National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kinetics laser ablation

  1. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  2. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  3. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  4. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  5. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  6. Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis using Short Pulse UV Laser DESCRIPTION: Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass...

  7. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons,applications in analytical chemistry. Matrix independentLaser Ablation in Analytical Chemistry - A Review Richard E.

  8. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Cohen, Timothy; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the newest results of our experimental study of specific impulses and coupling coefficients achieved by double-pulsed ablation of graphite, aluminum, copper and lead targets.

  9. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-03-30

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the experimental technique developed for determination of specific impulses from plasma plume imaging with an intensified CCD camera.

  10. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  11. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  12. Generation of Core/shell Nanoparticles with Laser Ablation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Young Kyong

    2012-10-19

    Two types of core/shell nanoparticles (CS-NPs) generation based on laser ablation are developed in this study, namely, double pulse laser ablation and laser ablation in colloidal solutions. In addition to the study of the generation mechanism of CS...

  13. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  14. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Itina, Tatian E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue Benoit Lauras, Bat. F, 42000, St-Etienne (France)

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  15. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  16. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  17. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  18. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  19. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  20. Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics A thesis presented Laser Ablation of Silicon: Nanoparticles, Doping and Photovoltaics Eric Mazur Brian R. Tull Abstract irradiated surface layer to the grain boundaries. #12;iv Lastly, we measure the photovoltaic properties

  1. Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David R. Leibrandt; Robert J. Clark; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Paul Antohi; Waseem Bakr; Kenneth R. Brown; Isaac L. Chuang

    2007-06-22

    We demonstrate loading by laser ablation of $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 3-5 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Additionally, laser ablation is used to load traps with a trap depth (40 meV) below where electron impact ionization loading is typically successful ($\\gtrsim$ 500 meV).

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta ; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4

    2013-06-07

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  3. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  4. Pulsed Repetition Rate Nanosecond Laser Heating and Ablation of the Tokamak Graphite Tile Deposited Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulsed Repetition Rate Nanosecond Laser Heating and Ablation of the Tokamak Graphite Tile Deposited Layers

  5. RESONANCE LASER ABLATION WITH AN OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATOR LASER AND DETECTION BY A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert G.

    RESONANCE LASER ABLATION WITH AN OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATOR LASER AND DETECTION BY A MICROWAVE, University of Connecticut, 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT, 06269- 3060, U.S.A. Abstract: Laser ablation of solid samples was used for the determination of trace metals by use of either a pulsed excimer laser (20

  6. Laser ablation system, and method of decontaminating surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edelson, Martin C. (Ames, IA); Pang, Ho-ming (Ames, IA)

    1998-07-14

    A laser ablation system comprising a laser head providing a laser output; a flexible fiber optic cable optically coupled to the laser output and transmitting laser light; an output optics assembly including a nozzle through which laser light passes; an exhaust tube in communication with the nozzle; and a blower generating a vacuum on the exhaust tube. A method of decontaminating a surface comprising the following steps: providing an acousto-optic, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light ablation system having a fiber optically coupled output optics assembly; and operating the laser light ablation system to produce an irradiance greater than 1.times.10.sup.7 W/cm.sup.2, and a pulse width between 80 and 170 ns.

  7. Laser ablation of iron: A comparison between femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Tanta University, Tanta ; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4

    2013-08-28

    In this study, a comparison between femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) laser ablation of electrolytic iron was carried out in ambient air. Experiments were conducted using a Ti:sapphire laser that emits radiation at 785 nm and at pulse widths of 110 ps and 130 fs, before and after pulse compression, respectively. Ablation rates were calculated from the depth of craters produced by multiple laser pulses incident normally to the target surface. Optical and scanning electron microscopy showed that picosecond laser pulses create craters that are deeper than those created by the same number of femtosecond laser pulses at the same fluence. Most of the ablated material was ejected from the ablation site in the form of large particles (few microns in size) in the case of picosecond laser ablation, while small particles (few hundred nanometers) were produced in femtosecond laser ablation. Thermal effects were apparent at high fluence in both femtosecond and picosecond laser ablation, but were less prevalent at low fluence, closer to the ablation threshold of the material. The quality of craters produced by femtosecond laser ablation at low fluence is better than those created at high fluence or using picosecond laser pulses.

  8. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  9. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  10. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C. [Center for Laser-Based Manufacturing, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1?ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1?ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  11. Ultrafast laser ablation ICP-MS: role of spot size, laser fluence, and repetition rate in signal intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Ultrafast laser ablation ICP-MS: role of spot size, laser fluence, and repetition rate in signal,a Richard E. Russob and Ahmed Hassaneina Ultrafast laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass system. Though ultrafast laser ablation sample introduction provides better accuracy and precision

  12. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  13. Production efficiency of thin metal flyers formed by laser ablation S. Cogan, E. Shirman, and Y. Haasa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Yehuda

    Production efficiency of thin metal flyers formed by laser ablation S. Cogan, E. Shirman, and Y of these measurements allowed the determination of the flyer's kinetic energy and hence the efficiency of the launching and acceleration efficiencies up to 0.45 were measured under our experimental conditions. The results show

  14. Metal ablation by picosecond laser pulses: A hybrid simulation Carsten Schafer and Herbert M. Urbassek*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    applications, such as in laser modification of surfaces drilling, cutting, surface patterning .1 The emitted, often conventional nanosecond lasers have been used for ablation, it has now become clear that ablation and ab- late. The conventional theoretical approach to laser ablation of metals is based on the so

  15. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  16. Pre-ignition laser ablation of nanocomposite energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacy, S. C.; Massad, R. A.; Pantoya, M. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Laser ignition of energetic material composites was studied for initiation with heating rates from 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K/s. This is a unique heating rate regime for laser ignition studies because most studies employ either continuous wave CO{sub 2} lasers to provide thermal ignition or pulsed Nd:YAG lasers to provide shock ignition. In this study, aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanoparticle powders were pressed into consolidated pellets and ignited using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm wavelength) with varied pulse energy. Results show reduced ignition delay times corresponding to laser powers at the ablation threshold for the sample. Heating rate and absorption coefficient were determined from an axisymmetric heat transfer model. The model estimates absorption coefficients from 0.1 to 0.15 for consolidated pellets of Al + MoO{sub 3} at 1064 nm wavelength. Ablation resulted from fracturing caused by a rapid increase in thermal stress and slowed ignition of the pellet.

  17. Modeling of laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitomer, S.; Jones, R.D.; Howsare, C.

    1989-01-01

    The large-scale radiation-hydrodynamics computer code LASNEX, has been used to model experimental results in the laser ablation and fragmentation of renal and biliary calculi. Recent experiments have demonstrated laser ablation and fragmentation of human calculi in vitro and in vivo. In the interaction, laser light incident upon the calculus is of sufficient intensity to produce a plasma (a hot ionized gas). The physical picture which emerges is as follows. The plasma couples to acoustic and shear waves which then propagate through the dense stone material, causing spall and fracture by reflection from material discontinuities or boundaries. Experiments have thus far yielded data on the interaction against which models can be tested. Data on the following have been published: (1) light emission, (2) absorption and emission spectra, (3) fragmentation efficiency, (4) cavitation bubble dynamics and (5) mass removal. We have performed one dimensional simulations of the laser-matter interaction to elucidate the important physical mechanisms. We find that good quantitative fits between simulation and experiment are obtained for visible light emission, electron temperature, electron density, plasma pressure and cavitation bubble growth. With regard to mass removal, experiment and simulation are consistent with each other and give an excellent estimate of the ablation threshold. The modeling indicates that a very small ablation layer at the surface of the calculus is responsible for significant mass loss by fragmentation within the bulk of the calculus. With such quantitative fits in hand, we believe this type of modeling can now be applied to the study of other procedures involving plasma formation of interest to the medical community. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Dinescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.

    2013-11-13

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO{sub 2} target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (?=193 nm, ?=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm{sup ?2}. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  19. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, In vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

    2011-11-29

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation (LA) with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  20. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2012-10-30

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  1. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  2. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  3. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2014-08-19

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  4. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

    2011-06-21

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  5. Femtosecond laser plasma plume characteristics in the nanojoule ablation regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, S. P.; Chen, Zhijiang; Fedosejevs, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2V4 (Canada)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2V4 (Canada)

    2013-05-14

    Laser ablation of chromium with nanojoule energy UV femtosecond pulses under background pressure conditions between 0.3 Torr and 700 Torr is studied and the corresponding plasma plume images at different times after irradiation are measured. The ablation focal spot is less than or the order of a micron when 170 nJ of laser pulse energy is used. This low pulse energy leads to short lifetimes of the plasma of the order of tens of nanoseconds. The plume shape changes with ambient pressure due to the collision with background gas. An axially stretched plume changes to a more circular plume as the pressure increases. In addition, a separation of the ionic and atomic components is observed at lower pressure. These two components move at significantly different velocities as well. The plasma plume expands at almost constant velocity at very low pressure but exhibits significant deceleration at higher pressure reaching an asymptotic stopping distance. Plume images are also obtained near the ablation threshold pulse energy. The plume characteristics are compared to different models of plume expansion.

  6. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  7. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  8. Multidiagnostic analysis of ultrafast laser ablation of metals with pulse pair irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Wang, X. [CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); O'Connell, G.; Lunney, J. G. [School of Physics, Trinity College-Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-12-01

    Copper targets are irradiated in the ablation regime by pairs of equal, time-delayed collinear laser pulses separated on a timescale going from {approx_equal}2 ps to {approx_equal}2 ns. The ablation plume is characterized by ion probe diagnostic, fast imaging, and temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The variation in the ablation efficiency with the delay between the pulses is analyzed by measuring the ablation crater profile with a contact profilometer. The second laser pulse modifies the characteristics of the plasma plume produced by the first pulse and the ablation efficiency. The different mechanisms involved in double pulse ultrafast laser ablation are identified and discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in the frame of a simple model of the interaction of the second pulse with the nascent ablation plume produced by the first pulse. This model yields consistent and quantitative agreement with the experimental findings predicting the observed experimental trends of the ablation depth reduction and ion yield increase with the delay between the pulses, as well as the characteristic timescale of the observed changes. The possibility of controlling the characteristics of the plumes produced during ultrafast laser ablation via an efficient coupling of the energy of the second pulse to the various ablation components produced by the first pulse is of particular interest in ultrafast pulsed laser deposition and microprobe analyses of materials.

  9. Characterization of hydrocarbon and mixed layers in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesen, Thomas

    Characterization of hydrocarbon and mixed layers in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy) 014026 (4pp) doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2011/T145/014026 Characterization of hydrocarbon and mixed layers systematic laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) measurements carried out on various surface layers

  10. MICROANALYSIS OF SIDEROPHILE ELEMENTS IN FREMDLINGE USING LASER ABLATION ICP-MS. A. J. Campbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Os ra- tios measured by neutron activation analysis, suggest that Fremdlinge within a single CAI may vein in Allende (CV3-oxidized). Experimental: The laser ablation system utilized a CETAC LSX-200 laser ablation peripheral with a Fin- nigan MAT Element ICP mass spectrometer [4, 5]. The isotopes monitored were

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of indium tin-oxide narrow grooves for thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Femtosecond laser ablation of indium tin-oxide narrow grooves for thin film solar cells Qiumei Bian in the fabrication and assembly of thin film solar cells. Using a femtosecond (fs) laser, we selectively removed a unique scheme to ablate the indium tin-oxide layer for the fabrication of thin film solar cells

  12. Process and structures for fabrication of solar cells with laser ablation steps to form contact holes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-11-19

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accomodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thickness.

  13. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong; State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710054

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  15. Ablation driven by hot electrons generated during the ignitor laser pulse in shock ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piriz, A. R.; Rodriguez Prieto, G. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Zhang, Y. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 Dalian (China); Liu, S. D.; Zhao, Y. T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 730000 Lanzhou (China)

    2012-12-15

    An analytical model for the ablation driven by hot electrons is presented. The hot electrons are assumed to be generated during the high intensity laser spike used to produce the ignitor shock wave in the shock ignition driven inertial fusion concept, and to carry on the absorbed laser energy in its totality. Efficient energy coupling requires to keep the critical surface sufficiently close to the ablation front and this goal can be achieved for high laser intensities provided that the laser wavelength is short enough. Scaling laws for the ablation pressure and the other relevant magnitudes of the ablation cloud are found in terms of the laser and target parameters. The effect of the preformed plasma assembled by the compression pulse, previous to the ignitor, is also discussed. It is found that a minimum ratio between the compression and the ignitor pulses would be necessary for the adequate matching of the corresponding scale lengths.

  16. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  17. A Low Diffraction Laser Beam as Applied to Polymer Ablation Xuanhui Lu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    ] and UV [8] beams is a well established process. Factors of laser beams likely to affect drilling-diffraction beam to ablation-dominated drilling and grooving processes involving polymer material and its

  18. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets ofWhen the current data on glass were compared with the metal

  19. Toward Single-Cell Analysis by Plume Collimation in Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    is used to deliver laser energy to a sample in laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass with the electrospray plume resulting in increased ionization efficiency, reduced limit of detection (by a factor of 13-cell level.4 New cell isolation methods, such as laser capture microdissection, are being developed

  20. Invited Paper 505 In High-Power Laser Ablation V, Claude R. Phipps, Editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Invited Paper 505 In High-Power Laser Ablation V, Claude R. Phipps, Editor Proceedings of SPIE, Vol. 5448 (2004) Computer modeling of laser melting and spallation of metal targets Leonid V. Zhigilei in short pulse laser processing are investigated in a computational study performed with a hybrid atomistic

  1. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: Validation and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Luo Shengnian; Greenfield, Scott R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.

    2008-02-15

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4{+-}1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples.

  2. Treatment planning for prostate focal laser ablation in the face of needle placement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cepek, Jeremy Fenster, Aaron; Lindner, Uri; Trachtenberg, John; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Haider, Masoom A.; Ghai, Sangeet

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of needle placement uncertainty on the expected probability of achieving complete focal target destruction in focal laser ablation (FLA) of prostate cancer. Methods: Using a simplified model of prostate cancer focal target, and focal laser ablation region shapes, Monte Carlo simulations of needle placement error were performed to estimate the probability of completely ablating a region of target tissue. Results: Graphs of the probability of complete focal target ablation are presented over clinically relevant ranges of focal target sizes and shapes, ablation region sizes, and levels of needle placement uncertainty. In addition, a table is provided for estimating the maximum target size that is treatable. The results predict that targets whose length is at least 5 mm smaller than the diameter of each ablation region can be confidently ablated using, at most, four laser fibers if the standard deviation in each component of needle placement error is less than 3 mm. However, targets larger than this (i.e., near to or exceeding the diameter of each ablation region) require more careful planning. This process is facilitated by using the table provided. Conclusions: The probability of completely ablating a focal target using FLA is sensitive to the level of needle placement uncertainty, especially as the target length approaches and becomes greater than the diameter of ablated tissue that each individual laser fiber can achieve. The results of this work can be used to help determine individual patient eligibility for prostate FLA, to guide the planning of prostate FLA, and to quantify the clinical benefit of using advanced systems for accurate needle delivery for this treatment modality.

  3. On the role of chemical reactions in initiating ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-05-15

    The role of chemical reactions is investigated versus the thermal and mechanical processes occurring in a polymer substrate during irradiation by a laser pulse and subsequent ablation. Molecular dynamics simulations with an embedded Monte Carlo based reaction scheme were used to study ultraviolet ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) at 157 nm. We discuss the onset of ablation, the mechanisms leading to ablation, and the role of stress relaxation of the polymer matrix during ablation. Laser induced heating and chemical decomposition of the polymer substrate are considered as ablation pathways. It is shown that heating the substrate can set off ablation via mechanical failure of the material only for very short laser pulses. For longer pulses, the mechanism of ejection is thermally driven limited by the critical number of bonds broken in the substrate. Alternatively, if the photon energy goes towards direct bond breaking, it initiates chemical reactions, polymer unzipping, and formation of gaseous products, leading to a nearly complete decomposition of the top layers of substrates. The ejection of small molecules has a hollowing out effect on the weakly connected substrates which can lead to lift-off of larger chunks. Excessive pressure buildup upon the creation of gaseous molecules does not lead to enhanced yield. The larger clusters are thermally ejected, and an entrainment of larger polymer fragments in gaseous molecules is not observed.

  4. Dynamics of femto-and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (

  5. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN, UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A. [CNR-SPIN, UOS Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Wang, X.; Paparo, D. [CNR-SPIN, UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N=1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2ablated area is gradually decorated by nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (2001000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  6. Enhancement of muonium emission rate from silica aerogel with a laser ablated surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beer, G A; Hirota, S; Ishida, K; Iwasaki, M; Kanda, S; Kawai, H; Kawamura, N; Kitamura, R; Lee, S; Marshall, W Lee G M; Mibe, T; Miyake, Y; Okada, S; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Oishi, Y; Onishi, H; Otani, M; Saito, N; Shimomura, K; Strasser, P; Tabata, M; Tomono, D; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Won, E

    2014-01-01

    Emission of muonium ($\\mu^+e^-$) atoms from a laser-processed aerogel surface into vacuum was studied for the first time. Laser ablation was used to create hole-like regions with diameter of about 270$~\\mu$m in a triangular pattern with hole separation in the range of 300--500$~\\mu$m. The emission probability for the laser-processed aerogel sample is at least eight times higher than for a uniform one.

  7. Enhancement of muonium emission rate from silica aerogel with a laser ablated surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Beer; Y. Fujiwara; S. Hirota; K. Ishida; M. Iwasaki; S. Kanda; H. Kawai; N. Kawamura; R. Kitamura; S. Lee; W. Lee G. M. Marshall; T. Mibe; Y. Miyake; S. Okada; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; Y. Oishi; H. Onishi; M. Otani; N. Saito; K. Shimomura; P. Strasser; M. Tabata; D. Tomono; K. Ueno; K. Yokoyama; E. Won

    2014-07-31

    Emission of muonium ($\\mu^+e^-$) atoms from a laser-processed aerogel surface into vacuum was studied for the first time. Laser ablation was used to create hole-like regions with diameter of about 270$~\\mu$m in a triangular pattern with hole separation in the range of 300--500$~\\mu$m. The emission probability for the laser-processed aerogel sample is at least eight times higher than for a uniform one.

  8. Dense strongly coupled plasma in double laser pulse ablation of lithium: Experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Ajai; Sivakumaran, V.; Ganesh, R.; Joshi, H. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Ashwin, J. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot - 76100 (Israel)] [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot - 76100 (Israel)

    2013-08-15

    In a simple method of low power nano-second double pulsed laser ablation experiment in collinear geometry, formation of high density strongly coupled plasma is demonstrated. Using time-resolved measurements of the Stark broadened line width and line intensity ratio of the emission lines, the density and temperature of the plasma were estimated respectively. In this experiment, it is shown that ions are strongly coupled (ion-ion coupling parameter comes out to be >4). For comparison, both single and double pulsed laser ablations are presented. For the estimated experimental plasma parameters, first principle Langevin dynamics simulation corroborates the existence of a strongly coupled regime.

  9. IR-Laser Welding and Ablation of Biotissue Stained with Metal Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lalayan, A A

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biological tissue by the using of spherical metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation which spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. YAG:Nd laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 8 ns pulse duration, and operating in transverse electromagnetic modes TEM$_{00}$ was used for the synthesis of metal NPs. The Au,Ti Ni and Cu as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal NPs were formed in the liquid medium. Effectiveness of laser ablation in the case of the biotissue sample that stained with the metal NPs was approximately on 4-5 times larger than for the native sample. Also the scheme of a laser point welding for the deep-located biotissue layer selectively stained by the metal NPs has been demonstrated.

  10. New Combined Laser Ablation Platform Determines Cell Wall Chemistry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation/pulsed sample introduction/mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis and/or laser ablation with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Using this apparatus, we can measure the cell wall chemical composition of untreated biomass materials. Understanding the chemical composition of untreated biomass is key to both the biochemical and thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels. In the biochemical conversion process, the new technique provides a better understanding of the chemistry of lignin and will improve accessibility to plant sugars. In thermochemical conversion, the information provided by the new technique may help to reduce the formation of unwanted byproducts during gasification. NREL validated the ability of the system to detect pyrolysis products from plant materials using poplar, a potentially high-impact bioenergy feedstock. In the technique, biomass vapors are produced by laser ablation using the 3rd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (355 nm). The resulting vapors are entrained in a free jet expansion of helium, then skimmed and introduced into an ionization region. REMPI is used to ionize the vapors because it is highly sensitive for detecting lignin and aromatic metabolites. The laser ablation method was used to selectively volatilize specific plant tissues and detect lignin-based products from the vapors with enhanced sensitivity. This will allow the determination of lignin distribution in future biomass studies.

  11. Near-critical phase explosion promoting breakdown plasma ignition during laser ablation of graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Seleznev, L. V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    Removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure parameters were measured as a function of laser intensity I{sub peak} during nanosecond laser ablation of graphite. Surface vaporization of molten graphite at low intensities I{sub peak}<0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} was observed to transform into its near-critical phase explosion (intense homogeneous boiling) at the threshold intensity I{sub PE}approx =0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} in the form of a drastic, correlated rise of removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure magnitudes. Just above this threshold (I{sub peak}>=0.25 GW/cm{sup 2}), the explosive mass removal ended up with saturation of the removal rate, much slower increase of the air and recoil pressure magnitudes, and appearance of a visible surface plasma spark. In this regime, the measured far-field air shock pressure amplitude exhibits a sublinear dependence on laser intensity (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 4/9}), while the source plasma shock pressure demonstrates a sublinear trend (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), both indicating the subcritical character of the plasma. Against expectations, in this regime the plasma recoil pressure increases versus I{sub peak} superlinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 1.1}), rather than sublinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), with the mentioned difference related to the intensity-dependent initial spatial plasma dimensions within the laser waist on the graphite surface and to the plasma formation time during the heating laser pulse (overall, the pressure source effect). The strict coincidence of the phase explosion, providing high (kbar) hydrodynamic pressures of ablation products, and the ignition of ablative laser plasma in the carbon plume may indicate the ablative pressure-dependent character of the underlying optical breakdown at the high plume pressures, initiating the plasma formation. The experimental data evidence that the spatiotemporal extension of the plasma in the laser plume and ambient air during the heating laser pulse is supported by fast lateral electron and radiative heat conduction (laser-supported combustion wave regime), rather than by propagation of a strong shock wave (laser-supported detonation wave regime).

  12. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  13. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  14. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B. E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir; Afarideh, H. E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Ghergherehchi, M.

    2015-03-07

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (??=?193?nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193?nm) at a repetition rate of 1?Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230?nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  15. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-08-18

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 {micro}g L{sup -1} or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 {micro}L injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  16. Morphological changes in ultrafast laser ablation plumes with varying spot size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Polek, M. P.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-04

    We investigated the role of spot size on plume morphology during ultrafast laser ablation of metal targets. Our results show that the spatial features of fs LA plumes are strongly dependent on the focal spot size. Two-dimensional self-emission images showed that the shape of the ultrafast laser ablation plumes changes from spherical to cylindrical with an increasing spot size from 100 to 600 ?m. The changes in plume morphology and internal structures are related to ion emission dynamics from the plasma, where broader angular ion distribution and faster ions are noticed for the smallest spot size used. The present resultsmore »clearly show that the morphological changes in the plume with spot size are independent of laser pulse width.« less

  17. On the possibility of controlling laser ablation by tightly focused femtosecond radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alferov, S V; Karpeev, S V; Khonina, S N; Tukmakov, K N; Moiseev, O Yu [Image Processing Systems Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Samara (Russian Federation); Shulyapov, S A; Ivanov, K A; Savel'ev-Trofimov, A B [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    We report the results of studies on the possibilities of controlling laser ablation by changing the polarisation state and the intensity distribution in the focal plane of the beams of high-power femtosecond radiation by means of beam diaphragming and controllable phase modulation using binary-phase plates. The latter provides the adjustment of correlation between the electric field components in the focus area. Based on the results of numerical modelling of the distribution of the electric field components in the focus area, an explanation of the mechanism of formation of the unusually shaped craters is given. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Growth of diamond nanocrystals by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in liquid , P.W. May a,, L. Yin b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Diamond; Pulsed laser ablation; Nanoparticles; Nanodiamond 1 materials to be created [4,5]. The conditions inside the bubbles are similar to the cavitation bubbles

  20. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    , pharmaceuticals, radioactive waste analysis, and material dating, to name a few.5­10 One of the main problems or sample composition,11 ablation crater aspect ratio (depth to width), laser beam properties, transport

  1. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  2. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  3. Surface chemical reaction of laser ablated aluminum sample for detonation initiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Chang-hwan; Yoh, Jack J. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanakro, Kwanakgu, Seoul, Korea 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-01

    We explore the evolution of metal plasma generated by high laser irradiances and its effect on the surrounding air by using shadowgraph images after laser pulse termination; hence the formation of laser supported detonation and combustion processes has been investigated. The essence of the paper is in observing initiation of chemical reaction between ablated aluminum plasma and oxygen from air by inducing high power laser pulse (>1000 mJ/pulse) and conduct a quantitative comparison of chemically reactive laser initiated waves with the classical detonation of exploding aluminum (dust) cloud in air. Findings in this work may lead to a new method of initiating detonation from metal sample in its bulk form without the need of mixing nano-particles with oxygen for initiation.

