National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for kinetics flywheel energy

  1. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  2. Flywheel Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    K2H 8S1 Product: Focuses on design, fabrication, assembling and distributing flywheel energy storage systems and related components. References: Flywheel Energy Systems Inc1...

  3. Flywheels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Donald Arthur

    2015-05-01

    In use since ancient times, the flywheel has smoothed the flow of energy in rotating machinery from small, hand held devices to the largest engines. Today, standalone flywheel systems are being developed to store electrical energy. These systems are deployed in applications as diverse as uninterruptible power supplies, gantry cranes, and large research facilities. This chapter presents the technical foundation of flywheel design, a comparison with other energy storage technologies, and a survey of applications where flywheel energy storage systems are currently in service.

  4. Flywheel energy storage system focus of display

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flywheel Energy Storage System Focus of Display Demonstration to feature advanced, solar-powered replacement for batteries For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs ...

  5. Flywheel energy storage advances using HTS bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulcahy, T. M.

    1998-09-11

    High-Temperature-Superconducting (HT) bearings have the potential to reduce idling losses and make flywheel energy storage economical. Demonstration of large, high-speed flywheels is key to market penetration. Toward this goal, a flywheel system has been developed and tested with 5-kg to 15-kg disk-shaped rotors. Rlm speeds exceeded 400 mls and stored energies were >80 W-hr. Test implementation required technological advances in nearly all aspects of the flywheel system. Features and limitations of the design and tests are discussed, especially those related to achieving additional energy storage.

  6. Amber Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Amber Kinetics Product: Start-up company developing a novel flywheel energy storage system with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. References: Amber...

  7. Flywheel Energy Storage technology workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Howell, D.

    1993-12-31

    Advances in recent years of high strength/lightweight materials, high performance magnetic bearings, and power electronics technology has spurred a renewed interest by the transportation, utility, and manufacturing industries in Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) technologies. FES offers several advantages over conventional electro-chemical energy storage, such as high specific energy and specific power, fast charging time, long service life, high turnaround efficiency (energy out/energy in), and no hazardous/toxic materials or chemicals are involved. Potential applications of FES units include power supplies for hybrid and electric vehicles, electric vehicle charging stations, space systems, and pulsed power devices. Also, FES units can be used for utility load leveling, uninterruptable power supplies to protect electronic equipment and electrical machinery, and for intermittent wind or photovoltaic energy sources. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum to highlight technologies that offer a high potential to increase the performance of FES systems and to discuss potential solutions to overcome present FES application barriers. This document consists of viewgraphs from 27 presentations.

  8. RPM Flywheel Battery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RPM Flywheel Battery Jump to: navigation, search Name: RPM Flywheel Battery Place: California Product: Start-up planning to develop, produce, and market flywheel batteries for...

  9. Flywheel Energy Storage Device for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Flywheel Energy Storage Device for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About ...

  10. Reluctance apparatus for flywheel energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A motor generator for providing high efficiency, controlled voltage output or storage of energy in a flywheel system. A motor generator includes a stator of a soft ferromagnetic material, a motor coil and a generator coil, and a rotor has at least one embedded soft ferromagnetic piece. Control of voltage output is achieved by use of multiple stator pieces and multiple rotors with controllable gaps between the stator pieces and the soft ferromagnetic piece.

  11. Flywheel Energy Storage -- An Alternative to Batteries for UPS Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.

    2003-11-12

    Direct current (DC) system flywheel energy storage technology can be used as a substitute for batteries for providing backup power to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) system. Although the initial cost will usually be higher, flywheels offer a much longer life, reduced maintenance, a smaller footprint, and better reliability compared to a battery. The combination of these characteristics will generally result in a lower life-cycle cost for a flywheel compared to a battery. This paper describes the technology, its variations, and installation requirements, as well as provides application advice. One Federal application is highlighted as a “case study,” followed by an illustrative life-cycle cost comparison of batteries and flywheels. A list of manufacturers, with contact information is also provided.

  12. Dynamic voltage compensation on distribution feeders using flywheel energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissbach, R.S.; Karady, G.G.; Farmer, R.G.

    1999-04-01

    Advancements in power electronics bearings and materials have made flywheel energy storage systems a viable alternative to electrochemical batteries. A future application of such a device is as an uninterruptible power supply for critical loads on a distribution feeder. However, the same power electronics and flywheel system could also be used for dynamic voltage compensation. A comparison is made between series and parallel connection of such dynamic compensation techniques used to maintain rated load voltage on distribution feeders when there are momentary dips in the supply voltage. For each case a mathematical model is presented and analyzed. The two cases are compared and the series compensation technique is more effective.

  13. Flywheel energy storage with superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer; Hull, John R.

    1993-01-01

    A flywheel having superconductor bearings has a lower drag to lift ratio that translates to an improvement of a factor of ten in the rotational decay rate. The lower drag results from the lower dissipation of melt-processed YBCO, improved uniformity of the permanent magnet portion of the bearings, operation in a different range of vacuum pressure from that taught by the art, and greater separation distance from the rotating members of conductive materials.

  14. 'Recycling' Grid Energy with Flywheel Technology | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    denies that having the ability to store energy, as well as manage it better, makes sense." ... storage "shock absorbers," which can store the excess power or inject some if demand ...

  15. An overview of flywheel energy systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolsky, A. M.; Energy Systems

    2002-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings incorporating permanent magnets and ReBaCuO, together with carbon fibre, offer the possibility of increasing the stored, volumetric energy density of FES and unprecedentedly low idling loss of FES. Its stored energy need only satisfy customers needs for the time it takes to bring on conventional 'back-up'. The FES itself must come up to power quickly enough to avoid any disruption in the customer's operation (e.g., continuous industrial processes involving fragile materials, for example paper forming). Such customers do not care about the price of electricity nearly as much as they care about not ruining their product, damaging their machines or having 'clean ups' that stop or slow output. Firms that engage in electronic commerce and/or telecommunications also value uninterruptible power. Another set of potential customers (construction, electric railroads) may wish to avoid fluctuations in their electrical supply or they may wish to avoid causing harm to others who may hold them liable for poor power quality. Finally, real time prices (e.g., every 15 s) and real time commands, disseminated via internet, and distributed storage might enable reduced system generation costs. Generators and FES makers would have to cooperate to make this feasible. Now, the central techno-economic challenge is to build a high-power, low-loss motor generator that reaches full power in a very short time.

  16. Investigation of Synergy Between Electrochemical Capacitors, Flywheels, and Batteries in Hybrid Energy Storage for PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Sibley, Lewis, B.; Wohlgemuth, John

    1999-06-01

    This report describes the results of a study that investigated the synergy between electrochemical capacitors (ECs) and flywheels, in combination with each other and with batteries, as energy storage subsystems in photovoltaic (PV) systems. EC and flywheel technologies are described and the potential advantages and disadvantages of each in PV energy storage subsystems are discussed. Seven applications for PV energy storage subsystems are described along with the potential market for each of these applications. A spreadsheet model, which used the net present value method, was used to analyze and compare the costs over time of various system configurations based on flywheel models. It appears that a synergistic relationship exists between ECS and flywheels. Further investigation is recommended to quantify the performance and economic tradeoffs of this synergy and its effect on overall system costs.

  17. Flywheel Project Escalates Grid Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Flywheel Project Escalates Grid Efficiency Flywheel Project Escalates Grid Efficiency August 9, 2010 - 1:18pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? It's estimated to create 60 jobs in New York and Massachusetts (where Beacon Power is headquartered) and help bring clean technologies to market by improving the stability and reliability of the state's electric grid. More good news for New

  18. Model and simulation of a flywheel energy storage system at a utility substation using electro-magnetic transients programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissbach, R.S.; Karady, G.G.; Farmer, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    A flywheel energy storage system for use as an uninterruptible power supply at a utility substation to replace electrochemical batteries has been modeled. The model is developed using the Electro-Magnetic Transients Program (EMTP). Models for the flywheel, permanent magnet (synchronous) motor/generator, rectifiers and inverter have been included. Transient response for loss of power and clearing of a short circuit fault, as well as variation of load voltage due to the flywheel spinning down, is presented.

