., Lee, J., Onasch, T., Davidovits, P., and Cross, E. S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal of the uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state

  16. Can the sun save the Earth? Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    .bajajelectricals.com Instant Geyser Storage Geyser Immersion Heater #12;Solar Water Heating www;Solar Cooking http://gadhia-solar.com/images/steamsystem.jpg #12;Solar Cooking http://gadhia-solar.com/products/community.htm Double Community Cooker- Rishi Valley School #12;Solar Cooking - kitchen mnes.nic.in/solar

  17. The earliest water supply and sewage systems in Vilnius, Lithuania R. Pukien1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was meant for kitchen waste and was assembled in sections. Each section consisted of a flume made up of four supplied with water the newly built grand duke's palace. In the 1540s­1550s major development of the water preserved up to the bark edge. The constructed pine tree-ring series was dated against Vilnius pine

  18. Application of dendrochronology in archaeology. Water and sewage systems in Renaissance Vilnius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with water the newly built grand duke's palace. In the 1540s­1550s major development of the water supply of a wooden sewer were discovered north of the grand duke's palace. The sewer was meant for kitchen waste and was assembled in sections. Each section consisted of a flume made up of four sawn longitudinal boards resting

  19. More than imagination needed : Asquith's government and the Dardanelles Campaign 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallman, Charles Albert

    2001-01-01

    German invasion. It is not known what effect the scare of a German airship invasion played in Kitchener's decisions, but the Magnus, p. 312-313. ' Ferguson, p. 87. 30 notion had shaken many in the government since H. G. Wells' work and the Zepplin...

  20. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 -May 5, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-000845 YORK LANES RETAIL Gas leak Security, Toronto Fire and Enbridge Gas responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The source of the odour was located in a restaurant kitchen. EnbridgeWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 - May 5, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  1. College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension 2020 Ways to Save Waterin an Emergency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    College of Agricultural Sciences · Cooperative Extension 2020 Ways to Save Waterin an Emergency, this prac- tice is not recommended for showers without automatic tem- perature adjustment or a shut- off rinsing a dirty diaper and to cut down on the amount of soiled laundry to be washed. 20Reuse kitchen drain

  2. Liquid Polyamorphism: Some Unsolved Puzzles of Water in Bulk, Nanoconfined, and Biological Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    , liquid bulk water begins to ex- pand when its temperature drops below 4°C. Indeed, a simple kitchen layers of 0°C water "float" on top (cf, Fig. 1 of Ref [2]). The mysterious properties of liquidLiquid Polyamorphism: Some Unsolved Puzzles of Water in Bulk, Nanoconfined, and Biological

  3. This publication provides an overview of home garden and gardening practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    and promote proper handwashing techniques (wash hands for 20 seconds using warm water and soap, rinse well garden, harvest equipment, or kitchen. Handling Fresh Produce Information about safe handling of fruits and Harvest Sanitation · Any surface, container, or tool that comes in contact with fresh produce could

  4. MICROWAVE PROCESSING OF LUNAR SOIL Lawrence A. Taylor1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lawrence A.

    MICROWAVE PROCESSING OF LUNAR SOIL Lawrence A. Taylor1 and Thomas T. Meek2 The unique properties of lunar regolith make for the extreme coupling of the soil to microwave radiation. Space weathering lunar soil (i.e., 1200-1500 o C) in minutes in a normal kitchen-type 2.45 GHz microwave, almost as fast

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Induction versus Gas Stovetops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...........................................................................Page. 3 2.1 Materials of Construction 2.1.1 Induction Stove Materials 2.1.2 Gas Stove Materials 2.2 Energy Kouwenhoven Kjell Raemdonck #12;ii ABSTRACT The new Student Union Building being constructed at the University of British Columbia will have several new kitchens in order to cook for the growing population of students

  6. Best Management Practice #8: Steam Boiler Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boilers and steam generators are commonly used in large heating systems, institutional kitchens, or in facilities where large amounts of process steam are used. This equipment consumes varying amounts of water depending on system size, the amount of steam used, and the amount of condensate returned.

  7. This information was created by Baltimore Neighborhoods, Inc., a local, non-profit organization seeking justice in housing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    This information was created by Baltimore Neighborhoods, Inc., a local, non-profit organization seeking justice in housing. For more information on this and other topics please contact Baltimore and to the kitchen but not to all areas of the house. By law, in Baltimore City a roomer must be given at least 30

  8. the university of reading chaplaincy including location maps for central Reading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Street 3.30pm, 6pm www.stlaurencereading.com Welcome to Reading A very warm welcome from the University. The Chaplaincy Centre The Chaplains run a drop-in centre on the Whiteknights campus in Park House Lodge, behind the main library. Our library, kitchen, quiet room and common room are open every week day during office

  9. the university of reading chaplaincy Places of worship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    to Reading A very warm welcome from the University Chaplains! This leaflet includes the majority of places-in centre on the Whiteknights campus in Park House Lodge, behind the main library, which is open to all. Our library, kitchen, quiet room and common room are open every week day during office hours. Student Faith

  10. 20-20 Technologies NEWS & EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    focus on the Kitchen manufacturing industry. "Additionally, with 20-20's electronic data integration-20 Technologies Inc. (TSX: TWT), the world leader in 3D interior design and furniture manufacturing software, announced today that Wellborn Forest Products, a manufacturer of custom and semi- custom frameless

  11. JOHN VENN'S PIZZA PARTY School or club name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, W. Garrett

    thought for a moment, then set the timer for SEVENNTEEN minutes. "That's about half way in between." Tony arrived first. "Hey John," he said, "you need to clean up your kitchen! Look at all these roaches and a coffee maker. It's my own INVENNTION ." 1 #12;Tony looked at the contraption warily, as John pointed out

  12. LSUHSC NO Residence Halls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall provided that capacity exists after fulfilling fulltime student demand and that affiliates Cards are issued by the registrar's office, but are encoded for residential use by the Student Housing are shared with a suite mate. Kitchen and laundry facilities are located on each residential floor. All rooms

  13. Selwyn College STUDENT ACCOMMODATION HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeler, James

    Selwyn College CAMBRIDGE STUDENT ACCOMMODATION HANDBOOK 2013 ­ 2014 #12;Selwyn College Student Accommodation Handbook 2013-14 1 CONTENTS 1. ROOMS 3 1.1 College Accommodation 1.2 Allocation of Rooms 1.3 Keys Student Accommodation Handbook 2013-14 6. KITCHEN FACILITIES, FOOD STORAGE, WASHING FACILITIES

  14. Virtual Chef Easily saves new recipes with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virtual Chef Easily saves new recipes with filters based on difficulty, time, in-stock ingredients integrate into the kitchen space via the Virtual Chef tablet app. Find & Save Recipes Time Maintenance Hands Design Insights: RecipesTimers Tutorials 5:45 0:23 Virtual Chef Let's Cook Finally, we created high

  15. Ph.D. Thesis Optical Sensors Based on Dedicated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph.D. Thesis Optical Sensors Based on Dedicated Diffractive Optical Elements STEVEN RICHARD KITCHEN Kamstrup A/S Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department, Risř National Laboratory Mikroelektronikcentret;Abstract This thesis deals with the development of optical sensors based on laser diodes and dedicated

  16. Food Safety Certification and Knowledge EHS-Net Study Findings and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS251470B Food Safety Certification and Knowledge EHS-Net Study Findings and Recommendations More food workers have been linked with past foodborne illness outbreaks. To combat restaurant-related outbreaks, many public health agencies encourage or require food safety certification for restaurant kitchen

  17. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Sciences, UC Santa Cruz. #141 September 21, 2013 Sand Hill Bluff Sand Hill Bluff (from California Coastal covered with vegetation. The area is also a kitchen midden, as evidenced by the fragments of abalone shell location? Interestingly, the pile of sand is actually an old dune, but one that is no longer connected

  18. Welcome Centre Zentrale Universittsverwaltung Telefon +49 6221/54-2134 und 54-3612

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    house EG Erdgeschoss ground floor G-WC Gäste-WC separate toilet for guests HH Hochhaus high-rise building HK Heizkosten heating costs Kaution deposit KDB Küche, Diele, Bad kitchen, hall, bathroom KM / kalt Kaltmiete monthly rent excl. extra costs such as heating, cable TV, cleaning of shared areas

  19. Stand: Mai 2014 Rent per month

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stand: Mai 2014 Number of Apartment Floor m˛ Rent per month (inc. operating costs, electricity and heating) Fixed amount for final cleaning Living area in m˛ 3 rooms (33 m˛ + 27 m˛ + 39 m˛) 97,78 winter tenants (only on request). Attic floor, apartments 7 - 11: these apartments have a shared kitchen

  20. OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    . Complete kitchen with dishes, dishwasher, and microwave. Heating, hydro, wifi and satellite TV programming Floor For Rent! $1425/month utilities included! Main floor of house on Baker Road off Tyner. Beautiful. Female tenants preferred. Please text 250-617-1394 or e-mail les455@hotmail.com - First Floor One

  1. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and paper products. The Texas forest sector also produces many value-added forest products such as millwork, wood kitchen cabinets, prefabricated wood buildings, wood furniture, and various paper products in terms of total industry output, value-added, employment, and labor income. Total industry output

  2. Tips for Reducing Asthma Triggers in Indoor Environments The goal of parents who have children with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , animal dander, feathers, dust, food, and cockroaches. If your child can avoid being exposed to trigger materials weekly or more often if needed. Vacuum and wet mop hard-surface flooring often to reduce dust these #12;products. Consider using less toxic products. Keep foods "in the kitchen" for easier cleaning

  3. Michael Cooney, a researcher with the UH Manoa Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, in his lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King Founder & Owner Pacific Biodiesel Technologies, LLC. 808.877.3144 info@biodiesel.com Renewable at Manoa are working with Maui based company Pacific Biodiesel to develop a way to make water from Biodiesel Technologies, LLC. Wastewater from dishwashing and cleaning kitchens would clog sewer lines

  4. Biodiesel Engine Testing MECH-457 Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biodiesel Engine Testing MECH-457 Final Report Submitted to Jon Mikkelsen April 11, 2005 Darren at UBC has begun producing biodiesel fuel from waste cooking oils acquired from campus kitchens. Using biodiesel in a four-cylinder, 30 hp Kubota engine (V1305). This engine was chosen because it is used

  5. Administration Glasshouses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    9 Animal House Old Maths Okeover Stream Works and Services Boilerhouse Works and Services Workshops Club House Pavilion Ilam Stream Ngata Hall Dining & Kitchen Block Alpers Hall Maidstone Road Otakaro House Bishop Julius Hostel Rochester& Rutherford Hall Montana ELC M aidstone Road W adeley Road Solway

  6. Simulating the energy savings potential in domestic heating scenarios in Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ventilation, as well as the heat gains due to internal gains, solar gains and the heating system. In Section 5 dependent) is a banana #12;2 cake taken out of the oven and left to cool down in the kitchen. Energy

  7. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    waste, such as food and kitchen waste, green waste, paper;waste in view of their transformation into ethanol. Belgian Journal of Foodwastes, ADC final, ADC green, acid pretreatment, ethanol, lignin blocking, bovine serum albumin, Aspen model Introduction Overcoming challenges of food

  8. Evaluating the performance of carboxylate platform fermentations across diverse inocula originating as sediments from extreme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    , 2009). As feedstocks, the carboxylate platform can use many non-food biomass materials including landfill-targeted wastes such as yard clippings and kitchen waste, agricultural residues such as sugarcane. Terrestrial inocula from environments expected to favor rapid degradation of biomass (e.g., compost pile

  9. Composting with Worms Worm composting (or vermicomposting) is a natural and efficient way to recycle your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    . By covering food waste with a few inches of bedding, you avoid odors and pests (like fruit flies). RotatingComposting with Worms Worm composting (or vermicomposting) is a natural and efficient way to recycle your organic kitchen scraps. And it sure beats plowing through knee-high snowdrifts to the compost

  10. Using Compost For more information on selection, planting, cultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    IS COMPOST? Compost is produced when organic matter, such as garden and lawn waste, is broken down clays will drain faster. Compost also promotes a biologically healthy soil by providing food compost with yard and kitchen wastes (see the Virginia Gardener brochure on Making Compost from Yard

  11. DIRECT INJURY, MYIASIS, FORENSICS Influence of Resources on Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    soldier ßies can colonize human remains, which in many instances can coincide with food and organic wastes entomology, development time, food resource, minimum postmortem in- terval, waste management Forensic development was observed on six re- sources: control poultry feed, liver, manure, kitchen waste, fruits

  12. Waste management Stockholm University tries to maintain its environmental certification and we would be happy if you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlfarth, Barbara

    containers in the garbage-room. The remnants in your waste-paper-baskets could be food remnants, fruit peelWaste management Stockholm University tries to maintain its environmental certification and we for new products All waste-paper-baskets in your rooms, the kitchen and the copying

  13. Purchasing Compost Compost, the end product of a controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    wastes, makes an excellent addition to lawn or garden soil. Adding compost to your soil helps improve from kitchen scraps and yard and garden wastes, making enough compost is a tough job for gardeners municipalities to incinerate or landfill leaf and yard wastes. Some municipalities currently collect and compost

  14. Rosalie Wells / Woolf Essay Prize 2013 "It was certainly an odd monster that one made up by reading the historians first and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasenby, Joan

    in a kitchen chopping up suet" What is the benefit of reading history alongside literature and vice versa intense in the 16th and 17th centuries. Reading history alongside literature and vice versa is not merely? Virginia Woolf presented us with the perplexing paradox of women in history in `A room of one's own'; `She

  15. Harrington: Notice of Allowance (2014-SW-28011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Harrington Brass Works allowing Harrington to resume distribution of kitchen faucet individual model 20-210-026 after Harrington provided documentation showing that it had modified the model to be in compliance with the applicable water conservation standard.

  16. Hotel Line #503-418-2338 PATIENT/FAMILY ACCOMMODATIONS Information provided courtesy of OHSU Department of Care Management (503-494-2273)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Avail. Kitchen Avail. Laundry Free Local Calling Aladdin Motor Inn 8905 SW 30 th Ave & Barbur Portland Beds Ste $54.95 $56.95 3-4 people 5.0 mi. #12, shuttle by appt Avalon Hotel 0455 SW Hamilton Ct/ micro (fee) Benson Hotel 309 SW Broadway Portland 97205 Res: 888-523-6766 www.bensonhotel.com www

  17. Troy Velius Cake Cutting Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cytron, Ron K.

    Kitchen 5 4 8 10 Empty Dishwasher 6 4 5 10 Load Dishes after dinner 8 4 9 10 Scrub Pots and pans after 1 10 Load lunch dishes 8 3 7 10 Empty dishwasher before dinner 9 3 8 5 Load breakfast dishes 9 3 4 5

  18. Situation-Aware Interpretation, Planning and Execution of User Commands by Autonomous Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    interpretation and planning. (1) a. Please put the dirty plates into the dishwasher. b. Show me the exit, please the following plan: pick-up plate1; pick- up plate2; move-to kitchen; open dishwasher; put plate1 dishwasher; put plate2 dishwasher . If, during execution of this plan, the robot perceives more dirty plates

  19. Developmental Science 12:2 (2009), pp 264271 DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, M.alinda

    2009-01-01

    on the kitchen counter, I could mean almost anything. In terms of referent, I could be indicating the backpack still might mean almost anything from `it's time to do your home- work' to `try searching there for your intention or meaning; see Tomasello, Carpenter & Liszkowski, 2007, for more on these terms). Recent

  20. Policies and Guidelines for Caterers and Vendors These policies and guidelines are designed to compliment the ecological mission of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    committed to the preservation of our world's oceans. As representatives of the Center, it is imperative for all food preparation; catering materials brought into the Center, all clean up during and after following the event. The kitchen and/or food use area(s) are to be mopped or swept once you are done. Please

  1. g Ris Report No. S Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUMPS STEADY-STATE CONDITIONS STEAM CONDENSES STEAM TURBINES T CODES UDC 621.039.S24.4-97: 611.3.06 #12 turbine, a low-pressure steam turbine, a moisture separator, a reheater, a condenser, feedwater heaters Characteristic of Steam Turbines for Nuclear Power Plants 17 3.1. Stage with Moisture Trap 17 3.2. Determination

  2. Ris-M-2190 DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER PLANT MODEL BWR-PLASIM OUTLINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the turbine connected via the steam line, the feedwater system and three control systems. #12;- 4 - #12;- 5 coolant flow 28 3. THE TURBINE AND FEEDWATER HEATERS 30 3.1. Flow and pressure calculations for the turbine . 33 3.2. Enthalpy and power calculations for the turbine 35 3.3. The reheater model 37 3

  3. Ris-M-2652 s Development ofA Two-level Modular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4.3. "Heater model" 54 #12;- 4 - Page 4.4. Turbine module 56 4.4.1. Steam line 56 4.4.2. HP-turbine 57 4.4.3. Reheater 61 4.4.4. LP-turbine 67 4.4.5. Condenser 68 4.4.6.fcttaraextraction 70 4.4.7. Powe

  4. Theory of lithographically-induced self-assembly and J. Liang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    reheating subject to a new voltage pattern, a different island pattern can form. Further- more, both heat-assemble into a triangular lattice of islands in another phase. We describe a theory of the stability of the island lattice. It is well known that the total interface energy reduces when the island diameter increases. We show that

  5. HEAT REMOVAL/ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL ChallengerTM 3000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    = Advanced Microprocessor 0= No Reheat 0= No Humidifier F= Downflow C-= Chilled Water B=575/60/3 G= Advanced Unit Air Cooled Centrifugal Condensing Unit Water/Glycol Condensing Unit 3 Tons 60 Hz (50 Hz) B*036E (B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.0 OPERATION WITH ADVANCED MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

  6. Exam Number: Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    and the boundary work for the process. 2. Consider a simple Rankine cycle with steam entering the turbine at 30.75 and the turbine efficiency is 0.90. Determine: (a) The thermal efficiency (b) The quality of the steam. Following the reheater the steam passes through a second turbine which has an exit pressure of 100 k

  7. CyclePad Help System CyclePad License

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    of Library Examples of Cycles Simple Steam Rankine Cycle Simple Refrigerator Cycle Basic Gas Turbine Cycle Steam Cycle with Reheat Combined Gas Turbine & Rankine Cycle Basic Engineering Thermodynamics Tables Turbine Compressor Pump Heater Cooler Heat Exchanger Throttle #12;CyclePad Help System 4 Splitter

  8. Large-Scale Optimization of Complex Separator and Reactor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghougassian, Paul Gougas

    2013-01-01

    Fig. 5.2: UniSim PFD of steam turbine train; No CO 2 captureFig. 5.5 UniSim PFD of steam turbine train; 90% CO 2 captureCold reheat steam exits the HP turbine at the said

  9. R^2-corrections to Chaotic Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor H. Cardenas; Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2003-08-13

    Scalar density cosmological perturbations, spectral indices and reheating in a chaotic inflationary universe model, in which a higher derivative term is added, are investigated. This term is supposed to play an important role in the early evolution of the Universe, specifically at times closer to the Planck era.

  10. Pervaporation assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A (Fairfield, CA)

    2012-02-28

    The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

  11. Pervaporation process and assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P. (Redwood City, CA); Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

    2010-07-20

    The invention is a pervaporation process and pervaporation equipment, using a series of membrane modules, and including inter-module reheating of the feed solution under treatment. The inter-module heating is achieved within the tube or vessel in which the modules are housed, thereby avoiding the need to repeatedly extract the feed solution from the membrane module train.