  4. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8?nm and 610.3?nm), and ionic (548.4?nm and 478.8?nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  5. Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  6. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, Saim Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  7. Copyright c 2002 Tech Science Press CMES, vol.3, no.5, pp.539-555, 2002 Multiscale Modeling of Laser Ablation: Applications to Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    of Laser Ablation: Applications to Nanotechnology Leonid V. Zhigilei1 and Avinash M. Dongare 1 Abstract-driven methods in nanotechnology. In this pa- per we discuss two computational schemes developed for simulation, applications of laser ablation have been extended into emerging area of nanotechnology. In particular, laser

  8. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Ding, H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2013-07-15

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 1–5 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  9. Low work function surface layers produced by laser ablation using short-wavelength photons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Short-wavelength photons are used to ablate material from a low work function target onto a suitable substrate. The short-wavelength photons are at or below visible wavelength. The elemental composition of the deposit is controlled by the composition of the target and the gaseous environment in which the ablation process is performed. The process is carried out in a deposition chamber to which a short-wavelength laser is mounted and which includes a substrate holder which can be rotated, tilted, heated, or cooled. The target material is mounted onto a holder that spins the target during laser ablation. In addition, the deposition chamber is provided with a vacuum pump, an external gas supply with atomizer and radical generator, a gas generator for producing a flow of molecules on the substrate, and a substrate cleaning device, such as an ion gun. The substrate can be rotated and tilted, for example, whereby only the tip of an emitter can be coated with a low work function material.

  10. Novel Technique for the CO2 Laser Fabrication of Optical Devices with Sub-Micrometer Ablation Depth Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a strong wavelength and temperature dependence 5 . In this work a 100 W, pulse width modulated (PWM), CO2Novel Technique for the CO2 Laser Fabrication of Optical Devices with Sub-Micrometer Ablation Depth techniques for the processing of fibre end face and cladding surfaces using a 9.6 µm CO2 laser. We

  11. Dynamics of femtosecond laser absorption of fused silica in the ablation regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebugle, M., E-mail: lebugle@lp3.univ-mrs.fr; Sanner, N.; Varkentina, N.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the ultrafast absorption dynamics of fused silica irradiated by a single 500?fs laser pulse in the context of micromachining applications. A 60-fs-resolution pump-probe experiment that measures the reflectivity and transmissivity of the target under excitation is developed to reveal the evolution of plasma absorption. Above the ablation threshold, an overcritical plasma with highly non-equilibrium conditions is evidenced in a thin layer at the surface. The maximum electron density is reached at a delay of 0.5?ps after the peak of the pump pulse, which is a strong indication of the occurrence of electronic avalanche. The results are further analyzed to determine the actual feedback of the evolution of the optical properties of the material on the pump pulse. We introduce an important new quantity, namely, the duration of absorption of the laser by the created plasma, corresponding to the actual timespan of laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung. Our results indicate an increasing contribution of plasma absorption to the total material absorption upon raising the excitation fluence above the ablation threshold. The role of transient optical properties during the energy deposition stage is characterized and our results emphasize the necessity to take it into account for better understanding and control of femtosecond laser-dielectrics interaction.

  12. Optimization of La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} complex oxide laser ablation conditions by plume imaging and optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Scotti di Uccio, U.; Aruta, C.; Granozio, F. Miletto; Wang, X.; Maccariello, D.; Maritato, L.; Orgiani, P.

    2010-08-15

    The properties of thin films of complex oxides, such as La{sub 1-x}D{sub x}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} (D=Ba, Ca, Sr, etc.), produced by pulsed laser deposition depend critically on the experimental parameters in which laser ablation is carried out. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the pulsed laser ablation process of La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3-{delta}}, in oxygen background, in the ambient pressure range from 10{sup -2} to 1 mbar, typically employed in pulsed laser deposition of manganites. The laser ablation plume was studied by using time-gated imaging and optical emission spectroscopy techniques. It was found that at a pressure of {approx_equal}10{sup -2} mbar, the plume species arriving at the substrate are characterized by hyperthermal kinetic energy ({approx_equal}10 eV), and high degree of excitation. On the contrary, at larger oxygen pressure (0.1-1 mbar), the velocity of plume species reaching the substrate, and their degree of excitation are much reduced by the confining effects of the background gas. These features explain why an appropriate choice of the experimental conditions in which the deposition process is carried out leads to better quality films, providing helpful indications to improve control over the growth process of both La{sub 1-x}D{sub x}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} and other perovskitic oxides.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation-based mass spectrometry. An ideal tool for stoichiometric analysis of thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LaHaye, Nicole L.; Kurian, Jose; Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Alff, Lambert; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-08-19

    An accurate and routinely available method for stoichiometric analysis of thin films is a desideratum of modern materials science where a material’s properties depend sensitively on elemental composition. We thoroughly investigated femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (fs-LA-ICP-MS) as an analytical technique for determination of the stoichiometry of thin films down to the nanometer scale. The use of femtosecond laser ablation allows for precise removal of material with high spatial and depth resolution that can be coupled to an ICP-MS to obtain elemental and isotopic information. We used molecular beam epitaxy-grown thin films of LaPd(x)Sb2 and T´-La2CuO4 to demonstrate themore »capacity of fs-LA-ICP-MS for stoichiometric analysis and the spatial and depth resolution of the technique. Here we demonstrate that the stoichiometric information of thin films with a thickness of ~10 nm or lower can be determined. Furthermore, our results indicate that fs-LA-ICP-MS provides precise information on the thin film-substrate interface and is able to detect the interdiffusion of cations.« less

  14. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

  15. Addition and recombination reactions of unsaturated radicals using a novel laser kinetics spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismail, Huzeifa

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the construction of a novel, low-noise laser kinetics spectrometer. A quasi-CW (picosecond pulse), tunable Ti:Sapphire laser is used to detect various transient species in laser flash photolysis ...

  16. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  17. IR laser ablative desulfurization of poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) Sardar M.A. Durani a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    IR laser ablative desulfurization of poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) Sardar M.A. Durani a , Ehsan E,* a Center for Applied Physical Sciences, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals similar to those in PPS. The PLAD of PPS thus represents a unique example of the desulfurization of S

  18. Absorption of a single 500 fs laser pulse at the surface of fused silica: Energy balance and ablation efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varkentina, N.; Sanner, N.; Lebugle, M.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)] [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LP3 UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille (France)

    2013-11-07

    Ablation of fused silica by a single femtosecond laser pulse of 500 fs pulse duration is investigated from the perspective of efficiency of incident photons to remove matter. We measure the reflected and transmitted fractions of the incident pulse energy as a function of fluence, allowing us to recover the evolution of absorption at the material surface. At the ablation threshold fluence, 25% of incident energy is absorbed. At high fluences, this ratio saturates around 70% due to the appearance of a self-triggered plasma mirror (or shielding) effect. By using the energy balance retrieved experimentally and measurements of the ablated volume, we show that the amount of absorbed energy is far above the bonding energy of fused silica at rest and also above the energy barrier to ablate the material under non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions. Our results emphasize the crucial role of transient plasma properties during the laser pulse and suggest that the major part of the absorbed energy has been used to heat the plasma formed at the surface of the material. A fluence range yielding an efficient and high quality ablation is also defined, which makes the results relevant for femtosecond micromachining processes.

  19. CO{sub 2} laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O'Sullivan, G.; O'Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2012-03-15

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to {approx}2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO{sub 2} pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is {approx}10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  20. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es; Siegel, Jan, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  1. Laser-ablation sampling for inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-DOFMS) has been coupled with laser-ablation (LA) sample introduction for the elemental analysis of solids. ICP-DOFMS is well suited for the analysis of laser-generated aerosols because it offers both high-speed mass analysis and simultaneous multi-elemental detection. Here, we evaluate the analytical performance of the LA-ICP-DOFMS instrument, equipped with a microchannel plate-based imaging detector, for the measurement of steady-state LA signals, as well as transient signals produced from single LA events. Steady-state detection limits are 1 mg g1, and absolute single-pulse LA detection limits are 200 fg for uranium; the system is shown capable of performing time-resolved single-pulse LA analysis. By leveraging the benefits of simultaneous multi-elemental detection, we also attain a good shot-to-shot reproducibility of 6% relative standard deviation (RSD) and isotope-ratio precision of 0.3% RSD with a 10 s integration time.

  2. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1?atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1?atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  3. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Dual Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2009-07-01

    The rapid global expansion of nuclear energy is motivating the expedited development of new safeguards technology to mitigate potential proliferation threats arising from monitoring gaps within the uranium enrichment process. Current onsite enrichment level monitoring methods are limited by poor sensitivity and accuracy performance. Offsite analysis has better performance, but this approach requires onsite hand sampling followed by time-consuming and costly post analysis. These limitations make it extremely difficult to implement comprehensive safeguards accounting measures that can effectively counter enrichment facility misuse. In addition, uranium enrichment by modern centrifugation leads to a significant proliferation threat, since the centrifuge cascades can quickly produce a significant quantity of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an engineered safeguards approach having continuous aerosol particulate collection and uranium isotope analysis to provide timely detection of HEU production in a low enriched uranium facility. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy, to characterize the 235U/238U isotopic ratio by subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths arising from differences in each isotope’s nuclear mass, volume, and spin (hyperfine structure for 235U). Environmental sampling media is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes a 10 to 20-µm sample diameter. The ejected plasma forms a plume of atomic vapor. A plume for a sample containing uranium has atoms of the 235U and 238U isotopes present. Tunable diode lasers are directed through the plume to selectively excite each isotope and their presence is detected by monitoring absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. Single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and abundance uncertainty less than 10% have been demonstrated with measurements on surrogate materials. In this paper we present measurement results on samples containing background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils) laced with micron-sized target particles having isotopic ratios ranging from 1 to 50%.

  4. A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

    2012-05-01

    Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

  5. Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica extracted from oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2014-03-14

    Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica is examined via time-resolved reflectivity measurements. After optical breakdown was caused by irradiation of a pump pulse with fluence F{sub pump}?=?3.3–14.9?J/cm{sup 2}, the reflectivity oscillated with a period of 63?±?2 ps for a wavelength ??=?795?nm. The period was reduced by half for ??=?398?nm. We ascribe the oscillation to the interference between the probe pulses reflected from the front and rear surfaces of the photo-excited molten fused silica layer. The time-resolved reflectivity agrees closely with a model comprising a photo-excited layer which expands due to the formation of voids, and then separates into two parts, one of which is left on the sample surface and the other separated as a molten thin layer from the surface by the spallation mechanism. Such oscillations were not observed in the reflectivity of soda-lime glass. Whether the reflectivity oscillates or not probably depends on the layer viscosity while in a molten state. Since viscosity of the molten fused silica is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the soda-lime glass at the same temperature, fused silica forms a molten thin layer that reflects the probe pulse, whereas the soda-lime glass is fragmented into clusters.

  6. Isotopic Analysis of Uranium in NIST SRM Glass by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Hart, Garret L.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2013-05-19

    We employed femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry for the 11 determination of uranium isotope ratios in a series of standard reference material glasses (NIST 610, 612, 614, and 12 616). This uranium concentration in this series of SRM glasses is a combination of isotopically natural uranium in 13 the materials used to make the glass matrix and isotopically depleted uranium added to increase the uranium 14 elemental concentration across the series. Results for NIST 610 are in excellent agreement with literature values. 15 However, other than atom percent 235U, little information is available for the remaining glasses. We present atom 16 percent and isotope ratios for 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U for all four glasses. Our results show deviations from the 17 certificate values for the atom percent 235U, indicating the need for further examination of the uranium isotopes in 18 NIST 610-616. Our results are fully consistent with a two isotopic component mixing between the depleted 19 uranium spike and natural uranium in the bulk glass.

  7. Near-field thermal radiative transfer and thermoacoustic effects from vapor plumes produced by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser ablation of bulk water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, S. D.

    2006-12-15

    Submillimeter deep heating of bulk water by thermal radiation from ablative water plumes produced by a 10.6 {mu}m transversely excited atmospheric CO{sub 2} laser and the related acoustic generation has been studied using a contact time-resolved photoacoustic technique. Effective penetration depths of thermal radiation in water were measured as a function of incident laser fluence and the corresponding plume temperatures were estimated. The near-field thermal and thermoacoustic effects of thermal radiation in laser-ablated bulk water and their potential near-field implications are discussed.

  8. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-08-19

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  9. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Liu, Jianping; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kwon, Min-Ki; Dupuis, Russell D.; Das, Suman; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2014-04-07

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500?nm, depth of 50?nm, and a periodicity of 1??m were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  10. Developing the model of laser ablation by considering the interplay between emission and expansion of aluminum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, F.; Tavassoli, S. H. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, ShahidBeheshti University, 19396 4716, G. C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, the ablation behavior of aluminum target and its plasma radiation in noble ambient gases by a laser pulse with wavelength of 266 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns are numerically studied. A thermal model of laser ablation considering heat conduction, Euler equations, Saha-Eggert equations, Knudsen layer, mass and energy balance relations and optical shielding effects are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Effects of excitation energy on plasma expansion and its emissivity are investigated. Time and spatial-resolved plasma emission including bremsstrahlung, recombination and spectral emission at early delay times after laser irradiation is obtained. Effects of two ambient gases (He and Ar) as well as different gas pressures of 100, 300, 500, and 760 Torr on plasma expansion and its spectrum are studied. Results illustrate that at initial delay times, especially at high noble gas pressures, ionic lines have the maximum intensities, while at later times neutral lines dominate. When the pressure of ambient gas increases, a confinement of the plasma plume is predicted and the intensity of neutral lines decreases. Continuous emission increases with wavelength in both ambient gases. Spatially resolved analysis shows that an intense continuous emission is predicted next to the sample surface decreasing with distance from the latter.

  11. Investigation of the effect of water content, thickness and optical properties on laser ablation of biological tissue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidyanathan, Varadarajan

    1991-01-01

    studied as p. m/pulse showed an exponential decrease with increasing thickness as did the mass removed/pulse. The front diameter showed an increase with increasing thickness. The effect of increasing repetition rate on the energy output of the Er...:YAG laser was studied. The energy/pulse due to single pulse as well as multiple pulses was monitored. The energy/ pulse showed an increase with increasing repetition rate for both cases with a tendency to saturate. The effect of beamwidth on ablation rate...

  12. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Laser Absorption Spectrometry: Automated Environmental Sampling and Laser-Based Analysis for HEU Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear power, and consequently the uranium enrichment industry, requires the development of new safeguards technology to mitigate proliferation risks. Current enrichment monitoring instruments exist that provide only yes/no detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) production. More accurate accountancy measurements are typically restricted to gamma-ray and weight measurements taken in cylinder storage yards. Analysis of environmental and cylinder content samples have much higher effectiveness, but this approach requires onsite sampling, shipping, and time-consuming laboratory analysis and reporting. Given that large modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) can quickly produce a significant quantity (SQ ) of HEU, these limitations in verification suggest the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended safeguards instrument concept, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely analysis of enrichment levels within low enriched uranium facilities. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy to characterize the uranium isotopic ratio through subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths. Environmental sampling (ES) media from an integrated aerosol collector is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes material from a 10 to 20-µm diameter spot of the surface of the sampling media. The plume of ejected material begins as high-temperature plasma that yields ions and atoms, as well as molecules and molecular ions. We concentrate on the plume of atomic vapor that remains after the plasma has expanded and then cooled by the surrounding cover gas. Tunable diode lasers are directed through this plume and each isotope is detected by monitoring absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. The media is translated by a micron resolution scanning system, allowing the isotope analysis to cover the entire sample surface. We also report, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of laser-based isotopic measurements on individual micron-sized particles that are minor target components in a much larger heterogeneous mix of ‘background’ particles. This composition is consistent with swipe and environmental aerosol samples typically collected for safeguards ES purposes. Single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope abundance uncertainty better than 10% has been demonstrated using gadolinium isotopes as surrogate materials.

  13. Emission features of femtosecond laser ablated carbon plasma in ambient K. F. Al-Shboul, S. S. Harilal, and A. Hassanein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Emission features of femtosecond laser ablated carbon plasma in ambient helium K. F. Al-Shboul, S 2013; published online 30 April 2013) We investigated the optical emission features of plasmas produced emission spectroscopy, and temporally spatially resolved optical time of flight emission spectroscopy were

  14. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin, E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, No. 3 South Section 3, Circle Road 2, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ?20 nm in depth and ?500 ?m or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  15. PROOF COPY 019605JAP Effect of pulsing parameters on laser ablative cleaning of copper oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    Engineering, Columbia University, 220 Mudd Building, MC 4703, New York, New York 10027 Received 29 June 2005 stimulated researchers to seek alternative cleaning methods. Laser cleaning using short pulsed laser, such as silicon dioxide, the acoustic pulse induced by the absorp- tion of the laser energy at the substrate

  16. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  17. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  18. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Rui Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be potentially employed to undertake in situ analysis of materials imbedded in diverse media, such as cryogenic ices, biological samples, tissues, minerals, etc., by covered with an IR-absorbing laser ablation medium and study the chemical composition and reaction pathways of the analyte in its natural surroundings.

  19. Investigation of optical limiting properties of Aluminium nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation in different carrier media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Jyothi, L.; Narayana Rao, D.; Prakash, P.; Mayank Shekhar, S.; Durga Prasad, M.

    2013-12-28

    In this communication, we carried out the systematic investigation of nonlinear absorption and scattering properties of Aluminium nanoparticles (Al NPs) in various polar and non-polar solvents. Al NPs were synthesized with pulsed Nd:YAG laser operated at 1064 nm by ablating Al target in polar and non-polar liquid environment like chloroform, chlorobenzene, toluene, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride. Synthesized Al NPs colloids of various solvents differ in appearance and UV-Vis extinction spectra exhibit absorption in the UV region. The characterization of Al NPs performed by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that NPs are made up of a well crystallized Al inner part (bright zone) embedded with an amorphous metal Al shell (dark region). Growth, aggregation, and precipitation mechanisms which influence the optical properties and stability of NPs are found to be related to the dipole moment of the surrounding liquid environment. The nonlinear absorption and scattering studies are performed by open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm under nanosecond pulse excitation. The Z-scan measurements are fitted theoretically to estimate both two-photon absorption (TPA) and nonlinear scattering (NLS) coefficients. In polar solvents like chlorobenzene, chloroform synthesized Al NPs exhibited higher TPA, NLS coefficient values, and lower optical limiting threshold values in comparison with partially polar solvent like toluene and non-polar solvents like benzene and carbontetrachloride. These results indicate the potential use of Al NPs as a versatile optical limiting material.

  20. Nanostructured europium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in a He buffer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luna, H.; Franceschini, D. F.; Prioli, R.; Guimaraes, R. B.; Sanchez, C. M.; Canal, G. P.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Galvao, R. M. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ 24210-346 (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente 225, 22453-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ 24210-346 (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Laboratorio de Plasmas Aplicados, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66328, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Laboratorio de Plasmas Aplicados, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-09-15

    Nanostrucured europium oxide and hydroxide films were obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser ablation of a europium metallic target, in the presence of a 1 mbar helium buffer atmosphere. Both the produced film and the ambient plasma were characterized. The plasma was monitored by an electrostatic probe, for plume expansion in vacuum or in the presence of the buffer atmosphere. The time evolution of the ion saturation current was obtained for several probe to substrate distances. The results show the splitting of the plume into two velocity groups, being the lower velocity profile associated with metal cluster formation within the plume. The films were obtained in the presence of helium atmosphere, for several target-to-substrate distances. They were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, for as-deposited and 600 deg. C treated-in-air samples. The results show that the as-deposited samples are amorphous and have chemical composition compatible with europium hydroxide. The thermally treated samples show x-ray diffraction peaks of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with chemical composition showing excess oxygen. Film nanostructuring was shown to be strongly correlated with cluster formation, as shown by velocity splitting in probe current versus time plots.

  1. Laser-ablative engineering of phase singularities in plasmonic metamaterial arrays for biosensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Zywietz, Urs; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2014-02-17

    By using methods of laser-induced transfer combined with nanoparticle lithography, we design and fabricate large-area gold nanoparticle-based metamaterial arrays exhibiting extreme Heaviside-like phase jumps in reflected light due to a strong diffractive coupling of localized plasmons. When employed in sensing schemes, these phase singularities provide the sensitivity of 5?×?10{sup 4} deg. of phase shift per refractive index unit change that is comparable with best values reported for plasmonic biosensors. The implementation of sensor platforms on the basis of such metamaterial arrays promises a drastic improvement of sensitivity and cost efficiency of plasmonic biosensing devices.

  2. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6?ns, 1064?nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ?300?Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ?100?Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  3. Femtosecond laser pulse driven melting in gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension: Identification of a transition from stretched to exponential kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yuelin; Jiang, Zhang; Lin, Xiao -Min; Wen, Haidan; Walko, Donald A.; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Subbaraman, Ram; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Gray, Stephen K.; Ho, Phay

    2015-01-30

    Many potential industrial, medical, and environmental applications of metal nanorods rely on the physics and resultant kinetics and dynamics of the interaction of these particles with light. We report a surprising kinetics transition in the global melting of femtosecond laser-driven gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension. At low laser intensity, the melting exhibits a stretched exponential kinetics, which abruptly transforms into a compressed exponential kinetics when the laser intensity is raised. It is found the relative formation and reduction rate of intermediate shapes play a key role in the transition. Supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and a kinetic model, themore »behavior is traced back to the persistent heterogeneous nature of the shape dependence of the energy uptake, dissipation and melting of individual nanoparticles. These results could have significant implications for various applications such as water purification and electrolytes for energy storage that involve heat transport between metal nanorod ensembles and surrounding solvents.« less

  4. A high-intensity, pulsed supersonii:, carbon source aivith C("Pi> kinetic energies of 0.08-0.7 eV for crossed beam experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    1 A high-intensity, pulsed supersonii:, carbon source aivith C("Pi> kinetic energies of 0.08-0.7 e the laser pulse, the pulsed valve, and a chopper wheel located 40 mm after the laser ablation. Neither. INTRODUCTION Chemical reactions of ground state atomic carbon C(3Pj) play a major role in combustion processes

  5. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  6. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  7. ablation laser spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gasification. Potential Impact This combined platform used for the measurement and analysis of biomass cell spectrometry. Using this apparatus, we can measure the cell wall chemical composition of untreated biomass materials. Understanding the chemical composition of untreated biomass is key to both the biochemical

  8. Impact of Laser Fiber Design on Outcome of Endovenous Ablation of Lower-Extremity Varicose Veins: Results from a Single Practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, Ethan A., E-mail: eprince@lifespan.org; Soares, Gregory M.; Silva, MaryLou; Taner, Anil; Ahn, SunHo; Dubel, Gregory J.; Jay, Bryan S. [Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The design of laser fibers used for endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) in the management of lower-extremity varicose vein disease may affect treatment success. The purpose of this investigation is to report our experience using the gold-tip NeverTouch VenaCure laser fiber (AngioDynamics, Queensbury, NY) and to compare that to our experience with standard bare-tip fibers. A retrospective chart review of 363 consecutive EVLA treatments using the gold-tip laser fiber was performed. Demographic data including patient age, sex, history of previous varicose vein stripping, vein identity, laterality, treatment length, total applied energy in joules (J), use of adjuvant sclerotherapy and ambulatory phlebectomy, treatment-related complications, and treatment failure, which was defined as recanalization of any portion of the treated vein during follow-up as assessed by duplex ultrasound examination-were entered into a spreadsheet. These data were compared with a control group of 471 EVLA treatments performed with a standard bare-tip laser fiber. Data were analyzed using independent-samples Student's t test, chi-square test, and multivariate analysis. Demographic data were similar between the two groups. Treatments with the gold-tip fiber had a failure rate of 11.1%, whereas treatment with a bare-tip fiber had a failure rate of 2.3% during a similar follow-up period. This difference was highly statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed fiber type as the most significant factor associated with treatment failure. We conclude that laser fiber design has a significant effect on treatment success in the performance of EVLA.