  19. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  20. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  1. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  2. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1983-10-11

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel body is enclosed by a rim of circumferentially wound fiber embedded in resin. The rim promotes flywheel safety and survivability. The flywheel has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability. 6 figs.

  3. Rimmed and edge thickened stodola shaped flywheel. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel body is enclosed by a rim of circumferentially wound fiber embedded in resin. The rim promotes flywheel safety and survivability. The flywheel has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability.

  4. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Satish V. (San Ramon, CA); Stone, Richard G. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body (15) composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel (10) body (15) is enclosed by a rim (50) of circumferentially wound fiber (2) embedded in resin (3). The rim (50) promotes flywheel (10) safety and survivability. The flywheel (10) has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability.

  5. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  6. Eco Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kinetics Jump to: navigation, search Name: eco-Kinetics Place: Stapylton, Queensland, Australia Zip: 4207 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Queensland-based renewable energy...

  7. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body (15) ...

  8. Development of long life three phase uninterruptible power supply using flywheel energy storage unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Isao; Okita, Yoshihisa; Andoh, Itaru

    1995-12-31

    According to development of computer applications, uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) are indispensable to the industrial field. But the cost for maintaining the conventional UPS is very high, because frequent replacement of parts which have short life time is necessary. This paper describes the research and development of a new UPS which has long life parts for maintenance free. To lengthen the life time, the following techniques are introduced: (1) a flywheel energy storage unit having more than 20 years life time; (2) electrolytic capacitor less inverter and converter. By using these techniques, a three phase UPS rating 5kVA, 200V is developed, and excellent performance is obtained: input power factor is over 99.7%; output voltage distortion is under 1.5%; transformer less UPS achieves light weight system; the UPS have function of automatic output voltage balance using auxiliary diode rectifier; input current harmonic distortion is less than 1.2%, even if the single phase load is connected.

  9. Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

  10. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Patent: Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body (15) composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel (10) body (15) is enclosed by a rim (50) of circumferentially wound fiber (2)

  11. High speed flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrath, Stephen V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  12. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  13. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Satish V. (San Ramon, CA); Christensen, Richard M. (Danville, CA); Toland, Richard H. (West Chester, PA)

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  14. Reactor coolant pump flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

    2013-11-26

    A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

  15. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

    1998-07-07

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

  16. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  17. Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2013) Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, PA for Hazle Spindle LLC....

  18. Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2013) | Department of Energy Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013) Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013) Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, PA for Hazle Spindle LLC. The plant will provide frequency regulation services to grid operator PJM Interconnection. For more information about how OE performs research

  19. Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Project Type. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Revision: V1.0 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies Project Type. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Revision: V1.0 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies Project Type. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Revision: V1.0 In this program, Amber Kinetics designed, built, and tested a sub--scale 5

  20. Hazle Spindle, LLC Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hazle Spindle, LLC Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant Project Description Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20MW flywheel plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania for the plant owner/operator, Hazle Spindle LLC The plant will provide frequency regulation services to grid operator PJM Interconnection. The Beacon Power technology uses flywheels to recycle energy from the grid in response to changes in demand and grid

  1. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

    1987-04-28

    A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

  2. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Donald E. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Ingham, Kenneth T. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  3. Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rounds, Robert; Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

  4. AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AER NY Kinetics LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: AER NY Kinetics LLC Address: PO Box 585 21 Entrance Avenue Place: Ogdensburg Zip: 13669 Region: United States Sector: Marine...

  5. Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blake, Henry W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

  6. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

    1989-12-12

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

  7. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veronesi, Luciano (O'Hara Twp., Allegheny County, PA); Raimondi, ALbert A. (Monroeville Borough, Allegheny County, PA)

    1989-01-01

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

  8. Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kinetic Wave Power Address: 2861 N Tupelo St Place: Midland Zip: 48642 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  9. Layered flywheel with stress reducing construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedericy, Johan A. (Palos Verdes Estates, CA); Towgood, Dennis A. (Huntington Beach, CA)

    1984-11-13

    A flywheel having elastic spokes carrying an elastic rim; and a hub coupling the spokes to a shaft and deforming in response to centrifugal force to match the radial distortion of the spokes.

  10. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of triphenylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-28

    We report vibrational information of both the first electronically excited state and the ground cationic state of jet-cooled triphenylene via the techniques of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. The first excited electronic state S{sub 1} of the neutral molecule is of A{sub 1}? symmetry and is therefore electric dipole forbidden in the D{sub 3h} group. Consequently, there are no observable Franck-Condon allowed totally symmetric a{sub 1}? vibrational bands in the REMPI spectrum. All observed vibrational transitions are due to Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling to the E? third electronically excited state S{sub 3}. The assignment of all vibrational bands as e? symmetry is based on comparisons with calculations using the time dependent density functional theory and spectroscopic simulations. When an electron is eliminated, the molecular frame undergoes Jahn-Teller distortion, lowering the point group to C{sub 2v} and resulting in two nearly degenerate electronic states of A{sub 2} and B{sub 1} symmetry. Here we follow a crude treatment by assuming that all e? vibrational modes resolve into b{sub 2} and a{sub 1} modes in the C{sub 2v} molecular frame. Some observed ZEKE transitions are tentatively assigned, and the adiabatic ionization threshold is determined to be 63?365 7 cm{sup ?1}. The observed ZEKE spectra contain a consistent pattern, with a cluster of transitions centered near the same vibrational level of the cation as that of the intermediate state, roughly consistent with the propensity rule. However, complete assignment of the detailed vibrational structure due to Jahn-Teller coupling requires much more extensive calculations, which will be performed in the future.

  11. MHK Projects/Ogdensburg Kinetic Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization AER NY Kinetics LLC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The “alternative energy generating sources” include combined heat and power (CHP) projects, flywheel energy storage, energy efficient steam technology. and renewable technologies that generate us...

  13. REACTOR-FLASH BOILER-FLYWHEEL POWER PLANT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loeb, E.

    1961-01-17

    A power generator in the form of a flywheel with four reactors positioned about its rim is described. The reactors are so positioned that steam, produced in the reactor, exists tangentially to the flywheel, giving it a rotation. The reactors are incompletely moderated without water. The water enters the flywheel at its axis, under sufficient pressure to force it through the reactors, where it is converted to steam. The fuel consists of parallel twisted ribbons assembled to approximate a cylinder.

  14. Optimal Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Systems Place: Torrance, California Zip: 90505 Product: Manufacturer of flywheel power system, specialising in aerospace and defence sector. Coordinates: 40.417285,...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy generating sources" include combined heat and power (CHP) projects, flywheel energy storage, energy efficient steam technology. and renewable technologies that...

  16. STEPHENTOWN SPINDLE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STEPHENTOWN SPINDLE PROJECT SUMMARY In August 2010, the Department of Energy issued a 43 million loan guarantee to finance Stephentown Spindle, a flywheel energy storage project ...

  17. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  18. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  19. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  20. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

    1998-07-14

    An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

  1. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

  2. Vycon Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Cerritos, California Zip: 90703 Product: Vycon markets and manufactures flywheel energy storage systems for a wide range of applications in the power quality and UPS...

  3. Ashman Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has developed various permanent magnet high-speed generators and various flywheel energy storage applications funded by NASA and NASA GRC has extensively tested these...

  4. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  5. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  6. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  7. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft010_pitz_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based

  8. Micro Hydro Kinetic Turbines from Smart Hydro Power | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Kinetic Turbines from Smart Hydro Power Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tauchturbine.jpg Technology Profile Project(s) where this...

  9. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  10. Opening Remarks, California Energy Commission Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    N * Pumped Hydro * Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) * Flywheels * Batteries (Na-S, Li-Ion, Redox Flow, etc.) * Super-Capacitors (SuperCaps) * Superconducting Magnetics * ...