  12. PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    TT P Enthalpies at other states and the fractions of steam extracted from the turbines can it without permission. 10-109 10-104 A steam power plant operating on the ideal reheat-regenerative Rankine and the expansion processes in the turbines are isentropic. Also, the state of water at the inlet of pumps

  13. Appl Phys B (2012) 107:873880 DOI 10.1007/s00340-012-4997-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    of the spot sizes, inter-pulse delay times, energies of the preheating and re- heating pulses on the LIBS reheating in dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy R.W. Coons · S.S. Harilal · S.M. Hassan · A © Springer-Verlag 2012 Abstract Dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrosco- py (LIBS) provides improved

  14. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    focused attention on the efficiency of HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) systems. Therefore-objective optimization Particle swarm optimization Variable-air-volume Reheat process Model predictive control Energy resulting in energy savings and optimal outdoor air- flow rates. Rink et al. [3] considered control

  15. PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    power output and the rate of exergy destruction are to be determined. Assumptions 1 This is a steady 44 44 4 4 fgf fgf sxss hxhh x P Analysis We take the entire turbine, excluding the reheat The reversible (or maximum) power output is determined from the rate form of the exergy balance applied

  16. 202 IEEE TRANS.4CTIONS Oh'AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. AC-18,NO. 3, J U K E 1973 Design and Analysis of Boiler-Turbine-Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwatny, Harry G.

    of Boiler-Turbine-Generator Controls Using Optimal Linear Regulator Theory JOHN P. McDOKALD AND HARRY G of a nonlinear mathematical model of a drum-type, twin furnace, reheat boiler-turbine-generator (RBTG) system- tiveoperatingandcontrolstrategies for boiler-t.urbine- generator systems to meet different, system operating ob- jectives. Among

  17. The Temperature and Relative Humidity Control in Cushing Library 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    the building. This paper will concentrate the unit, which serves the book stacks. This AHU is a multiple zone, constant air volume (MZCAV) system, with reheat and direct digital control (DDC). It has a standard cooling coil, glycol cooling coil, steam...

  18. The Role of Prediction Algorithms in the MavHome Smart Home Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    in the kitchen. Bob steps into the bathroom and turns on the light. MavHome records this interaction, displaysThe Role of Prediction Algorithms in the MavHome Smart Home Architecture #3; Sajal K. Das, Diane J,cook,bhatt,heierman,tyling@cse.uta.edu Abstract The goal of the MavHome (Managing An Intelligent Versatile Home) project is to create a home

  19. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rama Govindarajan; Manikandan Mathur; Ratul DasGupta; N. R. Selvi; Neena Susan John; G. U. Kulkarni

    2006-10-03

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

  20. NOAA National Weather Service I'm a weather forecaster.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , it goes a long way But if he hits it from the top of a hill, it goes even farther. So, if my dad had super will need is an instrument to tell whether it's hot or cold down below. Good! In your kitchen, place a tray of ice near a bowl of hot tap water. Move your hand over the ice, then over the hot water. Do you feel

  1. Consumer's Guide: Preventing Food-borne Illness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Food and Nutrition Specialists

    2008-12-22

    , whichwillkillthebacteriathatcausefood-borne illness. ? Chillperishablefoodsandleftoversassoon aspossibleto40degreesForbelow. Shopping for safety Whenshoppingforfood,addperishablefoods ?meats,poultry,fish,eggs,milkproducts,and refrigeratorandfreezeritems.... USDAFoodSafetyandInspectionService.April2006. http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Foodborne Illness_What_Consumers_Need_to_Know/index. asp Spring Clean Your Way to a Safer Kitchen.Partnership forFoodSafetyEducation.2006. http...

  2. Exploring Two Phases of Design-by-Analogy "Multiple Solutions" and "Multiple Analogies" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadwal, Apeksha

    2010-10-12

    the wire only. ? The kitchen utensil must be capable of containing the powdered substance and carrying the powdered substance 1 meter without losing the powdered substance. Create as many solutions as possible based on the analogy. Fig. 11... for a Gecko?s Foot example. As the structural consistency requirement and one-to?one constraint restrict the use of analogies to draw multiple solutions, this leads to the first research question: Can engineers draw multiple solutions (multiple...

  3. Non-Thermal Production of Dangerous Relics in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Giudice; A. Riotto; I. Tkachev

    1999-07-27

    Many models of supersymmetry breaking, in the context of either supergravity or superstring theories, predict the presence of particles with weak scale masses and Planck-suppressed couplings. Typical examples are the scalar moduli and the gravitino. Excessive production of such particles in the early Universe destroys the successful predictions of nucleosynthesis. In particular, the thermal production of these relics after inflation leads to a bound on the reheating temperature, T_{RH} dangerous relics may be much more efficient than the thermal production after inflation. Scalar moduli fields may be copiously created by the classical gravitational effects on the vacuum state. Consequently, the new upper bound on the reheating temperature is shown to be, in some cases, as low as 100 GeV. We also study the non-thermal production of gravitinos in the early Universe, which can be extremely efficient and overcome the thermal production by several orders of magnitude, in realistic supersymmetric inflationary models.

  4. High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

  5. Electron-ion relaxation time dependent signal enhancement in ultrafast double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-22

    We investigated the emission properties of collinear double-pulse compared to single-pulse ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Our results showed that the significant signal enhancement noticed in the double pulse scheme is strongly correlated to the characteristic electron-ion relaxation time and hence to the inter-pulse delays. Spectroscopic excitation temperature analysis showed that the improvement in signal enhancement is caused by the delayed pulse efficient reheating of the pre-plume. The signal enhancement is also found to be related to the upper excitation energy of the selected lines, i.e., more enhancement noticed for lines originating from higher excitation energy levels, indicating reheating is the major mechanism behind the signal improvement.

  6. Encyclopaedia Curvatonis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Vennin; Kazuya Koyama; David Wands

    2015-07-27

    We investigate whether the predictions of single-field models of inflation are robust under the introduction of additional scalar degrees of freedom, and whether these extra fields change the potentials for which the data show the strongest preference. We study the situation where an extra light scalar field contributes both to the total curvature perturbations and to the reheating kinematic properties. Ten reheating scenarios are identified, and all necessary formulas allowing a systematic computation of the predictions for this class of models are derived. They are implemented in the public library ASPIC, which contains more than 75 single-field potentials. This paves the way for a forthcoming full Bayesian analysis of the problem. A few representative examples are displayed and discussed.

  7. A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coburn, T.T.

    1988-07-26

    This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

  8. More on cosmological constraints on spontaneous R-symmetry breaking models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); Ookouchi, Yutaka, E-mail: hamada@gauge.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kohei.kamada@epfl.ch, E-mail: kobayash@gauge.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: yutaka.ookouchi@artsci.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819–0395 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We study the spontaneous R-symmetry breaking model and investigate the cosmological constraints on this model due to the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, R-axion. We consider the R-axion which has relatively heavy mass in order to complement our previous work. In this regime, model parameters, R-axions mass and R-symmetry breaking scale, are constrained by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and overproduction of the gravitino produced from R-axion decay and thermal plasma. We find that the allowed parameter space is very small for high reheating temperature. For low reheating temperature, the U(1){sub R} breaking scale f{sub a} is constrained as f{sub a} < 10{sup 12?14} GeV regardless of the value of R-axion mass.

  9. Modulated preheating and isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enqvist, Kari; Rusak, Stanislav, E-mail: kari.enqvist@helsinki.fi, E-mail: stanislav.rusak@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-03-01

    We consider a model of preheating where the coupling of the inflaton to the preheat field is modulated by an additional scalar field which is light during inflation. We establish that such a model produces the observed curvature perturbation analogously to the modulated reheating scenario. The contribution of modulated preheating to the power spectrum and to non-Gaussianity can however be significantly larger compared to modulated perturbative reheating. We also consider the implications of the current constraints on isocurvature perturbations in case where the modulating field is responsible for cold dark matter. We find that existing bounds on CDM isocurvature perturbations imply that modulated preheating is unlikely to give a dominant contribution to the curvature perturbation and that the same bounds suggest important constraints on non-Gaussianity and the amount of primordial gravitational waves.

  10. Blue-tilted Tensor Spectrum and Thermal History of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Tomo Takahashi; Shuichiro Yokoyama

    2014-07-17

    We investigate constraints on the spectral index of primordial gravitational waves (GWs), paying particular attention to a blue-tilted spectrum. Such constraints can be used to test a certain class of models of the early Universe. We investigate observational bounds from LIGO+Virgo, pulsar timing and big bang nucleosynthesis, taking into account the suppression of the amplitude at high frequencies due to reheating after inflation and also late-time entropy production. Constraints on the spectral index are presented by changing values of parameters such as reheating temperatures and the amount of entropy produced at late time. We also consider constraints under the general modeling approach which can approximately describe various scenarios of the early Universe. We show that the constraints on the blue spectral tilt strongly depend on the underlying assumption and, in some cases, a highly blue-tilted spectrum can still be allowed.

  11. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  12. LATTICEEASY: A Program for Lattice Simulations of Scalar Fields in an Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Felder; Igor Tkachev

    2000-11-13

    We describe a C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://physics.stanford.edu/gfelder/latticeeasy/ . In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for.

  13. In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece

    2013-07-16

    Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/cm^3, for 150 GeV winos current data constrains the reheat temperature to be above 1.4 GeV. As a result, for models in which the wino mass is a loop factor below the gravitino mass, the data favor moduli that are more than an order of magnitude heavier than the gravitino. We discuss some of the sobering implications of this result for the status of supersymmetry. We also comment on other neutralino dark matter scenarios, in particular the case of mixed bino/higgsino dark matter. We show that in this case, direct and indirect searches are complementary to each other and could potentially cover most of the parameter space.

  14. V >K S l O O ' f g -f RisO-M-2640

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    actions 19 3.3. Failures 20 4. CONTAINMENT ACTIVITY 23 5. STEAM GENERATOR 24 6. TURBINES AND CONDENSER 33 6.1. Steam line 33 6.2. HP-turbine 34 6.3. Reheater 37 6.4. LP-turbine 39 6.5. Condenser 40 6. The LP-turbine outlet steam is condensed in the condenser which is cooled with seawater. Extraction flows

  15. INTERLABORATORY TESTS OF EMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN FRANCE USING A TESTING BENCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    boiler or a fuel-oil boiler. These exhaust gases can be humidified and doped by pollutants coming from to receive 5 different teams. ineris-00972214,version1-3Apr2014 #12;boiler Water Pollutant reheater spray infection cswi E D " " » 7D ika/h 70 kg/h 30D kg.'h. fuel oil boiler 2.75m diam 150 mm Port A Port B Port C

  16. Carbon Diffusion Across Dissimilar Steel Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Race, Julia Margaret

    1992-12-08

    generation plant is illustrated in Figure 1.1. Furnace walls Superheater Reheater Turbine Condenser Economiser Figure 1.1: Schematic representation of the power plant layout. 1.2 Material considerations 1.2.1 111echanical properties The first requirement... to sustain steady, instantaneous or cyclic stresses when operating at the design temperature and pressure. Fossil fuelled boilers and gas and liquid metal cooled reactors can generate steam at upto 600°C, but more recently temperatures have been standardised...

  17. page 1 of 4 TkF Vrmeteknik Refrigeration / Kylteknik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    QL and QH and compressor power (all in kW) for the following two cases: 1. no sub-cooling, no reheat with COPHP = 5 that requires 2.75 W electric power to run. a. Is this pump suitable to maintain a temperature temperature T0 = 288 K, exit temperature T1 = 400 K. A production rate of 100 kg/h liquid N2 is needed. Note

  18. Steam Management- The 3M Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    by utilizing air vents. ? Steam traps on siphon-drained revolving drying drums frequently operate incorrectly in this application. Automatic differential condensate controllers are being installed on these drums. ? Automatic air vents are also being... and overcooling the drum, which required irJcreased steam for reheat downstream as a consequence. Improved temperature control was added to the cooling portion of the process. ? Flash steam from condensate receivers is reused for low temperature applications...

  19. 852 Prospect Issue 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1999-01-01

    and high moisture conditions. As the delivered dew point approaches freezing, coil frosting becomes a concern. Also if low humidity air is supplied to an occupied space, additional energy fm heating it back to a comfonable temperature, reheating.... Generally, cooling dehumidification is preferred for high temperatures where it is most efficient and frosting of the coil is not a concern. As the dew point approaches 32?F, condensate removed from the passing air stream begins to freeze on the cooling...

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell steam reforming power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    2013-03-12

    The present invention is a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reforming Power System that utilizes adiabatic reforming of reformate within this system. By utilizing adiabatic reforming of reformate within the system the system operates at a significantly higher efficiency than other Solid Oxide Reforming Power Systems that exist in the prior art. This is because energy is not lost while materials are cooled and reheated, instead the device operates at a higher temperature. This allows efficiencies higher than 65%.

  1. Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ping

    2010-12-15

    Catalysts have been used to speed up chemical reactions as long as yeast has been used to make bread rise. Today, catalysts are used everywhere from home kitchens to industrial chemical factories. In the near future, new catalysts being developed at Brookhaven Lab may be used to speed us along our roads and highways as they play a major role in solving the world’s energy challenges. During the lecture, Liu will discuss how theorists and experimentalists at BNL are working together to formulate and test new catalysts that could be used in real-life applications, such as hydrogen-fuel cells that may one day power our cars and trucks.

  2. txH2O: Volume 5, Number 2 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2009-01-01

    summe r keep it o n 72? at n ight and 8 2? during the day. ? Chan ge air filt ers once a month or rinse if w ashable. I nsert air filter corr ectly. ? For w indow un its, look a t the size of the ro om and n umber of people.... In and ar ound the kitchen ? Dishw asher ? R un bleach through the dishw asher to c lean the d rain. ? Bakin g ? Use ce ramic or g lass pans because they bake food qui cker than metal pans. ? Durin g summe r ? Cook with the m...

  3. Training working memory and fluid intelligence in older adults: developing measures and exploring outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynes, Sinéad

    2013-04-16

    as reflecting g. Such batteries often include measures with a high WM demand (e.g. Wechsler, 1981). Another method is to administer a single test that has a particularly high loading on g (Duncan, Burgess & Emslie, 1995). As discussed further below... is extremely motivating for me to see as a student. To Dr. Russell Thompson for providing the Feature Match task used in chapter two and for his encouraging advice over cups of tea in the kitchen. And my thanks go to two visiting students to the unit...

  4. Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 4 Number 3 : Full issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

    1967-11-24

    phraseology. The Chinese and Tihetans are being informed that I am a high and impor­ tant official- which of course the Resident at Indore is - and they are to treat the matter seriously and send an equally high official. I am to have the rank of Colonel... as Intelligence Officer ( 17)-which is the only billet for a Military Officer. I had lunch with the Viceroy ~nd met Lord Kitchener. The former very enthusias tic. He first of all told me how much he appreciated my work in Indore. He said when he looked back...

  5. Beginnings of the Lhasa Expedition: Younghusband's Own Words

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehra, Parshotam

    1967-11-24

    . The Chinese and Tihetans are being informed that I am a high and impor­ tant official- which of course the Resident at Indore is - and they are to treat the matter seriously and send an equally high official. I am to have the rank of Colonel and an escort... Officer ( 17)-which is the only billet for a Military Officer. I had lunch with the Viceroy ~nd met Lord Kitchener. The former very enthusias tic. He first of all told me how much he appreciated my work in Indore. He said when he looked back...

  6. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    water or electricity, and the only heat was the wood-burning stove in the kitchen. Edna was an excellent cook, and spent long hours “putting up” the summer har- vest in preparation for the lean months of winter. Charlie recalls that during the worst... excavations in SE Texas. The unfinished painting in the background indicates yet another one of Charlie’s talents. 11 Charlie Bollich continued... gram for Rice Improvement, Texas A&M. In 1994, Charlie was inducted in to the USDA-ARS Science Hall of Fame...

  7. Interview of Hermann Hauser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauser, Hermann

    2009-01-06

    years, it is a wise thing to use; the main advantage over solar panels, which use silicon, is cost; silicon is about 20% efficient now and plastic solar cells are about 6-7% efficient at present, so we need to get their efficiency up; people like Richard... of them, Acorn was a very innovative company - were made in the Italian Kitchen a few doors down; one of them was the Econet - one evening we invented networking; thought that computers should talk to each other and got terribly excited in linking them all...

  8. KU Today, March 9, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friday, March 9, 2012 KUMC's recipes for better living In the Healing Foods Kitchen in KU Medical Center's Integrative Medicine program, patients, staff, students and the public discover how to prepare foods for specific health... on Wireless Communications (TWireless). Full Story TODAY’S EVENTS PLAY 'Summer & Smoke' Friday, March 9, 2012 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Crafton-Preyer Theatre View all events TWITTER @KUAdvising Don't forget to set your clocks an hour forward...

  9. txH20: Volume 8, Number 3 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    are equipped with activation switches connected to the on-demand tankless hot water system. Photo by Leslie Lee, Texas Water Resources Institute. To be WaterSense-certi?ed, homes must meet standard criteria in three areas: indoor water use, including... in the kitchen and bathrooms are made of recycled ?orescent bulbs and all of the house?s appliances are also EnergyStar-rated,? he said. Another of the home?s features is less obvious: the tankless, on-demand hot water system. Visitors might not even notice...

  10. Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

    2014-08-31

    A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in coal-fired boilers resulting from the coexistence of sulfur and chlorine in the fuel. A new corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfidation Corrosion Mechanism,” has been proposed to account for the accelerated corrosion wastage observed on the furnace walls of utility boilers burning coals containing sulfur and chlorine. In addition, a second corrosion mechanism, i.e., “Active Sulfide-to-Oxide Corrosion Mechanism,” has been identified to account for the rapid corrosion attack on superheaters and reheaters. Both of the newly discovered corrosion mechanisms involve the formation of iron chloride (FeCl2) vapor from iron sulfide (FeS) and HCl, followed by the decomposition of FeCl2 via self-sustaining cycling reactions. For higher alloys containing sufficient chromium, the attack on superheaters and reheaters is dominated by Hot Corrosion in the presence of a fused salt. Furthermore, two stages of the hot corrosion mechanism have been identified and characterized in detail. The initiation of hot corrosion attack induced by molten sulfate leads to Stage 1 “acidic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the protective scale formed initially on the deposit-covered alloy surfaces. Once the protective scale is penetrated, Stage 2 Hot Corrosion is initiated, which is dominated by “basic” fluxing and re-precipitation of the scale in the fused salt. Based on the extensive corrosion information generated from this project, corrosion modeling was performed using non-linear regression analysis. As a result of the modeling efforts, two predictive equations have been formulated, one for furnace walls and the other for superheaters and reheaters. These first-of-the-kind equations can be used to estimate the corrosion rates of boiler tubes based on coal chemistry, alloy compositions, and boiler operating conditions for advanced boiler systems.

  11. Study on grain boundary character and strain distribution of intergranular cracking in the CGHAZ of T23 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Y.J.; Lu, H., E-mail: shweld@sjtu.edu.cn; Yu, C.; Xu, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Intergranular reheat cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of T23 steel was produced by strain to fracture tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermal–mechanical simulator. Then the grain boundary character, as well as the strain distribution after reheat crack propagation, was studied by electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that incoherent ?3 boundaries were seldom found on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Therefore, only the type of random high-angle boundaries played a crucial role in the intergranular cracking. Microstructurally cavities and small cracks were preferentially initiated from high-angle grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries and high-angle ones with misorientation angles less than 15° were more resistant to the cracking. More importantly, the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increased with the plastic strain induced by both temperature gradient and stress in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone, which contributed to the crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, the strain distributions in the vicinity of cavities and cracks revealed the accommodation processes of plastic deformation during stress relaxation. It also reflected the strength differences between grain interior and grain boundary at different heat-treated temperatures, which had a large influence on the cracking mechanism. - Highlights: • The coincidence site lattice boundaries play little role in the reheat cracking. • Cavity and crack occur at high-angle grain boundaries rather than low-angle ones. • The strain leads low-angle grain boundaries to transform to high-angle ones. • Strain distribution differs for cavity and crack zones at different temperatures.