  9. Simple formula for the interspaces of periodic grating structures self-organized on metal surfaces by femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashida, Masaki; Ikuta, Yoshinobu; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-29

    Self-organized grating structures formed on Mo and Ti metal surfaces irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at wavelengths of 800 and 400 nm are investigated by electron microscopy. We observe the formation of the self-organized grating structures on the metals irradiated with 400-nm laser pulses at low laser fluence in narrow fluence ranges. The interspaces of the grating structure depend on the wavelength and fluence of the laser. We find that the dependence of the grating interspaces on laser fluence can be explained by a simple formula for induction of a surface-plasma wave through the parametric decay of laser light.

  10. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  11. Properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films obtained by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virt, I. S.; Rudyj, I. O.; Kurilo, I. V.; Lopatynskyi, I. Ye.; Linnik, L. F.; Tetyorkin, V. V.; Potera, P.; Luka, G.

    2013-07-15

    The properties of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films of variable thickness deposited onto Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si, and KCl substrates are investigated by the method of pulsed laser ablation. The samples are obtained at a substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C in a vacuum chamber with a residual pressure of 10{sup -5} Torr. The thickness of the films amounted to 40-1500 nm. The structure of the bulk material of the targets and films is investigated by the methods of X-ray diffraction and transmission high-energy electron diffraction, respectively. The electrical properties of the films are investigated in the temperature range of 253-310 K. It is shown that the films have semiconductor properties. The structural features of the films determine their optical parameters.

  12. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Examinations of the origins of polyatomic ions and advances in the sampling of particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, Travis

    2011-11-30

    This dissertation provides a general introduction to Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) sampling, with an examination of analytical challenges in the employment of this technique. It discusses the origin of metal oxide ions (MO+) in LA-ICP-MS, as well as the effect of introducing helium and nitrogen to the aerosol gas flow on the formation of these polyatomic interferences. It extends the study of polyatomic ions in LA-ICP-MS to metal argide (MAr+) species, an additional source of possible significant interferences in the spectrum. It describes the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in particulate samples.

  13. Kinetics of laser-pulse vaporization of uranium carbide by mass spectrometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehranian, F.

    1983-06-01

    The kinetics of uranium carbide vaporization in the temperature range 3000 K to 5200 K was studied using a Nd-glass laser with peak power densities from 1.6 x 10/sup 5/ to 4.0 x 10/sup 5/ watts/cm/sup 2/. The vapor species U, UC/sub 2/, C/sub 1/ and C/sub 3/ were detected and analyzed by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. From the mass spectrometer signals number densities of the various species in the ionizer were obtained as functions of time. The surface of the irradiated uranium carbide was examined by scanning electron microscope and the depth profile of the crater was obtained. In order to aid analysis of the data, the heat conduction and species diffusion equations for the solid (or liquid) were solved numerically by a computer code to obtain the temperature and composition transients during laser heating. A sensitivity analysis was used to study the effect of uncertainties in the input parameters on the computed surface temperatures.

  14. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  15. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  16. Studies of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF and magnetic reconnection using laser-produced plasmas at OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ion kinetic effects during the shock-convergence phase of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven, laser-produced plasmas have been facilitated by the use of ...

  17. Chemical and Spectroscopic Aspects of Polymer Ablation: Special Features and Novel Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, J. Thomas

    Repetition Rate Ablation 480 6 Outlook 481 7 Acknowledgments 481 8 References 481 1 Introduction 1.1 History-defined laser fluence (energy per unit area). As the fluence is raised above this threshold, the ablation rate in this field in many groups around the world. Many aspects of polymer ablation, and laser processing in general

  18. Ion emission and expansion in laser-produced tin plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdt, Russell Allen

    2011-01-01

    energy, in which the ablation pressure generated in the laser produced plasma is used to compress fusion reactants to thermonuclear

  19. Kinetic (particle-in-cell) simulation of nonlinear laser absorption in a finite-size plasma with a background inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdian, H. Kargarian, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field on the high intensity laser absorption rate in a sub-critical plasma has been investigated by employing a relativistic electromagnetic 1.5 dimensional particle-in-cell code. Relying on the effective nonlinear phenomena such as phase-mixing and scattering, this study shows that in a finite-size plasma the laser absorption increases with inhomogeneity of the magnetic field (i.e., reduction of characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, ?{sub p}) before exiting a considerable amount of laser energy from the plasma due to scattering process. On the other hand, the presence of the external inhomogeneous magnetic field causes the maximum absorption of laser to occur at a shorter time. Moreover, study of the kinetic results associated with the distribution function of plasma particles shows that, in a special range of the plasma density and the characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, a considerable amount of laser energy is transferred to the particles producing a population of electrons with kinetic energy along the laser direction.

  20. Medical applications of ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.; Kim, B.M.; Rubenchil, A.M.

    1999-03-16

    The characteristics of the ultrashort pulse laser (USPL, < 1 ps) ablation of biological tissues are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Effective USPL parameters for minimal damage and high ablation rates are discussed.

  1. Kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of uranium dioxide by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.

    1981-11-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require knowledge of the evaporation behavior of UO/sub 2/ at temperatures well above the melting point of 3140 K. In this study, rapid transient heating of a small spot on a UO/sub 2/ specimen was accomplished by a laser pulse, which generates a surface temperature excursion. This in turn vaporizes the target surface and the gas expands into vacuum. The surface temperature transient was monitored by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperatures investigated range from approx. 3700 K to approx. 4300 K. A computer program was developed to simulate the laser heating process and calculate the surface temperature evolution. The effect of the uncertainties of the high temperature material properties on the calculation was included in a sensitivity study for UO/sub 2/ vaporization. The measured surface temperatures were in satisfactory agreements.

  2. Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves and their Interactions Driven by the Ponderomotive Force of Crossing Laser Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedros Afeyan; K. Won; V. Savchenko; T. Johnston; A. Ghizzo; P. Bertrand

    2012-10-30

    We have found, using 1D periodic Vlasov-Poisson simulations, new nonlinear, nonstationary, stable, long lived, coherent structures in phase space, called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves. Ponderomotively driven for a short period of time, at a particular frequency and wavenumber, well inside the band gap that was thought to exist between electron plasma and electron acoustic wave frequencies, KEEN waves are seen to self-consistently form, and persist for thousands of plasma periods. KEEN waves are comprised of 4 or more significant phase-locked harmonic modes which persist only when driven sufficiently strongly. They also merge when two or more at different frequencies are driven sequentially. However, the final stable KEEN state that emerges is highly sensitive to their relative order of excitation. KEEN waves also interact quite strongly with electron plasma waves (EPW) especially when their harmonics are close to being resonant with the EPW frequency at the same k. The common assumption that whenever sufficiently large amplitude coherent laser energy is present in an unmagnetized plasma, EPWs and IAWs are the only waves with which the electromagnetic energy can interact coherently may require reconsideration.

  3. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  4. Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The scope of our research in laser and related technologies has grown over the years and has attracted a broad user base for applications within DOE, DOD, and private industry. Within the next few years, we expect to begin constructing the National Ignition Facility, to make substantial progress in deploying AVLIS technology for uranium and gadolinium enrichment, and to develop new radar sensing techniques to detect underwater objects. Further, we expect to translate LLNL patent ideas in microlithography into useful industrial products and to successfully apply high-power, diode-based laser technology to industrial and government applications.

  5. PROCEEDINGS288 ---c..*. LASER ABLATION: I:`.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    !!!!s American Institute of Physics New York #12;Authorization to photocopy items for internal or personal use_eergycoupling mechanisms include linear light_I__ absorption in solid, liquid and vapor phase, thermal and optical runaway irradiance region and sought the most 1. efficient way of reaching ever higher plasma temperatures

  6. The effect of laser pulse duration on ICP-MS signal intensity, elemental fractionation, and detection limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    and alloys,7,8 geology,9 archaeology,6,10 biological samples,11 radioactive waste anal- ysis,9 etc-stoichiometric ICP-MS results, can occur during laser ablation, during transport from the ablation chamber to the ICP

  7. Theoretical investigation of the origin of the multipeak structure of kinetic-energy-release spectra from charge-resonance-enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Haixiang; Guo Yahui [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); China and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 10039 (China); Lu Ruifeng [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhang Peiyu; Han Keli; He Guozhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-09-15

    The dynamics of hydrogen molecular ions in intense laser pulses (100 fs, I = 0.77 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 2.5 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) has been studied, and the kinetic-energy-release spectra of Coulomb explosion channel have been calculated by numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In a recent experiment, a multipeak structure from charge-resonance-enhanced ionization is interpreted by a vibrational 'comb' at a critical nuclear distance. We found that the peaks could not be attributed to a single vibrational level but a collective contribution of some typical vibrational states in our calculated Coulomb explosion spectra, and the main peak shifts toward the low-energy region with increasing vibrational level, which is also different from the explanation in that experiment. We have also discussed the proton's kinetic-energy-release spectra for different durations with the same laser intensity.

  8. Femtosecond laser processing of crystalline silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, D. V.

    This paper reports the surface morphologies and ablation of crystalline silicon wafers irradiated by infra-red 775 nm Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. The effects of energy fluences (below and above single-pulse modification) ...

  9. Digital multimirror devices for precision laser micromachining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DMD LIFT results 24 PMMA donors New 3D printing technology! BiTe semiconductor film New laser 3D printing facility...An ORC breakthrough 75 µm #12;Summary · DMDs are very useful for precise ablation

  10. The mechanism of thin film Si nanomachining using femtosecond laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Jimmy Yi-Jie, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser ablation has been the subject of intense recent research. The pulse time ('width') is shorter than the electronic relaxation time, resulting in a decoupling of the period of laser illumination and ...

  11. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  12. Implosion Experiments using Glass Ablators for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smalyuk, V. A.

    Direct-drive implosions with 20-?m-thick glass shells were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of high-Z glass ablators for direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion. The x-ray signal caused by ...

  13. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  14. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Westphal, Saskia, E-mail: swestphal@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Pathology Aachen University Hospital (Germany); Isfort, Peter, E-mail: isfort@hia.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Braunschweig, Till, E-mail: tbraunschweig@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Pathology Aachen University Hospital (Germany); Penzkofer, Tobias, E-mail: penzkofer@hia.rwth-aachen.de; Bruners, Philipp, E-mail: bruners@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko, E-mail: kkichika@naramed-u.ac.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas, E-mail: smiro@hia.rwth-aachen.de; Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  15. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 5824 Stevenson Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  16. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menoni, Carmen S. (Fort Collins, CO); Rocca, Jorge J. (Fort Collins, CO); Vaschenko, Georgiy (San Diego, CA); Bloom, Scott (Encinitas, CA); Anderson, Erik H. (El Cerrito, CA); Chao, Weilun (El Cerrito, CA); Hemberg, Oscar (Stockholm, SE)

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  17. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  18. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welle, Eric J. (Niceville, NM); Tappan, Alexander S. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, Jeremy A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  19. SOFT LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION -MALDI, DIOS AND NANOSTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Chapter 20 SOFT LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION - MALDI, DIOS AND NANOSTRUCTURES Akos Veites Department on and the method of rapid heating was proposed to minimize the latter (Beuhler, et al., 1974). Lasers with respect to the ultimate size of the biomolecules (m/z Laser Ablation and its

  20. Laser-direct-driven quasi-isentropic experiments on aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Quanxi, E-mail: quanxixue@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Wang, Feng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Xisheng; Liu, Jingru [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments were performed on long temporally shaped laser pulses based on an analytical isentropic compression model. Upper pressure limits, the ablation pressure scaling law, and stress-density curves were studied. The validity of the analytical model used, the ablation pressure scaling law, and the phenomena of missing line-imaging velocity interferometer (VISAR) fringes in the experimental results are discussed.

  1. Method of defining features on materials with a femtosecond laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roos, Edward Victor (Los Altos, CA); Roeske, Franklin (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Benterou, Jerry J. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to a pulsed laser ablation method of metals and/or dielectric films from the surface of a wafer, printed circuit board or a hybrid substrate. By utilizing a high-energy ultra-short pulses of laser light, such a method can be used to manufacture electronic circuits and/or electro-mechanical assemblies without affecting the material adjacent to the ablation zone.

  2. Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  3. Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities You are accessing a document...

  4. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5?g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1?g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2?mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He?=?0.03?mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity?=?410?±?20?km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  5. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J., E-mail: mackinnon2@llnl.gov; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5?g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1?g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2?mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He?=?0.03?mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity?=?410?±?20?km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  6. Synthetic thrombus model for in vitro studies of laser thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermes, R.E.; Trajkovska, K.

    1998-07-01

    Laser thrombolysis is the controlled ablation of a thrombus (blood clot) blockage in a living arterial system. Theoretical modeling of the interaction of laser light with thrombi relies on the ability to perform in vitro experiments with well characterized surrogate materials. A synthetic thrombus formulation may offer more accurate results when compared to in vivo clinical experiments. The authors describe the development of new surrogate materials based on formulations incorporating chick egg, guar gum, modified food starch, and a laser light absorbing dye. The sound speed and physical consistency of the materials were very close to porcine (arterial) and human (venous) thrombi. Photographic and videotape recordings of pulsed dye laser ablation experiments under various experimental conditions were used to evaluate the new material as compared to in vitro tests with human (venous) thrombus. The characteristics of ablation and mass removal were similar to that of real thrombi, and therefore provide a more realistic model for in vitro laser thrombolysis when compared to gelatin.

  7. Pulsed Laser Powered Homogeneous Pyrolysis for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Pulsed Laser Powered Homogeneous Pyrolysis for Reaction Kinetics Studies: Probe Laser Measurement Pulsed laser powered homogeneous pyrolysis ( LPHP) is a technique which can be used to measure rate a number of researchers have shown that pulsed laser powered homogeneous pyrolysis (LPHP) can be used

  8. Laser ion source for Columbia Universitys microbeam A.W. Bigelow a,*, G. Randers-Pehrson a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Laser ion source for Columbia UniversityÕs microbeam A.W. Bigelow a,*, G. Randers-Pehrson a , R High School, NY, USA Available online 29 August 2005 Abstract A laser ion source that will be installed for irradiation experiments with mammalian cells. Through laser ablation the laser ion source can produce heavy

  9. Observation of the stabilizing effect of a laminated ablator on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masse, L.; Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Liberatore, S.; Theobald, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2011-05-15

    A laminated ablator is explored as an alternative concept for stabilizing the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability which develops in inertial fusion targets. Experiments measuring the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laminated planar foils are reported. Consistent with both theory and simulations, a significant reduction of the perturbation growth is experimentally observed for laminated ablators in comparison to what is observed for classical uniform ablators. Such an enhanced hydrodynamic stability opens opportunities for the design of high-gain inertial fusion targets.

  10. Process for laser machining and surface treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2004-10-26

    An improved method and apparatus increasing the accuracy and reducing the time required to machine materials, surface treat materials, and allow better control of defects such as particulates in pulsed laser deposition. The speed and quality of machining is improved by combining an ultrashort pulsed laser at high average power with a continuous wave laser. The ultrashort pulsed laser provides an initial ultrashort pulse, on the order of several hundred femtoseconds, to stimulate an electron avalanche in the target material. Coincident with the ultrashort pulse or shortly after it, a pulse from a continuous wave laser is applied to the target. The micromachining method and apparatus creates an initial ultrashort laser pulse to ignite the ablation followed by a longer laser pulse to sustain and enlarge on the ablation effect launched in the initial pulse. The pulse pairs are repeated at a high pulse repetition frequency and as often as desired to produce the desired micromachining effect. The micromachining method enables a lower threshold for ablation, provides more deterministic damage, minimizes the heat affected zone, minimizes cracking or melting, and reduces the time involved to create the desired machining effect.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of epitaxial BeO thin films on sapphire and SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, Thomas; Takahashi, Ryota; Lippmaa, Mikk, E-mail: mlippmaa@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-06-09

    Epitaxial beryllia thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001) and SrTiO{sub 3}(111) substrates. Nearly relaxed epitaxial films were obtained on both substrates at growth temperatures of up to about 600?°C. Crystalline films with expanded lattice parameters were obtained even at room temperature. The maximum growth temperature was limited by a loss of beryllium from the film surface. The volatility of beryllium appeared to be caused by the slow oxidation kinetics at the film surface and the re-sputtering effect of high-energy Be and BeO species in the ablation plume. Time-of-flight plume composition analysis suggested that the target surface became Be metal rich at low oxygen pressures, reducing the growth rate of beryllia films.

  12. Laser-accelerated disks for EOS studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Szoke, A.

    1981-09-01

    An indirect method of laser-based equation of state studies, which utilizes shock waves generated by laser-accelerated projectiles rather than ablation shocks from direct laser irradiation of the sample under investigation, is proposed and examined theoretically. We derive simple formulas for the minimum thickness and maximum speed of laser-accelerated disks, comparing them with results of Nd-laser experiments conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory. Our calculations indicate that disks can be accelerated to velocities above 10/sup 7/ cm/s using a wide choice of laser parameters (pulse duration, energy, intensity, wavelength, etc.). The use of shorter wavelengths, e.g., a KrF(0.25 ..mu..m) laser rather than Nd (1.06 ..mu..m), allows thicker disks to be accelerated and faster velocities to be attained, approximately in the ratio (lambda/sub L/(Nd)/lambda/sub L/(KrF))/sup 1/3/ approx. = 1.6. One-dimensional Lasnex computer calculations indicate that the laser-accelerated disk constitutes a useful flyer plate even while disassembling under the force of the laser ablation shock. The calculations predict that the shockwave the projectile disk generates in a second (impact) disk located a suitable distance away has a greater amplitude than the laser shock and is considerably more steady, exhibiting little decay in propagating through the second disk.

  13. Factors Limiting Complete Tumor Ablation by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulet, Erwan, E-mail: erwanpaulet@yahoo.fr; Aube, Christophe [University Hospital Angers, Department of Radiology (France); Pessaux, Patrick [University Hospital Angers, Department of Visceral Surgery (France); Lebigot, Jerome [University Hospital Angers, Department of Radiology (France); Lhermitte, Emilie [University Hospital Angers, Department of Visceral Surgery (France); Oberti, Frederic [University Hospital Angers, Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology (France); Ponthieux, Anne [University Hospital Angers, Clinical Research Center (France); Cales, Paul [University Hospital Angers, Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology (France); Ridereau-Zins, Catherine [University Hospital Angers, Department of Radiology (France); Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiological or physical factors to predict the risk of residual mass or local recurrence of primary and secondary hepatic tumors treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eighty-two patients, with 146 lesions (80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 66 metastases), were treated by RFA. Morphological parameters of the lesions included size, location, number, ultrasound echogenicity, computed tomography density, and magnetic resonance signal intensity were obtained before and after treatment. Parameters of the generator were recorded during radiofrequency application. The recurrence-free group was statistically compared to the recurrence and residual mass groups on all these parameters. Twenty residual masses were detected. Twenty-nine lesions recurred after a mean follow-up of 18 months. Size was a predictive parameter. Patients' sex and age and the echogenicity and density of lesions were significantly different for the recurrence and residual mass groups compared to the recurrence-free group (p < 0.05). The presence of an enhanced ring on the magnetic resonance control was more frequent in the recurrence and residual mass groups. In the group of patients with residual lesions, analysis of physical parameters showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the time necessary for the temperature to rise. In conclusion, this study confirms risk factors of recurrence such as the size of the tumor and emphasizes other factors such as a posttreatment enhanced ring and an increase in the time necessary for the rise in temperature. These factors should be taken into consideration when performing RFA and during follow-up.

  14. Isotopically Enriched Films and Nanostructures by Ultrafast Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Pronko

    2004-12-13

    This project involved a systematic study to apply newly discovered isotopic enrichment effects in laser ablation plumes to the fabrication of isotopically engineered thin films, superlattices, and nanostructures. The approach to this program involved using ultrafast lasers as a method for generating ablated plasmas that have preferentially structured isotopic content in the body of the ablation plasma plumes. In examining these results we have attempted to interpret the observations in terms of a plasma centrifuge process that is driven by the internal electro-magnetic fields of the plasma itself. The research plan involved studying the following phenomena in regard to the ablation plume and the isotopic mass distribution within it: (1) Test basic equations of steady state centrifugal motion in the ablation plasma. (2) Investigate angular distribution of ions in the ablation plasmas. (3) Examine interactions of plasma ions with self-generated magnetic fields. (3) Investigate ion to neutral ratios in the ablation plasmas. (5) Test concepts of plasma pumping. (6) Fabricate isotopically enriched nanostructures.

  15. Laser Desorption/Ionization of Transition Metal Atoms and Oxides from Solid Argon Lester Andrews,*, Andreas Rohrbacher, Christopher M. Laperle, and Robert E. Continetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    Laser Desorption/Ionization of Transition Metal Atoms and Oxides from Solid Argon Lester Andrews of the laser-ablated metal atoms and O2 in excess argon during condensation at 10 K, have been laser desorbed of organic acid typically used as a matrix in matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass

  16. Mass-ablation-rate measurements in direct-drive cryogenic implosions using x-ray self-emission images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. K., E-mail: adavi@lle.rochester.edu; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A technique to measure the mass ablation rate in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a pinhole x-ray framing camera is presented. In target designs consisting of two layers of different materials, two x-ray self-emission peaks from the coronal plasma were measured once the laser burned through the higher-Z outer layer. The location of the inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the location of the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak was used to measure the burnthrough time of the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material and instantaneous mass remaining. By varying the thickness of the outer layer, the mass ablation rate can be obtained as a function of time. Simulations were used to validate the methods and verify that the measurement techniques are not sensitive to perturbation growth at the ablation surface.

  17. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Laser Ablation Synthesis and Optical Characterization of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    -Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong aqueous solution for two days was placed inside the alumina tube at one end of the furnace. The system was pumped to 0.01 torr ( 1.33 Pa). Argon, mixed with 5% hydrogen as a carrier gas,

  19. The influence of ambient medium density on laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, M.M. III

    1995-11-01

    Interest in high flux transport processes has grown in recent years along with the ability and need to manipulate systems with microscopic length and time scales. These systems present unique engineering challenges. Because the time and length scales associated with these problems are very small, assumptions of local equilibrium, physical and mathematical smoothness of boundaries and the unambiguous definition of thermodynamic fields can not be automatically made, even though they may ultimately be acceptable. Furthermore, the observations are made on macroscopic or integrated scales. The large difference in scales between the temporal evolution of the process and the observation requires careful consideration of the claims made regarding the system`s microscopic, temporal behavior. In particular, consistency of a proposed model with observed results does not guarantee uniqueness, or predictive accuracy for the model. For these reasons, microscale heat transfer systems demand a careful consideration of the framework within which the experimentation and analysis are conducted.

  20. Apparatus for the laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA)

    2010-02-16

    An RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of carbon nanotubes. Such an apparatus, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently provides a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization.

  1. Apparatus for the Laser Ablative Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319AnotherAparnaEnergy

  2. Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

  3. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy study of femtosecond laser-irradiated selenium-doped 'black' silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, Arthur H. (Arthur Henry)

    2009-01-01

    'Black silicon' refers to silicon that has been treated in a laser-ablation process to incorporate large amounts of chalcogen dopants. The material has been found to have greatly increased absorbance of visible and infared ...

  4. Influence of oxygen pressure and aging on LaAlO{sub 3} films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jihwey; Aeppli, Gabriel [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Soh, Yeong-Ah, E-mail: yeongahsoh@gmail.com [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); David, Adrian; Lin, Weinan [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Wu, Tom [Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-24

    The crystal structures of LaAlO{sub 3} films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates at oxygen pressure of 10{sup ?3} millibars or 10{sup ?5} millibars, where kinetics of ablated species hardly depend on oxygen background pressure, are compared. Our results show that the interface between LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} is sharper when the oxygen pressure is lower. Over time, the formation of various crystalline phases is observed while the crystalline thickness of the LaAlO{sub 3} layer remains unchanged. X-ray scattering as well as atomic force microscopy measurements indicate three-dimensional growth of such phases, which appear to be fed from an amorphous capping layer present in as-grown samples.