  11. Arete Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Inc Place: Reno, Nevada Product: Developer and manufacturer of advanced flywheel energy storage systems. Coordinates: 32.944065, -97.578279 Show Map Loading map......

  12. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Batteries, flywheels, above-ground compressed air, micro pumped hydro, and other forms of energy storage may be able to provide significant support to the integration of renewable ...

  13. TPT Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Place: United Kingdom Product: Specialists in high-cycling flywheel systems for grid-level power management. References: TPT Energy1 This article is a stub. You can...

  14. The magnetic flywheel flow meter: Theoretical and experimental contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchenau, D., E-mail: d.buchenau@hzdr.de; Galindo, V.; Eckert, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Bautzner Landstrae 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-02

    The development of contactless flow meters is an important issue for monitoring and controlling of processes in different application fields, like metallurgy, liquid metal casting, or cooling systems for nuclear reactors and transmutation machines. Shercliff described in his book The Theory of Electromagnetic Flow Measurement, Cambridge University Press, 1962 a simple and robust device for contact-less measurements of liquid metal flow rates which is known as magnetic flywheel. The sensor consists of several permanent magnets attached on a rotatable soft iron plate. This arrangement will be placed closely to the liquid metal flow to be measured, so that the field of the permanent magnets penetrates into the fluid volume. The flywheel will be accelerated by a Lorentz force arising from the interaction between the magnetic field and the moving liquid. Steady rotation rates of the flywheel can be taken as a measure for the mean flow rate inside the fluid channel. The present paper provides a detailed theoretical description of the sensor in order to gain a better insight into the functional principle of the magnetic flywheel. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by corresponding laboratory experiments. For that purpose, a laboratory model of such a flow meter was built and tested on a GaInSn-loop under various test conditions.

  15. Department of Energy and Beacon Power Finalize $43 Million Loan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to work to make our nation energy independent," said Congressman Scott Murphy. Beacon's Gen 4 flywheel system is specifically designed to perform frequency regulation on utility ...

  16. Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flywheel - Jim Arseneaux, Beacon Power PDF icon ESS 2012 Peer Review - Flow-Assisted Zinc Anode Batteries for Grid-Scale Electricity Storage - Sanjoy Banerjee, CUNY Energy ...

  17. MHK Technologies/Kinetic Hydropower System KHPS | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsRoosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE *MHK ProjectsCornwall Ontario River Energy CORE Technology Resource Click here...

  18. Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A unified model of bond strength across multiple timescales Significance and Impact This is the first-ever demonstration that the equilibrium free energy can be determined by ...

  19. Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.

    1998-06-02

    An interface structure is described for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45{degree} with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning. 2 figs.

  20. Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    1998-06-02

    An interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45.degree. with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning.

  1. Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  2. When and how does a prominence-like jet gain kinetic energy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, S.; Wang, Yuming

    2014-02-20

    A jet is a considerable amount of plasma being ejected from the chromosphere or lower corona into the higher corona and is a common phenomenon. Usually, a jet is triggered by a brightening or a flare, which provides the first driving force to push plasma upward. In this process, magnetic reconnection is thought to be the mechanism to convert magnetic energy into thermal, nonthermal, and kinetic energies. However, most jets could reach an unusual high altitude and end much later than the end of its associated flare. This fact implies that there is another way to continuously transfer magnetic energy into kinetic energy even after the reconnection. The picture described above is well known in the community, but how and how much magnetic energy is released through a way other than reconnection is still unclear. By studying a prominence-like jet observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI, we find that the continuous relaxation of the post-reconnection magnetic field structure is an important process for a jet to climb up higher than it could through only reconnection. The kinetic energy of the jet gained through the relaxation is 1.6 times that gained from the reconnection. The resultant energy flux is hundreds of times larger than the flux required for the local coronal heating, suggesting that such jets are a possible source to keep the corona hot. Furthermore, rotational motions appear all the time during the jet. Our analysis suggests that torsional Alfvn waves induced during reconnection could not be the only mechanism to release magnetic energy and drive jets.

  3. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  4. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldn, .; Martnez, I. A.; Rica, R. A.; Dinis, L.

    2014-06-09

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  5. Nucleation of diindenoperylene and pentacene at thermal and hyperthermal incident kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kish, Edward R.; Desai, Tushar V.; Greer, Douglas R.; Engstrom, James R.; Woll, Arthur R.

    2015-05-15

    The authors have examined the nucleation of diindenoperylene (DIP) on SiO{sub 2} employing primarily atomic force microscopy and focusing on the effect of incident kinetic energy employing both thermal and supersonic sources. For all incident kinetic energies examined (E{sub i}?=?0.0911.3?eV), the nucleation of DIP is homogeneous and the dependence of the maximum island density on the growth rate is described by a power law. A critical nucleus of approximately two molecules is implicated by our data. A re-examination of the nucleation of pentacene on SiO{sub 2} gives the same major result that the maximum island density is determined by the growth rate, and it is independent of the incident kinetic energy. These observations are readily understood by factoring in the size of the critical nucleus in each case, and the island density, which indicates that diffusive transport of molecules to the growing islands dominate the dynamics of growth in the submonolayer regime.

  6. Kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral aluminum clusters: Al--Al{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Curlee, G.A.; White, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    Neutral aluminum clusters sputtered from polycrystalline aluminum were analyzed by laser postionization time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The kinetic energy distributions of Al through Al{sub 6} were measured by a neutrals time-of-flight technique. The interpretation of laser postionization TOF data to extract velocity and energy distributions is presented. The aluminum cluster distributions are qualitatively similar to previous copper cluster distribution measurements from our laboratory. In contrast to the steep high energy tails predicted by the single- or multiple- collision models, the measured cluster distributions have high energy power law dependences in the range of E{sup {minus}3} to E{sup {minus}4.5}. Correlated collision models may explain the substantial abundance of energetic clusters that are observed in these experiments. Possible influences of cluster fragmentation on the distributions are discussed.

  7. Kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral aluminum clusters: Al--Al[sub 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J. ); Curlee, G.A. . Dept. of Physics); White, J.M. . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Neutral aluminum clusters sputtered from polycrystalline aluminum were analyzed by laser postionization time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The kinetic energy distributions of Al through Al[sub 6] were measured by a neutrals time-of-flight technique. The interpretation of laser postionization TOF data to extract velocity and energy distributions is presented. The aluminum cluster distributions are qualitatively similar to previous copper cluster distribution measurements from our laboratory. In contrast to the steep high energy tails predicted by the single- or multiple- collision models, the measured cluster distributions have high energy power law dependences in the range of E[sup [minus]3] to E[sup [minus]4.5]. Correlated collision models may explain the substantial abundance of energetic clusters that are observed in these experiments. Possible influences of cluster fragmentation on the distributions are discussed.

  8. Inverse Kinetics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  9. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenta, Giovanni [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)] [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States); Markidis, Stefano [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Divin, Andrey [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-05-15

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S?10{sup ?3}W/m{sup 2}.

  10. Beacon Power Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1879 Sector: Solar Product: US-based developer of solar PV inverters and flywheel-based energy storage systems. References: Beacon Power Corp1 This article is a stub. You can...

  11. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Michael W; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-05-28

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2 +, H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  12. Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels Discusses detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms for complex hydrocarbon fuels and computationally efficiecnt, accurate methodologies for modeling advanced combustion strategies. PDF icon deer10_flowers.pdf More Documents & Publications Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Development Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical

  13. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace013_pitz_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

  14. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace013_pitz_2013_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels

  15. Dynamics of entropy perturbations in assisted dark energy with mixed kinetic terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwan, Khamphee

    2011-02-01

    We study dynamics of entropy perturbations in the two-field assisted dark energy model. Based on the scenario of assisted dark energy, in which one scalar field is subdominant compared with the other in the early epoch, we show that the entropy perturbations in this two-field system tend to be constant on large scales in the early epoch and hence survive until the present era for a generic evolution of both fields during the radiation and matter eras. This behaviour of the entropy perturbations is preserved even when the fields are coupled via kinetic interaction. Since, for assisted dark energy, the subdominant field in the early epoch becomes dominant at late time, the entropy perturbations can significantly influence the dynamics of density perturbations in the universe. Assuming correlations between the entropy and curvature perturbations, the entropy perturbations can enhance the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect if the signs of the contributions from entropy perturbations and curvature perturbations are opposite after the matter era, otherwise the ISW contribution is suppressed. For canonical scalar field the effect of entropy perturbations on ISW effect is small because the initial value of the entropy perturbations estimated during inflation cannot be sufficiently large. However, in the case of k-essence, the initial value of the entropy perturbations can be large enough to affect the ISW effect to leave a significant imprint on the CMB power spectrum.