  12. Inflationary Magnetogenesis in $R^{2}$-Inflation after Planck 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwar Saleh AlMuhammad

    2015-05-19

    We study the primordial magnetic field generated by the simple model $f^2 FF$ in Starobinsky, $R^2$-inflationary, model. The scale invariant PMF is achieved at relatively high power index of the coupling function, $\\left| \\alpha \\right| \\approx 7.44$. This model does not suffer from the backreaction problem as long as, the rate of inflationary expansion, $H$, is in the order of or less than the upper bound reported by Planck ($\\le 3.6 \\times 10^{-5} M_\\rm{Pl}$) in both de Sitter and power law expansion, which show similar results. We calculate the lower limit of the reheating parameter, $R_\\rm{rad} > 6.888$ in $R^2$-inflation. Based on the upper limit obtained from CMB, we find that the upper limits of magnetic field and reheating energy density as, $\\left(\\rho_{B_\\rm{end}} \\right)_\\rm{CMB} right)_\\rm{CMB} energy density for all possible values of $w _\\rm{reh}$ are respectively constrained as, $T_\\rm{reh} < 4.32 \\times 10^{13} \\rm{GeV}$ and $\\rho_\\rm{reh} < 3.259 \\times 10^{-18} M_\\rm{Pl}^4$ at $n_\\rm{s} \\approx 0.9674$. This value of spectral index is well consistent with Planck, 2015 results. Adopting $T_\\rm{reh}$, enables us to constrain the reheating e-folds number, $N_\\rm{reh}$ on the range $1 < N_\\rm{reh} < 8.3$, for $- 1/3 < w_\\rm{reh} < 1$. By using the scale invariant PMF generated by $f^2 FF$, we find that the upper limit of present magnetic field, $B_0 < 8.058 \\times 10^{-9} \\rm{G}$.

  13. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  14. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  15. Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, E.

    2013-02-01

    This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

  16. Nuclear Power - Operation, Safety and Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    for Advanced Reactors 47 P. F. Frutuoso e Melo, I. M. S. Oliveira and P. L. Saldanha Chapter 4 Geodetic Terrestrial Observations for the Determination of the Stability in the Kr?ko Nuclear Power Plant Region 71 S. Sav?ek, T. Ambro?i? and D. Kogoj Chapter... Experience in Nuclear Steam Reheat 3 Eugene Saltanov and Igor Pioro Chapter 2 Integrated Approach for Actual Safety Analysis 29 Francesco D?Auria, Walter Giannotti and Marco Cherubini Chapter 3 LWR Safety Analysis and Licensing and Implications...

  17. On Uplifted SUSY-Breaking Vacua and Direct Mediation in Generalized SQCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Auzzi; Shmuel Elitzur; Amit Giveon

    2010-03-21

    We search for viable models of direct gauge mediation, where the SUSY-breaking sector is (generalized) SQCD, which has cosmologically favorable uplifted vacua even when the reheating temperature is well above the messenger scale. This requires a relatively large tadpole term in the scalar potential for the spurion field X and, consequently, we argue that pure (deformed) SQCD is not a viable model. On the other hand, in SQCD with an adjoint, which is natural e.g. in string theory, assuming an appropriate sign in the Kahler potential for X, such metastable vacua are possible.

  18. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  19. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  20. Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

  1. Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nutt, Gerald L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1991-01-01

    The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

  2. Air- and Oxy-Fired Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G. R.; Tylczak, J.; Carney, C.; Laughlin, D.; Zhu, J.; Wise, A.

    2014-03-04

    The primary goal of this work was to examine the corrosion effects from flue gas composition changes arising from oxy?combustion. At 700°C, increased SO{sub X}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O contents in the gas phase arising from various oxy?combustion flue gas recirculation scenarios, while maintaining constant ash deposit chemistry, do not increase corrosion in superheater or reheater tubing. At 400°C, for both oxidative and reducing conditions, the corrosion rates were lower than at 700°C.

  3. Anisotropic inflation with non-abelian gauge kinetic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murata, Keiju [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Soda, Jiro, E-mail: K.Murata@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jiro@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    We study an anisotropic inflation model with a gauge kinetic function for a non-abelian gauge field. We find that, in contrast to abelian models, the anisotropy can be either a prolate or an oblate type, which could lead to a different prediction from abelian models for the statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of cosmological fluctuations. During a reheating phase, we find chaotic behaviour of the non-abelian gauge field which is caused by the nonlinear self-coupling of the gauge field. We compute a Lyapunov exponent of the chaos which turns out to be uncorrelated with the anisotropy.

  4. Heat Pipe Impact on Dehumidification, Indoor Air Quality and Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, J. T.

    1996-01-01

    for dehumidification, precooling, reheating and heat recovery. FIGURE 1. A SIMPLE HEAT BACKGROUND AND OVERVIEW The use of heat pipes dates back to the turn of the century. Heat pipes, also termed Perkins pipes, are heat transfer devices which work by means... stream_source_info ESL-HH-96-05-44.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 15385 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-HH-96-05-44.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 HEAT PIPE IMPACT...

  5. Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cromer, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    sometimes referred to as the Cromer cycle. The use of the desiccant provides the AC unit with enhanced moisture removal and a control mechanism whereby the moisture removal of the evaporator coil can be adjusted on the fly down to SHRs below 50... humidity control is added, the industry normally resorts to a “cold coil” strategy, that is, the air is overcooled by the machine to remove the humidity, and then reheated to get it back into the comfort zone. This process is inefficient, adding extra...

  6. Gravitino LSP and leptogenesis after the first LHC results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heisig, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Supersymmetric scenarios where the lightest superparticle (LSP) is the gravitino are an attractive alternative to the widely studied case of a neutralino LSP. A strong motivation for a gravitino LSP arises from the possibility of achieving higher reheating temperatures and thus potentially allow for thermal leptogenesis. The predictions for the primordial abundances of light elements in the presence of a late decaying next-to-LSP (NSLP) as well as the currently measured dark matter abundance allow us to probe the cosmological viability of such a scenario. Here we consider a gravitino-stau scenario. Utilizing a pMSSM scan we work out the implications of the 7 and 8 TeV LHC results as well as other experimental and theoretical constraints on the highest reheating temperatures that are cosmologically allowed. Our analysis shows that points with T{sub R}?>10{sup 9} GeV survive only in a very particular corner of the SUSY parameter space. Those spectra feature a distinct signature at colliders that could be looked at in the upcoming LHC run.

  7. Mass spectrum of primordial black holes from inflationary perturbation in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld: a limit on blue spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuuiti Sendouda; Shigehiro Nagataki; Katsuhiko Sato

    2006-06-07

    The mass spectrum of the primordial black holes formed by density perturbation in the radiation-dominated era of the Randall-Sundrum type-2 cosmology is given. The spectrum coincides with standard four-dimensional one on large scales but the deviation is apparent on smaller scales. The mass spectrum is initially softer than standard four-dimensional one, while after accretion during the earliest era it becomes harder than that. We also show expected extragalactic diffuse photon background spectra varying the initial perturbation power-law power spectrum and give constraints on the blue spectra and/or the reheating temperature. The most recent observations on the small scale density perturbation from WMAP, SDSS and Lyman-\\alpha Forest are used. What we get are interpreted as constraints on the smaller scale inflation on the brane connected to the larger one at the scale of Lyman-\\alpha Forest. If we set the bulk curvature radius to be 0.1 mm and assume the reheating temperature is higher than 10^6 GeV, the scalar spectral index from the smaller scale inflation is constrained to be n \\lesssim 1.3. Typically, the constraints are tighter than standard four-dimensional one, which is also revised by us using the most recent observations.

  8. Relic gravitational waves in the frame of slow-roll inflation with a power-law potential and the detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming-Lei Tong

    2013-02-22

    We obtained the analytic solutions of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) for the slow-roll inflation with a power-law form potential of the scalar field, $V=\\lambda\\phi^n$. Based on a reasonable range of $n$ constrained by cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations, we give tight constraints of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ and the inflation expansion index $\\beta$ for the fixed scalar spectral index $n_s$. Even though, the spectrum of RGWs in low frequencies is hardly depends on any parameters, the high frequency parts will be affected by several parameters, such as $n_s$, the reheating temperature $T_{RH}$ and the index $\\beta_s$ describing the expansion from the end of inflation to the reheating process. We analyzed in detail all the factors which would affect the spectrum of RGWs in high frequencies including the quantum normalization. We found that the future GW detectors SKA, eLISA, BBO and DECIGO are promising to catch the signals of RGWs. Furthermore, BBO and DECIGO have the potential not only to distinguish the spectra with different parameters but also to examine the validity of the quantum normalization.

  9. keV Warm Dark Matter via the Supersymmetric Higgs Portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John McDonald; Narendra Sahu

    2009-05-14

    Warm dark matter (WDM) may resolve the possible conflict between observed galaxy halos and the halos produced in cold dark matter (CDM) simulations. Here we present an extension of MSSM to include WDM by adding a gauge singlet fermion, \\bar{\\chi}, with a portal-like coupling to the MSSM Higgs doublets. This model has the property that the dark matter is {\\it necessarily warm}. In the case where M_{\\bar{\\chi}} is mainly due to electroweak symmetry breaking, the \\bar{\\chi} mass is completely determined by its relic density and the reheating temperature, T_R. For 10^2 GeV < T_{R} < 10^{5} GeV$, the range allowed by \\bar{chi} production via thermal Higgs annihilation, the \\bar{\\chi} mass is in the range 0.3-4 keV, precisely the range required for WDM. The primordial phase-space density, Q, can directly account for that observed in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, Q \\approx 5 x 10^{6}(eV/cm^3)/(km/s)^3,, when the reheating temperature is in the range T_R \\approx 10-100 TeV, in which case M_{\\bar{\\chi}} \\approx 0.45 keV. The free-streaming length is in the range 0.3-4 Mpc, which can be small enough to alleviate the problems of overproduction of galaxy substructure and low angular momentum of CDM simulations.

  10. Ionization Driven Fragmentation of Gas Outflows Responsible for FeLoBALs in Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bautista, Manuel A

    2010-01-01

    We show that time variations in the UV ionizing continuum of quasars, on scales of $\\sim$1 year, affect the dynamic structure of the plasmas responsible for low ionization broad absorption lines. Variations of the ionizing continuum produce non-equilibrium photoionization conditions over a significant fraction of the absorbing clouds and supersonically moving ionization fronts. When the flux drops the contraction of the ionized region drives a supersonic cooling front towards the radiation source and a rarefaction wave in the opposite direction. The pressure imbalance is compensated by an increased speed of the cool gas relative to the front. When the flux recovers the cool gas is re-ionized and re-heated by a supersonic ionization front traveling away from the radiation source and a forward shock is created. The reheated clouds equilibrate to a temperature of $\\sim 10^4$ K and are observed to have different radial velocities than the main cloud. Such fragmentation seems consistent with the multicomponent str...

  11. Fracture initiation by local brittle zones in weldments of quenched and tempered structural alloy steel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, K.L.; Reuter, W.G.; Reemsnyder, H.S.; Matlock, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) embrittlement of an API 2Y Grade 50T quenched and tempered offshore structural steel plate, welded by the submerged-arc process at a heat input of 4.5 kJ/mm, was investigated from the viewpoint of identifying the local brittle zone (LBZ) microstructure and the metallurgical factors associated with its formation. Microstructural and fractographic analysis showed the LBZ microstructure to be dual phase martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent. The formation of M-A constituent was found to be related to microstructural banding of the hot-rolled base plate. When the banded base plate was welded, M-A constituent formed only within the band microstructure which penetrated the intercritically-reheated coarse-grain HAZ (IRCGHAZ). The chemistry of the band microstructure in conjunction with the thermal cycle of the IRCGHAZ provided the critical conditions for the formation of M-A constituent in the API 2Y Grade 50T steel investigated. The influence of local brittle zones (i.e., M-A constituent) on the HAZ fracture toughness was evaluated by means of Crack-Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD) tests. These tests showed the steel to suffer embrittlement when the fatigue precrack sampled an intercritically-reheated coarse-grain HAZ which contained M-A constituent, confirming that M-A constituent is the major microstructural factor controlling the HAZ toughness of this particular steel.

  12. Method for loading shape memory polymer gripper mechanisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for loading deposit material, such as an embolic coil, into a shape memory polymer (SMP) gripping/release mechanism. The apparatus enables the application of uniform pressure to secure a grip by the SMP mechanism on the deposit material via differential pressure between, for example, vacuum within the SMP mechanism and hydrostatic water pressure on the exterior of the SMP mechanism. The SMP tubing material of the mechanism is heated to above the glass transformation temperature (Tg) while reshaping, and subsequently cooled to below Tg to freeze the shape. The heating and/or cooling may, for example, be provided by the same water applied for pressurization or the heating can be applied by optical fibers packaged to the SMP mechanism for directing a laser beam, for example, thereunto. At a point of use, the deposit material is released from the SMP mechanism by reheating the SMP material to above the temperature Tg whereby it returns to its initial shape. The reheating of the SMP material may be carried out by injecting heated fluid (water) through an associated catheter or by optical fibers and an associated beam of laser light, for example.

  13. Apparatus for loading shape memory gripper mechanisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for loading deposit material, such as an embolic coil, into a shape memory polymer (SMP) gripping/release mechanism. The apparatus enables the application of uniform pressure to secure a grip by the SMP mechanism on the deposit material via differential pressure between, for example, vacuum within the SMP mechanism and hydrostatic water pressure on the exterior of the SMP mechanism. The SMP tubing material of the mechanism is heated to above the glass transformation temperature (Tg) while reshaping, and subsequently cooled to below Tg to freeze the shape. The heating and/or cooling may, for example, be provided by the same water applied for pressurization or the heating can be applied by optical fibers packaged to the SMP mechanism for directing a laser beam, for example, thereunto. At a point of use, the deposit material is released from the SMP mechanism by reheating the SMP material to above the temperature Tg whereby it returns to its initial shape. The reheating of the SM material may be carried out by injecting heated fluid (water) through an associated catheter or by optical fibers and an associated beam of laser light, for example.

  14. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  15. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

    1981-04-01

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

  16. Comparisons of HVAC Simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Sartor, Dale; Mathew, Paul; Yazdanian, Mehry

    2008-08-13

    This paper compares HVAC simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for data centers. The HVAC systems studied in the paper are packaged direct expansion air-cooled single zone systems with and without air economizer. Four climate zones are chosen for the study - San Francisco, Miami, Chicago, and Phoenix. EnergyPlus version 2.1 and DOE-2.2 version 45 are used in the annual energy simulations. The annual cooling electric consumption calculated by EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 are reasonablely matched within a range of -0.4percent to 8.6percent. The paper also discusses sources of differences beween EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 runs including cooling coil algorithm, performance curves, and important energy model inputs.

  17. Multiwavelength Observations of EXO 0748-676 - I. Reprocessing of X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. I. Hynes; K. Horne; K. O'Brien; C. A. Haswell; E. L. Robinson; A. R. King; P. A. Charles; K. J. Pearson

    2006-05-04

    We present the first high time-resolution simultaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations of X-ray bursts in UY Vol, the optical counterpart of the low mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676, obtained with RXTE, HST, and Gemini-S. Strong reprocessed signals are present in the ultraviolet (a factor of 4) and optical (a factor of 2.5). These signals are lagged with respect to the X-rays and appear significantly smeared as well. The addition of far-ultraviolet coverage for one burst, together with the high quality of the dataset, allow much tighter constraints upon the temperature and geometry of the reprocessing region than previously possible. A single-zone black body reprocessing model for this burst suggests a rise in temperatures during the burst from 18,000 to 35,000K and an emitting area comparable to that expected for the disk and/or irradiated companion star. The lags, a mean of 4.0s and range of 2.5s, are consistent with those expected within the binary. The single-zone black body model cannot reproduce the ratio of optical to ultraviolet flux during the burst, however. The discrepancy, corresponding to underpredicting the optical by more than a factor of two, seems too large to explain with deviations from a local black body spectrum and more likely indicates that a range of reprocessing temperatures are required, as would be expected, with cooler regions not contributing to the UV. Comparable results are derived from other bursts, and in particular the lag and smearing both appear shorter when the companion star is on the near side of the disk as predicted. The burst observed by HST also yielded a spectrum of the reprocessed light. [Abridged

  18. Impact of Natural Gas Appliances on Pollutant Levels in California Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Li, Jina; Singer, Brett C.

    2012-12-01

    This report presents results from the first year of a 2-year study, investigating associations of five air pollutants (CO, NO2, NOX, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde) with the presence of natural gas appliances in California homes. From November 2011 to March 2012, pollutant concentration and occupant activity data were collected in 155 homes for 6-day periods. The sample population included both single-family (68%) and multi-family (32%) dwellings, with 87% having at least one gas appliance and 77% having an unvented gas cooking appliance. The geometric mean (GM) NO2 levels measured in the kitchen, bedroom and outside of homes were similar at values of 15, 12 and 11 ppb, respectively. In contrast, the GM NOx levels measured in the kitchen and bedroom of homes were much higher than levels measured outdoors, at levels of 42 and 41 ppb, compared to 19 ppb, respectively. Roughly 10% of sampled homes had 6-day average NO2 levels that exceeded the outdoor annual average limit set by the California Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) (30 ppb). The GMs of the highest 1-h and 8-h CO level measured in homes were 2.5 and 1.1 ppm, respectively. Four homes had a 1-h or 8-h concentration that exceeded the outdoor limits set by the CAAQS. The GM formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations measured in homes were 15 and 7 ppb, respectively. Roughly 95% of homes had average formaldehyde levels indoors that exceeded the Chronic Reference Exposure Level set by the California EPA (7 ppb). Concentrations of NO2 and NOx, and to a lesser extent CO were associated with use of gas appliances, particularly unvented gas cooking appliances. Based on first principles, it is expected that effective venting of cooking pollutant emissions at the source will lead to a reduction of pollutant concentrations. However, no statistical association was detected between kitchen exhaust fan use and pollutant concentrations in homes in this study where gas cooking occurred frequently. The lack of statistical

  19. Issues in federal preemption of state appliance energy efficiency regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Balistocky, S.; Schaefler, A.M.

    1982-12-01

    The findings and conclusions of the analysis of the various issues involved in the federal preemption of state regulations for the DOE no standard rule on covered appliances are summarized. The covered products are: refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, kitchen ranges and ovens, water heaters (excluding heat pump water heaters), room air conditioners, central air conditioners (excluding heat pumps), and furnaces. A detailed discussion of the rationale for the positions of groups offering comment for the record is presneted. The pertinent categories of state and local regulations and programs are explained, then detailed analysis is conducted on the covered products and regulations. Issues relating to the timing of preemption of state regulations are discussed, as well as issues relating to burden of proof, contents of petitions for exemptions from preemption, criteria for evaluating petitions, and procedural and other issues. (LEW)

  20. For building and construction. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, G.D.; Sharma, D.; Prakash, C.; Rao, K.R.; Jain, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen technical notes are compiled coveering: Apertures other than Northlights; Design of pile caps; thermal insulation of roofs of industrial buildings; room heating by solar energy; charging device for small capacity lime kilns; waste water disposal system for rural areas; low cost sound absorbing materials; solar space heating system; pedestal piles for low cost houses; solar timber seasoning kiln; design of cold storage for fruits and vegetables; techniques for improved thatch roofs; resilient floors for structural noise reduction; plastic composite panels for partition claddings and flush doors; chimney design for domestic kitchens; and a cheap and effective fire retardant treatment for paddy thatch/coconut leaves/palmyrah thatch. The notes give brief descriptions of the design and use of the materials and techniques covered.

  1. Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-09-01

    A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of $6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities. This publication details specifications of the parabolic trough solar system and highlights 5 years of measured performance data.

  2. Conceptual design of the solar repowering system for West Texas Utilities Company Paint Creek Power Station Unit No. 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    A conceptual design of a sodium-cooled, solar, central-receiver repowering system for West Texas Utilities' Paint Creek Unit 4 was prepared. The existing Paint Creek Unit 4 is a natural-gas-fired, baseload unit with a dependable net power output of 110 MWe. It is a reheat unit, has a main steam temperature and pressure of 538/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F) and 12.41 MPa (1800 psig), respectively, has a reheat temperature of 538/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F), and was placed in operation in 1972. On this conceptual design study program, a large number of trade studies and optimizations were carried out, in order to derive the most cost-effective design that had the greatest potential for widespread application and commercialization. As a result of these studies, the optimum power level for the solar part of the plant was determined to be 60 MWe, and provisions were made to store enough solar energy, so that the solar part of the plant would produce, on March 21 (equinox), 60 MWe of electric power for a period of 4 h after sunset. The tower in this system is 154 m (505 ft) high to the midpoint of the receiver, and is surrounded by 7882 heliostats (mirrors), each of which is 6.7 m (22 ft) by 7.3 m (24 ft). The mirror field occupies 1.74 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 2/ (430 acres), and extends 1040 m (3400 ft) to the north of the tower, 550 m (1800 ft) to the south of the tower, and is bounded on the east and west by Lake Stamford. The receiver, which is of the external type, is 15.4 m (50.5 ft) high by 14 m (45.9 ft) in diameter, and is capable of absorbing a maximum of 226 MW of thermal energy. The set of sodium-to-steam generators consists of an evaporator, a superheater, and a reheater, the power ratings of which are 83.2, 43.7, and 18.1 MWt, respectively. Conceptual design, system characteristics, economic analysis, and development plans are detailed. (WHK)

  3. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. . E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I.