  5. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meezan, N. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000291875667); Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ho, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000272137538); Field, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000184045131); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sepke, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spears, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Biener, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eckart, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grim, G. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamza, A. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hartouni, E. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000198694351); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoover, D. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000195652551); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kroll, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹? neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  6. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore »oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹? neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  7. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics Combustion KineticsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:13+00:00 The...

  8. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  9. Comparison of optical emission from nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma in atmosphere and vacuum conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Comparison of optical emission from nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma in atmosphere November 2012 Accepted 12 May 2013 Available online 18 May 2013 Keywords: Optical emission spectroscopy In this study we examine the emission from brass plasma produced by ns and fs laser ablation under both vacuum

  10. Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma S. S. Harilal, Riju 1996; accepted for publication 20 December 1996 The emission features of laser ablated graphite plume diagnostic technique. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to reveal the velocity

  11. Fabrication of corrugated artificial insect wings using laser micromachined molds This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Fabrication of corrugated artificial insect wings using laser micromachined molds This article has insect wings using laser micromachined molds Hiroto Tanaka and Robert J Wood School of Engineering formed and integrated by a single molding process. Employing a layered laser ablation technique, three

  12. Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noble, D.T.; Braymen, S.D.; Anderson, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point and a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained. 9 figs.

  13. Rep-Rated X-ray Damage and Ablation Experiments for IFE and ICF Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Payne, S A; Reyes, S; Schmitt, R C; Speth, J A

    2003-09-08

    The response of materials to high-dose x-ray exposures needs to be understood for inertial fusion energy (IFE) and inertial confinement fusion applications, where the requirements for IFE are considerably more stringent. In the IFE context, x-ray damage and/or small levels of ablation are of importance for component survivability, generation of debris, and contamination. Ablation quantities of even 1 angstrom per shot would result in material removal of more than 1 cm per year of operation. If even one part in a million of this material made its way to the final optics, it would coat them with a thickness equivalent to several waves of the laser light. Also, small-scale melting and thermomechanical effects, such as fatigue, can result from x-ray heating. These effects potentially become important when multiple shots are considered, and thus, their study requires use of rep-rated experiments. As a part of the High-Average Power Laser Program, the XAPPER experiment has been initiated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. XAPPER produces high doses of low-energy x-rays at repetition rates of up to 10 Hz. Study of x-ray damage is underway. An overview of facility capabilities, results to date, and future plans are provided.

  14. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  15. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  16. Ablation dynamics in coiled wire-array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Knapp, P. F.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Blesener, K. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2013-02-15

    Experiments to study the ablation dynamics of coiled wire arrays were performed on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College, and on the COBRA generator at Cornell University's Laboratory of Plasma Studies (1 MA, 100 ns). The MAGPIE generator was used to drive coiled wires in an inverse array configuration to study the distribution of ablated plasma. Using interferometry to study the plasma distribution during the ablation phase, absolute quantitative measurements of electron line density demonstrated very high density contrasts between coiled ablation streams and inter-stream regions many millimetres from the wire. The measured density contrasts for a coiled array were many times greater than that observed for a conventional array with straight wires, indicating that a much greater axial modulation of the ablated plasma may be responsible for the unique implosion dynamics of coiled arrays. Experiments on the COBRA generator were used to study the complex redirection of plasma around a coiled wire that gives rise to the ablation structure exhibited by coiled arrays. Observations of this complex 3D plasma structure were used to validate the current model of coiled array ablation dynamics [Hall et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 065003 (2008)], demonstrating irrefutably that plasma flow from the wires behaves as predicted. Coiled wires were observed to ablate and implode in the same manner on both machines, indicating that current rise time should not be an issue for the scaling of coiled arrays to larger machines with fast current rise times.

  17. Delayed Development of Pneumothorax After Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clasen, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.clasen@med.uni-tuebingen.d [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Kettenbach, Joachim [Medical University of Vienna, Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Austria); Kosan, Bora; Aebert, Hermann [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Schernthaner, Melanie [Medical University of Vienna, Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (Austria); Kroeber, Stefan-Martin [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Boemches, Andrea [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Acute pneumothorax is a frequent complication after percutaneous pulmonary radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In this study we present three cases showing delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation in 34 patients. Our purpose is to draw attention to this delayed complication and to propose a possible approach to avoid this major complication. These three cases occurred subsequent to 44 CT-guided pulmonary RF ablation procedures (6.8%) using either internally cooled or multitined expandable RF electrodes. In two patients, the pneumothorax, being initially absent at the end of the intervention, developed without symptoms. One of these patients required chest drain placement 32 h after RF ablation, and in the second patient therapy remained conservative. In the third patient, a slight pneumothorax at the end of the intervention gradually increased and led into tension pneumothorax 5 days after ablation procedure. Underlying bronchopleural fistula along the coagulated former electrode track was diagnosed in two patients. In conclusion, delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation can occur and is probably due to underlying bronchopleural fistula, potentially leading to tension pneumothorax. Patients and interventionalists should be prepared for delayed onset of this complication, and extensive track ablation following pulmonary RF ablation should be avoided.

  18. Effects of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and its influence on the topography of the Fe thin film grown in pulsed laser deposition facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Department of Physics, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan); Rawat, R. S.; Wang, Y.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Zakaullah, M. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-10-15

    The effect of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in laser induced Fe plasma is investigated using time-resolved fast gated imaging. The snow plow and shock wave models are fitted to the experimental results and used to estimate the ablation parameters and the density of gas atoms that interact with the ablated species. It is observed that RT instability develops during the interface deceleration stage and grows for a considerable time for higher laser energy fluence. The effects of RT instabilities formation on the surface topography of the Fe thin films grown in pulsed laser deposition system are investigated (i) using different laser energy fluences for the same wavelength of laser radiation and (ii) using different laser wavelengths keeping the energy fluence fixed. It is concluded that the deposition achieved under turbulent condition leads to less smooth deposition surfaces with bigger sized particle agglomerates or network.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, E-mail: gcarraf@tin.it; Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo [University of Insubria c/o Ospedale di Circolo, Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  20. Time-resolved vibrational and rotational emission analysis of laser-produced plasma of carbon and polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time-resolved vibrational and rotational emission analysis of laser-produced plasma of carbon and polymers B. Ne´meta,*, K. Musiolb , I. Sa´ntaa , J. Zachorowskib a Institute of Physics, Janus Pannonius and the CN radical in the plasma obtained by Nd:YAG laser ablation of graphite and polymers in atmospheric

  1. The influence of laser pulse duration and energy on ICP-MS signal intensity, elemental fractionation, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    of the thermal processes, heating of the sample can result in preferential evaporation, melting, and ablationThe influence of laser pulse duration and energy on ICP-MS signal intensity, elemental width, irradiance, repetition rate, and pulse energy, are critical parameters which influence the laser

  2. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neev, Joseph (Laguna Beach, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Glinsky, Michael E. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Feit, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Rubenchik, Alexander M. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

  3. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neev, J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Glinsky, M.E.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1998-02-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment. 8 figs.

  4. An International Pellet Ablation Database L.R. Baylor, A. Geraud*, W.A. Houlberg,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An International Pellet Ablation Database L.R. Baylor, A. Geraud*, W.A. Houlberg, D. Frigione+, M of an international pellet ablation database (IPADBASE) that has been assembled to enable studies of pellet ablation theories that are used to describe the physics of an ablating fuel pellet in a tokamak plasma. The database

  5. Simple and Compact Nozzle Design for Laser Vaporization Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokish, M G; Odom, B C

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a compact transparent nozzle for use in laser vaporization sources. This nozzle eliminates the need for an ablation aperture, allowing for a more intense molecular beam. We use this nozzle to prepare a molecular beam of aluminum monohydride (AlH) suitable for ion trap loading of AlH$^+$ via photoionization in ultra-high vacuum. We demonstrate stable AlH production over hour time scales using a liquid ablation target. The long-term stability, low heat load and fast ion production rate of this source are well-suited to molecular ion experiments employing destructive state readout schemes requiring frequent trap reloading.

  6. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  7. Microwave Ablation of Porcine Kidneys in vivo: Effect of two Different Ablation Modes ('Temperature Control' and 'Power Control') on Procedural Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Arnegger, F. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General, Abdominal and Transplantation Surgery (Germany); Koch, V.; Pap, B.; Holzschuh, M.; Bellemann, N. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Gehrig, T.; Senft, J.; Nickel, F. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General, Abdominal and Transplantation Surgery (Germany); Mogler, C. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General Pathology (Germany); Zelzer, S.; Meinzer, H. P. [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical and Biological Informatics (Germany); Stampfl, U.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to analyze the effect of two different ablation modes ('temperature control' and 'power control') of a microwave system on procedural outcome in porcine kidneys in vivo. Methods: A commercially available microwave system (Avecure Microwave Generator; MedWaves, San Diego, CA) was used. The system offers the possibility to ablate with two different ablation modes: temperature control and power control. Thirty-two microwave ablations were performed in 16 kidneys of 8 pigs. In each animal, one kidney was ablated twice by applying temperature control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96 Degree-Sign C, automatic power set point; group I). The other kidney was ablated twice by applying power control (ablation duration set point at 60 s, ablation temperature set point at 96 Degree-Sign C, ablation power set point at 24 W; group II). Procedural outcome was analyzed: (1) technical success (e.g., system failures, duration of the ablation cycle), and (2) ablation geometry (e.g., long axis diameter, short axis diameter, and circularity). Results: System failures occurred in 0% in group I and 13% in group II. Duration of the ablation cycle was 60 {+-} 0 s in group I and 102 {+-} 21 s in group II. Long axis diameter was 20.3 {+-} 4.6 mm in group I and 19.8 {+-} 3.5 mm in group II (not significant (NS)). Short axis diameter was 10.3 {+-} 2 mm in group I and 10.5 {+-} 2.4 mm in group II (NS). Circularity was 0.5 {+-} 0.1 in group I and 0.5 {+-} 0.1 in group II (NS). Conclusions: Microwave ablations performed with temperature control showed fewer system failures and were finished faster. Both ablation modes demonstrated no significant differences with respect to ablation geometry.

  8. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr. [Propulsion Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 (United States)

    2006-05-02

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin registered and PVC (Delrin registered is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser ({lambda} = 10.6 {mu}m) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  9. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumpan, S.A. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1990, contains articles in two main sections, Progress in Laser Fusion and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article presents the theoretical interpretation of the glass-ablator cryogenic-implosion experiments recently conducted on OMEGA. It is followed by an article describing the analysis of neutron time-of-flight data taken during DT and DD experiments; and a discussion of the improvements to laser diagnostics that now provide for precise control of the OMEGA laser is given. This paper contains a report on the development of transparent conductive coatings for KDP crystals, and a discussion of the study of the transient-surface Debye-Waller effect in materials irradiated with an ultrafast laser.

  10. A Complicated Postsurgical Echinococcal Cyst Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, L., E-mail: Loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, S. [Korgialeneio-Benakeio 'Red Cross Hospital of Athens', Department of Radiology (Greece); Brontzakis, P. [Korgialeneio-Benakeio 'Red Cross Hospital of Athens', Department of Surgery (Greece); Ptohis, N. [Korgialeneio-Benakeio 'Red Cross Hospital of Athens', Department of Radiology (Greece); Karaliotas, K. [Korgialeneio-Benakeio 'Red Cross Hospital of Athens', Department of Surgery (Greece)

    2008-01-15

    Surgery of hydatid cysts is often complicated with intrabiliary rupture (IBR), which if not recognized may lead to biliary fistula with rather high rates of morbidity and mortality. We report our experience with the application of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the treatment of an operated hepatic echinococcal cyst which was complicated with biliocystic communication and cysteocutaneous fistula with bile leakage. RF ablation was performed under CT guidance into the remaining cyst through the cutaneous fistula. Since ablation of the cyst and the fistula the patient has been asymptomatic.

  11. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  12. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2003-05-06

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  13. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Harju, Karen M.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2005-07-19

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  14. Development of pulse laser processing for mounting fiber Bragg grating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Aikihko; Shimada, Yukihiro; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ishibashi, Hisayoshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umebidai Kidugawa Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Applied Laser Technology Institute, Tsuruga Head Office, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 65-20 Kizaki Tsuruga Fukui 914-8585 (Japan); Technical Research and Development Institute, Kumagai Gumi Co., Ltd., 2-1 Tsukudo, Shinjuku Tokyo 162-8557 (Japan)

    2012-07-11

    Pulse laser processing has been developed for the application of industrial plants in monitoring and maintenance. Surface cleaning by nano-second laser ablation was demonstrated for decontamination of oxide layers of Cr contained steel. Direct writing by femtosecond processing induced a Bragg grating in optical fiber to make it a seismic sensor for structural health monitoring. Adhesive cement was used to fix the seismic sensor on the surface of reactor coolant pipe material. Pulse laser processing and its related technologies were presented to overcome the severe accidents of nuclear power plants.

  15. Composition analysis by scanning femtosecond laser ultraprobing (CASFLU).

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Lowell L. (Simi Valley, CA); Campbell, E. Michael (Danveille, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Livermore, CA); Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The composition analysis by scanning femtosecond ultraprobing (CASFLU) technology scans a focused train of extremely short-duration, very intense laser pulses across a sample. The partially-ionized plasma ablated by each pulse is spectrometrically analyzed in real time, determining the ablated material's composition. The steering of the scanned beam thus is computer directed to either continue ablative material-removal at the same site or to successively remove nearby material for the same type of composition analysis. This invention has utility in high-speed chemical-elemental, molecular-fragment and isotopic analyses of the microstructure composition of complex objects, e.g., the oxygen isotopic compositions of large populations of single osteons in bone.

  16. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  17. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait, E-mail: a.aitoumeziane@gmail.com; Liani, Bachir [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Abou Beker Blekaid University, Tlemcen (Algeria)] [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Abou Beker Blekaid University, Tlemcen (Algeria); Parisse, Jean-Denis [IUSTI UMR CNRS 7343, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)] [IUSTI UMR CNRS 7343, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355?nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  18. Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derrell W.

    1999-01-01

    The impact of nonlinear effects in the asymmetric catalysis of kinetic resolutions is analyzed. It is found with minimal assumptions that the kinetics of homocompetitive reactions should apply generally to kinetic resolutions involving partially...

  19. LLE Quarterly Report (July-September 1999)[Library for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-01-07

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1999, features a theoretical analysis of a process that generates mass perturbations of an imploding target driven by modulated laser illumination. The process, referred to as laser imprint, impacts the integrity of the shell during direct-drive implosions, potentially quenching target performance. In this article V. N. Goncharov, J. A. Delettrez, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town present a model of the generation of mass perturbations and analyze the mass perturbation growth due to nonuniform ablation pressure. Stabilizing mechanisms of thermal conduction smoothing and mass ablation are shown to suppress the acceleration perturbation, and mass ablation is also shown to impact velocity perturbations. The model predicts that a direct-drive cryogenic NIF target will remain intact during the implosion when l-Thz SSD beam smoothing is used.

  20. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement ofmore »href='S2095471915000158_inline5' mime-subtype='gif' type='simple'/>${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.« less

  1. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  2. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  3. 474 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 33, NO. 2, APRIL 2005 Fast Photography of a Laser Generated Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    of the plasma thermal energy into kinetic energy, plume confinement, ion acceleration, emission enhancement for Energy Research, the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0438 USA (e-mail: shar of the intensifier was set at 20 ns. Ablation of carbon into a vacuum creates an intensely luminous plume

  4. Thermal Protection with 5% Dextrose Solution Blanket During Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Enn Alexandria, E-mail: echen@cc.nih.gov; Neeman, Ziv; Lee, Fred T.; Kam, Anthony; Wood, Brad [National Institutes of Health, Radiology Department, Warren G. Magmison Clinical Center (United States)

    2006-12-15

    A serious complication for any thermal radiofrequency ablation is thermal injury to adjacent structures, particularly the bowel, which can result in additional major surgery or death. Several methods using air, gas, fluid, or thermometry to protect adjacent structures from thermal injury have been reported. In the cases presented in this report, 5% dextrose water (D5W) was instilled to prevent injury to the bowel and diaphragm during radiofrequency ablation. Creating an Insulating envelope or moving organs with D5W might reduce risk for complications such as bowel perforation.

  5. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  6. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  7. Evolution of ultrashort laser pulse in large amplitude plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu Zhigang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ji Peiyong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); The Shanghai Key Lab of Astrophysics, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The propagation and evolution of an ultrashort laser pulse in a large amplitude plasma wave are investigated based on the photon kinetic theory. The photon number distribution function for a laser pulse in the phase space is analytically obtained by solving the photon kinetic equation in the background plasma wave. And then, the behavior of the laser pulse can be described by combining the single photon dynamics and the photon number distribution function. The evolutions of the photon number density in the coordinate and frequency domain space are discussed, and broadening or compressing of the laser pulse is also displayed in this paper. In particular, the frequency shift of the entire laser pulse is analyzed, which reflects a way of energy transformation between the laser pulse and the plasma wave.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Subpleural Lung Malignancy: Reduced Pain Using an Artificially Created Pneumothorax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Edward W., E-mail: EdwardLee@mednet.ucla.edu; Suh, Robert D., E-mail: rsuh@mednet.ucla.ed [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Thoracic Imaging and Intervention, Center for the Health Sciences (CHS), UCLA Medical Center (United States); Zeidler, Michelle R. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care (United States); Tsai, Irene S. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Thoracic Imaging and Intervention, Center for the Health Sciences (CHS), UCLA Medical Center (United States); Cameron, Robert B. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Surgery, Thoracic Oncology (United States); Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiological Sciences, Thoracic Imaging and Intervention, Center for the Health Sciences (CHS), UCLA Medical Center (United States)

    2009-07-15

    One of the main issues with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the subpleural lung malignancy is pain management during and after RF ablation. In this article, we present a case that utilized a technique to decrease the pain associated with RF ablation of a malignancy located within the subpleural lung. Under CT guidance, we created an artificial pneumothorax prior to the RF ablation, which resulted in minimizing the pain usually experienced during and after the procedure. It also decreased the amount of pain medications usually used in patients undergoing RF ablation of a subpleural lung lesion.

  9. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  10. Patterning of silica microsphere monolayers with focused femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Wenjian; Piestun, Rafael

    2006-03-13

    We demonstrate the patterning of monolayer silica microsphere lattices with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses. We selectively removed microspheres from a lattice and characterized the effect on the lattice and the substrate. The proposed physical mechanism for the patterning process is laser-induced breakdown followed by ablation of material. We show that a microsphere focuses radiation in its interior and in the near field. This effect plays an important role in the patterning process by enhancing resolution and accuracy and by reducing the pulse energy threshold for damage. Microsphere patterning could create controlled defects within self-assembled opal photonic crystals.

  11. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  12. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  13. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  14. Irreversible Electroporation for Focal Ablation at the Porta Hepatis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru, E-mail: vk103@ic.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Thapar, Ankur, E-mail: a.thapar09@imperial.ac.uk; Oskrochi, Youssof, E-mail: Youssof.Oskrochi09@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Department of Surgery and Cancer (United Kingdom); Picard, John, E-mail: John.picard@imperial.nhs.uk [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthesia (United Kingdom); Leen, Edward L. S., E-mail: Edward.leen@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver metastases who are not candidates for surgery may be treated with focal ablation techniques with established survival benefits. Irreversible electroporation is the newest of these and has the putative advantages of a nonthermal action, preventing damage to adjacent biliary structures and bowel. This report describes the use of irreversible electroporation in a 61-year-old man with a solitary chemoresistant liver metastasis unsuitable for radiofrequency ablation as a result of its proximity to the porta hepatis. At 3 months, tumor size was decreased on computed tomography from 28 Multiplication-Sign 19 to 20 Multiplication-Sign 17 mm, representing stable disease according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. This corresponded to a decrease in tumor volume size from 5.25 to 3.16 cm{sup 3}. There were no early or late complications. Chemoresistant liver metastases in the proximity of the porta hepatis that are considered to be too high a risk for conventional surgery or thermal ablation may be considered for treatment by the novel ablation technique of irreversible electroporation.

  15. Palliation of Painful Perineal Metastasis Treated with Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, L., E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, S.; Kalioras, V.; Pomoni, M.; Batakis, N. [Red-Cross Hospital of Athens, Radiology Department, 'Korgialeneio-Benakeio' (Greece)

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of painful perineal metastasis from urinary bladder carcinoma in a 73-years-old woman, treated with CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The pain was immediately relieved and follow-up at 1 and 6 months showed total necrosis of the mass. One year later, the patient has no pain and her quality of life is improved.

  16. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  17. Excessive Hyperthermic Necrosis of a Pulmonary Lobe after Hypertonic Saline-Enhanced Monopolar Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae Sung, E-mail: tskim@smc.samsung.co.kr; Lim, Hyo K. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hojoong [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, The Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Although there has been a feasibility study of saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of the lung in rabbits, there has been no report on hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of human pulmonary tumors or its complication. We report a case in which a large necrotic cavity was produced in the lung after hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of recurrent metastatic tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma. Although hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation is powerful and efficient in local ablation, it is difficult to predict the exact extent of ablation, especially in the lungs. This can be dangerous, as there is a high chance of producing an ablation area much larger than expected and, hence, major complications. Special attention is required not to overablate while using this technique.

  18. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  19. Paint decontamination kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1984-04-01

    Decontamination kinetics of a high-gloss polyurethane paint have been investigated using a novel flow cell experiment where the sample was counted in situ during decontamination. The /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Y decontaminations follow a rate law that can be predicted theoretically for contaminant ion desorption from weakly heterogeneous random surface adsorption sites. Paint surfaces show the same decontamination kinetics after damage by abrasion or ultraviolet irradiation prior to contamination. The systems investigated exhibit Freundlich adsorption isotherm behavior during contamination; this is also characteristic of weakly heterogeneous random surfaces and is very commonly observed in ion adsorption studies at low concentrations.

  20. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: debaere@igr.fr [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  1. Laser Microperforated Biodegradable Microbial Polyhydroxyalkanoate Substrates for Tissue Repair Strategies: An Infrared Microspectroscopy Studey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G Ellis; P Cano; M Jadraque; M Martin; L Lopez; T Nunez; E de la Pena; C Marco; L Garrido

    2011-12-31

    Flexible and biodegradable film substrates prepared by solvent casting from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) solutions in chloroform were microperforated by ultraviolet laser ablation and subsequently characterized using infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and imaging techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both transmission synchrotron IR microspectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance microspectroscopy measurements demonstrate variations in the polymer at the ablated pore rims, including evidence for changes in chemical structure and crystallinity. SEM results on microperforated PHBHV substrates after cell culture demonstrated that the physical and chemical changes observed in the biomaterial did not hinder cell migration through the pores.

  2. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  3. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010more »of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.« less

  4. Kinetic freeze out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magas, V K; Csernai, László P; Grassi, Frédérique; Greiner, W; Hama, Y; Kodama, T; Lázár, Z I; Stöcker, H; Lázár, Zs.I.

    1999-01-01

    Freeze out of particles across a space-time hypersurface is discussed in kinetic models. The calculation of final momentum distribution of emitted particles is described for freeze out surfaces, with spacelike normals. The resulting non-equilibrium distribution does not resemble, the previously proposed, cut Juttner distribution, and shows non-exponential p_t-spectra similar to the ones observed in experiments.

  5. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  6. Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ván

    2011-02-01

    Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

  7. Fully-automatic laser welding and micro-sculpting with universal in situ inline coherent imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Paul J L; Ji, Yang; Galbraith, Christopher M; Kinross, Alison W; Van Vlack, Cole; Fraser, James M

    2014-01-01

    Though new affordable high power laser technologies make possible many processing applications in science and industry, depth control remains a serious technical challenge. Here we show that inline coherent imaging, with line rates up to 312 kHz and microsecond-duration capture times, is capable of directly measuring laser penetration depth in a process as violent as kW-class keyhole welding. We exploit ICI's high speed, high dynamic range and robustness to interference from other optical sources to achieve fully automatic, adaptive control of laser welding as well as ablation, achieving micron-scale sculpting in vastly different heterogeneous biological materials.

  8. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belikov, A V; Skrypnik, A V; Shatilova, K V

    2014-08-31

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained. (laser biophotonics)

  9. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high...