  16. Phase 1 STTR flywheel motor/alternator for hybrid electric vehicles. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; Kessinger, R.L. Jr.; Robinson, S.T.; Seymour, K.P.; Dockstadter, K.D.

    1997-12-31

    Visual Computing Systems (VCS) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have teamed, through a Phase 1 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE), to develop an advanced, low-cost motor/alternator drive system suitable for Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) applications. During Phase 1, system performance and design requirements were established, design concepts were generated, and preliminary motor/alternator designs were developed and analyzed. ORNL provided mechanical design and finite element collaboration and Lynx Motion Technology, a spin-off from VCS to commercialize their technology, constructed a proof-of-concept axial-gap permanent magnet motor/alternator that employed their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) with a survivable design speed potential of 10,000 rpm. The VCS motor/alternator was successfully tested in ORNL`s Motor Test Tank using an ORNL inverter and ORNL control electronics. It was first operated as an unloaded motor to 6,000 rpm and driven as an unloaded generator to 6,000 rpm. Output from the generator was then connected to a resistance bank, which caused the loaded generator to decelerate to 3,860 rpm where data was collected. After about 4-1/2 minutes, the test was terminated because of an impact noise. Subsequent inspection and operation at low speeds did not reveal the source of the noise. Electrical performance of the motor was excellent, encouraging continued development of this technology. Phase 2 efforts will focus on further design development and optimization, manufacturing development and prototype construction, testing, and evaluation.

  17. Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies Project Type. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Revision: V1.0 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  18. Distributed Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Energy Distributed Energy Distributed energy consists of a range of smaller-scale and modular devices designed to provide electricity, and sometimes also thermal energy, in locations close to consumers. They include fossil and renewable energy technologies (e.g., photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, microturbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells, combustion turbines, and steam turbines); energy storage devices (e.g., batteries and flywheels); and combined heat and power systems.

  19. Position and energy-resolved particle detection using phonon-mediated microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D. C.; Golwala, S. R.; Cornell, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; LeDuc, H. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Zmuidzinas, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-04

    We demonstrate position and energy-resolved phonon-mediated detection of particle interactions in a silicon substrate instrumented with an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The relative magnitude and delay of the signal received in each sensor allow the location of the interaction to be determined with < or approx. 1mm resolution at 30 keV. Using this position information, variations in the detector response with position can be removed, and an energy resolution of {sigma}{sub E} = 0.55 keV at 30 keV was measured. Since MKIDs can be fabricated from a single deposited film and are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, this technology can be extended to provide highly pixelized athermal phonon sensors for {approx}1 kg scale detector elements. Such high-resolution, massive particle detectors would be applicable to rare-event searches such as the direct detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay, or coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  20. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace013_pitz_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Development Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion

  1. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace013_pitz_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion

  2. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  3. CX-012512: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41848 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-012519: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41848 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Dynamical interpretation of average fission-fragment kinetic energy systematics and nuclear scission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadtochy, P.N. [GSI, Plankstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-01

    A dynamical interpretation of the well-known systematics for average total kinetic energy of fission fragments over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter (600 on the Coulomb parameter. The results of dynamical calculations of within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics show that the mean distance between the centers of mass of nascent fragments at the scission configuration increases linearly with the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}. This distance changes approximately from 2.35R{sub 0} for {sup 119}Xe to 2.6R{sub 0} for {sup 256}Fm. In spite of this increase in mean distance between future fragments at scission, the linear dependence of on the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} remains approximately valid over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}.

  6. Design guide for composite-material flywheels: rotor dyamic considerations. Part I. System whirling and stability. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert, C.W.; Ramunujam, G.

    1981-09-01

    Information to designers of flywheels is provided which will enable them to predict many aspects of the dynamic behavior of their flywheel systems when spin-tested with a quill-shaft support and driven by an air turbine. Computer programs are presented for the following dynamic analysis to obtain the results indicated: free whirling for natural frequencies versus rotational speed and the associated mode shapes; rough-type stability analysis for determining the stability limits; and forced whirling analysis for estimating the response of major components of the system to flywheel mass eccentricity and initial tilt. For the first and third kinds of analyses, two different mathematical models of the generic system are investigated. One is a seven-degree-of-freedom lumped-parameter analysis, while the other is a combined distributed- and lumped-parameter analysis. When applied to an existing flywheel system, the two models yielded numerical values for the lowest first-order forward critical speed in very close agreement with each other and with experimental results obtained in spin tests. Therefore, for the second kind of analysis, only the lumped-parameter model is implemented. Qualitative discussions as to why forced retrograde whirling is not as severe as forward whirling are also presented. The analyses are applied to the multi-material ring type flywheel systems, a constant-thickness-diskring type, and a tapered-thickness-disk type. In addition, the effects of the following flywheel design parameters on system dynamics were investigated: flywheel mass; diametral and polar mass moments of inertia; location of mass center from the lower end of the quill shaft; quill shaft length; lower turbine-bearing support stiffness; equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the external damper; flywheel dead weight; and torque applied at the turbine.

  7. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

    1986-01-10

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  8. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cross, Jon B. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  9. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

  10. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-07-20

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings. 2 figs.

  11. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, Dana Lynn

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  12. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    knowledge that combustion is governed by chain reactions of radicals. Diesel and Otto didn't need to know any chemistry beyond fuel + air heat However, in the intervening...

  13. CX-000760: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage DemonstrationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/09/2010Location(s): Freemont, CaliforniaOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  15. Bearing design for flywheel energy storage using high-TC superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature superconductor material bearing system (38) This system (38) includes a rotor (50) having a ring permanent magnet (60), a plurality of permanent magnets (16, 20 and 70) for interacting to generate levitation forces for the system (38). This group of magnets are a push/pull bearing (75). A high temperature superconductor structure (30) interacts with the ting permanent magnet (60) to provide stabilizing forces for the system (38).

  16. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion ... Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials Composite ...

  17. Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-02-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

  18. Analysis of Flow Cytometry DNA Damage Response Protein Activation Kinetics Following X-rays and High Energy Iron Nuclei Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Universities Space Research Association; Chappell, Lori J.; Whalen, Mary K.; Gurai, Sheena; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janice M.

    2010-12-15

    We developed a mathematical method to analyze flow cytometry data to describe the kinetics of {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 phosphorylations ensuing various qualities of low dose radiation in normal human fibroblast cells. Previously reported flow cytometry kinetic results for these DSB repair phospho-proteins revealed that distributions of intensity were highly skewed, severely limiting the detection of differences in the very low dose range. Distributional analysis reveals significant differences between control and low dose samples when distributions are compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Radiation quality differences are found in the distribution shapes and when a nonlinear model is used to relate dose and time to the decay of the mean ratio of phosphoprotein intensities of irradiated samples to controls. We analyzed cell cycle phase and radiation quality dependent characteristic repair times and residual phospho-protein levels with these methods. Characteristic repair times for {gamma}H2AX were higher following Fe nuclei as compared to X-rays in G1 cells (4.5 {+-} 0.46 h vs 3.26 {+-} 0.76 h, respectively), and in S/G2 cells (5.51 {+-} 2.94 h vs 2.87 {+-} 0.45 h, respectively). The RBE in G1 cells for Fe nuclei relative to X-rays for {gamma}H2AX was 2.05 {+-} 0.61 and 5.02 {+-} 3.47, at 2 h and 24-h postirradiation, respectively. For pATF2, a saturation effect is observed with reduced expression at high doses, especially for Fe nuclei, with much slower characteristic repair times (>7 h) compared to X-rays. RBEs for pATF2 were 0.66 {+-} 0.13 and 1.66 {+-} 0.46 at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. Significant differences in {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 levels comparing irradiated samples to control were noted even at the lowest dose analyzed (0.05 Gy) using these methods of analysis. These results reveal that mathematical models can be applied to flow cytometry data to uncover important and subtle differences following exposure to various qualities of low dose radiation.