    2006-07-01

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  4. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  5. Realistic quantum fields with gauge and gravitational interaction emerge in the generic static structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashinsky, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We study a finite basic structure that possibly underlies the observed elementary quantum fields with gauge and gravitational interactions. Realistic wave functions of locally interacting quantum fields emerge naturally as fitting functions for the generic distribution of many quantifiable properties of arbitrary static objects. We prove that in any quantum theory with the superposition principle, evolution of a current state of fields unavoidably continues along alternate routes with every conceivable Hamiltonian for the fields. This applies to the emergent quantum fields too. Yet the Hamiltonian is unambiguous for isolated emergent systems with sufficient local symmetry. The other emergent systems, without specific physical laws, cannot be inhabitable. The acceptable systems are eternally inflating universes with reheated regions. We see how eternal inflation perpetually creates new short-scale physical degrees of freedom and why they are initially in the ground state. In the emergent quantum worlds probabi...

  6. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  7. Large Blue Spectral Isocurvature Spectral Index Signals Time-Dependent Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Daniel J H

    2015-01-01

    We show that if a spectator linear isocurvature dark matter field degree of freedom has a constant mass through its entire evolution history, the maximum measurable isocurvature spectral index that is consistent with the current tensor-to-scalar ratio bound is about 2.4, even if experiments can be sensitive to a $10^{-6}$ contamination of the predominantly adiabatic power spectrum with an isocurvature power spectrum at the shortest observable length scales. Hence, any foreseeable future measurement of a blue isocurvature spectral index larger than about 2.4 may provide nontrivial evidence for dynamical degrees of freedom with time-dependent masses during inflation. The bound is not sensitive to the details of the reheating scenario and can be made mildly smaller if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is better constrained in the future.

  8. Large Blue Spectral Isocurvature Spectral Index Signals Time-Dependent Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel J. H. Chung

    2015-09-19

    We show that if a spectator linear isocurvature dark matter field degree of freedom has a constant mass through its entire evolution history, the maximum measurable isocurvature spectral index that is consistent with the current tensor-to-scalar ratio bound is about 2.4, even if experiments can be sensitive to a $10^{-6}$ contamination of the predominantly adiabatic power spectrum with an isocurvature power spectrum at the shortest observable length scales. Hence, any foreseeable future measurement of a blue isocurvature spectral index larger than about 2.4 may provide nontrivial evidence for dynamical degrees of freedom with time-dependent masses during inflation. The bound is not sensitive to the details of the reheating scenario and can be made mildly smaller if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is better constrained in the future.

  9. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  10. Inflaton dark matter from incomplete decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar Bastero-Gil; Rafael Cerezo; Joao G. Rosa

    2015-01-22

    We show that the decay of the inflaton field may be incomplete, while nevertheless successfully reheating the universe and leaving a stable remnant that accounts for the present dark matter abundance. We note, in particular, that since the mass of the inflaton decay products is field-dependent, one can construct models, endowed with an appropriate discrete symmetry, where inflaton decay is kinematically forbidden at late times and only occurs during the initial stages of field oscillations after inflation. We show that this is sufficient to ensure the transition to a radiation-dominated era and that inflaton particles typically thermalize in the process. They eventually decouple and freeze out, yielding a thermal dark matter relic. We discuss possible implementations of this generic mechanism within consistent cosmological and particle physics scenarios, for both single-field and hybrid inflation.

  11. Method for producing catalysis from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

  12. Thermal and non-thermal production of dark matter via Z'-portal(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Mambrini, Yann; Quevillon, Jérémie; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: yann.mambrini@th.u-psud.fr E-mail: b.zaldivar.m@csic.es

    2014-01-01

    We study the genesis of dark matter in the primordial Universe for representative classes of Z'-portals models. For weak-scale Z' mediators we compute the range of values of the kinetic mixing allowed by WMAP/PLANCK experiments corresponding to a FIMP regime. We show that very small values of ? (10{sup ?12}?reheating temperature, T{sub RH}, with a weak-scale coupling g{sub D} to ordinary matter. Relic abundance constraints then impose a direct correlation between T{sub RH} and the effective scale ? of the interactions: ? ? 10{sup 3}?10{sup 5} × T{sub RH}. Finally we describe in some detail the process of dark thermalisation and study its consequences on the computation of the relic abundance.

  13. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal system, Philippines and its implications to field exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seastres, J.S. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Saw, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field will be operating a total of 694 MWe by July 1997. The field has produced steam for the 112.5 MWe Tongonan I power plant since June 1983. With massive fluid withdrawal starting July 1996, a pre-commissioning hydrology was constructed to assess its implications to field exploitation. Pressure drawdown centered at well 106 in Mahiao was induced by fluid withdrawal at Tongonan-I production field. This drawdown will be accelerated by major steam withdrawal (734 kg/s) upon commissioning of power plants at Mahiao, Sambaloran and Malitbog sectors. To resolve this concern, fluid injection will be conducted at the periphery of Mahiao to provide recharge of reheated reinjection fluids in the reservoir. At Mahanagdong, the acidic fluid breakthrough will unlikely occur since the acidic zone north of this sector is not hydrologically well-connected to the main neutral-pH reservoir as indicated by pressure profiles.

  14. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 analysis of a 200% cold-leg break in a US/Japanese PWR with four loops and 15 x 15 fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spore, J.W.; Cappiello, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the results of a TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculation that simulated a 200% double-ended cold-leg-break loss-of-coolant accident in a generic US/Japanese pressurized water reactor. This is a best-estimate analysis using conservative boundary conditions and minimum safeguards. The calculation shows that the peak cladding temperature (PCT) occurs during blowdown and that the core reheat is minimal during reflood. The results also show that for an evaluation-model peak rod linear power of 15.85 kW/ft, a PCT of 1084 K is reached at 3.5 s into the blowdown transient, which is approx.394 K below the design basis limit of 1478 K. 10 figs.

  15. Method for producing catalysts from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

    1998-02-24

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

  16. Cooling-rate dependence of kinetic and mechanical stability of simulated glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah Staley; Elijah Flenner; Grzegorz Szamel

    2015-01-14

    Recently, ultrastable glasses have been created through vapor deposition. Subsequently, computer simulation algorithms have been proposed that mimic the vapor deposition process and result in simulated glasses with increased stability. In addition, random pinning has been used to generate very stable glassy configurations without the need for lengthy annealing or special algorithms inspired by vapor deposition. Kinetic and mechanical stability of experimental ultrastable glasses is compared to those of experimental glasses formed by cooling. We provide the basis for a similar comparison for simulated stable glasses: we analyze the kinetic and mechanical stability of simulated glasses formed by cooling at a constant rate by examining the transformation time to a liquid upon rapid re-heating, the inherent structure energies, and the shear modulus. The kinetic and structural stability increases slowly with decreasing cooling rate. The methods outlined here can be used to assess kinetic and mechanical stability of simulated glasses generated by using specialized algorithms.

  17. A Young White Dwarf with an Infrared Excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, S; Pantoja, B; Klein, B; Zuckerman, B; Su, K Y L; Meng, H Y A

    2015-01-01

    Using observations of Spitzer/IRAC, we report the serendipitous discovery of excess infrared emission from a single white dwarf PG 0010+280. At a temperature of 27,220 K and a cooling age of 16 Myr, it is the hottest and youngest white dwarf to display an excess at 3-8 $\\mu$m. The infrared excess can be fit by either an opaque dust disk within the tidal radius of the white dwarf or a 1300 K blackbody, possibly from an irradiated substellar object or a re-heated giant planet. PG 0010+280 has two unique properties that are different from white dwarfs with a dust disk: (i) relatively low emission at 8 $\\mu$m and (ii) non-detection of heavy elements in its atmosphere from high-resolution spectroscopic observations with Keck/HIRES. The origin of the infrared excess remains unclear.

  18. Studying Inflation with Future Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryusuke Jinno; Takeo Moroi; Tomo Takahashi

    2014-11-28

    Motivated by recent progress in our understanding of the $B$-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB), which provides important information about the inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), we study the possibility to acquire information about the early universe using future space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We perform a detailed statistical analysis to estimate how well we can determine the reheating temperature after inflation as well as the amplitude, the tensor spectral index, and the running of the inflationary gravitational waves. We discuss how the accuracies depend on noise parameters of the detector and the minimum frequency available in the analysis. Implication of such a study on the test of inflation models is also discussed.

  19. Studying inflation with future space-based gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: moroi@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent progress in our understanding of the B-mode polarization of cosmic microwave background (CMB), which provides important information about the inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), we study the possibility to acquire information about the early universe using future space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors. We perform a detailed statistical analysis to estimate how well we can determine the reheating temperature after inflation as well as the amplitude, the tensor spectral index, and the running of the inflationary gravitational waves. We discuss how the accuracies depend on noise parameters of the detector and the minimum frequency available in the analysis. Implication of such a study on the test of inflation models is also discussed.

  20. Apparatus for generating coherent infrared energy of selected wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Charles G. (Danville, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A tunable source (11) of coherent infrared energy includes a heat pipe (12) having an intermediate region (24) at which cesium (22) is heated to vaporizing temperature and end regions (27, 28) at which the vapor is condensed and returned to the intermediate region (24) for reheating and recirculation. Optical pumping light (43) is directed along the axis of the heat pipe (12) through a first end window (17) to stimulate emission of coherent infrared energy which is transmitted out through an opposite end window (18). A porous walled tubulation (44) extends along the axis of the heat pipe (12) and defines a region (46) in which cesium vapor is further heated to a temperature sufficient to dissociate cesium dimers which would decrease efficiency by absorbing pump light (43). Efficient generation of any desired infrared wavelength is realized by varying the wavelength of the pump light (43).

  1. G-Bounce Inflation: Towards Nonsingular Inflation Cosmology with Galileon Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taotao Qiu; Yu-Tong Wang

    2015-04-29

    We study a nonsingular bounce inflation model, which can drive the early universe from a contracting phase, bounce into an ordinary inflationary phase, followed by the reheating process. Besides the bounce that avoided the Big-Bang singularity which appears in the standard cosmological scenario, we make use of the Horndesky theory and design the kinetic and potential forms of the lagrangian, so that neither of the two big problems in bouncing cosmology, namely the ghost and the anisotropy problems, will appear. The cosmological perturbations can be generated either in the contracting phase or in the inflationary phase, where in the latter the power spectrum will be scale-invariant and fit the observational data, while in the former the perturbations will have nontrivial features that will be tested by the large scale structure experiments. We also fit our model to the CMB TT power spectrum.

  2. Development of Improved Iron-Aluminide Filter Tubes and Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Sutton, T.G.; Miller, C.J.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    2008-01-14

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to explore and develop advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate sintered iron-aluminide intermetallic porous bodies used for gas filtration so as to reduce production costs while maintaining or improving performance in advanced coal gasification and combustion systems. The use of a power turbine fired with coal-derived synthesis gas requires some form of gas cleaning in order to protect turbine and downstream components from degradation by erosion, corrosion, and/or deposition. Hot-gas filtration is one form of cleaning that offers the ability to remove particles from the gases produced by gasification processes without having to substantially cool and, possibly, reheat them before their introduction into the turbine. This technology depends critically on materials durability and reliability, which have been the subject of study for a number of years.

  3. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Bi-Directed Magnetohydrodynamic Jets Interacting with Cluster Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, S M

    2010-01-01

    We report on a series of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet propagation in realistic models of magnetized galaxy clusters. We are primarily interested in the details of energy transfer between jets and the intracluster medium (ICM) to help clarify what role such flows could have in the reheating of cluster cores. Our simulated jets feature a range of intermittency behaviors, including intermittent jets that periodically switch on and off and one model jet that shuts down completely, naturally creating a relic plume. The ICM into which these jets propagate incorporates tangled magnetic field geometries and density substructure designed to mimic some likely features of real galaxy clusters. We find that our jets are characteristically at least 60% efficient at transferring thermal energy to the ICM. Irreversible heat energy is not uniformly distributed, however, instead residing preferentially in regions very near the jet/cocoon boundaries. While intermittency...

  4. Subcarbonyl species of molybdenum hexacarbonyl supported on silica: A DRIFT study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurhinen, M.; Venaelaeinen, T.; Pakkanen, T.A. )

    1994-10-06

    Subspecies of partially decarbonylated molybdenum hexacarbonyl supported on silica were studied by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy. Mo(CO)[sub 6]/SiO[sub 2] was prepared in a fluidized bed reactor by vapor-phase adsorption of molybdenum hexacarbonyl under nitrogen flow. Decarbonylation begins when Mo(CO)[sub 6] has adsorbed onto the silica. Dehydroxylation of the support during calcination facilitates the formation of subspecies of Mo(CO)[sub 6]. The activation energy needed for bond formation between a transition metal and silica and for decarbonylation is lower than the desorption energy of physisorbed Mo(CO)[sub 6], and this was seen in the IR spectra as a disappearance of bands due to subspecies. When the supported Mo(CO)[sub 6] was reheated the physisorption bands were the last to disappear from the IR spectra. 37 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-31

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard) solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report also discusses plant performance, operations and maintenance, development, and facility cost estimate and economic analysis.

  6. Fluidized bed boiler having a segmented grate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waryasz, Richard E. (Longmeadow, MA)

    1984-01-01

    A fluidized bed furnace (10) is provided having a perforate grate (9) within a housing which supports a bed of particulate material including some combustibles. The grate is divided into a plurality of segments (E2-E6, SH1-SH5, RH1-RH5), with the airflow to each segment being independently controlled. Some of the segments have evaporating surface imbedded in the particulate material above them, while other segments are below superheater surface or reheater surface. Some of the segments (E1, E7) have no surface above them, and there are ignitor combustors (32, 34) directed to fire into the segments, for fast startup of the furnace without causing damage to any heating surface.

  7. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  8. Holographic Inflation Revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks; Willy Fischler

    2015-01-09

    This paper is a major revision of our previous work on the HST model of inflation. We identify the local fluctuations of the metric with fluctuations of the mass and angular momentum of black holes, and show that the consistency conditions in HST for a single trajectory to see more and more of a homogeneous distribution of black holes, imply that the system outside the horizon is undergoing inflation: small systems of equal entropy, are not in causal contact. Homogeneity then requires that the initial trajectory underwent inflation that expanded the black hole radius into our current horizon. The low entropy of the initial state of the universe is explained by the fact that this is the maximal entropy state, which has long lived localized excitations, and which can form structures more complex than black holes. The number of e-folds, reheat temperature of the universe and size of inflationary fluctuations are calculated in terms of a few parameters.

  9. Effects of kination and scalar-tensor cosmologies on sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehagen, Thomas; Gelmini, Graciela B., E-mail: trehagen@physics.ucla.edu, E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We study the effects of kination and scalar-tensor pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmologies on the non-resonant production of sterile neutrinos. We show that if the peak of the production rate of sterile neutrinos occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, the relic number density of sterile neutrinos could be reduced with respect to the number expected in the standard cosmology. Consequently, current bounds on active-sterile neutrino mixing derived from the relic energy density of sterile neutrinos could be greatly relaxed. In particular, we show that the sterile neutrinos which could explain the anomalies found in short-baseline neutrino experiments are compatible with recent joint Planck upper limits on their contribution to the energy density of the Universe in a scalar-tensor or a low-reheating temperature pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmology.

  10. Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2014-09-14

    High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

  11. Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-06-01

    Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH – non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 – Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate “should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory” it specifically indicates that it is intended to “provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.” The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that pro-vide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories.

  12. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  13. Cascading dust inflation in Born-Infeld gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Beltran Jimenez; Lavinia Heisenberg; Gonzalo J. Olmo; Christophe Ringeval

    2015-09-04

    In the framework of Born-Infeld inspired gravity theories, which deviates from General Relativity (GR) in the high curvature regime, we discuss the viability of Cosmic Inflation without scalar fields. For energy densities higher than the new mass scale of the theory, a gravitating dust component is shown to generically induce an accelerated expansion of the Universe. Within such a simple scenario, inflation gracefully exits when the GR regime is recovered, but the Universe would remain matter dominated. In order to implement a reheating era after inflation, we then consider inflation to be driven by a mixture of unstable dust species decaying into radiation. Because the speed of sound gravitates within the Born-Infeld model under consideration, our scenario ends up being predictive on various open questions of the inflationary paradigm. The total number of e-folds of acceleration is given by the lifetime of the unstable dust components and is related to the duration of reheating. As a result, inflation does not last much longer than the number of e-folds of deceleration allowing a small spatial curvature and large scale deviations to isotropy to be observable today. Energy densities are self-regulated as inflation can only start for a total energy density less than a threshold value, again related to the species' lifetime. Above this threshold, the Universe may bounce thereby avoiding a singularity. Another distinctive feature is that the accelerated expansion is of the superinflationary kind, namely the first Hubble flow function is negative. We show however that the tensor modes are never excited and the tensor-to-scalar ratio is always vanishing, independently of the energy scale of inflation.

  14. Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

    2006-05-30

    This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance. Validation of the TDL measurement on the EAF was confirmed by comparison with extractive sampling CO measurements.

  15. Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

  16. Analysis of Thermal and Chemical Effets on Negative Valve Overlap Period Energy Recovery for Low-Temperature Gasoline Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekoto, Dr Isaac; Peterson, Dr. Brian; Szybist, James P; Northrop, Dr. William

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for efficient auto-ignition controlled low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engines has been achieving the combustion phasing needed to reach stable performance over a wide operating regime. The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy has been explored as a way to improve combustion stability through a combination of charge heating and altered reactivity via a recompression stroke with a pilot fuel injection. The study objective was to analyze the thermal and chemical effects on NVO-period energy recovery. The analysis leveraged experimental gas sampling results obtained from a single-cylinder LTGC engine along with cylinder pressure measurements and custom data reduction methods used to estimate period thermodynamic properties. The engine was fueled by either iso-octane or ethanol, and operated under sweeps of NVO-period oxygen concentration, injection timing, and fueling rate. Gas sampling at the end of the NVO period was performed via a custom dump-valve apparatus, with detailed sample speciation by in-house gas chromatography. The balance of NVO-period input and output energy flows was calculated in terms of fuel energy, work, heat loss, and change in sensible energy. Experiment results were complemented by detailed chemistry single-zone reactor simulations performed at relevant mixing and thermodynamic conditions, with results used to evaluate ignition behavior and expected energy recovery yields. For the intermediate bulk-gas temperatures present during the NVO period (900-1100 K), weak negative temperature coefficient behavior with iso-octane fueling significantly lengthened ignition delays relative to similar ethanol fueled conditions. Faster ethanol ignition chemistry led to lower recovered fuel intermediate yields relative to similar iso-octane fueled conditions due to more complete fuel oxidation. From the energy analysis it was found that increased NVO-period global equivalence ratio, either from lower NVOperiod oxygen concentrations or higher fueling rates, in general led to a greater fraction of net recovered fuel energy and work as heat losses were minimized. These observations were supported by complementary single-zone reactor model results, which further indicated that kinetic time-scales favor chemical energy-consuming exothermic oxidation over slower endothermic reformation. Nonetheless, fuel energy recovery close to the thermodynamic equilibrium solution was achieved for baseline conditions that featured 4% NVO-period oxygen concentration.

  17. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  18. Powerful, Rotating Disk Winds from Stellar-mass Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, J M; Kaastra, J; Kallman, T; King, A L; Proga, D; Raymond, J; Reynolds, C S

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ionized X-ray disk winds observed in the Fe K band of four stellar-mass black holes observed with Chandra, including 4U 1630-47, GRO J1655-40, H 1743-322, and GRS 1915+105. High-resolution photoionization grids were generated in order to model the data. Third-order gratings spectra were used to resolve complex absorption profiles into atomic effects and multiple velocity components. The Fe XXV line is found to be shaped by contributions from the intercombination line (in absorption), and the Fe XXVI line is detected as a spin-orbit doublet. The data require 2-3 absorption zones, depending on the source. The fastest components have velocities approaching or exceeding 0.01c, increasing mass outflow rates and wind kinetic power by orders of magnitude over prior single-zone models. The first-order spectra require re-emission from the wind, broadened by a degree that is loosely consistent with Keplerian orbital velocities at the photoionization radius. This suggests that disk winds are ro...