  10. Bronchopleural Fistula After Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannella, Mathieu; Cornelis, Francois; Descat, Edouard; Ferron, Stephane; Carteret, Thibault; Castagnede, Hugues; Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: palussiere@bergonie.org [Regional Cancer Center, Department of Interventional Radiology, Institut Bergonie (France)

    2011-02-15

    The present article describes two cases of bronchopleural fistula (BPF) occurring after radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors. Both procedures were carried out using expandable multitined electrodes, with no coagulation of the needle track. After both ablations, ground-glass opacities encompassed the nodules and abutted the visceral pleura. The first patient had a delayed pneumothorax, and the second had a recurrent pneumothorax. Both cases of BPF were diagnosed on follow-up computed tomography chest scans (i.e., visibility of a distinct channel between the lung or a peripheral bronchus and the pleura) and were successfully treated with chest tubes alone. Our goal is to highlight the fact that BPF can occur without needle-track coagulation and to suggest that minimally invasive treatment is sufficient to cure BPFs of this specific origin.

  11. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ashok; Pino, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  12. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-06-22

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  13. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamagami, Takuji, E-mail: yamagami@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsushima, Shigenori; Tanaka, Osamu; Miura, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    We describe a 71-year-old woman with a hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RF) with a single internally cooled electrode under computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Nine months after the procedure, CT images showed herniation of the large intestine into the right pleural cavity. To our knowledge this complication of RF performed with a single internally cooled electrode under CT guidance has not been previously reported.

  14. Focal Hydrothermal Ablation: Preliminary Investigation of a New Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Sumit

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo determine whether focal tissue ablation is possible with interstitial instillation of steam.MethodsFresh swine livers were used. Through a 20 gauge needle, steam was instilled every 5 s, 3 (n = 5), 6 (n = 5), 9 (n = 5), or 12 (n = 5 + 5) times in a liver lobe. The ablated zones were sectioned parallel (n = 20) or perpendicular (n = 5) to the needle track. The longitudinal long and short axis diameters, or transverse long and short axis diameters of areas with discoloration on macroscopic examination, were measured. The experiment was repeated in vivo on a pig. Steam instillation was performed once every 5 s for 5 min in the liver (n = 3) and in muscle (n = 4), and temperature changes at three neighboring sites were monitored. Long and short axis diameters of the discolored areas were measured.ResultsA well-defined area of discoloration was invariably present at the site of steam instillation. The median longitudinal long axis diameter were 2.0, 2.5, 2.5, and 3.5 cm for 3, 6, 9, and 12 steam instillations in vitro, while median short axis diameters were 1.0, 1.5, 1.5, and 1.5 cm, respectively. Six attempts at ablation in vivo could be successfully completed. The long axis diameters of the ablated zones in the liver were 7.0 and 8.0 cm, while in muscle it ranged from 5.5 to 7.0 cm.ConclusionInstillation of steam in the liver in vitro and in vivo, and in muscle in vivo rapidly leads to circumscribed zones of coagulation necrosis.

  15. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  16. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumours

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [University of Pisa, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology, Liver Transplants, and Infectious Diseases (Italy); Baere, Thierry de [Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Lencioni, Riccardo [University of Pisa, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology, Liver Transplants, and Infectious Diseases (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumour ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of liver malignancies. Among these methods, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RFA is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options [1, 2]. In addition, RFA is considered a viable alternate to surgery (1) for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer, and (2) for patients deemed ineligible for surgical resection because of extent and location of the disease or concurrent medical conditions [3]. These guidelines were written to be used in quality-improvement programs to assess RFA of HCC and liver metastases. The most important processes of care are (1) patient selection, (2) performing the procedure, and (3) monitoring the patient. The outcome measures or indicators for these processes are indications, success rates, and complication rates.

  17. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.it; Bozzi, Elena [Pisa University Hospital, Division of Radiodiagnostic, Department of Oncological and Radiological Sciences (Italy); Faviana, Pinuccia [Pisa University Hospital, Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Molecular Diagnostics (Italy); Cioni, Dania [Pisa University Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation (Italy); Della Pina, Clotilde [Pisa University Hospital, Division of Radiodiagnostic, Department of Oncological and Radiological Sciences (Italy); Sbrana, Alberto [University of Pisa (Italy); Fontanini, Gabriella [Pisa University Hospital, Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Molecular Diagnostics (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Pisa University Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  18. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  19. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  20. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  1. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjects Caterpillar, SandiaCombustion Kinetics Home

  2. Task 12: Laser cleaning of contaminated painted surfaces. Semi-annual report, April 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisanti, A.A.; Hassett, D.J.

    1997-05-01

    Paint contaminated with radionuclides and other hazardous materials is common in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Facility decommissioning and decontamination requires the removal of contaminated paint. Paint removal technologies include laser- and abrasive-based systems. F2 Associates are utilizing a pulsed-repetition CO{sub 2} laser that produces a 2.5-cm x 2.5-cm beam which can be scanned across a 30- x 100-cm raster and, when placed on a robot, can be designed to clean any surface that the robot can be programmed to follow. Causing little or no damage to the substrate (concrete, steel, etc.), the laser ablates the material to be removed from a given surface. Ablated material is then pulled into a filtration and collection (VAC-PAC) system to prevent the hazardous substances from entering into the atmosphere. The VAC-PAC system deposits the ablated material into waste drums which may be removed from the system without compromising the integrity of the seal, allowing a new drum to be set up for collection without leakage of the ablated material into the atmosphere.

  3. Laser Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  4. Laser applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The breadth of current applications of laser technology is described. It is used as the basis for extrapolating to future application in such activities as AVLIS, SIS, ICP-MS, and RIMs.

  5. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore »the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  6. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  7. Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers Michael Hutchins #12;The PROBLEM opia - near sightedness - Laser Assisted in SItu Keratomileusis atomileusis is the procedure of opening the eye and ring the cornea. SIK uses an excimer laser to perform the alterations an er a knife or a femtosecond laser

  8. Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

  9. Modeling laser-induced periodic surface structures: Finite-difference time-domain feedback simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skolski, J. Z. P., E-mail: j.z.p.skolski@utwente.nl; Vincenc Obona, J. [Materials innovation institute M2i, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Römer, G. R. B. E.; Huis in 't Veld, A. J. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-03-14

    A model predicting the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) is presented. That is, the finite-difference time domain method is used to study the interaction of electromagnetic fields with rough surfaces. In this approach, the rough surface is modified by “ablation after each laser pulse,” according to the absorbed energy profile, in order to account for inter-pulse feedback mechanisms. LIPSSs with a periodicity significantly smaller than the laser wavelength are found to “grow” either parallel or orthogonal to the laser polarization. The change in orientation and periodicity follow from the model. LIPSSs with a periodicity larger than the wavelength of the laser radiation and complex superimposed LIPSS patterns are also predicted by the model.

  10. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tada, Akihiro, E-mail: tdakihiro@gmail.com; Hiraki, Takao [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Iguchi, Toshihiro [Fukuyama City Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Toyooka, Shinichi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery (Japan); Kiura, Katsuyuki [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Tsuda, Toshihide [Okayama University Graduate School, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Graduate School of Environmental Science (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Epidemiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  11. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  12. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russo, R.E.; Reade, R.P.; Garrison, S.M.; Berdahl, P.

    1995-07-11

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film. 8 figs.

  13. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russo, Richard E. (Walnut Creek, CA); Reade, Ronald P. (Berkeley, CA); Garrison, Stephen M. (Palo Alto, CA); Berdahl, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film.

  14. Massive Hemoptysis from Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: Successful Treatment by Coil Embolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Takao, Motoshi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic Surgery (Japan); Murashima, Shuichi; Kodama, Hiroshi; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Shimpo, Hideto [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic Surgery (Japan); Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    A 75-year-old man received lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation to treat lung metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma. Massive hemoptysis occurred 1 week after lung RF ablation. Emergent contrast-enhanced CT and pulmonary arteriography revealed a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm, which was embolized with coils. The postembolization course was uneventful. Hemoptysis did not recur for 5 months.

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment in Proximity to the Gallbladder Without Subsequent Acute Cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patti, Jay W.; Neeman, Ziv, E-mail: zneeman@cc.hih.gov; Wood, Bradford J. [National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Building 10, Room 1C641, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2003-08-15

    Initial reports have suggested that proximity of liver tumors to the gallbladder may increase the risk for cholecystitis after radiofrequency ablation. A colon adenocarcinoma metastasis to the liver in contact with the gallbladder was successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation without subsequent cholecystitis.

  16. IDetachable, Human-Rated, Ablative Environmentally Compliant TPSLunar Surface Systems 2008 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems 2008 Phase II Proposal X8.01-8631 Lightweight Hybrid Ablator Incorporating Aerogel-Filled Open skeleton filled with a high temperature nanoscale aerogel insulator. Structural integrity and high insulation behavior have been demonstrated when used in combination with a non-ablating, coated carbon

  17. Imaging of lithium pellet ablation trails and measurement of g profiles in TFTR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Darren T.

    Imaging of lithium pellet ablation trails and measurement of g profiles in TFTR J. L. Terry, E. S March 1992) Video images with 2 ps exposures of the Li+ emission in Li pellet ablation clouds have been obtained in a variety of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak discharges. The pellet clouds are viewed from

  18. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser on the electromagnetic (EM) properties in high-frequency domain (HF) of multiferroic Bi2FeCrO6 (BFCO) thin films. The films were epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser ablation. Typical 50 nm-thick BFCO

  19. Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm Related to Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurai, Jun, E-mail: sakurai@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Mimura, Hidefumi; Gobara, Hideo; Hiraki, Takao; Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    We describe a case of pulmonary artery (PA) pseudoaneurysm related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of lung tumor. We performed RFA for a pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma directly adjacent to a branch of the PA. Seventeen days later, the patient complained of hemoptysis. A chest CT image revealed PA pseudoaneurysm. Transcatheter coil embolization was performed 59 days after RFA. Although PA pseudoaneurysm is rare, with an incidence of 0.2% (1/538 sessions) at our institution, it should be recognized as a risk when treating lung tumors adjacent to a branch of the PA.

  20. Fusion neutron yield from high intensity laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Petrov, G.M.; Velikovich, A.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The fusion neutron yield from a compact neutron source is studied. Laser-irradiated deuterium clusters serve as a precursor of high-energy deuterium ions, which react with the walls of a fusion reaction chamber and produce copious amounts of neutrons in fusion reactions. The explosion of deuterium clusters with initial radius of 50-200 A irradiated by a subpicosecond laser with intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} is examined theoretically. We studied the conversion efficiency of laser energy to ion kinetic energy, the mean and maximum ion kinetic energy, and ion energy distribution function by a molecular dynamics model. A yield of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} neutrons/J is obtainable for a peak laser intensity of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} and clusters with an initial radius of 200-400 A.

  1. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. P. Schleich; J. P. Dahl

    2002-03-14

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number, N, of particles. We present a quantum state of N non-interacting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centrifugal potential whose strength is quadratic in the number of dimensions of configuration space.

  2. Stratospheric sulfur oxidation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayne, J.T.; Worsnop, D.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 in the atmosphere is believed to involve the reaction of SO3 with water. It is commonly assumed that this is an important step leading to homogeneous nucleation of H2SO4 aerosol particles. Heterogeneous chemistry on sulfuric acid aerosols regulate much of the ozone photochemistry in the lower stratosphere and are also believed to have significant effect on the climate. Understanding aerosol loading requires a detailed knowledge of the stratospheric sulfur budget, including its oxidation kinetics. Here we present results of a laboratory project studying a key step in the oxidation process, the homogeneous reaction between SO3 and H2O vapor. Kinetic measurements are performed in a high-pressure turbulent fast-flow reactor (fabricated at MIT) which minimizes heterogeneous loss of SO3 on reactorwalls. The rate of decay of SO3 and the appearance of H2SO4 is monitored in the presence of excess water vapor. Gas phase reactants and products are detected via an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer which is coupled to the exit of the flow reactor. Sulfuric acid nucleation studies can also be performed using the turbulent flow reactor. Initial measurements using a particle detector (based on Mie scattering) showed that aerosol formation and particle size distribution are controlled by varying the SO3/H2O gas ratio and the reactor temperature. Results for the reaction SO3J+ H2O show a second order dependence in water vapor density and a strong negative temperature dependence. The results, measured in the range -30C to +95C, imply that an SO3.H2O adduct and/or a water dimer species is likely involved in the reaction mechanism. Results of recent theoretical calculations on the SO3 + H2O system also support the finding that two water molecules are involved. Implications for the gas phase production of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  3. Optimization of the temporal shape of laser pulses for ablation , E. Lorina,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorin, Emmanuel

    @math.carleton.ca (E. Lorin), alain.cournoyer@ino.ca (A. Cournoyer) Preprint submitted to Elsevier November 12, 2013

  4. Physical mechanisms of short pulse laser ablation D. von der Linde and K. Sokolowski-Tinten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    and transform into some volatile phase, e.g. a gas or a plasma. The transition from the solid to the gas phase.e. a direct transition between the solid phase and the gas phase. Otherwise, a direct transition to a gaseous or a fluid phase can be accomplished by very rapid heating of solid matter to temperatures higher than

  5. High-throughput metal nanoparticle catalysis by pulsed laser ablation Selim Senkan a,*, Michael Kahn a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    -PLA were also screened for their catalytic activities and selectivities for the partial oxidation for catalytic applications. Catalytic materials containing Rh, bimetallic Rh/Pt and trimetallic Rh of propylene. In less than a day, over 40 different catalytic materials of nanoparticles supported on g-Al2O3

  6. Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization and laser ablation electrospray ionization mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization cellulose degradation products produced by accelerated aging in unsized cotton paper. Soluble extracts from and degradation rate of cellulose in aging paper has been of great concern in applications where the long term

  7. EFFECT OF PULSING PARAMETERS ON LASER ABLATIVE CLEANING OF COPPER Paper # M602

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    with the enthalpy method. Experiments are carried out on copper samples having different oxide layer thickness. The copper oxide layer thickness determined by ellipsometer, and the chemical constituents of the copper oxide layer determined via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are incorporated into this numerical

  8. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation: Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    the surface at 52ns. The jet stream of particles appeared atshows branching of the jet stream, which could be due to itsbut not particles. The jet stream of silicon particles as

  9. Radiative cooling of laser ablated vapor plumes: experimental and theoretical analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Grief, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    J. , Thermal radiation heat transfer, 4 th ed, (Taylor &in the calculation of the radiation heat transfer, only thelines, the thermal radiation heat transfer is given by [16

  10. Electrical and optical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    , DLC films can be used as anti-reflective coatings on optics, cutting and abrasive wear tools, IR windows, computer hard disk coatings, bioresistant coatings for medical implants, watch cases and lenses

  11. Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58 84(Technical Report) | SciTechfor

  12. Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-04-16

    A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs. 1 fig.

  13. Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs.

  14. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  15. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which...

  16. Systems and methods for laser assisted sample transfer to solution for chemical analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-08-27

    Systems and methods are described for laser ablation of an analyte from a specimen and capturing of the analyte in a dispensed solvent to form a testing solution. A solvent dispensing and extraction system can form a liquid microjunction with the specimen. The solvent dispensing and extraction system can include a surface sampling probe. The laser beam can be directed through the surface sampling probe. The surface sampling probe can also serve as an atomic force microscopy probe. The surface sampling probe can form a seal with the specimen. The testing solution including the analyte can then be analyzed using an analytical instrument or undergo further processing.

  17. Sandia Energy - Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Diagnostics Gas-Phase Diagnostics Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy Nonlinear Laser...

  18. X-ray ablation rates in inertial confinement fusion capsule materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    X-ray ablation rates have been measured in beryllium, copper-doped beryllium, germanium-doped plastic (Ge-doped CH), and diamondlike high density carbon (HDC) for radiation temperatures T in the range of 160-260 eV. In beryllium, the measured ablation rates range from 3 to 12 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns; in Ge-doped CH, the ablation rates range from 2 to 6 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns; and for HDC, the rates range from 2 to 9 mg/cm{sup 2}/ns. The ablation rates follow an approximate T{sup 3} dependence and, for T below 230 eV, the beryllium ablation rates are significantly higher than HDC and Ge-doped CH. The corresponding implied ablation pressures are in the range of 20-160 Mbar, scaling as T{sup 3.5}. The results are found to be well predicted by computational simulations using the physics packages and computational techniques employed in the design of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion capsules. An iterative rocket model has been developed and used to compare the ablation rate data set to spherical indirect-drive capsule implosion experiments and to confirm the validity of some aspects of proposed full-scale National Ignition Facility ignition capsule designs.

  19. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek™ Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  20. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore »the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently under-predicts ? ln v / ? ln k2+ and ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T, and persistently over-predicts ? ln v / ? ln k1+ and ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T. In contrast, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ? ln v / ? ln k2+, ? ln v / ? ln k1+, ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T and ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T. Since the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics includes the advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, soil biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  1. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillams, Alice, E-mail: alliesorting@gmail.com [The London Clinic, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Khan, Zahid [Countess of Chester Hospital (United Kingdom); Osborn, Peter [Queen Alexandra Hospital (United Kingdom); Lees, William [University College London Medical School (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  2. Promethium-doped phosphate glass laser at 933 and 1098 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupke, W.F.; Shinn, M.D.; Kirchoff, T.A.; Finch, C.B.; Boatner, L.A.

    1987-12-28

    A promethium (Pm/sup 3 +/) laser has been demonstrated for the first time. Trivalent promethium 147 doped into a lead-indium-phosphate glass etalon was used to produce room-temperature four-level laser emission at wavelengths of 933 and 1098 nm. Spectroscopic and kinetic measurements have shown that Pm/sup 3 +/ is similar to Nd/sup 3 +/ as a laser active ion.

  3. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  4. Transhepatic Approach for Percutaneous Computed-Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: iguchi@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Mukai, Takashi; Hase, Soichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Tajiri, Nobuhisa; Sakurai, Jun; Mimura, Hidefumi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Saika, Takashi; Kumon, Hiromi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Urology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    We performed percutaneously radiofrequency (RF) ablation of 5 renal cell carcinomas (mean diameter 26 {+-} 15 mm) with computed-tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance using the transhepatic route. The RF electrode was successfully advanced into all tumors. RF ablation caused one minor complication (small asymptomatic perirenal hematoma); no major complications occurred. The follow-up contrast-enhanced CT images showed no local tumor progression of any tumors in a median period of 10 months (range 3-14 months). In conclusion, it seems that this transhepatic approach is safe and can be an alternative method for electrode insertion during RF ablation of selected renal tumors.

  5. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keil, Sebastian, E-mail: keil@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Bruners, Philipp [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany); Brehmer, Bernhard [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Mahnken, Andreas Horst [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming more and more established in the treatment of various neoplasms, including retroperitoneal tumors of the kidneys and the adrenal glands. We report the case of RFA in a patient suffering from the third relapse of a retroperitoneal liposarcoma in the left psoas muscle. After repeated surgical resection and supportive radiation therapy of a primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma and two surgically treated recurrences, including replacement of the ureter by a fraction of the ileum, there was no option for further surgery. Thus, we considered RFA as the most suitable treatment option. Monopolar RFA was performed in a single session with a 2-cm umbrella-shaped LeVeen probe. During a 27-month follow-up period the patient remained free of tumor.

  6. Outcome after Radiofrequency Ablation of Sarcoma Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koelblinger, Claus, E-mail: claus.koelblinger@bhs.at [KH Barmherzige Schwestern Ried, Department of Radiology (Austria); Strauss, Sandra, E-mail: s.strauss@ucl.ac.uk [UCL and UCLH, Department of Medical Oncology (United Kingdom); Gillams, Alice, E-mail: alliesorting@gmail.com [The London Clinic, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-14

    PurposeResection is the mainstay of management in patients with sarcoma lung metastases, but there is a limit to how many resections can be performed. Some patients with inoperable disease have small-volume lung metastases that are amenable to thermal ablation. We report our results after radiofrequency ablation (RFA).MethodsThis is a retrospective study of patients treated from 2007 to 2012 in whom the intention was to treat all sites of disease and who had a minimum CT follow-up of 4 months. Treatment was performed under general anesthesia/conscious sedation using cool-tip RFA. Follow-up CT scans were analyzed for local control. Primary tumor type, location, grade, disease-free interval, prior resection/chemotherapy, number and size of lung tumors, uni- or bilateral disease, complications, and overall and progression-free survival were recorded.ResultsTwenty-two patients [15 women; median age 48 (range 10–78) years] with 55 lung metastases were treated in 30 sessions. Mean and median tumor size and initial number were 0.9 cm and 0.7 (range 0.5–2) cm, and 2.5 and 1 (1–7) respectively. Median CT and clinical follow-up were 12 (4–54) and 20 (8–63) months, respectively. Primary local control rate was 52 of 55 (95 %). There were 2 of 30 (6.6 %) Common Terminology Criteria grade 3 complications with no long-term sequelae. Mean (median not reached) and 2- and 3-year overall survival were 51 months, and 94 and 85 %. Median and 1- and 2-year progression-free survival were 12 months, and 53 and 23 %. Prior disease-free interval was the only significant factor to affect overall survival.ConclusionRFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with small-volume sarcoma metastases.

  7. Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation of Unresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinomas: A Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haidu, Marion, E-mail: marion.haidu@i-med.ac.at [Medical University Innsbruck, Clinic of Radiology, Department of Microinvasive Therapy (SIP) (Austria); Dobrozemsky, Georg, E-mail: georg.dobroszemsky@i-med.ac.at [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Austria); Schullian, Peter, E-mail: peter.schullian@i-med.ac.at; Widmann, Gerlig, E-mail: gerlig.widmann@i-med.ac.at [Medical University Innsbruck, Clinic of Radiology, Department of Microinvasive Therapy (SIP) (Austria); Klaus, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.klaus@bhs.at; Weiss, Helmut, E-mail: helmut.weiss@bbsalz.at; Margreiter, Raimund, E-mail: raimund.margreiter@i-med.ac.at [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Surgery (Austria); Bale, Reto, E-mail: reto.bale@i-med.ac.at [Medical University Innsbruck, Clinic of Radiology, Department of Microinvasive Therapy (SIP) (Austria)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment effects, complications, and outcome of percutaneous stereotactic radiofrequency ablation (SRFA) of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Patients and Methods: Eleven consecutive patients (nine men and two women) with a total of 36 inoperable ICCs (18 initial lesions, 16 lesions newly detected during follow-up, and two local recurrences) underwent SRFA between December 2004 and June 2010. Two different radiofrequency ablation (RFA) devices with internally cooled electrodes were used. Tumor diameters ranged from 0.5 to 10 cm (median 3.0 cm). A total of 23 SRFA sessions were performed. The efficacy of SRFA was evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months. Results: Primary technical effectiveness rate was 92%. Further follow-up every 3 months revealed three local recurrences (8%), two of which were successfully retreated, resulting in a secondary technical effectiveness rate of 98%. After a total of 23 RFA sessions, three major complications occurred (13%) that could be managed interventionally. Mean follow-up time was 35 months (range 12-81 months). One- and 3-year overall survival rates were 91 and 71%, respectively. The median overall survival was 60 months (according to the life table method). Eight (73%) of 11 patients were still alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: SRFA is effective in the treatment of unresectable ICC even if the tumor is large and located close to major vessels. SRFA shows a survival benefit compared to other palliative treatment options and may also be considered as the first-line local treatment of ICCs in selected patients.

  8. Fabrication of moth-eye structures on silicon by direct six-beam laser interference lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jia; Zhang, Ziang; Weng, Zhankun; Wang, Zuobin Wang, Dapeng

    2014-05-28

    This paper presents a new method for the generation of cross-scale laser interference patterns and the fabrication of moth-eye structures on silicon. In the method, moth-eye structures were produced on a surface of silicon wafer using direct six-beam laser interference lithography to improve the antireflection performance of the material surface. The periodic dot arrays of the moth-eye structures were formed due to the ablation of the irradiance distribution of interference patterns on the wafer surface. The shape, size, and distribution of the moth-eye structures can be adjusted by controlling the wavelength, incidence angles, and exposure doses in a direct six-beam laser interference lithography setup. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that direct six-beam laser interference lithography can provide a way to fabricate cross-scale moth-eye structures for antireflection applications.