  19. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  20. FY06 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER REVIEW John D. Boyes Sandia National Laboratories ESS Program Makeup ESS Base Program - CEC/DOE Data Acquisition and Project Support - NYSERDA/DOE Data Acquisition and Project Support - Boeing Superconducting Flywheel - ACONF Coast Guard Project - HybSim Hybrid Storage Model Development Congressionally-Directed Programs - University of Missouri-Rolla - Grid Modernization - Iowa Stored Energy Project - EEI - BiPolar Ni-MH Battery Development - Sprint - Storage

  1. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Testing and Validation (October 2012)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Testing and Validation Independent testing of individual cell level to megawatt-scale electrical energy storage systems Testing and validating the performance of electrical equipment is a critical step in the process to deploy technologies in the grid. Before these devices, such as batteries and flywheels, are installed in the grid, they must be proven to be safe and reliable. However, energy storage manufacturers and integrators are often unable to afford or have the capabilities to provide

  2. Theoretical investigation of the origin of the multipeak structure of kinetic-energy-release spectra from charge-resonance-enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Haixiang; Guo Yahui [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); China and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 10039 (China); Lu Ruifeng [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhang Peiyu; Han Keli; He Guozhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-09-15

    The dynamics of hydrogen molecular ions in intense laser pulses (100 fs, I = 0.77 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 2.5 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) has been studied, and the kinetic-energy-release spectra of Coulomb explosion channel have been calculated by numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In a recent experiment, a multipeak structure from charge-resonance-enhanced ionization is interpreted by a vibrational 'comb' at a critical nuclear distance. We found that the peaks could not be attributed to a single vibrational level but a collective contribution of some typical vibrational states in our calculated Coulomb explosion spectra, and the main peak shifts toward the low-energy region with increasing vibrational level, which is also different from the explanation in that experiment. We have also discussed the proton's kinetic-energy-release spectra for different durations with the same laser intensity.

  3. Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Erik

    2012-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) federal assistance for the management of a project to develop and test a prototype flywheel-?based energy recovery and storage system in partnership with Test Devices, Inc. (TDI). TDI specializes in the testing of jet engine and power generation turbines, which uses a great deal of electrical power for long periods of time. In fact, in 2007, the company consumed 3,498,500 kW-?hr of electricity in their operations, which is equivalent to the electricity of 328 households. For this project, CTE and TDI developed and tested a prototype flywheel-?based energy recovery and storage system. This technology is being developed at TDIs facilities to capture and reuse the energy necessary for the companys core process. The new technology and equipment is expected to save approximately 80% of the energy used in the TDI process, reducing total annual consumption of power by approximately 60%, saving approximately two million kilowatt-?hours annually. Additionally, the energy recycling system will allow TDI and other end users to lower their peak power demand and reduce associated utility demand charges. The use of flywheels in this application is novel and requires significant development work from TDI. Flywheels combine low maintenance costs with very high cycle life with little to no degradation over time, resulting in lifetimes measured in decades. All of these features make flywheels a very attractive option compared to other forms of energy storage, including batteries. Development and deployment of this energy recycling technology will reduce energy consumption during jet engine and stationary turbine development. By reengineering the current inefficient testing process, TDI will reduce risk and time to market of efficiency upgrades of gas turbines across the entire spectrum of applications. Once in place the results from this program will also help other US industries to utilize energy recycling technology to lower domestic energy use and see higher net energy efficiency. The prototype system and results will be used to seek additional resources to carry out full deployment of a system. Ultimately, this innovative technology is expected to be transferable to other testing applications involving energy-?based cycling within the company as well as throughout the industry.

  4. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace_20_choi.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT

  5. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    efficiency clean combustion engines | Department of Energy Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Developing chemical kinetic mechanisms and applying them to simulating engine combustion processes. PDF icon deer09_aceves.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Chemical

  6. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Abruna, Hector Daniel Cornell University 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Our work is...

  7. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOEs Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  8. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  9. Kinetic Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    tidal generators. Has notably patented the KESC Tidal Generator which is based on free flow hydrodynamics. Coordinates: 29.187525, -82.140394 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Kinetic Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    56210 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  11. Microsoft Word - OE_Energy_Storage_Program_Plan_Feburary_2011v3[2].docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Images-Front cover: 20MW Beacon Power flywheel storage facility; Ameren's 440MW pumped-hydro storage at Taum Sauk, Missouri. Back cover: 8MW SCE / A123 Lithium-ion storage at Tehachapi wind farm; 25MW Primus Power flow battery at Modesto, California; 110MW compressed air energy storage in McIntosh, Alabama. TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary............................................................................................................. 1 1.0 Introduction to the OE Storage Program

  12. SEVIL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: SEVIL Place: France Product: designs, develops and manufactures electricity storage flywheels. References: SEVIL1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Presentation on the Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. PDF icon storage_theory_session_eiazab.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Documentation of Hybrid

  14. Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon acep_01_larson.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled

  15. Energy 101: Hydropower

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-24

    Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses.

  16. Energy 101: Hydropower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses.

  17. FVB Energy Inc. Technical Assistance Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.

    2011-05-17

    The request made by FVB asked for advice and analysis regarding the value of recapturing the braking energy of trains operating on electric light rail transit systems. A specific request was to evaluate the concept of generating hydrogen by electrolysis. The hydrogen would, in turn, power fuel cells that could supply electric energy back into the system for train propulsion or, possibly, also to the grid. To allow quantitative assessment of the potential resource, analysis focused on operations of the SoundTransit light rail system in Seattle, Washington. An initial finding was that the full cycle efficiency of producing hydrogen as the medium for capturing and reusing train braking energy was quite low (< 20%) and, therefore, not likely to be economically attractive. As flywheel energy storage is commercially available, the balance of the analysis focused the feasibility of using this alternative on the SoundTransit system. It was found that an investment in a flywheel with a 25-kWh capacity of the type manufactured by Beacon Power Corporation (BPC) would show a positive 20-year net present value (NPV) based on the current frequency of train service. The economic attractiveness of this option would increase initially if green energy subsidies or rebates were applicable and, in the future, as the planned frequency of train service grows.

  18. Paint decontamination kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1984-04-01

    Decontamination kinetics of a high-gloss polyurethane paint have been investigated using a novel flow cell experiment where the sample was counted in situ during decontamination. The /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Y decontaminations follow a rate law that can be predicted theoretically for contaminant ion desorption from weakly heterogeneous random surface adsorption sites. Paint surfaces show the same decontamination kinetics after damage by abrasion or ultraviolet irradiation prior to contamination. The systems investigated exhibit Freundlich adsorption isotherm behavior during contamination; this is also characteristic of weakly heterogeneous random surfaces and is very commonly observed in ion adsorption studies at low concentrations.

  19. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  20. Diffusion In Confinement: Kinetic Simulations of Self- and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collective-Diffusion Behavior of Adsorbed Gases | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Diffusion In Confinement: Kinetic Simulations of Self- and Collective-Diffusion Behavior of Adsorbed Gases

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-wind-turbines-2014-update Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-wind-turbines-2014-update Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it...

  3. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideosre-building-greensburg Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it...

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-fuel-cell-technology Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it...

  5. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ft010_pitz_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

  6. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ft010_pitz_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Development

  7. Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace035_larson_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data

  8. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  9. Velkess Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Velkess Inc. Product: Start-up company developing a novel flywheel technology using a flexible rotor. References: Velkess Inc.1 This article...