  19. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-07

    Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

  20. In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

  1. CONSTRAINING THE BULK LORENTZ FACTOR OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OUTFLOW IN THE MAGNETIC-DOMINATED JET MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Zhe; Lin Hainan; Jiang Yunguo, E-mail: changz@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: linhn@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangyg@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2012-11-10

    Recent observations by the Fermi-LAT showed that there are delayed arrivals of GeV photons relative to the onset of MeV photons in some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to avoid a large optical depth, the minimal value of the Lorentz factor has been estimated to be higher than 1000 in some of the brightest bursts. In this paper, we present a detailed calculation of the time delay between the MeV and GeV photons in the framework of the magnetic-dominated jet model. We find that the time delay strongly depends on the saturated bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. Inspired by this fact, we use this model to calculate the Lorentz factors of the four brightest Fermi bursts. The results indicate that the Lorentz factors are much smaller than those obtained from the 'single-zone' scenario. The short burst GRB 090510 has a minimal Lorentz factor of 385, while the three long bursts, GRB 080916c, GRB 090902b, and GRB 090926, have almost the same Lorentz factors with an average value near 260. Another interesting result is that, for long bursts, GeV photons are emitted after the bulk Lorentz factor saturates. For the short GRB, however, MeV and GeV photons are emitted at the same phase, i.e., either in the expansion phase or in the coasting phase.

  2. The Origin of Blue Cores in Hubble Deep Fields E/S0 galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe Menanteau; Raul Jimenez; Francesca Matteucci

    2001-09-29

    In this letter we address the problem of the origin of blue cores and inverse color gradients in early-type galaxies reported in the Hubble Deep Field North and South (HDFs) by Menanteau, Abraham & Ellis 2001. We use a multi-zone single collapse model. This model accounts for the observed blue cores by adopting a broad spread in formation redshifts for ellipticals, allowing some of these galaxies begin forming no more than ~1 Gyr before the redshift of observation. The single-zone collapse model then produces cores that are bluer than the outer regions because of the increase of the local potential well toward the center which makes star-formation more extended in the central region of the galaxy. We compare the predicted V-I(r) color gradients with the observed ones using the redshift of formation ($z_F$) of the elliptical as the only free parameter. We find that the model can account with relatively good agreement for the blue cores and inverse color gradients found in many spheroidals and at the same time for the red and smooth colors profiles reported. Based on the model our analysis suggests two populations of field ellipticals, one formed recently, within $\\lesssim1$Gyr and another much older formed $\\gtrsim4$Gyr since the redshift of observation.

  3. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  4. The impact of demand-controlled ventilation on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, J.E.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation controls and energy analyses were performed for a range of typical buildings, systems, and climates. Only single zone buildings were considered, so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates, and for buildings that have low relative internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 10% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger, but were strongly dependent upon the occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules (e.g., stores and restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was reduced by a factor of 10 with demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates.

  5. Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

    2012-05-15

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

  6. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

  7. Freeze-In Dark Matter with Displaced Signatures at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond T. Co; Francesco D'Eramo; Lawrence J. Hall; Duccio Pappadopulo

    2015-06-24

    Dark matter, $X$, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature $T_R \\ll {\\rm TeV}$. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle $B$ of the thermal bath, $B \\rightarrow X$. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any $m_X$ in the range ${\\rm keV} < m_X < m_B$ and for values of $m_B$ accessible to these colliders. This result applies whether the early MD era arises after conventional inflation, when $T_R$ is the usual reheat temperature, or is a generic MD era with an alternative origin. In the former case, if $m_X$ is sufficiently large to be measured from kinematics, the reheat temperature $T_R$ can be extracted. Our result is independent of the particular particle physics implementation of $B \\rightarrow X$, and can occur via any operator of dimension less than 8 (4) for a post-inflation (general MD) cosmology. An interesting example is provided by DFS axion theories with TeV-scale supersymmetry and axino dark matter of mass GeV to TeV, which is typically overproduced in a conventional RD cosmology. If $B$ is the higgsino, $\\tilde h$, Higgs, W and Z particles appear at the displaced decays, $\\tilde h \\rightarrow h \\tilde a, Z \\tilde a$ and $\\tilde h^\\pm \\rightarrow W^\\pm \\tilde a$. The scale of axion physics, $f$, is predicted to be in the range $(3\\times10^8 - 10^{12})$ GeV and, over much of this range, can be extracted from the decay length.

  8. THE IMPACT OF THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-DARK MATTER VELOCITY DIFFERENCE ON THE z {approx} 20 21 cm BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Matthew; O'Leary, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that during the cosmic Dark Ages the baryons were typically moving supersonically with respect to the dark matter with a spatially variable Mach number. Such supersonic motion may source shocks that inhomogeneously heat the universe. This motion may also suppress star formation in the first halos. Even a small amount of coupling of the 21 cm signal to this motion has the potential to vastly enhance the 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations at 15 {approx}< z {approx}< 40, as well as to imprint distinctive acoustic oscillations in this signal. We present estimates for the size of this coupling, which we calibrate with a suite of cosmological simulations of the high-redshift universe using the GADGET and Enzo codes. Our simulations, discussed in detail in a companion paper, are initialized to self-consistently account for gas pressure and the dark matter-baryon relative velocity, v {sub bc} (in contrast to prior simulations). We find that the supersonic velocity difference dramatically suppresses structure formation on 10-100 comoving kpc scales, it sources shocks throughout the universe, and it impacts the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (even for halo masses as large as 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }). However, prior to reheating by astrophysical sources, we find that the v {sub bc}-sourced temperature fluctuations can contribute only as much as Almost-Equal-To 10% of the fluctuations in the 21 cm signal. We do find that v {sub bc} in certain scenarios could source an O(1) component in the power spectrum of the 21 cm background on observable scales via the X-ray (but not ultraviolet) backgrounds produced once the first stars formed. In a scenario in which {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun} minihalos reheated the universe via their X-ray backgrounds, we find that the pre-reionization 21 cm signal would be larger than previously anticipated and exhibit more significant acoustic features. Such features would be a direct probe of the first stars and black holes. In addition, we show that structure formation shocks are unable to heat the universe sufficiently to erase a strong 21 cm absorption trough at z {approx} 20 that is found in most models of the sky-averaged 21 cm intensity.

  9. Abundance of {sup 14}C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellner, Johann Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-15

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO{sub 2} emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 12}C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in {sup 14}C and reflect the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying {sup 14}C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper {sup 14}C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated {sup 14}C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135 pMC.

  10. Economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) mandated that minimum energy efficiency standards be established for classes of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners, and furnaces. EPCA requires that standards be designed to achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter Two describes the methodology used in the economic analysis and its relationship to legislative criteria for consumer product efficiency assessment; details how the CPES Value Model systematically compared and evaluated the economic impacts of regulation on the consumer, manufacturer and Nation. Chapter Three briefly displays the results of the analysis and lists the proposed performance standards by product class. Chapter Four describes the reasons for developing a baseline forecast, characterizes the baseline scenario from which regulatory impacts were calculated and summarizes the primary models, data sources and assumptions used in the baseline formulations. Chapter Five summarizes the methodology used to calculate regulatory impacts; describes the impacts of energy performance standards relative to the baseline discussed in Chapter Four. Also discussed are regional standards and other program alternatives to performance standards. Chapter Six describes the procedure for balancing consumer, manufacturer, and national impacts to select standard levels. Details of models and data bases used in the analysis are included in Appendices A through K.

  11. Investigation on effects of surface morphologies on response of LPG sensor based on nanostructured copper ferrite system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Satyendra; Yadav, B.C.; Gupta, V.D.; Dwivedi, Prabhat K.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Figure shows the variations in resistance with time for copper ferrite system synthesized in various molar ratio. A maximum variation in resistance was observed for copper ferrite prepared in 1:1 molar ratio. Highlights: ? Evaluation of structural, optical and surface morphologies. ? Significant variation in LPG sensing properties. ? Surface modification of ferric oxide pellet by copper ferrite. ? CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} pellets for LPG sensing at room temperature. -- Abstract: Synthesis of a copper ferrite system (CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) via chemical co-precipitation method is characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface morphology (scanning electron microscope) and optical absorption spectroscopy. These characteristics show their dependence on the relative compositions of the two subsystems. They are further confirmed by the variation in the band gap. A study of gas sensing properties shows the spinel CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized in 1:1 molar ratio exhibit best response to LPG adsorption/resistance measurement. Thus resistance based LPG sensor is found robust, cheap and may be applied for kitchens and industrial applications.

  12. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tesanovic, Zlatko [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

    2010-09-01

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything from fancy gauge theories to synchrotron radiation into its kitchen sink - only recently began to show any signs of waning. In the spring of 2008, as if on cue, a new family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors burst on the scene, hinting at an alternative route to room-temperature superconductivity and all of its momentous consequences. Fueled by genuine excitement - and a bit of hype - the iron-based superconductivity turned into a science blockbuster of 2009. I will present a pedagogical review of this new field, contrast the physics of iron- and copper-based systems, and speculate on the microscopic origins of the two types of high-temperature superconductivity.

  13. Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of wooden cabinets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Looby, G.P. [University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide (EPA/600/R-92/088, May 1992). The WMAC team at Colorado state University performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers wooden kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Components purchased from vendors are prepared for production through cutting, sanding, and routing operations. Stain, sealer, and top-coat are applied in separate spray booths. After the final coating, the components are dried and assembled. The assessment team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint sludge from the spray booth water curtains is generated in a large amount and that significant cost savings could be achieved by dewatering the sludge before it is shipped offsite for disposal and reusing the water. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  14. Passive solar heated energy conserving biosphere home. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarski, R.

    1985-01-01

    ''Warm Gold'' is an original design of a passive solar heated energy conserving biosphere home. It has been owner-built with financial help from the US Department of Energy through its Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program of 1980. The home incorporates the six major components of passive solar design: appropriate geometry and orientation, glazing, light levels and reflective surfaces, ventilation, thermal storage, and insulation. Warm Gold is an earth-sheltered home with earth cover on the roof as well as on the two opaque north leg walls. It is of durable and efficient masonry construction which included stone masonry with on-site materials and cement block and ready mix concrete. Excavation, backfill, and drainage were necessary aspects of earth sheltered construction together with the all-important Bentonite waterproofing system. Warm Gold is a house which meets all the national building code standards of HUD. The home has two bedrooms, one bathroom, living room, dining room-kitchen, greenhouse, and utility annex, all of which are incorporated with the earth-sheltered, passive solar systems to be a comfortable, energy-efficient living environment.

  15. Personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and its association with respiratory illness in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koo, L.C.; Ho, J.H.; Ho, C.Y.; Matsuki, H.; Shimizu, H.; Mori, T.; Tominaga, S. )

    1990-05-01

    In 1985, 362 primary schoolchildren and their 319 mothers were surveyed in Hong Kong to study the possible relationship of air pollution to respiratory illnesses. Using nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) measured by personal samplers as a measure of air pollution, the study aimed to identify the major sources of NO{sub 2} in the indoor environment and see whether its increased presence was associated with respiratory symptoms. The levels of NO{sub 2} among the mothers was found to increase by 21% if dust exposure was reported from the workplace, 18% if they used such cooking fuels as liquid petroleum gas or kerosene, 11% when kitchens did not have ventilating fans, and 10% when incense was burned at home. In terms of respiratory symptoms, an increase in NO{sub 2} levels of 19% was reported among those with allergic rhinitis and 18% among those with chronic cough. The levels of NO2 among children were correlated with levels measured in classrooms, all of which had opened windows so that the NO{sub 2} came from outdoors. No association was found between children's NO{sub 2} levels and respiratory symptoms. With the exception of smoking by the father and the children's NO{sub 2} levels, no association was found between smoking at home and NO{sub 2} levels.

  16. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P.

    2008-04-15

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  17. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1 million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  18. Fluid-driven deformation of a soft granular material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. MacMinn; Eric R. Dufresne; John S. Wettlaufer

    2015-02-24

    Compressing a porous, fluid-filled material will drive the interstitial fluid out of the pore space, as when squeezing water out of a kitchen sponge. Inversely, injecting fluid into a porous material can deform the solid structure, as when fracturing a shale for natural gas recovery. These poromechanical interactions play an important role in geological and biological systems across a wide range of scales, from the propagation of magma through the Earth's mantle to the transport of fluid through living cells and tissues. The theory of poroelasticity has been largely successful in modeling poromechanical behavior in relatively simple systems, but this continuum theory is fundamentally limited by our understanding of the pore-scale interactions between the fluid and the solid, and these problems are notoriously difficult to study in a laboratory setting. Here, we present a high-resolution measurement of injection-driven poromechanical deformation in a system with granular microsctructure: We inject fluid into a dense, confined monolayer of soft particles and use particle tracking to reveal the dynamics of the multi-scale deformation field. We find that a continuum model based on poroelasticity theory captures certain macroscopic features of the deformation, but the particle-scale deformation field exhibits dramatic departures from smooth, continuum behavior. We observe particle-scale rearrangement and hysteresis, as well as petal-like mesoscale structures that are connected to material failure through spiral shear banding.

  19. Water jet rebounds on hydrophobic surfaces : a first step to jet micro-fluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; R. Kofman; Xavier Noblin; Mathieu Pellegrin

    2010-09-28

    When a water jet impinges upon a solid surface it produces a so called hydraulic jump that everyone can observe in the sink of its kitchen. It is characterized by a thin liquid sheet bounded by a circular rise of the surface due to capillary and gravitational forces. In this phenomenon, the impact induces a geometrical transition, from the cylindrical one of the jet to the bi-dimensional one of the film. A true jet rebound on a solid surface, for which the cylindrical geometry is preserved, has never been yet observed. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a water jet can impact a solid surface without being destabilized. Depending on the incident angle of the impinging jet, its velocity and the degree of hydrophobicity of the substrate, the jet can i) bounce on the surface with a fixed reflected angle, ii) land on it and give rise to a supported jet or iii) be destabilized, emitting drops. Capillary forces are predominant at the sub-millimetric jet scale considered in this work, along with the hydrophobic nature of the substrate. The results presented in this letter raise the fundamental problem of knowing why such capillary hydraulic jump gives rise to this unexpected jet rebound phenomenon. This study furthermore offers new and promising possibilities to handle little quantity of water through "jet micro-fluidics"

  20. Coke oven gas injection to blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, F.L.; Terza, R.R.; Sobek, T.F.; Myklebust, K.L. [U.S. Steel, Clairton, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    U.S. Steel has three major facilities remaining in Pennsylvania`s Mon Valley near Pittsburgh. The Clairton Coke Works operates 12 batteries which produce 4.7 million tons of coke annually. The Edgar Thomson Works in Braddock is a 2.7 million ton per year steel plant. Irvin Works in Dravosburg has a hot strip mill and a range of finishing facilities. The coke works produces 120 mmscfd of coke oven gas in excess of the battery heating requirements. This surplus gas is used primarily in steel re-heating furnaces and for boiler fuel to produce steam for plant use. In conjunction with blast furnace gas, it is also used for power generation of up to 90 MW. However, matching the consumption with the production of gas has proved to be difficult. Consequently, surplus gas has been flared at rates of up to 50 mmscfd, totaling 400 mmscf in several months. By 1993, several changes in key conditions provided the impetus to install equipment to inject coke oven gas into the blast furnaces. This paper describes the planning and implementation of a project to replace natural gas in the furnaces with coke oven gas. It involved replacement of 7 miles of pipeline between the coking plants and the blast furnaces, equipment capable of compressing coke oven gas from 10 to 50 psig, and installation of electrical and control systems to deliver gas as demanded.

  1. Analysis of candidate silicon carbide recuperator materials exposed to industrial furnace environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federer, J.I.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kotchick, D.M.; Petrak, D.

    1985-07-01

    Several SiC ceramics were exposed to the combustion environment in six industrial furnaces to determine their corrosion resistance. The matrials were sintered-..cap alpha.. (Hexoloy SA), Sintride, recrystallized (NC-400), CVD SiC coated NC-400, siliconized (NC-430), reaction sintered (SC-X and KT), and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/-bounded (C/75 and CN-178). Tubes of these materials were exposed in two aluminum remelt furnaces, a forge furnace, a steel reheat furnace, and two steel soaking pits at temperatures of 925 to 1250/sup 0/C for periods of 530 to 5545 h. Significant corrosion occurred in specimens exposed to aluminum remelt furnaces and one of the steel soaking pits, whereas corrosion in the other furnaces was substantially less or negligible. The average C-ring fracture strengths of Hexoloy SA and NC-430, the only materials so tested, were substantially affected by the exposures. The lowest strength in Hexoloy SA occurred in specimens exposed in an aluminum remelt furnace, while the lowest strength in NC-430 occurred in specimens exposed in a steel soaking pit. These results show that SiC ceramics are susceptible to both corrosion and strength degradation when exposed to certain furnace environments.

  2. Consistent generation of magnetic fields in axion inflation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiro Fujita; Ryo Namba; Yuichiro Tada; Naoyuki Takeda; Hiroyuki Tashiro

    2015-04-15

    There has been a growing evidence for the existence of magnetic fields in the extra-galactic regions, while the attempt to associate their origin with the inflationary epoch alone has been found extremely challenging. We therefore take into account the consistent post-inflationary evolution of the magnetic fields that are originated from vacuum fluctuations during inflation. In the model of our interest, the electromagnetic (EM) field is coupled to a pseudo-scalar inflaton $\\phi$ through the characteristic term $\\phi F\\tilde F$, breaking the conformal invariance. This interaction dynamically breaks the parity and enables a continuous production of only one of the polarization states of the EM field through tachyonic instability. The produced magnetic fields are thus helical. We find that the dominant contribution to the observed magnetic fields in this model comes from the modes that leave the horizon near the end of inflation, further enhanced by the tachyonic instability right after the end of inflation. The EM field is subsequently amplified by parametric resonance during the period of inflaton oscillation. Once the thermal plasma is formed (reheating), the produced helical magnetic fields undergo a turbulent process called inverse cascade, which shifts their peak correlation scales from smaller to larger scales. We consistently take all these effects into account within the regime where the perturbation of $\\phi$ is negligible and obtain $B_{\\rm eff} \\sim 10^{-19}$G, indicating the necessity of additional mechanisms to accommodate the observations.

  3. Thin polymer icemaker development and test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, R.W. )

    1991-08-01

    We have constructed and tested a small device to produce ice in ice/water mixtures using a cold fluid as the heat sink. The device is a flexible heat exchanger constructed from a thin film of a suitable polymer. When filled with circulating liquid coolant the heat exchanger consists of an inflated series of parallel tubes; ice forms on the outside in complementary half cylinders. When the circulation is cut off, gravity drains the coolant and the static head of the water bath crushes the tubes, freeing them from the ice which floats to the surface. Brine circulation is then re-started and the cycle begins again. Here we report recent testing of this device: it makes ice readily under water and easily sheds the semi-cylinders of ice over many cycles of operation. It produces ice at a rate of 10 kg/m{sup 2}-hour. It offers substantial benefits in simplicity and reliability over mechanical harvester ice making systems, and the potential for significant improvements in energy efficiency compared to systems which use a re-heat cycle to harvest the ice. A reliable method of leak detection has been developed. The device should be of substantial value to systems where efficiency and reliability are at a premium, such as slush ice for district cooling.

  4. Thin polymer icemaker development and test program. Final report on technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, R.W.