  9. Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

  10. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Globig, Michael A. (Antioch, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  11. Measurement of thermally ablated lesions in sonoelastographic images using level set methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Kevin J.

    such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have attracted the interest as hypo-attenuating regions. However, it also presents disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure

  12. Bulk ablation of soft tissue with intense ultrasound: Modeling and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, T. Douglas

    , the thermal de- struction of large tissue volumes is most commonly per- formed using radiofrequency RF ablation electromagnetic radiation in the 400­700 kHz range .3,4 Intense ultrasound treatment, first

  13. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Piriz, A. R.; Lopez Cela, J. J. [E.T.S.I. Industriales and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas (INEI), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A previous theory on dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at interfaces between Newtonian fluids is reformulated in order to make evident the analogy of this problem with the related one on dynamic stabilization of ablation fronts in the framework of inertial confinement fusion. Explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the boundaries of the dynamically stable region which turns out to be completely analogue to the stability charts obtained for the case of ablation fronts. These results allow proposing experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for studying the case of ablation fronts. Experiments with Newtonian fluids are presented which demonstrate the validity of the theoretical approach and encourage to pursue experimental research on ablation fronts to settle the feasibility of dynamic stabilization in the inertial confinement fusion scenario.

  14. A novel means of cardiac catheter guidance for ablation therapy of ventricular tachycardia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Wener

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a system for identifying the site of origin of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and guiding a catheter to that site in order to deliver radio-frequency (RF) ablation therapy. Myocardial infarction (MI), also ...

  15. Mechanism for self-formation of periodic structures on a plastic polymer surface using a nanoseconds and femtosecond laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansouri, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    The high UV laser dose at 193 nm induces grooves on poly allyl diglycol carbonate PADC (CR39) at normal irradiation. The spatial period exhibits to be nearly invariant for azimuth and polar angles indicating a loose dependence on the incident angles but the LIPSS (Laser-induced periodic surface structures) are always parallel to the P polarization component of the incident beam. The most common approach to explain LIPSS formation is related to the Sipe theory which does not account for all the observed phenomena especially LIPSS with periodicity larger than the laser wavelength. In fact the LIPSS is a multi parameter mechanism based on surface rippling, acoustic modulation and laser ablation and etc. In experiment with CR-39 polymer, laser irradiation produce a very tiny melting layer of mixture of monomer due to depolymerization on the surface and it seems capillary wave is responsible for grooves (fringe pattern) formation.

  16. From ripples to spikes: a hydro-dynamical physical mechanism to interpret femtosecond laser induced self-assembled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsibidis, George D; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Materials irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses in sub-ablation conditions are observed to develop various types of self-assembled morphologies that range from nano-ripples to periodic micro-grooves and quasi-periodic micro-spikes. Here, we present a physical scenario that couples electrodynamics, describing surface plasmon excitation, with hydrodynamics, describing Marangoni convection, to elucidate this important sub-ablation regime of light matter interaction in which matter is being modified, however, the underlying process is not yet fully understood. The proposed physical mechanism could be generally applicable to practically any conductive material structured by ultrashort laser pulses, therefore it can be useful for the interpretation of further critical aspects of light matter interaction.

  17. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  18. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  19. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: clbrace@wisc.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (?20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (?10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ?70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  20. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  1. System and method of infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in polyacrylamide gels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haglund, Jr., Richard F.; Ermer, David R.; Baltz-Knorr, Michelle Lee

    2004-11-30

    A system and method for desorption and ionization of analytes in an ablation medium. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of preparing a sample having analytes in a medium including at least one component, freezing the sample at a sufficiently low temperature so that at least part of the sample has a phase transition, and irradiating the frozen sample with short-pulse radiation to cause medium ablation and desorption and ionization of the analytes. The method further includes the steps of selecting a resonant vibrational mode of at least one component of the medium and selecting an energy source tuned to emit radiation substantially at the wavelength of the selected resonant vibrational mode. The medium is an electrophoresis medium having polyacrylamide. In one embodiment, the energy source is a laser, where the laser can be a free electron laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. Alternatively, the laser can be a solid state laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. The laser can emit light at various ranges of wavelength.

  2. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  3. Frequency comb swept lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Tsung-Han

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep ...

  4. Laser machining of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Myers, Booth R. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  5. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  6. Laser Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter covers the basics of the field of stabilizing lasers to optical frequency references such as optical cavities and molecular transitions via the application of servo control systems. These discussions are given with reference to the real-life frequency metrology experienced in Hall-Labs (now Ye-Labs), JILA, University of Colorado. The subjects covered include: the basics of control system stability, a discussion of both the theoretical and experimental limitations, an outline of optical cavity susceptibility to environmental noise, and a brief introduction to the use and limitations of molecular transitions as frequency references.

  7. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory ChalkboardFiber Lasers NIF

  8. Laser Roadshow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratoryandBryanoutreach Laser Roadshow

  9. Analysis of laser remote fusion cutting based on a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matti, R. S. [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, S-971 87 Luleå (Sweden); Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Mosul, Mosul (Iraq); Ilar, T.; Kaplan, A. F. H. [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, S-971 87 Luleå (Sweden)

    2013-12-21

    Laser remote fusion cutting is analyzed by the aid of a semi-analytical mathematical model of the processing front. By local calculation of the energy balance between the absorbed laser beam and the heat losses, the three-dimensional vaporization front can be calculated. Based on an empirical model for the melt flow field, from a mass balance, the melt film and the melting front can be derived, however only in a simplified manner and for quasi-steady state conditions. Front waviness and multiple reflections are not modelled. The model enables to compare the similarities, differences, and limits between laser remote fusion cutting, laser remote ablation cutting, and even laser keyhole welding. In contrast to the upper part of the vaporization front, the major part only slightly varies with respect to heat flux, laser power density, absorptivity, and angle of front inclination. Statistical analysis shows that for high cutting speed, the domains of high laser power density contribute much more to the formation of the front than for low speed. The semi-analytical modelling approach offers flexibility to simplify part of the process physics while, for example, sophisticated modelling of the complex focused fibre-guided laser beam is taken into account to enable deeper analysis of the beam interaction. Mechanisms like recast layer generation, absorptivity at a wavy processing front, and melt film formation are studied too.

  10. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure on the Ti-based nanolayered thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrovi?, Suzana M.; Gakovi?, B.; Peruško, D.; Stratakis, E.; Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete ; Bogdanovi?-Radovi?, I.; ?ekada, M.; Fotakis, C.; Department of Physics, University of Crete, 714 09 Heraklion, Crete ; Jelenkovi?, B.

    2013-12-21

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) and chemical composition changes of Ti-based nanolayered thin films (Al/Ti, Ni/Ti) after femtosecond (fs) laser pulses action were studied. Irradiation is performed using linearly polarized Ti:Sapphire fs laser pulses of 40 fs pulse duration and 800 nm wavelength. The low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization with periods slightly lower than the irradiation wavelength, was typically formed at elevated laser fluences. On the contrary, high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with uniform period of 155 nm, parallel to the laser light polarization, appeared at low laser fluences, as well as in the wings of the Gaussian laser beam distribution for higher used fluence. LSFL formation was associated with the material ablation process and accompanied by the intense formation of nanoparticles, especially in the Ni/Ti system. The composition changes at the surface of both multilayer systems in the LSFL area indicated the intermixing between layers and the substrate. Concentration and distribution of all constitutive elements in the irradiated area with formed HSFLs were almost unchanged.

  11. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  12. Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, A., E-mail: roy@fzu.cz, E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Harilal, S. S.; Polek, M. P.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Endo, A. [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)] [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-Pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-03-15

    We investigated the role of laser pulse duration and intensity on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064?nm Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–20?ns) and intensity. Experimental results performed at CMUXE indicate that the conversion efficiency (CE) of the EUV radiation strongly depend on laser pulse width and intensity, with a maximum CE of ?2.0% measured for the shortest laser pulse width used (5?ns). Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma showed that the ion flux kinetic profiles are shifted to higher energy side with the reduction in laser pulse duration and narrower ion kinetic profiles are obtained for the longest pulse width used. However, our initial results showed that at a constant laser energy, the ion flux is more or less constant regardless of the excitation laser pulse width. The enhanced EUV emission obtained at shortest laser pulse duration studied is related to efficient laser-plasma reheating supported by presence of higher energy ions at these pulse durations.

  13. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  14. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels...

  15. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawai, T., E-mail: t-kawai@hosp.yoka.hyogo.jp; Kaminou, T., E-mail: kaminout@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Fujioka, S.; Ito, H. [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Hakuai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ihaya, T. [Sanin Rosai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  16. Kinetics of visible light photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals:Theory and in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yuan, C.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Ager III, J.W.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-11-14

    Photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals illuminated with visible laser light under ambient conditions was investigated. The photo-oxidation kinetics were monitored by in situ measurement of the crystalline Ge volume fraction by Raman spectroscopy. The effects of laser power and energy on the extent of oxidation were measured using both in situ and ex situ Raman scattering techniques. A mechanistic model in which the tunneling of photo-excited carriers to the oxide surface for electron activated molecular oxygen dissociation is proposed. This quantitative model successfully describes all experimental photo-oxidation observations using physical parameters.

  17. Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Prof. Donald G. Truhlar, Department of Chemistry, February 2007 Recent Results ·Novel analytic functionMedicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics Elizabeth Amin and C. R. Wagner, Medicinal Chemistry Jiali Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 #12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design ·Zn

  18. In conventional accelerators, energy from RF electro-magnetic waves in vacuum is transformed into kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    into kinetic energy of particles driven by the electric field. In high-energy- physics colliders, some, they will equip scientists with powerful new capabilities for answering key questions. Those machines will also charges, called a plasma wave or laser wake, supports a strong longitudinal electric field (see figure 1

  19. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Barmina; P. G. Kuzmin; S. F. Timashev; G. A. Shafeev

    2013-06-03

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 10E10-10E13 Watts per square centimeter. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  20. Laser Pointer Safety INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser Pointer Safety INTRODUCTION The use of laser diode pointers that operate in the visible to the retractable, metal pointer, the laser pointer beam will produce a small dot of light on whatever object at which it is aimed. It can draw an audience¹s attention to a particular key point in a slide show. Laser

  1. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  2. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  3. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  4. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

  5. Laser accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vescial, F.; Aronowitz, F.; Niguel, L.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a laser accelerometer. It comprises: an optical cavity characterizing a frame having an input axis (x), a cross axis (y) orthogonal to and co-planar with the input axis and a (z) axis passing through the intersection of the (x) and (y) axes, the (z) axis being orthogonal to the plane of the (x) and (y) axes; and (x) axis proof mass having a predetermined blanking surface; a flexible beam having a first end coupled to the (x) axis proof mass and a second end coupled to the frame, deflection of the flexible beams permitting a predetermined range of movement of the (x) proof mass on the input axis in a direction opposite to sensed acceleration of the frame; a laser light source having a mirror means within the cavity for providing a light ray coaxially aligned with the (z) axis; detector means having at least a first detector on a sensitive plane, the plane being normal to the (z) axis; bias and amplifier means coupled to the detector means for providing a bias current to the first detector and for amplifying the intensity signal; the (x) axis proof mass blanking surface being centrally positioned within and normal to the light ray null intensity region to provide increased blanking of the light ray in response to transverse movement of the mass on the input axis; control means responsive to the intensity signal for applying an (x) axis restoring force to restore the (x) axis proof mass to the central position and for providing an (x) axis output signal proportional to the restoring force.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaibari, Ammar A. [Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Molian, Pal [Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered 'brick-bridge-mortar' nacre of AlMgB{sub 14} (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB{sub 14}. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB{sub 14}/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 {mu}m lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  7. Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamato, H.

    2008-01-01

    Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling H. Okamoto, A.M. Sessler,effective transverse laser cooling simultaneously withlongitudinal laser cooling, two possibilities are

  8. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    H: Cytokine production after helium-neon laser irradiationpower helium: neon laser irradiation enhances production ofHelium-neon laser irradiation induces effects on cytokine production

  9. Learn More about Fusion & Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learn More about Fusion & Lasers How Lasers Work Learn how lasers were developed and how they work. Outreach NIF & Photon Science researchers take learning opportunities on the...

  10. Laser-assisted nanomaterial deposition, nanomanufacturing, in situ monitoring and associated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Hwang, David J; Minor, Andrew M

    2013-11-12

    Laser-assisted apparatus and methods for performing nanoscale material processing, including nanodeposition of materials, can be controlled very precisely to yield both simple and complex structures with sizes less than 100 nm. Optical or thermal energy in the near field of a photon (laser) pulse is used to fabricate submicron and nanometer structures on a substrate. A wide variety of laser material processing techniques can be adapted for use including, subtractive (e.g., ablation, machining or chemical etching), additive (e.g., chemical vapor deposition, selective self-assembly), and modification (e.g., phase transformation, doping) processes. Additionally, the apparatus can be integrated into imaging instruments, such as SEM and TEM, to allow for real-time imaging of the material processing.

  11. Single-Session Radiofrequency Ablation of Bilateral Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: palussiere@bergonie.org; Gomez, Fernando; Cannella, Matthieu; Ferron, Stephane; Descat, Edouard [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology, Regional Cancer Centre (France); Fonck, Marianne [Institut Bergonie, Department of Digestive Oncology (France); Brouste, Veronique [Institut Bergonie, Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit (France); Avril, Antoine [Institut Bergonie, Department of Surgery (France)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study examined the feasibility and efficacy of bilateral lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) performed in a single session. Methods: From 2002-2009, patients with bilateral lung metastases were treated by RFA, where possible in a single session under general anesthesia with CT guidance. The second lung was punctured only if no complications occurred after treatment of the first lung. Five lung metastases maximum per patient were treated by RFA and prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of acute and delayed complications. Secondary endpoints were calculation of hospitalization duration, local efficacy, median survival, and median time to tumor progression. Local efficacy was evaluated on CT or positron emission tomography (PET) CT. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated for bilateral lung metastases with RFA (mean age, 62 years). Single-session treatment was not possible in 40 due to severe pneumothoraces (n = 24), bilateral pleural contact (n = 14), and operational exclusions (n = 2). Twenty-seven (41%) received single-session RFA of lesions in both lungs for 66 metastases overall. Fourteen unilateral and four bilateral pneumothoraces occurred (18 overall, 66.7%). Unilateral (n = 13) and bilateral (n = 2) chest tube drainage was required. Median hospitalization was 3 (range, 2-8) days. Median survival was 26 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 19-33). Four recurrences on RFA sites were observed (4 patients). Median time to tumor progression was 9.5 months (95% CI, 4.2-23.5). Conclusions: Although performing single-session bilateral lung RFA is not always possible due to pneumothoraces after RFA of first lung, when it is performed, this technique is safe and effective.

  12. A Spectrum of Nerve Injury after Thermal Ablation: A Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Asher; Gupta, Sanjay Ahrar, Kamran Tam, Alda L.

    2013-10-15

    Thermal ablation is an accepted alternative for the palliation of pain from bone metastases. Although rare, neurologic complications after thermal ablation have been reported. We present four cases, including two cases of rapid reversal of postcryoablation neurapraxia after the administration of steroid therapy, and review the literature.

  13. Development of a precise size-controllable pellet injector for the detailed studies of ablation phenomena and mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Development of a precise size-controllable pellet injector for the detailed studies of ablation, pellet injection experiments have been actively carried out in many toroidal devices in the sense. In order to have a common measure of pellet ablation, the regression study has been performed

  14. Spontaneous Regression of Multiple Pulmonary Metastases After Radiofrequency Ablation of a Single Metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Pramod; Escudier, Bernard; Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: debaere@igr.fr [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2011-04-15

    We report two cases of spontaneous regression of multiple pulmonary metastases occurring after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of a single lung metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first such cases reported. These two patients presented with lung metastases progressive despite treatment with interleukin-2, interferon, or sorafenib but were safely ablated with percutaneous RFA under computed tomography guidance. Percutaneous RFA allowed control of the targeted tumors for >1 year. Distant lung metastases presented an objective response despite the fact that they received no targeted local treatment. Local ablative techniques, such as RFA, induce the release of tumor-degradation product, which is probably responsible for an immunologic reaction that is able to produce a response in distant tumors.

  15. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sanjit O.; Petre, Elena N.; Osborne, Joseph; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  16. Microwave Ablation of Pulmonary Malignancies Using a Novel High-energy Antenna System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, Mark W.; Chung, Daniel; Boardman, Philip; Gleeson, Fergus V.; Anderson, Ewan M.

    2013-04-15

    To evaluate the technical success, safety, and imaging follow-up of malignant pulmonary nodules treated with a novel high-energy percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) system. Between July 2010 and September 2011, a total of 23 patients, 12 men, mean age 68 (range 30-87) years with 29 pulmonary malignancies of median diameter 19 (range 8-57) mm, underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA with a 16G microwave needle antenna enabling power up to 180 W. Technical success was defined as needle placement in the intended lesion without death or serious injury. Adequacy of ablation was assessed at 24 h on contrast-enhanced CT. Circumferential solid or ground glass opacification >5 mm was used to define an ideal ablation. Local tumor recurrence was assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months after ablation on contrast-enhanced CT. MWA was technically successful in 93 % (n = 27). Mean ablation duration was 3.6 (range 1-9) min. Ten patients (43 %) developed a pneumothorax as a result of the MWA; only 3 (13 %) required placement of a chest drain. Thirty-day mortality rate was 0 %. The mean hospital stay was 1.5 (range 1-7) days. A total of 22 lesions (75 %) were surrounded by {>=}5 mm ground glass or solid opacification after the procedure. At a median follow-up of 6 months, local recurrence was identified in 3 out of 26 lesions, giving a local control rate of 88 %. MWA using a high-power antenna of pulmonary malignancies is safe, technically achievable, and enables fast ablation times.

  17. Life-Threatening Hematuria Requiring Transcatheter Embolization Following Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, H. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Whittlestone, T. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Department of Urology (United Kingdom); Callaway, M.P. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Mark.Callaway@ubht.swest.nhs.uk

    2006-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation is increasingly being acknowledged as a valid treatment for renal cell carcinoma in patients in whom definitive curative resection is deemed either undesirable or unsafe. A number of published series have shown the technique to have encouraging results and relatively low complication rates. In this article, we report a case of delayed life-threatening hematuria requiring transcatheter embolization of a bleeding intrarenal artery in a patient who had undergone imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation of a 3 cm renal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, such a complication has not been reported previously.

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, Toshiya, E-mail: ksj@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine (Japan); Nishida, Naoshi [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Endocrinology (Japan); Itoh, Kyo [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Combined MRI and Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Renal Tumor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fotiadis, Nikolas I., E-mail: fotiadis.nicholas@gmail.co [Royal London Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Sabharwal, Tarun [Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Gangi, Afshin [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Radiology Department (France); Adam, Andreas [Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    Percutaneous CT- and ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been shown to have very promising medium-term results. We present a unique case of recurrent RCC after partial nephrectomy in a patient with a single kidney and impaired renal function. This tumor could not be visualized either with CT or with ultrasound. A combination of magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopic guidance was used, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, to ablate the tumor with radiofrequency. The patient was cancer-free and off dialysis at 30-month follow up.

  20. Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    to laser ablation and 3D printing for rapid prototypinglaser ablation, and 3D printing. 2.1 ExperimentalMachining, Laser ablation, 3D printing, Microfluidics, Value

  1. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  2. Possibility of nuclear pumped laser experiment using low enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obara, Toru; Takezawa, Hiroki [Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-19, Ookayama Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2012-06-06

    Possibility to perform experiments for nuclear pumped laser oscillation by using low enriched uranium is investigated. Kinetic analyses are performed for two types of reactor design, one is using highly enriched uranium and the other is using low enriched uranium. The reactor design is based on the experiment reactor in IPPE. The results show the oscillation of nuclear pumped laser in the case of low enriched uranium reactor is also possible. The use of low enriched uranium in the experiment will make experiment easier.

  3. Temporal structure of X-ray radiation pulses of picosecond laser plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, V S; Kovkov, D V; Matafonov, A P; Karabadzhak, G F; Raikunov, G G [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, Korolev, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Fokin, D A; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ignat'ev, G N; Kapitanov, S V; Krapiva, P S; Korotkov, K E [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    The shape of the X-ray pulse generated by picosecond laser plasma is experimentally studied. The unusual phenomenon was experimentally observed for the first time for targets made of moderate-heavy chemical elements, namely, the pulse of hard X-ray radiation generated by laser plasma at the laser radiation flux of ?10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} had a longer duration than the pulse of softer X-ray radiation. A simple kinetic model is suggested for explaining this fact. We have suggested a method for controlling the temporal shape of X-ray pulse emitted by laser plasma by varying the contrast of laser pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miley, George H. (Champagne, IL); Wells, William E. (Urbana, IL); DeYoung, Russell J. (Hampton, VA)

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  5. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

  6. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  7. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.

    1999-03-02

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided. 11 figs.

  8. Laser induced chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orel, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    the simplest prototype chemical reaction, and since it is soLASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D. E.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

  9. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  10. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  11. Temporal femtosecond pulse shaping dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structures in fused silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin, E-mail: lixin02@bit.edu.cn; Zhang, Kaihu; Yu, Dong; Yu, Yanwu [NanoManufacturing Fundamental Research Joint Laboratory of National Science Foundation of China, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    The dependence of periodic structures and ablated areas on temporal pulse shaping is studied upon irradiation of fused silica by femtosecond laser triple-pulse trains. Three types of periodic structures can be obtained by using pulse trains with designed pulse delays, in which the three-dimensional nanopillar arrays with ?100–150?nm diameters and ?200?nm heights are first fabricated in one step. These nanopillars arise from the break of the ridges of ripples in the upper portion, which is caused by the split of orthogonal ripples in the bottom part. The localized transient electron dynamics and corresponding material properties are considered for the morphological observations.

  12. Innovative lasers for uranium isotope separation. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1991-06-01

    Copper vapor lasers have important applications to uranium atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). The authors have spent the first two years of their project investigating two innovative methods of exciting/pumping copper vapor lasers which have the potential to improve the efficiency and scaling of large laser systems used in uranium isotope separation. Experimental research has focused on the laser discharge kinetics of (1) microwave, and (2) electron beam excitation/pumping of large-volume copper vapor lasers. During the first year, the experiments have been designed and constructed and initial data has been taken. During the second year these experiments have been diagnosed. Highlights of some of the second year results as well as plans for the future include the following: Microwave resonant cavity produced copper vapor plasmas at 2.45 GHz, have been investigated. A CW (0--500 W) signal heats and vaporizes the copper chloride to provide the atomic copper vapor. A pulsed (5 kW, 0.5--5kHz) signal is added to the incoming CW signal via a hybrid mixer to excite the copper states to the laser levels. An enhancement of the visible radiation has been observed during the pulsed pardon of the signal. Electrical probe measurements have been implemented on the system to verify the results of the electromagnetic model formulated last year. Laser gain measurements have been initiated with the use of a commercial copper vapor laser. Measurements of the spatial profile of the emission are also currently being made. The authors plan to increase the amount of pulsed microwave power to the system by implementing a high power magnetron. A laser cavity will be designed and added to this system.

  13. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Max Wiedmann #12;What is TMR? · TMR is used to improve blood flow to heart muscle tissue (myocardial tissue). · This is done using a laser to create small with bypass surgery so no additional opening is required. · The surgeon uses the laser to create 20 to 40 1mm

  14. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  15. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  16. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  17. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  18. Eco Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG|ElecSolutionsKinetics Jump

  19. Bile Duct Disruption Following Radiofrequency Ablation: Successful Repair Using a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Philip M.; Hare, Christopher M.B., E-mail: christopher.hare@uclh.org; Lees, William R. [Middlesex Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-15

    Persistent biliary leaks, whether iatrogenic or secondary to malignancy, often present a difficult management problem. Recent reports have suggested a role for covered metallic stents in this context. We describe the successful use of a covered stent to seal a persistent biliary leak following radiofrequency ablation of colorectal liver metastases.

  20. CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation in Patients with Hepatic Metastases from Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobs, Tobias F., E-mail: tobias.jakobs@med.uni-muenchen.de; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Schrader, Angelika [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany); Stemmler, Hans Joachim [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III (Germany); Trumm, Christoph [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany); Lubienski, Andreas [University of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiology (Germany); Murthy, Ravi [The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging (United States); Helmberger, Thomas K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Department of Radiology (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical success, technique effectiveness, and survival following radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer liver metastases and to determine prognostic factors. Forty-three patients with 111 breast cancer liver metastases underwent CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Technical success and technique effectiveness was evaluated by performing serial CT scans. We assessed the prognostic value of hormone receptor status, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and presence of extrahepatic tumor spread. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Technical success was achieved in 107 metastases (96%). Primary technique effectiveness was 96%. During follow-up local tumor progression was observed in 15 metastases, representing a secondary technique effectiveness of 86.5%. The overall time to progression to the liver was 10.5 months. The estimated overall median survival was 58.6 months. There was no significant difference in terms of survival probability with respect to hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, and presence of isolated bone metastases. Survival was significantly lower among patients with extrahepatic disease, with the exception of skeletal metastases. We conclude that CT-guided RF ablation of liver metastases from breast cancer can be performed with a high degree of technical success and technique effectiveness, providing promising survival rates in patients with no visceral extrahepatic disease. Solitary bone metastases did not negatively affect survival probability after RF ablation.