  10. KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin, O 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin, O 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING; CONSUMPTION RATES; DEAD TIME; DETECTION; DIFFUSION; DNA; ENERGY TRANSFER; FABRICATION;...

  11. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high...

  12. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

  13. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

  14. Sandia Energy - Chemistry of Autoignition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of Autoignition Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics Chemistry of Autoignition Chemistry of...

  15. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  16. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  17. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace076_mcnenly_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine

  18. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide (Conference) | SciTech Connect kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and

  19. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling | Department of Energy 09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es_17_sastry.pdf More Documents & Publications Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eerevideosenergy-101-wind-turbines-2014-update Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into...

  3. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses. http:energy.goveere...

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and...

  5. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Video Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of...

  6. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of...

  7. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of...

  8. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it...

  11. Hitec Power Protection | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Hitec Power Protection Place: Almelo, Netherlands Zip: 7602 Product: UPS flywheel systems. References: Hitec Power Protection1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  12. Pentadyne Power Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manufactures light, self-contained flywheels designed to provide a long lasting, low maintenance alternative to conventional batteries. Coordinates: 39.817671, -74.533983 Show...

  13. Philips Color Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Massachusetts Zip: 01803 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Efficiency Product: LED lighting systems Website: www.colorkinetics.com Coordinates: 42.5005723,...

  14. The Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2010-08-31

    The higher penetration of intermittent generation resources (including wind and solar generation) in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) balancing authorities (BAs) raises issue of requiring expensive additional fast grid balancing services in response to additional intermittency and fast up and down power ramps in the electric supply system. The overall goal of the wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) project is to develop the principles, algorithms, market integration rules, a functional design, and a technical specification for an energy storage system to help cope with unexpected rapid changes in renewable generation power output. The resulting system will store excess energy, control dispatchable load and distributed generation, and utilize inter-area exchange of the excess energy between the California ISO and Bonneville Power Administration control areas. A further goal is to provide a cost-benefit analysis and develop a business model for an investment-based practical deployment of such a system. There are two tasks in Phase 2 of the WAEMS project: the flywheel field tests and the battery evaluation. Two final reports, the Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Flywheel Field Tests Final Report and the Wide-area Energy Storage and Management System Battery Storage Evaluation, were written to summarize the results of the two tasks.

  15. National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01

    To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

  16. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts...

  17. General non-minimal kinetic coupling to gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.; Cardona, W. E-mail: wilalbca@univalle.edu.co

    2010-07-01

    We study a model of scalar field with a general non-minimal kinetic coupling to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the cosmological dynamics of this model and the issue of accelerated expansion. Solutions giving rise to power-law expansion have been found. The dynamical equation of state is studied for the two cases, without and with free kinetic term . In the first case, a behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found. In the second case, a solution was found, which match the current phenomenology of the dark energy. The model shows a rich variety of dynamical scenarios.

  18. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  19. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore » the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently under-predicts ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ and ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T, and persistently over-predicts ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ and ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T. In contrast, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+, ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+, ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T and ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T. Since the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics includes the advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, soil biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  20. Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrodes | Department of Energy Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es093_daniel_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion

  1. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace022_daw_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR

  2. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  3. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  4. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  5. Stochastic Parallel PARticle Kinetic Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    SPPARKS is a kinetic Monte Carlo simulator which implements kinetic and Metropolis Monte Carlo solvers in a general way so that they can be hooked to applications of various kinds. Specific applications are implemented in SPPARKS as physical models which generate events (e.g. a diffusive hop or chemical reaction) and execute them one-by-one. Applications can run in paralle so long as the simulation domain can be partitoned spatially so that multiple events can be invokedmore » simultaneously. SPPARKS is used to model various kinds of mesoscale materials science scenarios such as grain growth, surface deposition and growth, and reaction kinetics. It can also be used to develop new Monte Carlo models that hook to the existing solver and paralle infrastructure provided by the code.« less

  6. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    national energy security by developing energy sources with limited impacts on environment improving efficiency and reliability of nation's energy infrastructure Research...

  7. ENERGY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. Department of ENERGY Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review-2015 Framing Document http://energy.gov/qtr 2015-01-13 Page 2 The United States faces serious energy-linked challenges as well as substantial energy opportunities. Disruptions, both natural and man-made, threaten our aging energy infrastructure; global patterns of energy use are changing our climate; and our nation's dependence on foreign sources of energy comes at a significant cost to our economy. We need clean,

  8. IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineering advisor C.Y. Wang - Battery and fuel cell research * Max Ripepi - Masters Engineering Mechanics advisor Charles Bakis - Self levitating flywheel design...

  9. EA-1753: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Beacon Power Corporation Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant, Chicago Heights, Illinois Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment (EA), DOE determined that its proposed...

  10. Piller Power Systems GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Germany Zip: 327520 Product: Manufacturer of high capacity dynamic and static UPS flywheel and converter systems. Coordinates: 53.695599, 19.973301 Show Map Loading map......

  11. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013) DOEEPRI 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook...

  12. MHK Technologies/Manchester Bobber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Floating mass connected to a ratcheting clutch, gearbox and flywheel to power an induction generator to generate electricity - Constant movement of the waves combined with the...

  13. Kinetics of the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction under microwave heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.L.; Katz, J.D.; Rees, D.; Paffett, M.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Datye, A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    915 MHz microwave heating has been used to drive the CO oxidation reaction over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with out significantly affecting the reaction kinetics. As compared to an identical conventionally heated system, the activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction order with respect to CO were unchanged. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple extrapolation technique. Microwave-induced thermal gradients were found to play a significant role in kinetic observations. The authors chose the CO oxidation reaction over a supported metal catalyst because the reaction kinetics are well known, and because of the diverse dielectric properties of the various elements in the system: CO is a polar molecule, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are non-polar, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a dielectric, and Pt and Pd are conductors.

  14. Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    101: Hydroelectric Power Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power August 13, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis Learn how hydroelectric power, or hydropower, captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses. Humans have been using water to generate power for thousands of years. Hydroelectric power, or hydropower, captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity, which is then fed into the electrical grid to be used in homes and

  15. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

  16. Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hydrocarbons | Department of Energy kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_sampara.pdf More

  17. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Presentation on the Kinetics, Mechanics and ...

  18. Sandia Energy - High Pressure Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Pressure Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry High Pressure ChemistryAshley...

  19. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  20. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy /newsroom/_assets/images/energy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security imperative. Health Space Computing Energy Earth Materials Science Technology The Lab All The Grid Modernization Initiative represents a comprehensive DOE effort to help shape the future of our nation's grid and solve the challenges of integrating conventional and renewable sources with energy storage and smart buildings. Los

  1. Nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics and the possible breakdown of gyro-kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Deng Zhao

    2013-01-15

    A nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics (termed cyclo-kinetics here) is formulated to test the breakdown of the gyro-kinetic approximations. Six dimensional cyclo-kinetics can be regarded as an extension of five dimensional gyro-kinetics to include high-frequency cyclotron waves, which can interrupt the low-frequency gyro-averaging in the (sixth velocity grid) gyro-phase angle. Nonlinear cyclo-kinetics has no limit on the amplitude of the perturbations. Formally, there is no gyro-averaging when all cyclotron (gyro-phase angle) harmonics of the perturbed distribution function (delta-f) are retained. Retaining only the (low frequency) zeroth cyclotron harmonic in cyclo-kinetics recovers both linear and nonlinear gyro-kinetics. Simple recipes are given for converting continuum nonlinear delta-f gyro-kinetic transport simulation codes to cyclo-kinetics codes by retaining (at least some) higher cyclotron harmonics.