    1991-08-01

    We have constructed and tested a small device to produce ice in ice/water mixtures using a cold fluid as the heat sink. The device is a flexible heat exchanger constructed from a thin film of a suitable polymer. When filled with circulating liquid coolant the heat exchanger consists of an inflated series of parallel tubes; ice forms on the outside in complementary half cylinders. When the circulation is cut off, gravity drains the coolant and the static head of the water bath crushes the tubes, freeing them from the ice which floats to the surface. Brine circulation is then re-started and the cycle begins again. Here we report recent testing of this device: it makes ice readily under water and easily sheds the semi-cylinders of ice over many cycles of operation. It produces ice at a rate of 10 kg/m{sup 2}-hour. It offers substantial benefits in simplicity and reliability over mechanical harvester ice making systems, and the potential for significant improvements in energy efficiency compared to systems which use a re-heat cycle to harvest the ice. A reliable method of leak detection has been developed. The device should be of substantial value to systems where efficiency and reliability are at a premium, such as slush ice for district cooling.

  5. R{sup 2}-inflation with conformal SM Higgs field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbunov, Dmitry; Tokareva, Anna E-mail: tokareva@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2013-12-01

    We introduce conformal coupling of the Standard Model Higgs field to gravity and discuss the subsequent modification of R{sup 2}-inflation. The main observation is a lower temperature of reheating which happens mostly through scalaron decays into gluons due to the conformal (trace) anomaly. This modifies all predictions of the original R{sup 2}-inflation. To the next-to-leading order in slow roll parameters we calculate amplitudes and indices of scalar and tensor perturbations produced at inflation. The results are compared to the next-to-leading order predictions of R{sup 2}-inflation with minimally coupled Higgs field and of Higgs-inflation. We discuss additional features in gravity wave signal that may help to distinguish the proposed variant of R{sup 2}-inflation. Remarkably, the features are expected in the region available for study at future experiments like BBO and DECIGO. Finally, we check that (meta)stability of electroweak vacuum in the cosmological model is consistent with recent results of searches for the Higgs boson at LHC.

  6. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Baird, Mark L [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Harris, James A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  7. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States)] [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States)] [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  8. Power-law and intermediate inflationary models in $f(T)$-gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Rezazadeh; A. Abdolmaleki; K. Karami

    2015-09-26

    We study inflation in the framework of $f(T)$-gravity in the presence of a canonical scalar field. After reviewing the basic equations governing the background cosmology in $f(T)$-gravity, we turn to study the cosmological perturbations and obtain the evolutionary equations for the scalar and tensor perturbations. Solving those equations, we find the power spectra for the scalar and tensor perturbations. Then, we consider a power-law form for the $f(T)$ function in the action and examine the inflationary models with the power-law and intermediate scale factors. We see that in contrast with the standard inflationary scenario based on the Einstein gravity, in the considered $f(T)$-gravity scenario, the power-law and intermediate inflationary models can be compatible with the observational results of Planck 2015 at 68\\% CL. In our $f(T)$-gravity setting, the potentials responsible for both the power-law and intermediate inflationary models have the power-law form $V(\\phi ) \\propto {\\phi ^m}$ but the power $m$ is different for them. Therefore, we can refine some of power-law inflationary potentials in the framework of $f(T)$-gravity while they are disfavored by the observational data in the standard inflationary scenario. Interestingly enough, the self-interacting quartic potential $V(\\phi ) \\propto {\\phi ^4}$ which has special reheating properties, can be consistent with the Planck 2015 data in our $f(T)$-gravity scenario while it is ruled out in the standard inflationary scenario.

  9. Homogeneous cosmology with aggressively expanding civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jay Olson

    2014-11-17

    In the context of a homogeneous universe, we note that the appearance of aggressively expanding advanced life is geometrically similar to the process of nucleation and bubble growth in a first-order cosmological phase transition. We exploit this similarity to describe the dynamics of life saturating the universe on a cosmic scale, adapting the phase transition model to incorporate probability distributions of expansion and resource consumption strategies. Through a series of numerical solutions covering several orders of magnitude in the input assumption parameters, the resulting cosmological model is used to address basic questions related to the intergalactic spreading of life, dealing with issues such as timescales, observability, competition between strategies, and first-mover advantage. Finally, we examine physical effects on the universe itself, such as reheating and the backreaction on the evolution of the scale factor, if such life is able to control and convert a significant fraction of the available pressureless matter into radiation. We conclude that the existence of life, if certain advanced technologies are practical, could have a significant influence on the future large-scale evolution of the universe.

  10. Taming the Runaway Problem of Inflationary Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence J. Hall; Taizan Watari; T. T. Yanagida

    2006-03-15

    A wide variety of vacua, and their cosmological realization, may provide an explanation for the apparently anthropic choices of some parameters of particle physics and cosmology. If the probability on various parameters is weighted by volume, a flat potential for slow-roll inflation is also naturally understood, since the flatter the potential the larger the volume of the sub-universe. However, such inflationary landscapes have a serious problem, predicting an environment that makes it exponentially hard for observers to exist and giving an exponentially small probability for a moderate universe like ours. A general solution to this problem is proposed, and is illustrated in the context of inflaton decay and leptogenesis, leading to an upper bound on the reheating temperature in our sub-universe. In a particular scenario of chaotic inflation and non-thermal leptogenesis, predictions can be made for the size of CP violating phases, the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay and, in the case of theories with gauge-mediated weak scale supersymmetry, for the fundamental scale of supersymmetry breaking.

  11. Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-10-01

    Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650şC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

  12. Standard Model with a real singlet scalar and inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enqvist, Kari; Nurmi, Sami; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo E-mail: sami.nurmi@helsinki.fi E-mail: kimmo.i.tuominen@helsinki.fi

    2014-08-01

    We study the post-inflationary dynamics of the Standard Model Higgs and a real singlet scalar s, coupled together through a renormalizable coupling ?{sub sh}h{sup 2}s{sup 2}, in a Z{sub 2} symmetric model that may explain the observed dark matter abundance and/or the origin of baryon asymmetry. The initial values for the Higgs and s condensates are given by inflationary fluctuations, and we follow their dissipation and relaxation to the low energy vacua. We find that both the lowest order perturbative and the non-perturbative decays are blocked by thermal effects and large background fields and that the condensates decay by two-loop thermal effects. Assuming instant reheating at T=10{sup 16} GeV, the characteristic temperature for the Higgs condensate thermalization is found to be T{sub h} ? 10{sup 14} GeV, whereas s thermalizes typically around T{sub s} ? 10{sup 6} GeV. By that time, the amplitude of the singlet is driven very close to the vacuum value by the expansion of the universe, unless the portal coupling takes a value ?{sub sh}?< 10{sup -7} and the singlet s never thermalizes. With these values of the coupling, it is possible to slowly produce a sizeable fraction of the observed dark matter abundance via singlet condensate fragmentation and thermal Higgs scattering. Physics also below the electroweak scale can therefore be affected by the non-vacuum initial conditions generated by inflation.

  13. Petrology and geochemistry of Alto Peak, a vapor-cored hydrothermal system, Leyte Province, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, A.G.; Giggenbach, W.F.; Saleras, J.R.M.; Salonga, N.D.; Vergara, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    Based on detailed petrological information on secondary mineral assemblages and the composition of fluids trapped in inclusions and discharged from five wells, the Alto Peak geothermal field was found to represent a combined vapor and liquid-dominated system. A central core or chimney, with a diameter of about 1 km, a height of some 3 km and occupied by a high gas vapor (1.1 to 5.6 molal CO{sub 2}), is surrounded by an envelope of intermediate salinity water (7,000 mg/kg Cl) with temperatures between 250 and 350 C. The transition from purely vapor-dominated to liquid-dominated zones takes place via two-phase zones occupied by fluid mixtures of highly variable compositions. Much of the lower temperature, mature neutral pH Cl water is likely to have formed during an earlier stage in the evolution of the system. High temperatures of > 300 C, and associated alteration, are limited to wells AP-1D and the lower parts of AP-2D and are ascribed to re-heating by recent magmatic intrusions. The isotopic composition of the well discharges suggests that they contain some 40 to 50% of magmatic water. Alto Peak is considered a typical example of hydrothermal systems associated with many dormant volcanoes.

  14. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 1. Design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-31

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report discusses in detail the design of the collector system, heat transport system, thermal storage subsystem, heat transport loop, steam generation subsystem, electrical, instrumentation, and control systems, power conversion system, master control system, and balance of plant. The performance, facility cost estimate and economic analysis, and development plan are also discussed.

  15. A Computer Program for Simulating Transient Behavior in Steam Turbine Stage Pressure of AHWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Anu; Thangamani, I.; Chakraborty, G.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-07-01

    It is proposed to couple the Advanced Heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, with a desalination plant. The objective of this coupling is to produce system make-up and domestic water. The proposed desalination plant needs about 1.9 kg/sec of steam and the minimum pressure requirement is 3 bars. The desalination plant can be fed with bled steam extracted from a suitable stage in low pressure turbine. As the turbine stage pressure changes with the load, it is essential to know the availability of bled steam at aforesaid pressure for various load condition. The objective of the present study is to identify a suitable extraction point so as to ensure availability of steam at desired condition for desalination plant, even at part load conditions. In order to fulfill the above objective a steam and feed system analysis code was developed which incorporates the mathematical formulation of different components of the steam and feed system such as, high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) turbines, re-heater, feed heaters etc. The dynamic equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the stage pressure at various load conditions. Based on the results obtained, the suitable extraction stage in LP turbine was selected. This enables to determine the lowest possible part load operation up to which availability of desalination plant could be ensured. (authors)

  16. Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

  17. Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a steam driven power system by steam mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA); Prichard, Andrew W. (Richland, WA); Reid, Bruce D. (Pasco, WA); Burritt, James (Virginia Beach, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a steam driven power plant wherein addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant results in a surprising increase in plant performance. For Example, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler may be installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

  18. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  19. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  20. Freeze-In Dark Matter with Displaced Signatures at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Raymond T; Hall, Lawrence J; Pappadopulo, Duccio

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter, $X$, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature $T_R \\ll {\\rm TeV}$. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle $B$ of the thermal bath, $B \\rightarrow X$. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any $m_X$ in the range ${\\rm keV} < m_X < m_B$ and for values of $m_B$ accessible to these colliders. This result applies whether the early MD era arises after conventional inflation, when $T_R$ is the usual reheat temperature, or is a generic MD era with an alternative origin. I...

  1. Rehabilitation of a 410-MW utility boiler at Costa Sur, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosado, R.; Salmeron, M.

    1995-12-31

    To increase unit reliability and availability and to meet the current and future electric power demands in Puerto Rico, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) recently performed a scheduled outage rehabilitation of Costa Sur Power Station Unit 5. This major rehabilitation of a 23-year-old, 410 MW, oil-fired boiler was accompanied by the upgrading of the low-pressure turbine with new rotors. The boiler rehabilitation included the replacement of all waterwall floor panels from just below the burner windbox, down to the lower drum. Temporary support was provided for the lower drum and its structural system during the panel replacement. The steam drum internals were completely rehabilitated, with the installation of a new liner and cleaning and repair of other internals as required. The superheater and reheater desuperheater liners were also replaced. In addition, all major components of both the firing system and the air preheaters were replaced. The gas recirculation fan was rehabilitated, and its discharge duct was replaced.

  2. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

    2014-09-01

    Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

  3. Experiment data report for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundle B-6. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R H; Longest, A W; Crowley, J L

    1984-07-01

    A reference source of MRBT bundle B-6 test data is presented with minimum interpretation. The primary objective of this 8 x 8 multirod burst test was to investigate cladding deformation in the alpha-plus-beta-Zircaloy temperature range under simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. B-6 test conditions simulated the adiabatic heatup (reheat) phase of an LOCA and produced very uniform temperature distributions. The fuel pin simulators were electrically heated (average linear power generation of 1.42 kW/m) and were slightly cooled with a very low flow (Re approx. 140) of low-pressure superheated steam. The cladding temperature increased from the initial temperature (330/sup 0/C) to the burst temperature at a rate of 3.5/sup 0/C/s. The simulators burst in a very narrow temperature range, with an average of 930/sup 0/C. Cladding burst strain ranged from 21 to 56%, with an average of 31%. Volumetric expansion over the heated length of the cladding ranged from 16 to 32%, with an average of 23%. 23 references.

  4. Experiment data report for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) Bundle B-5. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R H; Crowley, J L; Longest, A W

    1984-08-01

    A reference source of MRBT bundle B-5 test data is presented with interpretation limited to that necessary to understand pertinent features of the test. Primary objectives of this 8 x 8 multirod burst test were to investigate the effects of array size and rod-to-rod interactions on cladding deformation in the high-alpha-Zircaloy temperature range under simulated light-water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. B-5 test conditions, nominally the same as used in an earlier 4 x 4 (B-3) test, simulated the adiabatic heatup (reheat) phase of an LOCA and were conducive to large deformation. The fuel pin simulators were electrically heated (average linear power generation of 3.0 kW/m) and were slightly cooled with a very low flow (Re approx. 140) of low-pressure superheated steam. The cladding temperature increased from the initial temperature (335/sup 0/C) to the burst temperature at a rate of 9.8/sup 0/C/s. The simulators burst in a very narrow temperature range, with an average of 768/sup 0/C. Cladding burst strain ranged from 32% to 95%, with an average of 61%. Volumetric expansion over the heated length of the cladding ranged from 35% to 79%, with an average of 52%. The results clearly show deformation was greater in the bundle interior and suggest rod-to-rod mechanical interactions caused axial propagation of the deformation.

  5. Simultaneous Removal of Particulates and NOx Using Catalyst Impregnated Fibrous Ceramic Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.I.; Mun, S.H.; Kim, S.T.; Hong, M.S.; Lee, J.C.

    2002-09-19

    The research is focused on the development and commercialization of high efficiency, cost effective air pollution control system, which can replace in part air pollution control devices currently in use. In many industrial processes, hot exhaust gases are cooled down to recover heat and to remove air pollutants in exhaust gases. Conventional air pollution control devices such as bag filters, E.P. and adsorption towers withstand operating temperatures up to 300 C. Also, reheating is sometimes necessary to meet temperature windows for S.C.R. Since Oxidation reactions of acid gases such as SO{sub 2}, and HCl with lime are enhanced at high temperatures, catalyst impregnated ceramic filters can be candidate for efficient and cost effective air pollution control devices. As shown on Fig. 1., catalytic ceramic filters remove particulates on exterior surface of filters and acid gases are oxidized to salts reacting with limes injected in upstream ducts. Oxidation reactions are enhanced in the cake formed on exterior of filters. Finally, injected reducing gas such as NH{sub 3} react with NOx to form N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O interior of filters in particulate-free environment. Operation and maintenance technology is similar to conventional bag filters except that systems are exposed to relatively high temperatures ranging 300-500 C.

  6. A Minimal Inflation Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Alvarez-Gaume; Cesar Gomez; Raul Jimenez

    2011-10-18

    We elaborate on a minimal inflation scenario based entirely on the general properties of supersymmetry breaking in supergravity models. We identify the inflaton as the scalar component of the Goldstino superfield. We write plausible candidates for the effective action describing this chiral superfield. In particular the theory depends (apart from parameters of O(1)) on a single free parameter: the scale of supersymmetry breaking. This can be fixed using the amplitude of CMB cosmological perturbations and we therefore obtain the scale of supersymmetry breaking to be 10^{12-14} GeV. The model also incorporates explicit R-symmetry breaking in order to satisfy the slow roll conditions. In our model the eta-problem is solved without extra fine-tuning. We try to obtain as much information as possible in a model independent way using general symmetry properties of the theory's effective action, this leads to a new proposal on how to exit the inflationary phase and reheat the Universe.

  7. Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, A., E-mail: roy@fzu.cz, E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Harilal, S. S.; Polek, M. P.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Endo, A. [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)] [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-03-15

    We investigated the role of laser pulse duration and intensity on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064?nm Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–20?ns) and intensity. Experimental results performed at CMUXE indicate that the conversion efficiency (CE) of the EUV radiation strongly depend on laser pulse width and intensity, with a maximum CE of ?2.0% measured for the shortest laser pulse width used (5?ns). Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma showed that the ion flux kinetic profiles are shifted to higher energy side with the reduction in laser pulse duration and narrower ion kinetic profiles are obtained for the longest pulse width used. However, our initial results showed that at a constant laser energy, the ion flux is more or less constant regardless of the excitation laser pulse width. The enhanced EUV emission obtained at shortest laser pulse duration studied is related to efficient laser-plasma reheating supported by presence of higher energy ions at these pulse durations.

  8. Supersymmetric B – L inflation near the conformal coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Arai, Masato; Kawai, Shinsuke; Okada, Nobuchika

    2014-06-01

    We investigate a novel scenario of cosmological inflation in a gauged B-L extended minimal supersymmetric Standard Model with R-symmetry. We use a noncanonical Kähler potential and a superpotential, both preserving the R-symmetry to construct a model of slow-roll inflation. The model is controlled by two real parameters: the nonminimal coupling ? that originates from the Kähler potential, and the breaking scale v of the U(1)B-L symmetry. We compute the spectrum of the cosmological microwave background radiation and show that the prediction of the model fits well the recent Planck satellite observation for a wide range of the parameter space. Wemore »also find that the typical reheating temperature of the model is low enough to avoid the gravitino problem but nevertheless allows sufficient production of the baryon asymmetry if we take into account the effect of resonance enhancement. The model is free from cosmic strings that impose stringent constraints on generic U(1)B-L based scenarios, as in our scenario the U(1)B-L symmetry is broken from the onset.« less

  9. Energy Transfer between Throats from a 10d Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. v. Harling; A. Hebecker; T. Noguchi

    2008-03-28

    Strongly warped regions, also known as throats, are a common feature of the type IIB string theory landscape. If one of the throats is heated during cosmological evolution, the energy is subsequently transferred to other throats or to massless fields in the unwarped bulk of the Calabi-Yau orientifold. This energy transfer proceeds either by Hawking radiation from the black hole horizon in the heated throat or, at later times, by the decay of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states. In both cases, we calculate in a 10d setup the energy transfer rate (respectively decay rate) as a function of the AdS scales of the throats and of their relative distance. Compared to existing results based on 5d models, we find a significant suppression of the energy transfer rates if the size of the embedding Calabi-Yau orientifold is much larger than the AdS radii of the throats. This effect can be partially compensated by a small distance between the throats. These results are relevant, e.g., for the analysis of reheating after brane inflation. Our calculation employs the dual gauge theory picture in which each throat is described by a strongly coupled 4d gauge theory, the degrees of freedom of which are localized at a certain position in the compact space.

  10. Throat Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harling, B v

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we study throats in the early, hot universe. Throats are a common feature of the landscape of type IIB string theory. If a throat is heated during cosmological evolution, energy is subsequently transferred to other throats and to the standard model. We calculate the heat transfer rate and the decay rate of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states in a ten-dimensional model. For the calculation, we employ the dual description of the throats in terms of gauge theories. We discuss modifications of the decay rate which arise in flux compactifications and for Klebanov-Strassler throats and emphasize the role of tachyonic scalars in such throats in mediating decays of Kaluza-Klein modes. Our results are also applicable to the energy transfer from the heated standard model to throats. We determine the resulting energy density in throats at our epoch in dependence of their infrared scales and of the reheating temperature. The Kaluza-Klein modes in the throats decay to other sectors with a highly suppresse...

  11. Microturbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microturbines are small combustion turbines, approximately the size of a refrigerator, with outputs of 25-500 kilowatt (kW). They evolved from automotive and truck turbochargers, auxiliary power units for airplanes, and small jet engines and are composed of a compressor, a combustor, a turbine, an alternator, a recuperator, and a generator. Microturbines offer a number of potential advantages over other technologies for small-scale power generation. These include their small number of moving parts, compact size, light weight, greater efficiency, lower emissions, lower electricity costs, and ability to use waste fuels. They can be located on sites with space limitations for the production of power, and waste heat recovery can be used to achieve efficiencies of more than 80%. Turbines are classified by the physical arrangement of their component parts: single-shaft or two-shaft, simple-cycle or recuperated, inter-cooled, and reheat. The machines generally rotate more than 40,000 rotations per minute (rpm). Bearing selection, whether the manufacturer uses oil or air, is dependent on use. Single-shaft is the more common design because it is simpler and less expensive to build. Conversely, the split shaft is necessary for machine drive applications because it does not require an inverter to change the frequency of the AC power.

  12. Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G.L.