  1. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizandari, Malkhaz [Tbilisi State Medical University, Department of Radiology (Georgia); Pai, Madhava, E-mail: madhava.pai@imperial.ac.uk; Xi Feng [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina [University Hospital Brno Bohunice, Department of Radiology (Czech Republic); Quaretti, Pietro [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina [University of Bologna, Department of Radiology, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi (Italy); Ao Guokun [The 309 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Department of Radiology (China); Kyriakides, Charis [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Robert [Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering (United Kingdom); Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy, E-mail: nagy.habib@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  2. Stress (Tako-Tsubo) Cardiomyopathy Following Radiofrequency Ablation of a Liver Tumor: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min, E-mail: jmsh@snu.ac.kr; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Park, Eun-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, and Institute of Radiation Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction occurring in the absence of obstructive coronary disease. It is precipitated by acute emotional or physical stress. We present a case of stress cardiomyopathy which developed during hepatic radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Sustained Growth of the Ex Vivo Ablation Zones' Critical Short Axis Using Gas-cooled Radiofrequency Applicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempp, Hansjoerg, E-mail: hansjoerg.rempp@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Scharpf, Marcus [Insitute of Pathology, Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy (Germany); Voigtlaender, Matthias [ERBE Elektromedizin GmbH (Germany); Schraml, Christina; Schmidt, Diethard [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Fend, Falko [Insitute of Pathology, Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Enderle, Markus D. [ERBE Elektromedizin GmbH (Germany); Pereira, Philippe L. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Minimalinvasive Therapien und Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Clasen, Stephan [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ablation zones created with a gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 320 ablations with an internally gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator were performed on fresh ex vivo bovine liver tissue, varying the ablation time (5, 10, 15, and 20 min), power (20, 30, 40, and 50 W), and gas pressure of the CO{sub 2} used for cooling (585, 600, 615, 630, 645 psi), leading to a total of 80 different parameter combinations. Size and shape of the white coagulation zone were assessed. Results: The largest complete ablation zone was achieved after 20 min of implementing 50 W and 645 psi, resulting in a short axis of mean 46 {+-} 1 mm and a long axis of 56 {+-} 2 mm (mean {+-} standard deviation). Short-axis diameters increased between 5 and 20 min of ablation time at 585 psi (increase of the short axis was 45% at 30 W, 29% at 40 W, and 39% at 50 W). This increase was larger at 645 psi (113% at 30 W, 67% at 40 W, and 70% at 50 W). Macroscopic assessment and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) staining revealed incompletely ablated tissue along the needle track in 18 parameter combinations including low-power settings (20 and 30 W) and different cooling levels and ablation times. Conclusion: Gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators increase the short-axis diameter of coagulation in an ex vivo setting if appropriate parameters are selected.

  4. Observation of a crossover in kinetic aggregation of Palladium colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ghafari; M. Ranjbar; S. Rouhani

    2014-12-27

    We use field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) to investigate the growth of palladium colloids over the surface of thin films of WO3/glass. The film is prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at different temperatures. A PdCl2 (aq) droplet is injected on the surface and in the presence of steam hydrogen the droplet is dried through a reduction reaction process. Two distinct aggregation regimes of palladium colloids are observed over the substrates. We argue that the change in aggregation dynamics emerges when the measured water drop Contact Angel (CA) for the WO3/glass thin films passes a certain threshold value, namely CA = 46 degrees, where a crossover in kinetic aggregation of palladium colloids occurs. Our results suggest that the mass fractal dimension of palladium aggregates follows a power-law behavior. The fractal dimension (Df) in the fast aggregation regime, where the measured CA values vary from 27 up to 46 degrees, according to different substrate deposition temperatures, is Df = 1.75 (0.02). This value of Df is in excellent agreement with kinetic aggregation of other colloidal systems in fast aggregation regime. Whereas for the slow aggregation regime, with CA = 58 degrees, the fractal dimension changes abruptly to Df=1.92 (0.03). We have also used a modified Box-Counting method to calculate fractal dimension of gray-level images and observe that the crossover at around CA = 46 degrees remains unchanged.

  5. Creation of a Tumor-Mimic Model Using a Muscle Paste for Radiofrequency Ablation of the Lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawai, T., E-mail: t.kawai@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Kaminou, T.; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Fujioka, S.; Ito, H. [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Nakamura, K. [Hakuai Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an easily created tumor-mimic model and evaluate its efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lung. The bilateral lungs of eight living adult swine were used. A tumor-mimic model was made by percutaneous injection of 1.0 ml muscle paste through the bone biopsy needle into the lung. An RFA probe was then inserted into the tumor mimics immediately after tumor creation. Ablation time, tissue impedance, and temperature were recorded. The tumor mimics and their coagulated regions were evaluated microscopically and macroscopically. The muscle paste was easily injected into the lung parenchyma through the bone biopsy needle and well visualized under fluoroscopy. In 10 of 12 sites the tumor mimics were oval shaped, localized, and homogeneous on gross specimens. Ten tumor mimics were successfully ablated, and four locations were ablated in the normal lung parenchyma as controls. In the tumor and normal lung parenchyma, ablation times were 8.9 {+-} 3.5 and 4.4 {+-} 1.6 min, respectively; tissue impedances at the start of ablation were 100.6 {+-} 16.6 and 145.8 {+-} 26.8 {Omega}, respectively; and temperatures at the end of ablation were 66.0 {+-} 7.9 and 57.5 {+-} 7.6{sup o}C, respectively. The mean size of tumor mimics was 13.9 x 8.2 mm, and their coagulated area was 18.8 x 13.1 mm. In the lung parenchyma, the coagulated area was 15.3 x 12.0 mm. In conclusion, our tumor-mimic model using muscle paste can be easily and safely created and can be ablated using the ablation algorithm in the clinical setting.

  6. Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple Collisionality Regimes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma...

  7. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  8. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  9. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  10. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  11. Cost effective nanostructured copper substrates prepared with ultrafast laser pulses for explosives detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamad, Syed; Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Soma, Venugopal Rao E-mail: soma-venu@yahoo.com; Mohiddon, Md. Ahamad

    2014-06-30

    Ultrafast laser pulses induced surface nanostructures were fabricated on a copper (Cu) target through ablation in acetone, dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and chloroform. Surface morphological information accomplished from the field emission scanning electron microscopic data demonstrated the diversities of ablation mechanism in each case. Fabricated Cu substrates were utilized exultantly to investigate the surface plasmon (localized and propagating) mediated enhancements of different analytes using surface enhance Raman scattering (SERS) studies. Multiple utility of these substrates were efficiently demonstrated by collecting the SERS data of Rhodamine 6G molecule and two different secondary explosive molecules such as 5-amino-3-nitro-l,2,4-triazole and trinitrotoluene on different days which were weeks apart. We achieved significant enhancement factors of >10{sup 5} through an easily adoptable cleaning procedure.

  12. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  13. Probing embryonic tissue mechanics with laser hole-drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Scully, Peter C; Hutson, M Shane

    2008-01-01

    We have used laser hole-drilling to assess mechanical changes in an embryonic epithelium during development - in vivo and with subcellular resolution. This method uses a single laser pulse to ablate a cylindrical hole (1 micron in diameter, 5-7 micron tall) clean through the epithelium, and tracks the subsequent recoil of adjacent cells (with ms time resolution). We investigate dorsal closure in the fruit fly with emphasis on apical constriction of amnioserosa cells. We find that substantial in-plane tension is carried across each cell surface and not just along cell-cell interfaces. In early phases of constriction, the tension is 1.6-fold greater along cell-cell interfaces. Later, the two tensions are indistinguishable. Other changes associated with constriction include a decrease in the characteristic recoil times and an increased anisotropy. The smaller time constants imply a more solid-like tissue. The anisotropy matches changes in the underlying quasi-hexagonal cellular mesh. The results of these laser h...

  14. FIREBALL: Fusion Ignition Rocket Engine with Ballistic Ablative Lithium Liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Lee, Michael H. [Propulsion Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center XD22, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fimognari, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Thermo-nuclear fusion may be the key to a high Isp, high specific power propulsion system. In a fusion system energy is liberated within, and imparted directly to, the propellant. In principle, this can overcome the performance limitations inherent in systems that require thermal power transfer across a material boundary, and/or multiple power conversion stages (NTR, NEP). A thermo-nuclear propulsion system, which attempts to overcome some of the problems inherent in the Orion concept, is described. A dense FRC plasmoid is accelerated to high velocity (in excess of 500 km/s) and is compressed into a detached liner (pulse unit). The kinetic energy of the FRC is converted into thermal and magnetic-field energy, igniting a fusion burn in the magnetically confined plasma. The fusion reaction serves as an ignition source for the liner, which is made out of detonable materials. The energy liberated in this process is converted to thrust by a pusher-plate, as in the classic Orion concept. However with this concept, the vehicle does not carry a magazine of autonomous pulse-units. By accelerating a second, heavier FRC, which acts as a piston, right behind the first one, the velocity required to initiate the fusion burn is greatly reduced.

  15. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos (Okemos, MI); Lozovoy, Vadim V. (Okemos, MI); Comstock, Matthew (Milford, MI)

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  16. Experimental techniques for subnanosecond resolution of laser-launched plates and impact studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Stahl, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Miniature laser-launched plates have applications in shock wave physics, studying dynamic properties of materials and can be used to generate experimental data in a manner similar to a laboratory gas gun for one-dimensional impact experiments. Laser-launched plates have the advantage of small size, low kinetic energy, and can be launched with ubiquitous laboratory lasers. Because of the small size and high accelerations (10{sup 7}--10{sup 10} g`s), improved temporal resolution and optical non-contact methods to collect data are required. Traditional mechanical in-situ gauges would significantly impair the data quality and do not have the required time response.

  17. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  18. Photophysics of O2 excited by tunable laser radiation around 193 nm B. L. G. Bakkera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijmegen, University of

    Photophysics of O2 excited by tunable laser radiation around 193 nm B. L. G. Bakkera) and D. H and the velocity map imaging technique. Angular and kinetic energy distributions of the product O ions and O(3 P2 by tunable radiation around 193 nm, a wavelength falling within the Schumann­Runge bands,1 the dominant

  19. Currents and shear Alfven wave radiation generated by an exploding laser-produced plasma: Perpendicular incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    February 2003 Examples of one plasma expanding into another and the consequent radiation of wave energy of wave energy is fundamental in many areas of astronomy and plasma physics. Astrophysical explosions mainly depos- ited into ion kinetic energy.8 Since then, major advances in laser technology have created

  20. Preliminary design of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, G., E-mail: shawgc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Martin, M. Z.; Martin, R.; Biewer, T. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for measuring surface matter composition. LIBS is performed by focusing laser radiation onto a target surface, ablating the surface, forming a plasma, and analyzing the light produced. LIBS surface analysis is a possible diagnostic for characterizing plasma-facing materials in ITER. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has enabled the initial installation of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic on the prototype Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), which strives to mimic the conditions found at the surface of the ITER divertor. This paper will discuss the LIBS implementation on Proto-MPEX, preliminary design of the fiber optic LIBS collection probe, and the expected results.

  1. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriev, P A; Milichko, V A; Mukhin, I S; Gudovskikh, A S; Sitnikova, A A; Samusev, A K; Krasnok, A E; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonances, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanopart...

  2. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  3. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  4. Laser assisted high entropy alloy coating on aluminum: Microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katakam, Shravana; Joshi, Sameehan S.; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2014-09-14

    High entropy alloy (Al-Fe-Co-Cr-Ni) coatings were synthesized using laser surface engineering on aluminum substrate. Electron diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution of body centered cubic high entropy alloy phase along with phases with long range periodic structures within the coating. Evolution of such type of microstructure was a result of kinetics associated with laser process, which generates higher temperatures and rapid cooling resulting in retention of high entropy alloy phase followed by reheating and/or annealing in subsequent passes of the laser track giving rise to partial decomposition. The partial decomposition resulted in formation of precipitates having layered morphology with a mixture of high entropy alloy rich phases, compounds, and long range ordered phases.

  5. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

  6. Synthetic laser medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  7. Fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Feeman, James F. (Wyomissing, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  8. Laser Compression of Tantalum /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chia-Hui

    2013-01-01

    of this container was filled with aerogel, which acts as aafter laser compression. Aerogel was designed to deceleratein this geometry. The aerogel did not introduce any

  9. Novel fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Feeman, James F. (Wyomissing, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  10. Lasers for industrial chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.J.; Robinson, C.P.

    1980-04-01

    Three categories for application of laser technology to applied-photochemistry research are set forth as (1) laser-based analytical techniques, (2) studies of chemical-reaction dynamics, and (3) chemical reactions with primary energy or control provided by lasers. Specific systems being developed and chemical processes being monitored by laser-techniques are described. Studies of laser diagnostics for coal gasification now involving measurement of coal gases downstream of the scrubber are discussed, and potential applications of laser techniques to measurements of the hot-gas regions of the gasifier itself are forecast. A technique developed for the monitoring of gaseous UF/sub 6/ in process streams by measurement of its fluorescence after irradiation with short uv pulses from tunable lasers indicates that this same technique might be applied to many other molecules by proper choice of exciting laser wavelength and monitor. Special laser techniques for monitoring the presence of harmfurst-calf heifer performance was not affected by the feeding of an ensiled cattle waste-peanut hulls mixture compared to a conventional feeding program.

  11. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  12. Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid...

  13. Model simplification of chemical kinetic systems under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Thomas Michael Kyte

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the impact of uncertainty on the reduction and simplification of chemical kinetics mechanisms. Chemical kinetics simulations of complex fuels are very computationally expensive, especially when ...

  14. Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated at localized and extended defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large kinetic...

  15. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data...

  16. Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons...

  17. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  18. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  19. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel Philip

    2013-01-01

    1.1 Laser ceramic basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.1 Advantages of laser ceramics . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.2 Challenges to laser ceramic green-body tailoring 1.2

  20. The effects of early time laser drive on hydrodynamic instability growth in National Ignition Facility implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. L.; Clark, D. S.; Suter, L. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Masse, L. P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-09-15

    Defects on inertial confinement fusion capsule surfaces can seed hydrodynamic instability growth and adversely affect capsule performance. The dynamics of shocks launched during the early period of x-ray driven National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions determine whether perturbations will grow inward or outward at peak implosion velocity and final compression. In particular, the strength of the first shock, launched at the beginning of the laser pulse, plays an important role in determining Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) oscillations on the ablation front. These surface oscillations can couple to the capsule interior through subsequent shocks before experiencing Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth. We compare radiation hydrodynamic simulations of NIF implosions to analytic theories of the ablative RM and RT instabilities to illustrate how early time laser strength can alter peak velocity growth. We develop a model that couples the RM and RT implosion phases and captures key features of full simulations. We also show how three key parameters can control the modal demarcation between outward and inward growth.

  1. Strontium isotope evidence of Neanderthal mobility at the site of Lakonis, Greece using laser-ablation PIMMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Tanya M.

    reflect climatic adaptation (Holliday and Falsetti, 1995; Steudel-Numbers and Tilkens, 2004). Nonetheless, such as sea-shells at sites far from the coast. Raw ma- terial in Neanderthal sites is found to be mostly

  2. Monazite response to ultrahigh-pressure subduction from U-Pb dating by laser ablation split stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    transition in Western Norway. J. Geol. Soc. Lond. 168, 887–Trondheim region Caledonides, Norway. Norges Geol. Unders.Western Gneiss Region, S. Norway. In: Gayer, R.A. (Ed. ),

  3. Monazite response to ultrahigh-pressure subduction from U-Pb dating by laser ablation split stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    10.1029/2004TC001781. Young, D.J. , Hacker, B.R. , Andersen,Soc. Am. Bull. 117, 117–134. Hacker, B.R. , Andersen, T.B. ,Geol. 21, 613–629. Hacker, B.R. , Andersen, T.B. , Johnston,

  4. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 31 (1996) 2801 2805 Laser ablation of diamond fibres and a diamond fibre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    1996-01-01

    ] and are also being considered for cutting tools [4]. A recent development has been the manufacture of diamond damage using conventional tools. The cutting and machining operations have therefore become a critical Research Agency Farnborough, GU14 6TD, UK Continuous chemical vapour-deposited diamond-coated fibres

  5. Effect of temperature on sulfur-doped diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    DLC films to be used in many applications, such as anti-reflective coatings on optics, cutting and abrasive wear tools, IR windows, computer hard disk coatings, bio-resistant coatings for medical implants

  6. Serial removal of caries lesions from tooth occlusal surfaces using near-IR image-guided IR laser ablation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Kenneth H; Tom, Henry; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    D. Selective Removal of Demineralization Using Near Infraredliterature has shown that demineralization is significantlyenamel. As a result, demineralization appears with higher

  7. Monazite response to ultrahigh-pressure subduction from U-Pb dating by laser ablation split stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    processes in Rb–Sr geochronology: isotopic relics inPb accessory mineral geochronology by LA-MC-ICP-MS. J. Anal.CA-TIMS to monazite U–Pb geochronology. Chem. Geol. 312–313,

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours with the Patient Under Thoracic Epidural Anaesthesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouliquen, Cassiopee; Kabbani, Youssef, E-mail: kabbani@bergonie.org; Saignac, Pierre; Gekiere, Jean-Pierre [Institut Bergonie, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Regional Cancer Centre (France); Palussiere, Jean [Institut Bergonie, Department of Interventional Radiology, Regional Cancer Centre (France)

    2011-02-15

    Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours is a curative technique that is newly considered being offered to nonsurgical patients. It is of major interest because it enables local destruction of the tumour without surgery and spares healthy parenchyma. However, some patients have previous serious respiratory failure, thus ruling out mechanical ventilation. To operate with the patient under thoracic epidural is an answer to this problem. Our experience shows that the procedure is able to be performed completely without converting to general anaesthesia.

  9. Transhepatic CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuehl, Hilmar, E-mail: hilmar.kuehl@uni-due.de; Stattaus, Joerg; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald [University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with adrenal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been poor, and aggressive treatment of these tumors is mandatory to improve patients' survival. Since adrenalectomy may be difficult to perform after previous surgery of the right liver lobe, other approaches are required to treat the adrenal mass. This report aims at demonstrating the feasibility of CT-guided transhepatic radiofrequency ablation of right adrenal HCC metastases pretreated with chemoembolization in patients unable to undergo surgical resection.

  10. A Comparison of Direct Heating During Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation in Ex Vivo Liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreano, Anita; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of temperature elevations when using 480 kHz RF and 2.45 GHz microwave energy in ex vivo liver models. A total of 60 heating cycles (20 s at 90 W) were performed in normal, RF-ablated, and microwave-ablated liver tissues (n = 10 RF and n = 10 microwave in each tissue type). Heating cycles were performed using a 480-kHz generator and 3-cm cooled-tip electrode (RF) or a 2.45-GHz generator and 14-gauge monopole (microwave) and were designed to isolate direct heating from each energy type. Tissue temperatures were measured by using fiberoptic thermosensors 5, 10, and 15 mm radially from the ablation applicator at the depth of maximal heating. Power delivered, sensor location, heating rates, and maximal temperatures were compared using mixed effects regression models. No significant differences were noted in mean power delivered or thermosensor locations between RF and microwave heating groups (P > 0.05). Microwaves produced significantly more rapid heating than RF at 5, 10, and 15 mm in normal tissue (3.0 vs. 0.73, 0.85 vs. 0.21, and 0.17 vs. 0.09 Degree-Sign C/s; P < 0.05); and at 5 and 10 mm in ablated tissues (2.3 {+-} 1.4 vs. 0.7 {+-} 0.3, 0.5 {+-} 0.3 vs. 0.2 {+-} 0 Degree-Sign C/s, P < 0.05). The radial depth of heating was {approx}5 mm greater for microwaves than RF. Direct heating obtained with 2.45-GHz microwave energy using a single needle-like applicator is faster and covers a larger volume of tissue than 480-kHz RF energy.

  11. LASER Safety Manual August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UW LASER Safety Manual August 2007 Radiation Safety Office Environmental Health and Safety;Contents 1. Laser Basics 1.1 Laser Theory 1.2 Types of Lasers 2. Hazards and Safety Standards 2 2.6.4 Other Hazards 2.7 Hazard Classes 2.7.1 Introduction 2.7.2 Class 3B Lasers 2.7.3 Class 4 Lasers

  12. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  13. X-Ray Ablation and Debris Venting for the HIF Point Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debonnel, C.S. [University of California (United States); Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Peterson, P.F. [University of California (United States)

    2003-09-15

    This paper presents detailed design and analysis for x-ray ablation and venting in the 120-beam, 7-MJ heavy-ion fusion (HIF) 'robust' point design. The HI Robust Point Design ('RPD-2002') is a self-consistent, non-optimized system design that has been generated as a point of reference for ongoing research in the HIF program. The point design uses a thick-liquid protected chamber, derived from HYLIFE-II - no structural surfaces face the target. A ternary salt mixture called flinabe (LiNaBeF{sub 4}) has been selected for the liquid structures. Detailed two-dimensional, axially symmetric TSUNAMI calculations have been performed to determine the mass of ablation debris generated by the target x-rays following ignition and to predict the venting of the debris from the inside of the pocket into the main chamber and beam lines. These calculations provide predictions of the impulse loading to the surfaces of the liquid pocket - The closest liquid structures will experience a somewhat strong impulse, but further optimization of the design will easily decrease this impulse. The integrated mass and energy fluxes of ablation and target debris reaching the beam-line magnetic shutters are given as well: A small and acceptable magnetic dipole will prevent any debris ingression up in the final focus magnet region.

  14. Polar-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility P. B. Radha, F. J. Marshall, J. A. Marozas, A. Shvydky, I. Gabalski et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy deposition farther from the ablation surface, and consequently reduced kinetic energy of the imploding shell. Ignition designs3,4 compensate for this reduced hydro- dynamic efficiency (defined as the ratio of the maximum shell kinetic energy to the laser energy) by increasing the energy of the most

  15. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575...

  16. Experimental observation of controllable kinetic constraints in a cold atomic gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valado, M M; Hoogerland, M D; Lesanovsky, I; Garrahan, J P; Arimondo, E; Ciampini, D; Morsch, O

    2015-01-01

    Many-body systems relaxing to equilibrium can exhibit complex dynamics even if their steady state is trivial. At low temperatures or high densities their evolution is often dominated by steric hindrances affecting particle motion [1,2,3]. Local rearrangements are highly constrained, giving rise to collective - and often slow - relaxation.This dynamics can be difficult to analyse from first principles, but the essential physical ingredients are captured by idealized lattice models with so- called kinetic constraints [4]. Here we experimentally realize a many-body system exhibiting manifest kinetic constraints and measure its dynamical properties. In the cold Rydberg gas used in our experiments, the nature of the constraints can be tailored through the detuning of the excitation lasers from resonance [5,6,7,8], which controls whether the system undergoes correlated or anti- correlated dynamics. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions [5,6], and highlight the analogy between the dynamics of interactin...

  17. Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments Marc J. Palmeri Princeton University Arnold Lab #12;Outline · Motivation ­ Applications of laser micromachining ­ Problems with laser micromachining · How do lasers work? · What is laser micromachining? · Micromachining assembly · Methods

  18. On the relationships between the Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics, and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use either of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) kinetics, which is the first-order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of an enzyme–substrate complex exactly for a single-enzyme and single-substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of a quasi-steadymore »state for the enzyme–substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme–substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme–substrate complexes, substrates, and enzymes. In particular, I show that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in deriving the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [E]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [E]T, and persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [S]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [S]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently underpredicts ? ln v / ? ln k2+ and ? ln v / ? ln [E]T, and persistently overpredicts ? ln v / ? ln k1+ and ? ln v / ? ln [S]T. In contrast, the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ? ln v / ? ln k2+, ? ln v / ? ln k1+, ? ln v / ? ln [E]T, and ? ln v / ? ln [S]T, indicating that ECA-based models will be more calibratable if the modeled processes do obey the law of mass action. Since the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics includes advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, land biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect that removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  19. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  20. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  1. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  2. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  3. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  4. Kinetic vs. energetic discrimination in biological copying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2013-04-12

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and can not be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the opposite, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Pol{\\gamma}, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway

  5. Nonlinear response theory in chemical kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvohuz, M; Mukamel, S

    2014-01-01

    ?D(t) are D 0 (t) = (1) Chemical reactions, N h i ( x , t) iOF NONLINEAR RESPONSE THEORY TO CHEMICAL KINETICS Equation (non- linear responses of chemical systems to perturbations

  6. Time integration methods for reactor kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nóbrega, José de Anchieta Wanderley da

    A technique based on the Padé approximations is applied to the solution of the point kinetics equations. The method consists of treating explicitly the roots of the inhour formula which would make the Padé approximations ...