  2. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive SpectrumKinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  3. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling | Department of Energy 10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es082_sastry_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications track 3: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2015 GTO Peer Review | Poster Session

  4. Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    towards robust metal-organic frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation as a versatile synthetic route towards robust metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Dawei Feng, Kecheng Wang, Zhangwen Wei, Ying-Pin Chen, Cory M. Simon, Ravi K. Arvapally, Richard L. Martin, Mathieu Bosch, Tian-Fu Liu, Stephen Fordham, Daqiang Yuan, Mohammad A. Omary, Maciej Haranczyk, Berend Smit & Hong-Cai Zhou,

  5. Diffusion in confinement: kinetic simulations of self- and collective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion behavior of adsorbed gases | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome confinement: kinetic simulations of self- and collective diffusion behavior of adsorbed gases Previous Next List M. K. F. Abouelnasr and B. Smit, PCCP 14 (33), 11600 (2012) DOI: 10.1039/C2CP41147D abo121 Abstract The self- and collective-diffusion behaviors of adsorbed methane, helium, and isobutane in zeolite frameworks LTA, MFI, AFI, and SAS were examined at various

  6. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratory Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels William J. Pitz (PI), Charles K. Westbrook, Marco Mehl, M. Lee Davisson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory May 12, 2009 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Washington, DC This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  7. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  8. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  9. Effects of Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 Effects of Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 A presentation showing that point defects play an important role in the kinetics of NaAlH4 including vacancies and interstitials consistent with observed effects of Ti. PDF icon effects_of_point_defects.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 FTA - SunLine Transit Agency - Final Report Proceedings of the 1998 U.S. DOE

  10. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of hydroxyethylamine

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    β-secretase-1 inhibitors (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of hydroxyethylamine β-secretase-1 inhibitors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of hydroxyethylamine β-secretase-1 inhibitors Highlights: *Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of 10 hydroxyethylamine BACE-1 inhibitors. *Equilibrium binding of inhibitors was enthalpy driven for BACE-1. *Negative entropy of binding was observed

  12. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experimental Data | Department of Energy A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data Presents experimental study of a Cu-zeolite SCR in both reactor and engine test cell, and comparison of the model parameters between the SCR reactor and engine model PDF icon p-27_song.pdf More Documents & Publications Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage

  13. Investigation of NO2 Oxidation Kinetics and Burning Mode for Medium Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Particulate: Contrasting O2 and NO2 Oxidation | Department of Energy NO2 Oxidation Kinetics and Burning Mode for Medium Duty Diesel Particulate: Contrasting O2 and NO2 Oxidation Investigation of NO2 Oxidation Kinetics and Burning Mode for Medium Duty Diesel Particulate: Contrasting O2 and NO2 Oxidation Reports on preliminary measurements of particulate reactivity and changes in microstructure upon exposure to NO2, which is often present at significant levels in diesel engine exhaust.

  14. Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace035_larson_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber (LNT) Materials

  15. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace022_daw_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and the Development of a Representative Model

  16. Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple Collisionality Regimes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma...

  17. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines NH3 generation...

  18. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  19. Rim for rotary inertial energy storage device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knight, Jr., Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Pollard, Roy E. (Powell, TN)

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved rim or a high-performance rotary inertial energy storage device (flywheel). The improved rim is fabricated from resin impregnated filamentary material which is circumferentially wound in a side-by-side relationship to form a plurality of discretely and sequentially formed concentric layers of filamentary material that are bound together in a resin matrix. The improved rim is provided by prestressing the filamentary material in each successive layer to a prescribed tension loading in accordance with a predetermined schedule during the winding thereof and then curing the resin in each layer prior to forming the next layer for providing a prestress distribution within the rim to effect a self-equilibrating compressive prestress within the windings which counterbalances the transverse or radial tensile stresses generated during rotation of the rim for inhibiting deleterious delamination problems.

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it...

  2. Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ..) ".. _,; ,' . ' , ,; Depar?.me.nt ,of.' Energy Washington; DC 20585 : . ' , - $$ o"\ ' ~' ,' DEC ?;$ ;y4,,, ~ ' .~ The Honorable John Kalwitz , 200 E. Wells Street Milwaukee, W~isconsin 53202, . . i :. Dear,Mayor 'Kalwitz: " . " Secretary of Energy Hazel' O'Leary has announceha new,approach 'to,openness in " the Department of Ene~rgy (DOE) and its communications with'the public. In -. support of~this initiative, we areipleased to forward the enclosed information

  3. Femtosecond laser pulse driven melting in gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension: Identification of a transition from stretched to exponential kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yuelin; Jiang, Zhang; Lin, Xiao -Min; Wen, Haidan; Walko, Donald A.; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Subbaraman, Ram; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Gray, Stephen K.; Ho, Phay

    2015-01-30

    Many potential industrial, medical, and environmental applications of metal nanorods rely on the physics and resultant kinetics and dynamics of the interaction of these particles with light. We report a surprising kinetics transition in the global melting of femtosecond laser-driven gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension. At low laser intensity, the melting exhibits a stretched exponential kinetics, which abruptly transforms into a compressed exponential kinetics when the laser intensity is raised. It is found the relative formation and reduction rate of intermediate shapes play a key role in the transition. Supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and a kinetic model, themore » behavior is traced back to the persistent heterogeneous nature of the shape dependence of the energy uptake, dissipation and melting of individual nanoparticles. These results could have significant implications for various applications such as water purification and electrolytes for energy storage that involve heat transport between metal nanorod ensembles and surrounding solvents.« less

  4. Wind Energy Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Wind Energy Basics Wind Energy Basics Wind Energy Basics Once called windmills, the technology used to harness the power of wind has advanced significantly over the past ten years, with the United States increasing its wind power capacity 30% year over year. Wind turbines, as they are now called, collect and convert the kinetic energy that wind produces into electricity to help power the grid. Wind energy is actually a byproduct of the sun. The sun's uneven heating of

  5. Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydroelectric Power Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Addthis Description Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses. Topic Water Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power video: The video opens with the words "Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power." This is followed by a montage of rivers and streams, then a shot of an older water wheel. People have been capturing the energy

  6. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  7. Basic Energy Sciences (BES) at LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coherency Does Not Equate to Stability Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from Single Molecule Force...

  8. Power Tree Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree Corp Place: Boca Raton, Florida Zip: 33487 Product: Florida-based flywheel power storage systems maker. References: Power Tree Corp1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  9. Active Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Austin, Texas Zip: 78758 Product: Austin-based designer and manufacturer of battery-free power storage products using flywheels. Coordinates: 30.267605, -97.742984 Show Map...

  10. Energy

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    M onthly Energy Re< view Ila A a m 0 II 8 IIIW *g U In this issue: New data on nuclear electricity in Eastern Europe (Table 10.4) 9'Ij a - Ordering Information This publication...

  11. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

  12. NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmiller, Jeff; Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2006-03-01

    The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

  13. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  14. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of CoalCorn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric ... of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of CoalCorn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric ...

  15. Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated at localized and extended defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large kinetic...