    2005-10-03

    This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

  13. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}? 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  14. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Development of an O2-Enriched Furnace System for Reduced CO2 and NOx Emissions For the Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward W. Grandmaison; David J. Poirier; Eric Boyd

    2003-01-20

    An oxygen-enriched furnace system for reduced CO2 and NOx emission has been developed. The furnace geometry, with a sidewall-mounted burner, was similar to configurations commonly encountered in a steel reheat furnace. The effect of stack oxygen concentration, oxygen enrichment level and air infiltration on fuel savings/CO2 reduction, NOx emissions and scale formation were investigated. The firing rate required to maintain the furnace temperature at 1100 C decreased linearly with increasing oxygen enrichment. At full oxygen enrichment a reduction of 40-45% in the firing rate was required to maintain furnace temperature. NOx emissions were relatively constant at oxygen enrichment levels below 60% and decreased concentration at all oxygen enrichment levels. Air infiltration also had an effect on NOx levels leading to emissions similar to those observed with no air infiltration but with similar stack oxygen concentrations. At high oxygen enrichment levels, there was a larger variation in the refractory surface-temperature on the roof and blind sidewall of the furnace. Scale habit, intactness, adhesion and oxidation rates were examined for five grades of steel over a range of stack oxygen concentrations and oxygen enrichment levels at 1100 degree C. The steel grade had the largest effect on scaling properties examined in this work. The stack oxygen concentration and the oxygen enrichment level had much smaller effects on the scaling properties.

  15. Simulation of the Two Stages Stretch-Blow Molding Process: Infrared Heating and Blowing Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordival, M.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Velay, V. [CROMeP - Ecole des Mines d'Albi Carmaux - Campus Jarlard - 81013 Albi cedex 09 (France)

    2007-05-17

    In the Stretch-Blow Molding (SBM) process, the temperature distribution of the reheated perform affects drastically the blowing kinematic, the bottle thickness distribution, as well as the orientation induced by stretching. Consequently, mechanical and optical properties of the final bottle are closely related to heating conditions. In order to predict the 3D temperature distribution of a rotating preform, numerical software using control-volume method has been developed. Since PET behaves like a semi-transparent medium, the radiative flux absorption was computed using Beer Lambert law. In a second step, 2D axi-symmetric simulations of the SBM have been developed using the finite element package ABAQUS registered . Temperature profiles through the preform wall thickness and along its length were computed and applied as initial condition. Air pressure inside the preform was not considered as an input variable, but was automatically computed using a thermodynamic model. The heat transfer coefficient applied between the mold and the polymer was also measured. Finally, the G'sell law was used for modeling PET behavior. For both heating and blowing stage simulations, a good agreement has been observed with experimental measurements. This work is part of the European project ''APT{sub P}ACK'' (Advanced knowledge of Polymer deformation for Tomorrow's PACKaging)

  16. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangels, J.A. (Ceradyne Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  17. Technical area status report for second-stage destruction and offgas treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, N.B.; Dalton, J.D.; Vavruska, J.

    1994-08-01

    This report was sponsored by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP), which was established by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (OTD). DOE/EM carries the charter to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation throughout the DOE complex. Within EM, the OTD established the MWIP to identify and develop new technologies for treatment of DOE low-level mixed waste. This report represents the second TASR for the Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment technical area. This TASR updates technology information, a design methodology for air pollution control systems for mixed waste treatment, and technology development needs for DOE/EM. The TASRs form the basis of a technology development program that addresses the highest priority DOE environmental needs and is coordinated with other technology development efforts both inside and outside DOE. The main functions of the second-stage destruction and offgas treatment system are to treat the gaseous effluent from the primary treatment process to acceptable levels for release to the atmosphere. Specific functions include (1) destruction of volatile organics; (2) capture of particulate matter; (3) capture of volatile metals; (4) capture and control of volatile, condensed-phase, and solid-phase radionuclides; (5) control of acid gases; (6) NO{sub x} abatement; and (7) gas cooling and reheating as required to perform these functions.

  18. LSQ14bdq: A Type Ic super-luminous supernova with a double-peaked light curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Sim, S A; Inserra, C; Anderson, J P; Baltay, C; Benetti, S; Chambers, K; Chen, T -W; Elias-Rosa, N; Feindt, U; Flewelling, H A; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Galbany, L; Huber, M E; Kangas, T; Kankare, E; Kotak, R; Krühler, T; Maguire, K; McKinnon, R; Rabinowitz, D; Rostami, S; Schulze, S; Smith, K W; Sullivan, M; Tonry, J L; Valenti, S; Young, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present data for LSQ14bdq, a hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the La Silla QUEST survey and classified by the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects. The spectrum and light curve are very similar to slow-declining SLSNe such as PTF12dam. However, detections within $\\sim1$ day after explosion show a bright and relatively fast initial peak, lasting for $\\sim15$ days, prior to the usual slow rise to maximum light. The broader, main peak can be fit with either central engine or circumstellar interaction models. We discuss the implications of the precursor peak in the context of these models. It is too bright and narrow to be explained as a normal \\Ni-powered SN, and we suggest that interaction models may struggle to fit the precursor and main peak simultaneously. We propose that the initial peak is from the post-shock cooling of an extended stellar envelope, and reheating by a central engine drives the second peak. In this picture, we show that an explosion energy of $\\...

  19. Generation of coherent structures after cosmic inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Stamatopoulos, Nikitas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Graham, Noah [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of hybrid inflation models, which are characterized by two real scalar fields interacting quadratically. We start by solving numerically the coupled Klein-Gordon equations in static Minkowski spacetime, searching for possible coherent structures. We find long-lived, localized configurations, which we identify as a new kind of oscillon. We demonstrate that these two-field oscillons allow for ''excited'' states with much longer lifetimes than those found in previous studies of single-field oscillons. We then solve the coupled field equations in an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime, finding that as the field responsible for inflating the Universe rolls down to oscillate about its minimum, it triggers the formation of long-lived two-field oscillons, which can contribute up to 20% of the total energy density of the Universe. We show that these oscillons emerge for a wide range of parameters consistent with WMAP 7-year data. These objects contain total energy of about 25x10{sup 20} GeV, localized in a region of approximate radius 6x10{sup -26} cm. We argue that these structures could have played a key role during the reheating of the Universe.

  20. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This guide regarding energy recovery is one in a series on best practices for laboratories. It was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs 21'), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH - non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 - Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate 'should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory' it specifically indicates that it is intended to 'provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.' The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that provide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories. Various types of energy recovery devices and systems can substantially reduce heating and cooling energy required for conditioning spaces in laboratories. Heating and cooling systems can be downsized when energy recovery is used because these systems reduce peak heating and cooling requirements. Heating and cooling systems can also be downsized by capturing heat generated in high-load spaces and transferring it to spaces requiring reheat. There are many opportunities for energy recovery in laboratories. This guide includes descriptions of several air-to-air energy recovery devices and methods, such as using enthalpy wheels (Figure 1), heat pipes, or run-around loops in new construction. These devices generally recover energy from exhaust air. This recovered energy is used to precondition supply air during both cooling and heating modes of operation. In addition to air-to-air energy recovery options, this guide includes a description of a water-to-water heat recovery system that collects heat from high-load spaces and transfers it to spaces that require reheat. While air-to-air recovery devices provide significant energy reduction, in some laboratory facilities the amount of energy available in the exhaust air exceeds the pre-heat and pre-cooling needed to maintain supply air conditions. During these periods of time, controls typically reduce the energy recovery capacity to match the reduced load. If the energy recovered in the exhaust is not needed then it is rejected from the facility. By using a water-to-water recovery system, it is possible to significantly reduce overall building energy use by reusing heating or cooling energy generated in the building before it is rejected to the outdoors. Laboratory managers are encouraged to perform a life-cycle cost analysis of an energy-recovery technology to determine the feasibility of its application in their laboratory. Usually, the shortest payback periods occur when the heating and cooling load reduction provided by an energy recovery system allows the laboratory to install and use smaller heating (e.g., hot water or steam) and cooling (e.g., c

  1. Modeling and experimental results for condensing supercritical CO2 power cycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Radel, Ross F.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This Sandia supported research project evaluated the potential improvement that 'condensing' supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) power cycles can have on the efficiency of Light Water Reactors (LWR). The analytical portion of research project identified that a S-CO{sub 2} 'condensing' re-compression power cycle with multiple stages of reheat can increase LWR power conversion efficiency from 33-34% to 37-39%. The experimental portion of the project used Sandia's S-CO{sub 2} research loop to show that the as designed radial compressor could 'pump' liquid CO{sub 2} and that the gas-cooler's could 'condense' CO{sub 2} even though both of these S-CO{sub 2} components were designed to operate on vapor phase S-CO{sub 2} near the critical point. There is potentially very high value to this research as it opens the possibility of increasing LWR power cycle efficiency, above the 33-34% range, while lowering the capital cost of the power plant because of the small size of the S-CO{sub 2} power system. In addition it provides a way to incrementally build advanced LWRs that are optimally designed to couple to S-CO{sub 2} power conversion systems to increase the power cycle efficiency to near 40%.

  2. Holographic Inflation and the Low Entropy of the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks

    2015-01-12

    This is a completely rewritten version of the talk I gave at the Philosophy of Cosmology conference in Tenerife, September 2014, which incorporates elements of my IFT Madrid Anthropics Conference talk. The original was too technical. The current version uses intuitive notions from black hole physics to explain the model of inflationary cosmology based on the Holographic Space Time formalism. The reason that the initial state of the universe had low entropy is that more generic states have no localized excitations, since in HST, localized excitations are defined by constraints on the fundamental variables. The only way to obtain a radiation dominated era, is for each time-like geodesic to see an almost uniform gas of small black holes as its horizon expands, such that the holes evaporate into radiation before they collide and coalesce. Comparing the time slicing that follows causal diamonds along a trajectory, with the global FRW slicing, one sees that systems outside the horizon had to undergo inflation, with a number of e-folds fixed by the present and inflationary cosmological constants, and the black hole number density on FRW slices just after inflation ends. These parameters also determine the size of scalar and tensor metric perturbations and the reheat temperature of the universe. I sketch a class of explicit finite quantum mechanical models of cosmology, which have these properties. Physicists interested in the details of those models should consult a recent paper\\cite{holoinflation3}.

  3. Experimental Study of the Aging and Self-Healing of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-01

    High operating temperatures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) require that sealant must function at a high temperature between 600oC and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. This paper describes tests to investigate the temporal evolution of the volume fraction of ceramic phases, the evolution of micro-damage, and the self-healing behavior of the glass ceramic sealant used in SOFCs. It was found that after the initial sintering process, further crystallization of the glass ceramic sealant does not stop, but slows down and reduces the residual glass content while boosting the ceramic crystalline content. Under the long-term operating environment, distinct fibrous and needle-like crystals in the amorphous phase disappeared, and smeared/diffused phase boundaries between the glass phase and ceramic phase were observed. Meanwhile, the micro-damage was induced by the cooling-down process from the operating temperature to the room temperature, which can potentially degrade the mechanical properties of the glass/ceramic sealant. The glass/ceramic sealant self-healed upon reheating to the SOFC operating temperature, which can restore the mechanical performance of the glass/ceramic sealant.

  4. Realistic quantum fields with gauge and gravitational interaction emerge in the generic static structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Bashinsky

    2015-05-28

    We study a finite basic structure that possibly underlies the observed elementary quantum fields with gauge and gravitational interactions. Realistic wave functions of locally interacting quantum fields emerge naturally as low-resolution descriptions of the generic distribution of many quantifiable properties of arbitrary static objects. We prove that in any quantum theory with the superposition principle, evolution of a current state unavoidably continues along alternate routes with every Hamiltonian that possesses pointer states. Then for a typical system the Hamiltonian changes unpredictably during evolution. This applies to the emergent quantum fields too. Yet the Hamiltonian is unambiguous for isolated emergent systems with sufficient symmetry, e.g., local supersymmetry. The other emergent systems, without specific physical laws, cannot be inhabitable. The acceptable systems are eternally inflating universes with reheated regions. We see how eternal inflation perpetually creates new short-scale physical degrees of freedom and why they are initially in the ground state. In the emergent quantum worlds probabilities follow from the first principles. The Born rule is not universal but there are reasons to expect it in a typical world. The emergent quantum evolution is necessarily Everettian (many-world). However, for a finite underlying structure the Everett branches with the norm below a positive threshold cease to exist. Hence some experiments that could be motivated by taking the Everett view too literally will be fatal for the participants.

  5. Estimating Energy and Water Losses in Residential Hot WaterDistribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James

    2005-02-26

    Residential single family building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include; the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy needed to reheat water that was already heated once before. Average losses of water are estimated to be 6.35 gallons (24.0 L) per day. (This is water that is rundown the drain without being used while waiting for hot water.) The amount of wasted hot water has been calculated to be 10.9 gallons (41.3L) per day. (This is water that was heated, but either is not used or issued after it has cooled off.) A check on the reasonableness of this estimate is made by showing that total residential hot water use averages about 52.6 gallons (199 L) per day. This indicates about 20 percent of average daily hot water is wasted.

  6. Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

  7. Study of Geometric Stability and Structural Integrity of Self-Healing Glass Seal System Used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-02-15

    A self-healing glass seal has the potential of restoring its mechanical properties upon being reheated to SOFC stack operating temperature, even when it has experienced some cooling induced damage/cracking at room temperature. Such a self-healing feature is desirable for achieving high seal reliability during thermal cycling. On the other hand, self-healing glass is also characterized by its low mechanical stiffness and high creep rate at the typical operating temperature of SOFCs. Therefore, geometry stability and structural integrity of the glass seal system becomes critical to its successful application in SOFCs. In this paper, the geometry stability of the self-healing glass and the influence of various interfacial conditions of ceramic stoppers with the PEN, IC, and glass seal on the structural integrity of the glass seal during the operating and cooling down processes are studied using finite element analyses. For this purpose, the test cell used in the leakage tests for compliant glass seals conducted at PNNL is taken as the initial modeling geometry. The effect of the ceramic stopper on the geometry stability of the self-healing glass sealants is studied first. Two interfacial conditions of the ceramic stopper and glass seals, i.e., bonded (strong) or un-bonded (weak), are considered. Then the influences of interfacial strengths at various interfaces, i.e., stopper/glass, stopper/PEN, as well as stopper/IC plate, on the geometry stability and reliability of glass during the operating and cooling processes are examined.

  8. Investigation of Performance of SCN-1 Pure Glass as Sealant Used in SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-03-01

    As its name implies, self-healing glass seal has the potential of restoring its mechanical properties upon being reheated to stack operating temperature, even when it has experienced some cooling induced damage/crack at room temperature. Such a self-healing feature is desirable for achieving high seal reliability during thermal cycling. On the other hand, self-healing glass is also characterized by its low mechanical stiffness and high creep rate at the typical operating temperature of SOFCs. Therefore, from a design’s perspective, it is important to know the long term geometric stability and thermal mechanical behaviors of the self-healing glass under the stack operating conditions. These predictive capabilities will guide the design and optimization of a reliable sealing system that potentially utilizes self-healing glass as well as other ceramic seal components in achieving the ultimate goal of SOFC. In this report, we focused on predicting the effects of various generic seal design parameters on the stresses in the seal. For this purpose, we take the test cell used in the leakage test for compliant glass seals conducted in PNNL as our initial modeling geometry. The effect of the ceramic stopper on the geometry stability of the self-healing glass sealants is studied first. Then we explored the effect of various interfaces such as stopper and glass, stopper and PEN, as well stopper and IC plate, on the geometry stability and reliability of glass during the operating and cooling processes.

  9. Rate of gravitational inflaton decay via gauge trace anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Watanabe

    2011-04-26

    We analyze decay processes of the inflaton field, phi, during the coherent oscillation phase after inflation in f(phi)R gravity. It is inevitable that the inflaton decays gravitationally into gauge fields in the presence of f(phi)R coupling. We show a concrete calculation of the rate that the inflaton field decays into a pair of gauge fields via the trace anomaly. Comparing this new decay channel via the anomaly with the channels from the tree-level analysis, we find that the branching ratio crucially depends on masses and the internal multiplicities (flavor quantum number) of decay product particles. While the inflaton decays exclusively into light fields, heavy fields still play a role in quantum loops. We argue that this process in principle allows us to constrain the effects of arbitrary heavy particles in the reheating. We also apply our analysis to Higgs inflation, and find that the gravitational decay rate would never exceed gauge interaction decay rates if quantum gravity is unimportant.

  10. Improving SFR Economics through Innovations from Thermal Design and Analysis Aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Vincent Mousseau; Per F. Peterson

    2008-06-01

    Achieving economic competitiveness as compared to LWRs and other Generation IV (Gen-IV) reactors is one of the major requirements for large-scale investment in commercial sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) power plants. Advances in R&D for advanced SFR fuel and structural materials provide key long-term opportunities to improve SFR economics. In addition, other new opportunities are emerging to further improve SFR economics. This paper provides an overview on potential ideas from the perspective of thermal hydraulics to improve SFR economics. These include a new hybrid loop-pool reactor design to further optimize economics, safety, and reliability of SFRs with more flexibility, a multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle to improve plant thermal efficiency and reduce safety related overnight and operation costs, and modern multi-physics thermal analysis methods to reduce analysis uncertainties and associated requirements for over-conservatism in reactor design. This paper reviews advances in all three of these areas and their potential beneficial impacts on SFR economics.

  11. Large forging manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thamboo, Samuel V. (Latham, NY); Yang, Ling (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

  12. Comparison of Simulated and Experimental Combustion of Biodiesel Blends in a Single Cylinder Diesel HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The effect of biodiesel content on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine performance has been investigated both experimentally and by computer simulation. Combustion experiments were performed in a single cylinder HCCI engine using blends of soy biodiesel in ultra low sulfur diesel, with concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 vol% and equivalence ratios ( ) from 0.38 to 0.48. Data from the engine tests included combustion analysis and exhaust composition analysis with standard gaseous emissions equipment. The engine utilized a custom port fuel injection strategy to provide highly premixed charges of fuel and air, making it possible to compare the results with single zone chemical kinetics simulations that were performed using CHEMKIN III, with a reaction set including 670 species and over 3000 reactions. The reaction mechanism incorporated equations for the combustion of a paraffinic fuel, n-heptane, and an oxygenated component, methyl butanoate, as well as reactions for the formation of NOx. The zero-dimensional model did a reasonably good job of predicting the HCCI combustion event, correctly predicting intake temperature effects on the phasing of both low temperature heat release (LTHR) and the main combustion event. It also did a good job of predicting the magnitude of LTHR. Differences between the simulation and experimental data included the dependence on biodiesel concentration and the duration of both LTHR and the main combustion event. The probable reasons for these differences are the changing derived cetane number (DCN) of the model fuel blend with biodiesel concentration, and the inability of the model to account for stratification of temperature and . The simulation also showed that concentrations of intermediate species produced during LTHR are dependent on the magnitude of LTHR, but otherwise the addition of biodiesel has no discernable effect.

  13. The impact of demand-controlled and economizer ventilation strategies on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandemuehl, M.J.; Braun, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies for constant-air-volume (CAV) systems in commercial buildings. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation, and energy analyses were performed for four typical building types, eight alternative ventilation systems, and twenty US climates. Only single-zone buildings were considered so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates and for buildings that have relatively low internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 20% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger but were strongly dependent upon the building type and occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules and large internal gains (i.e., restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was virtually eliminated by demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates. For both heating and cooling, the savings associated with demand-controlled ventilation are dependent on the fixed minimum ventilation rate of the base case at design conditions.