  7. Kinetics of Anionic Surfactant Anoxic Degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, Julianna G.

    2010-07-14

    The biodegradation kinetics of Geropon TC-42 (trademark) by an acclimated culture was investigated in anoxic batch reactors to determine biokinetic coefficients to be implemented in two biofilm mathematical models. Geropon ...

  8. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  9. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Matthew E. (Huntsville, AL)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  10. Laboratory for Laser Energetics annual report, 1 October 1991--30 September 1992. Inertial Fusion Program and National Laser Users Facility Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is an annual report covering research progress on laser fusion and the OMEGA Upgrade design and development. In laser fusion, line-spectroscopy methods were demonstrated to be useful in diagnosing the core temperature and densities of polymer-shell targets; a theoretical analysis of nonlocal heat transport effects on filamentation of light in plasmas confirms that the principle mechanism driving filamentation is kinetic thermal rather than ponderomotive; a new method (spatial beam deflection) to produce laser pulses of arbitrary shape was developed; laser-plasma x-ray emission was measured using photodiode arrays; experiments on long-scale-length plasmas have shown that smoothing by spectral dispersion has proven effective in reducing Raman scattering; a method for increasing the gas-retention time of polymer shell targets was developed by overcoating them with aluminum. Experiments relating to the OMEGA Upgrade are described.

  11. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  12. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control G. R. Plateau, , C. G. R acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy

  13. The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser Dimitrios Mandridis dmandrid@creol.ucf.edu April 29, 2011 CREOL Affiliates Day 2011 #12;2 Objective: Frequency Swept (FM) Mode-locked Laser · Develop a frequency swept laser, · linear f-sweep, · uniform-intensity, · low noise, · with long-term stability

  14. Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes C.G.R. Geddes , E. Cormier. Nevada, Reno and U.C. Berkeley Abstract. Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson

  15. Kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral aluminum clusters: Al--Al{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Curlee, G.A.; White, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    Neutral aluminum clusters sputtered from polycrystalline aluminum were analyzed by laser postionization time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The kinetic energy distributions of Al through Al{sub 6} were measured by a neutrals time-of-flight technique. The interpretation of laser postionization TOF data to extract velocity and energy distributions is presented. The aluminum cluster distributions are qualitatively similar to previous copper cluster distribution measurements from our laboratory. In contrast to the steep high energy tails predicted by the single- or multiple- collision models, the measured cluster distributions have high energy power law dependences in the range of E{sup {minus}3} to E{sup {minus}4.5}. Correlated collision models may explain the substantial abundance of energetic clusters that are observed in these experiments. Possible influences of cluster fragmentation on the distributions are discussed.

  16. Kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral aluminum clusters: Al--Al[sub 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J. ); Curlee, G.A. . Dept. of Physics); White, J.M. . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Neutral aluminum clusters sputtered from polycrystalline aluminum were analyzed by laser postionization time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The kinetic energy distributions of Al through Al[sub 6] were measured by a neutrals time-of-flight technique. The interpretation of laser postionization TOF data to extract velocity and energy distributions is presented. The aluminum cluster distributions are qualitatively similar to previous copper cluster distribution measurements from our laboratory. In contrast to the steep high energy tails predicted by the single- or multiple- collision models, the measured cluster distributions have high energy power law dependences in the range of E[sup [minus]3] to E[sup [minus]4.5]. Correlated collision models may explain the substantial abundance of energetic clusters that are observed in these experiments. Possible influences of cluster fragmentation on the distributions are discussed.

  17. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen, E-mail: xwli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000?ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ?600?ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  18. Kinetic equation for a soliton gas Chernogolovka, July 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Kinetic equation for a soliton gas Gennady El Chernogolovka, July 2009 Gennady El Kinetic equation, Kinetic equation for solitons, JETP (1971) Here we consider only strongly integrable systems (like KdV, NLS etc.) Gennady El Kinetic equation for a soliton gas #12;From N-solitons/N-gap potentials

  19. Extending Newton's Law from Nonlocal-in-Time Kinetic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extending Newton's Law from Nonlocal-in-Time Kinetic Energy J.A.K. Suykens K.U. Leuven, ESAT: nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy, higher order Euler-Lagrange equation, Newton's sec- ond law of motion the kinetic energy with a form of nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy. It leads to a hypothetical extension

  20. New opacity measurement principle for LMJ-PETAL laser facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennec, M Le; Ducret, J -E; Turck-Chièze, S

    2015-01-01

    Stellar seismology reveals some interior properties of thousands of solar-type stars but the solar seismic sound speed stays puzzling since a decade as it disagrees with the Standard Solar Model (SSM) prediction. One of the explanations of this disagreement may be found in the treatment of the transport of radiation from the solar core to the surface. As the same framework is used for other stars, it is important to check precisely the reliability of the interacting cross sections of photons with each species in order to ensure the energy transport for temperature T > 2 - 10$^6$ K and density $\\rho$ > 0.2 g/cm$^3$. In this paper, we propose a new technique to reach the domain of temperature and density found in the solar radiative interior. This technique called the Double Ablation Front (DAF) is based on a high conversion of the laser energy into X-rays thanks to moderated Z material irradiated by laser intensity between 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{15}$ W/cm$^2$ and 4 $\\times$ 10$^{15}$ W/cm$^2$. This high conversion ...

  1. Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION Laser cooling of neutral atoms in the past decades has been a breakthrough in the understanding of their dy- namics and led to the seminal proposals of laser cooling-Doppler and subrecoil cooling, as well as new technologies, such as semiconductor diode lasers. Most of those

  2. , 7 2011, 7 2011 : LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    : ­ ­ , 7 2011, 7 2011 `' #12; : ­ ­ , 7 2011 : LASER : : : & · : & (-) - - - . · : laser ­ · : ­ & · : > 50 & (---) · ­ : lidar (- ) ­ -3 lidar (WMO, ESA; : ­ ­ , 7 2011 : LASER : : : & · : · : laser · : ( 10 m) · : > 5

  3. 1982 laser program annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  4. Ultra-fast laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V

    2014-01-21

    A laser system is provided which selectively excites Raman active vibrations in molecules. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and remote sensing.

  5. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1986-08-15

    The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process for the enrichment of uranium is evaluated. (AIP)

  6. Piezoelectric measurement of laser power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the energy of individual laser pulses or a series of laser pulses by reading the output of a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer which has received a known fraction of the total laser pulse beam. An apparatus is disclosed that reduces the incident energy on the PZ transducer by means of a beam splitter placed in the beam of the laser pulses.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation of Non-Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Under Real-Time FDG PET CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Nehmeh, Sadek A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guided RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.

  8. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Koehler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  9. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  10. Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratoryandBryanoutreach LaserLaserLaser

  11. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Kang Shi; Gregory Eyink

    2015-07-29

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree of degeneracy $\\delta$ of the critical points. Following Van Hove, we show that non-degenerate singularities lead to finite phase measures for $D>2$ but produce divergences when $D\\leq 2$ and possible breakdown of wave kinetics if the collision integral itself becomes too large (or even infinite). Similar divergences and possible breakdown can occur for degenerate singularities, when $D-\\delta\\leq 2,$ as we find for several physical examples, including electron-hole kinetics in graphene. When the standard kinetic equation breaks down, then one must develop a new singular wave kinetics. We discuss approaches from pioneering 1971 work of Newell \\& Aucoin on multi-scale perturbation theory for acoustic waves and field-theoretic methods based on exact Schwinger-Dyson integral equations for the wave dynamics.

  12. Experimental method for laser-driven flyer plates for 1-D shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D. L.; Luo, S. N.; Swift, D. C.; Loomis, E.; Johnson, R.; Greenfield, S.; Peralta, P.; Koskelo, A.; Tonks, D.

    2007-12-12

    One-dimensional shocks can be generated by impacting flyer plates accelerated to terminal velocities by a confined laser-ablated plasma. Over the past few years, we have developed this capability with our facility-size laser, TRIDENT, capable of {>=}500 Joules at multi-microsecond pulse lengths to accelerate 1-D flyer plates, 8-mm diameter by 0.1-2 mm thick. Plates have been accelerated to terminal velocities of 100 to {>=}500 m/s, with full recovery of the flyer and target for post mortem metallography. By properly tailoring the laser temporal and spatial profile, the expanding confined plasma accelerates the plate away from the transparent sapphire substrate, and decouples the laser parameters from shock pressure profile resulting from the plate impact on a target. Since the flyer plate is in free flight on impact with the target, minimal collateral damage occurs to either. The experimental method to launch these plates to terminal velocity, ancillary diagnostics, and representative experimental data is presented.

  13. Nanostructure evolution in joining of Al and Fe nanoparticles with femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Z.; Huang, H.; Zhou, Y. E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca; Liu, L.; Hu, A.; Duley, W.; He, P. E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-04-07

    The joining of Al-Fe nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation is reported in this paper. Fe and Al NPs were deposited on a carbon film in vacuum via fs laser ablation. Particles were then exposed to multiple fs laser pulses at fluences between 0.5 and 1.3?mJ/cm{sup 2}. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Diffraction X-ray observations indicate that Al and Fe NPs bond to each other under these conditions. For comparison, bonding of Al to Al and Fe to Fe NPs was also investigated. The nanostructure, as observed using TEM, showed that individual Al NPs were monocrystalline while individual Fe NPs were polycrystalline prior to joining and that these structures are retained after the formation of Al-Al and Fe-Fe NPs. Al-Fe NPs produced by fs laser joining exhibited a mixed amorphous and crystalline phase at the interface. Bonding is suggested to originate from intermixing within a region of high field intensity between particles.

  14. Experimental and Computational Studies of High Energy Density Plasma Streams Ablated from Fine Wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenly, John B. [Cornell University; Seyler, Charles [Cornell University

    2014-03-30

    Experimental and computational studies of high energy density plasma streams ablated from fine wires. Laboratory of Plasma Studies, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University. Principal Investigators: Dr. John B. Greenly and Dr. Charles E. Seyler. This report summarizes progress during the final year of this project to study the physics of high energy density (HED) plasma streams of 10^17-10^20/cm3 density and high velocity (~100-500 km/s). Such streams are produced from 5-250 micrometer diameter wires heated and ionized by a 1 MA, 250 ns current pulse on the COBRA pulsed power facility at Cornell University. Plasma is ablated from the wires and is driven away to high velocity by unbalanced JxB force. A wire, or an array of wires, can persist as an essentially stationary, continuous source of this streaming plasma for >200 ns, even with driving magnetic fields of many Tesla and peak current densities in the plasma of many MA/cm2. At the heart of the ablation stream generation is the continuous transport of mass from the relatively cold, near-solid-density wire "core" into current-carrying plasma within 1 mm of the wire, followed by the magnetic acceleration of that plasma and its trapped flux to form a directed stream. In the first two years of this program, an advancing understanding of ablation physics led to the discovery of several novel wire ablation experimental regimes. In the final year, one of these new HED plasma regimes has been studied in quantitative detail. This regime studies highly reproducible magnetic reconnection in strongly radiating plasma with supersonic and superalfvenic flow, and shock structures in the outflow. The key discovery is that very heavy wires, e.g. 250 micrometer diameter Al or 150 micrometer Cu, behave in a qualitatively different way than the lighter wires typically used in wire-array Z-pinches. Such wires can be configured to produce a static magnetic X-point null geometry that stores magnetic and thermal energy; reconnection and outflow are triggered when the current begins to decrease and the electric field reverses. The reconnecting flow is driven by both magnetic and thermal pressure forces, and it has been found to be possible to vary the configuration so that one or the other dominates. The magnetic null extends into a current sheet that is heated and radiates strongly, with supersonic outflows. This is the first study of reconnection in this HED plasma regime. This compressible, radiative regime, and the triggering mechanism, may be relevant to solar and astrophysical processes. The PERSEUS extended MHD code has been developed for simulation of these phenomena, and will continue to be used and further developed to help interpret and understand experimental results, as well as to guide experimental design. The code is well-suited to simulations of shocks, and includes Hall and electron inertia physics that appear to be of importance in a number of ablation flow regimes, and definitely in the reconnection regime when gradient scales are comparable to the ion inertial scale. During the final year, our graduate student supported by this grant completed a new version of PERSEUS with the finite volume computational scheme replaced by a discontinuous Galerkin method that gives much less diffusive behavior and allows faster run time and higher spatial resolution. Thecode is now being used to study shock structures produced in the outflow region of the reconnection regime.

  15. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th harmonic of 1054-nm) to probe a plasma volume. The Thomson scattered light is collected by a...

  16. Dynamical laser spike processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Tait, Alexander N; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved "spiking" of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate that graphene-coupled laser systems offer a unified low-level spike optical processing paradigm that goes well beyond previously studied laser dynamics. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation---fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system, but the addit...

  17. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Benjamin S. (Benjamin Stanford), 1974-

    2003-01-01

    The development of the terahertz frequency range has long been impeded by the relative dearth of compact, coherent radiation sources of reasonable power. This thesis details the development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) ...

  18. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  19. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  20. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  1. EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

  2. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Isfort, Peter, E-mail: isfort@hia.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Braunschweig, Till, E-mail: tbraunschweig@ukaachen.de; Westphal, Saskia, E-mail: swestphal@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Pathology, Aachen University Hospital (Germany); Woitok, Anna, E-mail: awoitok@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Laboratory Animal Science (Germany); Penzkofer, Tobias, E-mail: penzkofer@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Bruners, Philipp, E-mail: bruners@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany); Kichikawa, Kimihiko, E-mail: kkichika@naramed-u.ac.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas, E-mail: smiro@hia.rwth-aachen.de; Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  3. Renal Function Outcomes for Multifocal Renal Neoplasms Managed by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Pushpender, E-mail: pugupta@wakehealth.edu; Allen, Brian C., E-mail: bcallen2@wakehealth.edu; Chen, Michael Y., E-mail: mchen@wakehealth.edu; Childs, David D., E-mail: dchilds@wakehealth.edu; Kota, Gopi, E-mail: gkota@wakehealth.edu; Zagoria, Ronald J., E-mail: rzagoria@wakehealth.edu [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function changes related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms. Methods: This is an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study of all patients treated with computed tomography guided RFA for multifocal renal neoplasms at one institution. Fifty-seven subjects, mean age 70 (range 37-88) years, underwent RFA of 169 renal neoplasms (average size 2.0 cm). Subjects had between 2 and 8 (mean 2.96) neoplasms ablated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured before and after RFA. Complications related to RFA were recorded. Results: eGFR decreased on average of 4.4 % per tumor treated and 6.7 % per ablation session (average 1.76 tumors treated per session). For subjects with the largest neoplasm measuring >3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 14.5 % during the course of their treatment. If the largest neoplasm measured 2-3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 7.7 %, and if the largest neoplasm measured <2 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 3.8 %. Subjects with reduced baseline renal function were more likely to have a greater decline in eGFR after RFA. There was a minor complication rate of 6.3 % (6 of 96 sessions), none of which required treatment, and a major complication rate of 4.2 % (4 of 96 sessions). Conclusion: RFA for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms results in mild decline of renal function.

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Renal Angiomyolipoma: Median-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, S. M. Anderson, C. J.; Patel, U.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of large angiomyolipomas (AMLs) using saline-cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods. Institutional Review Board approval for the study was received. Four patients (all female, age range 33-67 years) with large AMLs (maximal axis 6.1-32.4 cm) not suitable for embolotherapy or surgery consented to a trial of RFA. Procedures were performed under computerized tomographic guidance using 14G saline-infused electrodes. Two ablations (diameter 4-7 cm) were undertaken in each patient. Variables studied were technical success, treatment safety, alteration of tumor consistency, tumor size, effect on renal function, and medium-term freedom from haemorrhage. Results. All four patients underwent successful RFA without any intraprocedural complications. There has been no haemorrhage, or new renal specific symptom, during a minimum 48-month period, and normal renal function has been normal. On follow-up radiological imaging, the tumors have become fattier with involution of the soft-tissue elements (soft tissue-to-total tumor ratio decreased mean [range] of 0.26 [0.14-0.48] to 0.17 [0.04-0.34] U; p = 0.04 [paired Student t test]). Further evidence of treatment effect was the development of a capsule around the ablation zone, but there was no change in overall tumor volume (mean [range] 1,120 [118-2,845] to 1150 [90-3,013] ml; p = 1 [paired Student t test]). Conclusion. RFA of large AMLs is technically feasible using saline-infused electrodes. The soft-tissue elements decreased in volume; the tumors become fattier; and there has been no renal haemorrhage during a 48-month period.

  5. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  6. Pulsed gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Louis W. (Madison, WI); Fitzsimmons, William A. (Madison, WI)

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  7. Dark Soliton Fiber Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Zhang; D. Y. Tang; L. M. Zhao; X. Wu; Q. L. Bao; K. P. Loh

    2009-05-08

    We report on the experimental observation of stable dark solitons in an all normal dispersion fiber laser. We found experimentally that dark soliton formation is a generic feature of the fiber laser under strong continuous wave (CW) emission. However, only under appropriate pump strength and negative cavity feedback, stable single or multiple dark soliton could be achieved. Furthermore, we show that the features of the observed dark solitons could be well understood based on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE).

  8. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  9. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  10. Variable laser attenuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  11. Bulk measurement of copper and sodium content in CuIn(0.7)Ga(0.3)Se(2) (CIGS) solar cells with nanosecond pulse length laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D; DeAngelis, Alexander; Kaneshiro, Jess; Mallory, Stewart A; Chang, Yuancheng; Gaillard, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we show that laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with a nanosecond pulse laser can be used to measure the copper and sodium content of CuIn(0.7)Ga(0.3)Se(2) (CIGS) thin film solar cells on molybdenum. This method has four significant advantages over methods currently being employed: the method is inexpensive, measurements can be taken in times on the order of one second, without high vacuum, and at distances up to 5 meters or more. The final two points allow for in-line monitoring of device fabrication in laboratory or industrial environments. Specifically, we report a linear relationship between the copper and sodium spectral lines from LIBS and the atomic fraction of copper and sodium measured via secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), discuss the ablation process of this material with a nanosecond pulse laser compared to shorter pulse duration lasers, and examine the depth resolution of nanosecond pulse LIBS.

  12. Laboratory for Laser Energetics annual report, 1 October 1991--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    This is an annual report covering research progress on laser fusion and the OMEGA Upgrade design and development. In laser fusion, line-spectroscopy methods were demonstrated to be useful in diagnosing the core temperature and densities of polymer-shell targets; a theoretical analysis of nonlocal heat transport effects on filamentation of light in plasmas confirms that the principle mechanism driving filamentation is kinetic thermal rather than ponderomotive; a new method (spatial beam deflection) to produce laser pulses of arbitrary shape was developed; laser-plasma x-ray emission was measured using photodiode arrays; experiments on long-scale-length plasmas have shown that smoothing by spectral dispersion has proven effective in reducing Raman scattering; a method for increasing the gas-retention time of polymer shell targets was developed by overcoating them with aluminum. Experiments relating to the OMEGA Upgrade are described.

  13. Plasma formation on a metal surface under combined action of laser and microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilyuk, A P; Shaparev, N Ya [Institute of Computational Modelling of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-31

    By means of numerical modelling of the combined effect of laser (1.06 mm) and microwave (10{sup 10} – 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}) radiation on the aluminium surface in vacuum it is shown that the additional action of microwave radiation with the frequency 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} provides complete ionisation of the metal vapour (for the values of laser radiation duration and intensity used in the calculations), while in the absence of microwave radiation the vapour remains weakly ionised. The mathematical model used accounts for the processes, occurring in the condensed phase (heat conduction, melting), the evaporation and the kinetic processes in the resulting vapour. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Using laser absorption spectroscopy to monitor composition and physical properties of metal vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berzins, L.V.

    1993-09-03

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program has been using laser absorption spectroscopy to monitor vapor densities for over 15 years. Laser absorption spectroscopy has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both density and composition. During this time the diagnostic has moved from a research tool toward a robust component of a process control system. The hardware used for this diagnostic is discussed elsewhere at this symposium. This paper describes how the laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostic is used as a component of a process control system as well as supplying detailed measurements on vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures, and constituent distributions. Examples will be drawn from the uranium AVLIS program. In addition potential applications such as composition control in the production of metal matrix composites or aircraft alloys will be discussed.

  15. Kinetic effects on robustness of electron magnetohydrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hata, M. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sakagami, H. [Fundamental Physics Simulation Research Division, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Das, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15

    Following recent remarkable progress in the development of high-power short-pulse lasers, exploration is ongoing into hitherto unknown phenomena at fast time scales of electrons, the understanding of which is becoming crucial. For a simplified description of such phenomena, the Electron Magnetohydrodynamics (EMHDs) fluid description is often adopted. For the possibility of electron transport in high-density plasma, exact solutions of the EMHD model in the form of electron vortex currents, together with their associated magnetic fields, have been considered. However, the fluid EMHD model does not incorporate kinetic effects. Here, the finite Larmor radius effects owing to a finite electron temperature on the robustness of the exact EMHD structures are investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that larger EMHD vortex structures can sustain themselves for long periods, even in high temperature plasma; however, sustaining structures at higher temperatures tends to be difficult. With increasing temperature, electrons with finite Larmor radii become disengaged from the localized region. It is also shown that structures localized in smaller regions are more difficult to sustain. A quantitative criterion in terms of the structure size and Larmor radius has been established by simulations over a wide range of parameters. Finally, we conclude that a structure, larger than about eight times the typical Larmor radius at r=R, could form and exist even under the effects of finite electron temperature.

  16. Tunable dye laser amplifier chain for laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor' S; D'yachkov, Aleksei B; Labozin, Valerii P; Mironov, Sergei M; Nikulin, Sergei A; Firsov, Valerii A

    2004-05-31

    A tunable dye laser amplifier chain developed for experiments on atomic vapour laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is described. The system, pumped by copper vapour lasers, consists of a master oscillator and an amplifier stage including a preamplifier and three main amplifiers working in the saturation mode. The master oscillator of the stage is a dye laser with a grazing incidence diffraction grating. Longitudinal pumping of the amplifiers is used. The efficiency of the main amplifiers is 50 % - 55 %. The average power of laser radiation at the output of the last amplifier is 100 W. (lasers. amplifiers)

  17. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  18. A simple theory of protein folding kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple model of protein folding dynamics that captures key qualitative elements recently seen in all-atom simulations. The goals of this theory are to serve as a simple formalism for gaining deeper insight into the physical properties seen in detailed simulations as well as to serve as a model to easily compare why these simulations suggest a different kinetic mechanism than previous simple models. Specifically, we find that non-native contacts play a key role in determining the mechanism, which can shift dramatically as the energetic strength of non-native interactions is changed. For protein-like non-native interactions, our model finds that the native state is a kinetic hub, connecting the strength of relevant interactions directly to the nature of folding kinetics.

  19. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree ...

  20. Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Unresectable Hepatic Tumors Using a Triple-Spiral-Shaped Electrode Needle: Initial Experience in 34 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, Loukas; Poulou, Loukia S., E-mail: ploukia@hotmail.co [General Hospital of Chest Diseases 'Sotiria', Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Greece); Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Medical School, University of Athens, Department of Hematology (Greece); Kelekis, Alexis D.; Pomoni, Maria; Kelekis, Dimitrios A. [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, Eugenidion Hospital (Greece)

    2010-02-15

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using a triple-spiral-shaped electrode needle for unresectable primary or metastatic hepatic tumors. Thirty-four patients with 46 index tumors were treated. Ablation zone, morbidity, and complications were assessed. The lesions were completely ablated with an ablative margin of about 1 cm. Five patients (14.7%) with a lesion larger than 4.5 cm had local tumor progression after 1 month and were retreated. Hemothorax, as a major complication, occurred in 1 of 34 patients (3.0%) or 1 of 46 lesions ablated (2.2%). RFA using this new electrode needle can be effective in the treatment of large unresectable hepatic tumors.