  14. Cosmic-Ray Models of the Ridge-Like Excess of Gamma Rays in the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar Macias; Chris Gordon; Roland Crocker; Stefano Profumo

    2015-06-11

    The High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) has detected diffuse TeV emission correlated with the distribution of molecular gas along the Ridge at the Galactic Center. Diffuse, non-thermal emission is also seen by the Fermi large area telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the GeV range and by radio telescopes in the GHz range. Additionally, there is a distinct, spherically symmetric excess of gamma rays seen by Fermi-LAT in the GeV range. A cosmic ray flare, occurring in the Galactic Center, $10^4$ years ago has been proposed to explain the TeV Ridge. An alternative, steady-state model explaining all three data sets (TeV, GeV, and radio) invokes purely leptonic processes. We show that the flare model from the Galactic Center also provides an acceptable fit to the GeV and radio data, provided the diffusion coefficient is energy independent. However, if Kolmogorov-type turbulence is assumed for the diffusion coefficient, we find that two flares are needed, one for the TeV data (occurring approximately $10^4 $ years ago) and an older one for the GeV data (approximately $10^5$ years old). We find that the flare models we investigate do not fit the spherically symmetric GeV excess as well as the usual generalized Navarro-Frenk-White spatial profile, but are better suited to explaining the Ridge. We also show that a range of single-zone, steady-state models are able to explain all three spectral data sets. Large gas densities equal to the volumetric average in the region can be accommodated by an energy independent diffusion or streaming based steady-state model. Additionally, we investigate how the flare and steady-state models may be distinguished with future gamma-ray data looking for a spatial dependence of the gamma-ray spectral index.

  15. RADIATION MECHANISM AND JET COMPOSITION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND GeV-TeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jin; Lu Ye; Zhang Shuangnan; Liang Enwei; Sun Xiaona; Zhang Bing

    2013-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P{sub jet}) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L{sub jet}) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L{sub s,jet}) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies ({epsilon}) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L{sub bol,jet}) for FSRQs and with the L{sub jet} for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P{sub jet}-L{sub s,jet} relation of FSRQs. They have lower {epsilon} and L{sub bol,jet} values than FSRQs, and a tentative L{sub bol,jet}-{epsilon} relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters ({sigma}) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with {epsilon} for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with {epsilon} for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

  16. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  17. Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-17

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

  18. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  19. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Rencher

    2008-06-30

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assess the resulting impact on APC systems. An analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs were going to be conducted. The tests were intended to determine the impact of operation of cooling flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, ESP particulate removal, SO{sub 3} removal, and Hg removal, and to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger. Testing was going to be conducted on Columbian coal (with properties similar to low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal) and SO{sub 3} will be spiked onto the flue gas to simulate operation with higher SO{sub 3} concentrations resulting from firing a higher sulfur coal, or operating with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. The project was also going to include associate planning, laboratory analytical support, reporting, and management activities. The URS project team finalized a conceptual alternative approach to demonstrate, via an engineering study, the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption. This idea was presented in summary format to NETL for consideration. NETL determined that this alternative approach deviated from the original project objectives, and that it would be in the best interest of all parties involved to cancel the project.

  20. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  1. Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  2. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

  3. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume E-mail: jaume.amoros@upc.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  4. The Detection Rate of Molecular Gas in Elliptical Galaxies: Constraints on Galaxy Formation Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Fujita; Masahiro Nagashima; Naoteru Gouda

    2000-05-15

    In order to constrain parameters in galaxy formation theories, especially those for a star formation process, we investigate cold gas in elliptical galaxies. We calculate the detection rate of cold gas in them using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and compare it with observations. We show that the model with a long star formation time-scale (~20 Gyr) is inconsistent with observations. Thus, some mechanisms of reducing the mass of interstellar medium, such as the consumption of molecular gas by star formation and/or reheating from supernovae, are certainly effective in galaxies. Our model predicts that star formation induced when galaxies in a halo collide each other reduces the cold gas left until the present. However, we find that the reduction through random collisions of satellite (non-central) galaxies in mean free time-scale in a halo is not required to explain the observations. This may imply that the collisions and mergers between satellite galaxies do not occur so often in clusters or that they do not stimulate the star formation activity as much as the simple collision model we adopted. For cD galaxies, the predicted detection rate of cold gas is consistent with observations as long as the transformation of hot gas into cold gas is prevented in halos whose circular velocities are larger than 500 km s^-1. Moreover, we find that the cold gas brought into cDs through captures of gas-rich galaxies is little. We also show that the fraction of galaxies with observable cold gas should be small for cluster ellipticals in comparison with that for field ellipticals.

  5. Postcombustion and its influences in 135 MWe CFB boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaohua Li; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Qing Liu; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue

    2009-09-15

    In the cyclone of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a noticeable increment of flue gas temperature, caused by combustion of combustible gas and unburnt carbon content, is often found. Such phenomenon is defined as post combustion, and it could introduce overheating of reheated and superheated steam and extra heat loss of exhaust flue gas. In this paper, mathematical modeling and field measurements on post combustion in 135MWe commercial CFB boilers were conducted. A novel one-dimensional combustion model taking post combustion into account was developed. With this model, the overall combustion performance, including size distribution of various ashes, temperature profile, and carbon content profiles along the furnace height, heat release fraction in the cyclone and furnace were predicted. Field measurements were conducted by sampling gas and solid at different positions in the boiler under different loads. The measured data and corresponding model-calculated results were compared. Both prediction and field measurements showed post combustion introduced a temperature increment of flue gas in the cyclone of the 135MWe CFB boiler in the range of 20-50{sup o}C when a low-volatile bituminous coal was fired. Although it had little influence on ash size distribution, post combustion had a remarkable influence on the carbon content profile and temperature profile in the furnace. Moreover, it introduced about 4-7% heat release in the cyclone over the total heat release in the boiler. This fraction slightly increased with total air flow rate and boiler load. Model calculations were also conducted on other two 135MWe CFB boilers burning lignite and anthracite coal, respectively. The results confirmed that post combustion was sensitive to coal type and became more severe as the volatile content of the coal decreased. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  7. Energy conservation at The University of Miami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1995-06-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: {open_quotes}To make UM one of the most energy efficient Universities in the Nation by the year 2000.{close_quotes} In order for the University to meet this goal we knew we would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past (i.e. elimination, reheat, first generation lighting retrofits, and some diversity), each plant had excess capacity. At that time we also had identified about 600 tons of old falling apart air conditioning equipment. Our Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. As this concept took shape it became evident that a master chilled water loop encircling the entire campus would address the next 20 years of campus development. This 20 year plan would require various phases of development. Phase I would connect three chilled water production plants and enable us to supply chilled water to seven existing facilities with approximately 600 tons of old inefficient air conditioning equipment and supply chilled water to the new Law and Music facilities, (approximately 400 tons) without buying any additional chillers.

  8. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: rgill@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (? ? 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (? {sub T} ? 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 × 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup –1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at ? {sub T} ? 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; –3 < ? < –3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  9. Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

    2011-05-11

    Coal-fired power plants are a significant part of the nation���¢��������s power generating capacity, currently accounting for more than 55% of the country���¢��������s total electricity production. Extending the reliable lifetimes of fossil fired boiler components and reducing the maintenance costs are essential for economic operation of power plants. Corrosion and erosion are leading causes of superheater and reheater boiler tube failures leading to unscheduled costly outages. Several types of coatings and weld overlays have been used to extend the service life of boiler tubes; however, the protection afforded by such materials was limited approximately one to eight years. Power companies are more recently focused in achieving greater plant efficiency by increasing steam temperature and pressure into the advanced-ultrasupercritical (A-USC) condition with steam temperatures approaching 760�������°C (1400�������°F) and operating pressures in excess of 35MPa (5075 psig). Unfortunately, laboratory and field testing suggests that the resultant fireside environment when operating under A-USC conditions can potentially cause significant corrosion to conventional and advanced boiler materials1-2. In order to improve reliability and availability of fossil fired A-USC boilers, it is essential to develop advanced nanostructured coatings that provide excellent corrosion and erosion resistance without adversely affecting the other properties such as toughness and thermal fatigue strength of the component material.

  10. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  11. Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin

    2014-10-01

    This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. Cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air in older homes in warm-humid climates. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long-off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

  12. Nonminimally coupled hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Seoktae [Center for Quantum Spacetime, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong 1, Mapo-gu, 121-742, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Minamitsuji, Masato [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda 669-1337 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    We discuss the hybrid inflation model where the inflaton field is nonminimally coupled to gravity. In the Jordan frame, the potential contains {phi}{sup 4} term as well as terms in the original hybrid inflation model. In our model, inflation can be classified into the type (I) and the type (II). In the type (I), inflation is terminated by the tachyonic instability of the waterfall field, while in the type (II) by the violation of slow-roll conditions. In our model, the reheating takes place only at the true minimum and even in the case (II) finally the tachyonic instability occurs after the termination of inflation. For a negative nonminimal coupling, inflation takes place in the vacuum-dominated region, in the large field region, or near the local minimum/maximum. Inflation in the vacuum-dominated region becomes either the type (I) or (II), resulting in a blue or red spectrum of the curvature perturbations, respectively. Inflation around the local maximum can be either the type (I) or the type (II), which results in the red spectrum of the curvature perturbations, while around the local minimum it must be the type (I), which results in the blue spectrum. In the large field region, to terminate inflation, potential in the Einstein frame must be positively tilted, always resulting in the red spectrum. We then numerically solve the equations of motion to investigate the whole dynamics of inflaton and confirm that the spectrum of curvature perturbations changes from red to blue ones as scales become smaller.

  13. Monitoring of temperature-compensated conductivity in fossil power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bursik, A.

    1995-01-01

    Specific conductivity is an inexpensive, reliable, on-line method for monitoring the overall level of contaminants and its trends in fossil plant cycles. The most important applications are the monitoring in makeup water and at the economizer inlet. In the makeup, the specific conductivity is related to the content of makeup ionic impurities and carbon dioxide. Specific conductivity at the economizer inlet is an indication of the ammonia level during normal operation, since other ionic impurity levels are relatively very low in relation to the ammonia content. Cation conductivity serves as an excellent diagnostic tool. The advantage of using strong-acid cation exchanger for the alkalizing agents elimination and for the great sensitivity improvement has already been recognized in the 1950`s. The cation conductivity is currently one of the most important {open_quotes}core parameters{close_quotes} in the Cycle Chemistry Improvement Project. In this project, the most important plant cycle locations where cation conductivity on-line monitoring is strongly advised are: condensate pump discharge; polisher outlet or economizer inlet; and hot reheat steam or main steam. An additional monitoring location is the blowdown or the downcomer of drum boilers. The cation conductivity monitoring at this location is becoming vital with the introduction of oxygenated chemistry and OH (sodium hydroxide) treatment in cycles with drum boilers. Degassed cation conductivity has been addressed. Applying this method, the effect of carbon dioxide on cation conductivity is eliminated by boiling off gaseous carbon dioxide before the actual cation conductivity monitoring. Therefore, the degassed cation conductivity reflects only the total non-volatile anionic impurity level.

  14. NOvel Refractory Materials for High Alkali, High Temperature Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, J.G.; Griffin, R.

    2011-08-30

    Refractory materials can be limited in their application by many factors including chemical reactions between the service environment and the refractory material, mechanical degradation of the refractory material by the service environment, temperature limitations on the use of a particular refractory material, and the inability to install or repair the refractory material in a cost effective manner or while the vessel was in service. The objective of this project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al2O3 spinel or other similar magnesia/alumina containing unshaped refractory composition (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, highalkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. A research team was formed to carry out the proposed work led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and was comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The two goals of this project were to produce novel refractory compositions which will allow for improved energy efficiency and to develop new refractory application techniques which would improve the speed of installation. Also methods of hot installation were sought which would allow for hot repairs and on-line maintenance leading to reduced process downtimes and eliminating the need to cool and reheat process vessels.

  15. Microstructure of warm rolling and pearlitic transformation of ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jun-Jie; Lian, Fu-Liang; Liu, Hong-Ji; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Sheng-Wu; Du, Lin-Xiu; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2014-09-15

    Pearlitic transformation mechanisms have been investigated in ultra-fine grained GCr15 steel. The ultrafine-grained steel, whose grain size was less than 1 ?m, was prepared by thermo-mechanical treatment at 873 K and then annealing at 923 K for 2 h. Pearlitic transformation was conducted by reheating the ultra-fine grained samples at 1073 K and 1123 K for different periods of time and then cooling in air. Scanning electron microscope observation shows that normal lamellar pearlite, instead of granular cementite and ferrite, cannot be formed when the grain size is approximately less than 4(± 0.6) ?m, which yields a critical grain size for normal lamellar pearlitic transformations in this chromium alloyed steel. The result confirms that grain size has a great influence on pearlitic transformation by increasing the diffusion rate of carbon atoms in the ultra-fine grained steel, and the addition of chromium element doesn't change this pearlitic phase transformation rule. Meanwhile, the grain growth rate is reduced by chromium alloying, which is beneficial to form fine grains during austenitizing, thus it facilitating pearlitic transformation by divorced eutectoid transformation. Moreover, chromium element can form a relatively high gradient in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, which promotes carbide formation in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, i.e., chromium promotes divorced eutectoid transformation. - Highlights: • Ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel was obtained by warm rolling and annealing technology. • Reduction of grain size makes pearlite morphology from lamellar to granular. • Adding Cr does not change normal pearlitic phase transformation rule in UFG steel. • Cr carbide resists grain growth and facilitates pearlitic transformation by DET.

  16. Using measured equipment load profiles to 'right-size' HVACsystems and reduce energy use in laboratory buildings (Pt. 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Frenze, David; Morehead, Michael; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-06-29

    There is a general paucity of measured equipment load datafor laboratories and other complex buildings and designers often useestimates based on nameplate rated data or design assumptions from priorprojects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequentlyoverestimated, and load variation across laboratory spaces within abuilding is typically underestimated. This results in two design flaws.Firstly, the overestimation of peak equipment loads results in over-sizedHVAC systems, increasing initial construction costs as well as energy usedue to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. Secondly, HVAC systemsthat are designed without accurately accounting for equipment loadvariation across zones can significantly increase simultaneous heatingand cooling, particularly for systems that use zone reheat fortemperature control. Thus, when designing a laboratory HVAC system, theuse of measured equipment load data from a comparable laboratory willsupport right-sizing HVAC systems and optimizing their configuration tominimize simultaneous heating and cooling, saving initial constructioncosts as well as life-cycle energy costs.In this paper, we present datafrom recent studies to support the above thesis. We first presentmeasured equipment load data from two sources: time-series measurementsin several laboratory modules in a university research laboratorybuilding; and peak load data for several facilities recorded in anational energy benchmarking database. We then contrast this measureddata with estimated values that are typically used for sizing the HVACsystems in these facilities, highlighting the over-sizing problem. Next,we examine the load variation in the time series measurements and analyzethe impact of this variation on energy use, via parametric energysimulations. We then briefly discuss HVAC design solutions that minimizesimultaneous heating and cooling energy use.

  17. On the magnetic evolution in Friedmann universes and the question of cosmic magnetogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christos G. Tsagas

    2014-12-15

    We reconsider the evolution of primordial magnetic fields in spatially flat Friedmann universes and the belief that, after inflation, these fields decay adiabatically on all scales. Without abandoning classical electromagnetism or standard cosmology, we demonstrate that this is not necessarily the case for superhorizon-sized fields. The reason is causality, which confines the post-inflationary processes of electric-current formation, electric-field elimination and magnetic-flux freezing within the horizon. As a result, the adiabatic magnetic decay is not a priori guaranteed on super-Hubble scales. Instead, after inflation, large-scale magnetic fields obey a power-law solution, where one of the modes drops at a rate slower than the adiabatic. Whether this slowly decaying mode can dominate depends on the initial conditions. These are determined by the magnetic evolution during inflation and by the nature of the transition from inflation to reheating and then to radiation and dust. We discuss two alternative and complementary scenarios to illustrate the role and the implications of the initial conditions for cosmic magnetogenesis. Our main claim is that superhorizon-sized magnetic fields can be superadiabatically amplified after inflation, as long as they remain outside the horizon of a spatially flat Friedmann universe. This means that inflation-produced fields can reach astrophysically relevant residual strengths without breaking away from standard physics. Moreover, using the same causality arguments, one can constrain (and in some cases assist) the non-conventional scenarios of primordial magnetogenesis that amplify their fields during inflation. Finally, we show that our analysis does not solely apply to flat Friedmann models but extends naturally to their marginally open and marginally closed counterparts.

  18. Evaluation of thermal energy storage materials for advanced compressed air energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

    1983-03-01

    Advanced Compressed-Air Energy Storage (ACAS) plants have the near-term potential to reduce the fuel consumption of compressed-air plants from 33 to 100%, depending upon their design. Fuel is saved by storing some or all of the heat of compression as sensible heat which is subsequently used to reheat the compressed air prior to expansion in the turbine generator. The thermal storage media required for this application must be low cost and durable. The objective of this project was to screen thermal store materials based on their thermal cycle durability, particulate formation and corrosion resistant characteristics. The materials investigated were iron oxide pellets, Denstone pebbles, cast-iron balls, and Dresser basalt rock. The study specifically addressed the problems of particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicate that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possibly stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants, and more in-depth longer term thermal cycling and materials testing of Dresser basalt is recommended. Also recommended is the redesign and costing analysis of both the hybrid and adiabatic ACAS facilities based upon the use of Dresser basalt as the thermal store material.

  19. Simulating the universe(s): from cosmic bubble collisions to cosmological observables with numerical relativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wainwright, Carroll L.; Aguirre, Anthony [SCIPP and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (United States); Johnson, Matthew C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, On, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Peiris, Hiranya V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lehner, Luis [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Liebling, Steven L., E-mail: cwainwri@ucsc.edu, E-mail: mjohnson@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: aguirre@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: llehner@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: steve.liebling@liu.edu [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brookville, NY, 11548 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The theory of eternal inflation in an inflaton potential with multiple vacua predicts that our universe is one of many bubble universes nucleating and growing inside an ever-expanding false vacuum. The collision of our bubble with another could provide an important observational signature to test this scenario. We develop and implement an algorithm for accurately computing the cosmological observables arising from bubble collisions directly from the Lagrangian of a single scalar field. We first simulate the collision spacetime by solving Einstein's equations, starting from nucleation and ending at reheating. Taking advantage of the collision's hyperbolic symmetry, the simulations are performed with a 1+1-dimensional fully relativistic code that uses adaptive mesh refinement. We then calculate the comoving curvature perturbation in an open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe, which is used to determine the temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For a fiducial Lagrangian, the anisotropies are well described by a power law in the cosine of the angular distance from the center of the collision signature. For a given form of the Lagrangian, the resulting observational predictions are inherently statistical due to stochastic elements of the bubble nucleation process. Further uncertainties arise due to our imperfect knowledge about inflationary and pre-recombination physics. We characterize observational predictions by computing the probability distributions over four phenomenological parameters which capture these intrinsic and model uncertainties. This represents the first fully-relativistic set of predictions from an ensemble of scalar field models giving rise to eternal inflation, yielding significant differences from previous non-relativistic approximations. Thus, our results provide a basis for a rigorous confrontation of these theories with cosmological data.

  20. Modified natural inflation: A small single field model with a large tensor to scalar ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debaprasad Maity; Pankaj Saha

    2015-01-09

    In this paper we explored in detail a phenomenological model of modified single field natural inflation in light of recent cosmological experiments, BICEP2. Our main goal is to construct an inflationary model which not only predicts the important cosmological quantities such as $(n_s, r)$ compatible with experimental observation, but also is consistent with the low energy effective theory framework. Therefore, all the fundamental scale apart from $M_p$ and quantities of our interest should be within the sub-Planckian region. In order to achieve our goal we modify the usual single field natural inflationary model by a specific form of higher derivative kinetic term called kinetic gravity braiding (KGB). One of our guiding principles to construct such a model is the constant shift symmetry of the axion. We have chosen the form of the KGB term in such a way that it predicts the required value of $n_s\\simeq 0.96$ and a large tensor to scalar ratio $r> 0.1$. Importantly for a wide range of parameter space our model has sub-Planckian axion decay constant $f$ and the scale of inflation $\\Lambda$. However, the reheating after the end of inflation limits the value of $f$ so that we are unable to get $f$ to be significantly lower than $M_p$. Furthermore, we find sub-Planckian field excursion for the axion field $\\Delta \\phi \\simeq f$ for the sufficient number of e-folding ${\\cal N} \\gtrsim 50 $. We also discussed in detail about the natural preheating mechanism in our model based on the recently proposed Chern-Simon coupling. We found this gravity mediated preheating is very difficult to achieve in our model. With our general analytic argument, we also would like to emphasize that Chern-Simons mediated preheating is very unlikely to happen in any slow roll inflationary model.