  16. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  17. Kinetic and reactor models for HDT of middle distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotta, R.M.; Filho, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of middle distillates over a commercial Ni-Mo/y-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been studied under wide operating conditions just as 340 to 380{degrees}C and 38 to 98 atm. A Power Law model was presented to each one of those reactions. The parameters of kinetic equations were estimated solving the ordinary differential equations by the 4 order Runge-Kutta-Gill algorithm and Marquardt method for searching of set of kinetic parameters (kinetic constants as well as the orders of reactions). An adiabatic diesel hydrotreating trickle-bed reactor packed with the same catalyst was simulated numerically in order to check up the behavior of this specific reaction system. One dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model was used in this work. For each feed, the mass and energy balance equations were integrated along the length of the catalytic bed using the 4th Runge-Kutta-Gill method. The performance of two industrial reactors was checked. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Effect of morphology of hydrophobic surfaces on cavitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUZAR,ALENKA; LEUNG,KEVIN

    2000-04-24

    Cavitation has been suggested to be a possible source of long range interactions between mesoscopic hydrophobic surfaces. While evaporation is predicted by thermodynamics, little is known about its kinetics. Glauber dynamics Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice gas close to liquid-gas coexistence and confined between partially drying surfaces are used to model the effect of water confinement on the dynamics of surface-induced phase transition. Specifically, they examine how kinetics of induced evaporation change as the texture of hydrophobic surfaces is varied. Evaporation rates are considerably slowed with relatively small amount of hydrophilic coverage. However, the distribution of hydrophilic patches is found to be crucial, with the homogeneous one being much more effective in slowing the formation of vapor tubes which triggers the evaporation process. They estimate the free energy barrier of vapor tube formation via transition state theory, using a constrained forward-backward umbrella sampling technique applied to the metastable, confined liquid. Furthermore, to relate simulation rates to experimental ones, they perform simulations using the mass-conserving Kawasaki algorithm. They predict evaporation time scales that range from hundreds of picoseconds in the case of mesoscopic surfaces {approximately} 10{sup 4} nm{sup 2} to tens of nanoseconds for smaller surfaces {approximately} 40 nm{sup 2}, when the two surfaces are {approximately} 10 solvent layers apart. The present study demonstrates that cavitation is kinetically viable in real systems and should be considered in studies of processes at confined geometry.

  19. On the relationships between the Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics, and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use either of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) kinetics, which is the first-order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of an enzyme–substrate complex exactly for a single-enzyme and single-substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of a quasi-steadymore » state for the enzyme–substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme–substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme–substrate complexes, substrates, and enzymes. In particular, I show that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in deriving the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [E]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [E]T, and persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [S]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [S]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently underpredicts ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ and ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [E]T, and persistently overpredicts ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ and ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [S]T. In contrast, the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+, ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+, ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [E]T, and ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [S]T, indicating that ECA-based models will be more calibratable if the modeled processes do obey the law of mass action. Since the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics includes advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, land biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect that removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  20. Bio-butanol: Combustion properties and detailed chemical kinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, G.; Curran, H.J.; Pichon, S.; Simmie, J.M.; Zhukov, V.

    2010-02-15

    Autoignition delay time measurements were performed at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2 for butan-1-ol at reflected shock pressures of 1, 2.6 and 8 atm at temperatures from 1100 to 1800 K. High-level ab initio calculations were used to determine enthalpies of formation and consequently bond dissociation energies for each bond in the alcohol. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1399 reactions involving 234 species was constructed and tested against the delay times and also against recent jet-stirred reactor speciation data with encouraging results. The importance of enol chemistry is highlighted. (author)

  1. Non-minimal Kinetic coupling to gravity and accelerated expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.

    2010-07-01

    We study a scalar field with kinetic term coupled to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the role of this new coupling in the accelerated expansion at large times. In the case of scalar field dominance, the scalar field and potential giving rise to power-law expansion are found in some cases, and a dynamical equation of state is calculated for a given solution of the field equations. A behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found.

  2. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical

  3. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  4. Fokker–Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal α-particles in a fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peigney, B.E.

    2014-12-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the transport of suprathermal α-particles in inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (α-particles) at a kinetic level. The model assumes spherical symmetry in configuration space and axial symmetry in velocity space around the mean flow velocity. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal α-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are then validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  5. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  6. Southern company energy storage study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton; Jenkins, Kip

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

  7. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  8. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Rh/Ba

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Traps for Design and Optimization | Department of Energy Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Rh/Ba NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Rh/Ba NOx Traps for Design and Optimization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace_27_harold.pdf More Documents & Publications

  9. Twenty Five Years of Vibrational Kinetics and Negative Ion Production in H2 Plasmas: Modelling Aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capitelli, M.; De Pascale, O.; Diomede, P.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.; Pagano, D.; Gicquel, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2005-04-06

    Different approaches to study vibrational kinetics coupled to electron one for modeling different kinds of negative ion sources are presented. In particular two types of sources are investigated. The first one is a classical negative ion source in which the plasma is generated by thermoemitted electrons; in the second one, electrons already present in the mixture are accelerated by an RF field to sufficiently high energy to ionize the gas molecules. For the first kind of ion source a new computational scheme is presented to couple heavy particle and electron kinetics. Moreover models developed for an RF inductive discharge and for a parallel plate discharge are described.

  10. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry and polarimetry in high temperature fusion plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    196 This content was downloaded on 12/12/2013 at 20:27 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry and polarimetry in high temperature fusion plasmas View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 53 (2013) 113005 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/53/11/113005 Electron kinetic

  11. MHK Technologies/SMART Hybrid System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description Smart Hydro Power's hybrid system combines a micro hydro kinetic turbine with solar panels (and sometimes other sources) to provide clean, continuous energy year round....

  12. On the Use of Energy Storage Technologies for Regulation Services in Electric Power Systems with Significant Penetration of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bo; Makarov, Yuri V.; DeSteese, John G.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Nyeng, Preben; McManus, Bart; Pease, John

    2008-05-27

    Energy produced by intermittent renewable resources is sharply increasing in the United States. At high penetration levels, volatility of wind power production could cause additional problems for the power system balancing functions such as regulation. This paper reports some partial results of a project work, recently conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project proposes to mitigate additional intermittency with the help of Wide Area Energy Management System (WAEMS) that would provide a two-way simultaneous regulation service for the BPA and California ISO systems by using a large energy storage facility. The paper evaluates several utility-scale energy storage technology options for their usage as regulation resources. The regulation service requires a participating resource to quickly vary its power output following the rapidly and frequently changing regulation signal. Several energy storage options have been analyzed based on thirteen selection criteria. The evaluation process resulted in the selection of flywheels, pumped hydro electric power (or conventional hydro electric power) plant and sodium sulfur or nickel cadmium batteries as candidate technologies for the WAEMS project. A cost benefit analysis should be conducted to narrow the choice to one technology.

  13. Growth kinetics of AlFe intermetallic compounds during annealing treatment of friction stir lap welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Movahedi, M., E-mail: m_movahedi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H., E-mail: kokabi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyed Reihani, S.M., E-mail: reihani@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, H., E-mail: hossein.najafi@epfl.ch [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics (ICMP), EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farzadfar, S.A., E-mail: seyed-amir.farzadfar@mail.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Department of Materials Engineering, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Cheng, W.J., E-mail: d9603505@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, C.J., E-mail: cjwang@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we explored the growth kinetics of the AlFe intermetallic (IM) layer at the joint interface of the St-12/Al-5083 friction stir lap welds during post-weld annealing treatment at 350, 400 and 450 C for 30 to 180 min. Optical microscope (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to investigate the structure of the weld zone. The thickness and composition of the IM layers were evaluated using image analysis system and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), respectively. Moreover, kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis was performed to evaluate the level of stored energy in the as-welded state. The results showed that the growth kinetics of the IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. Presence of the IM compounds as well as high stored energy near the joint interface of the as-welded sample was recognized to be the origin of the observed deviation from the parabolic diffusion law. - Highlights: This work provided a new insight into growth kinetics of AlFe IM thickness. The growth kinetics of IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. IM near the joint interface was the origin of deviation from the parabolic law. High stored energy at joint interface was origin of deviation from parabolic law.

  14. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Welch, D.; Ellsworth, J.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  15. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.D. Savee, D.L. Osborn, S.S. Vasu, C.J. Percival, D.E. Shallcross, and C.A. Taatjes, "Direct Kinetic Measurements of Criegee Intermediate (CH2OO) Formed by Reaction of CH2I...

  16. Kinetic neoclassical transport in the H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Grassie, J. S. de

    2014-07-15

    Multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport through the QH-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D is calculated using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density, and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. The radial electric field (E{sub r}) that maintains ambipolar transport across flux surfaces and to the wall is computed self-consistently on closed and open magnetic field lines and is in excellent agreement with experiment. The E{sub r} inside the separatrix is the unique solution that balances the outward flux of thermal tail deuterium ions against the outward neoclassical electron flux and inward pinch of impurity and colder deuterium ions. Particle transport in the pedestal is primarily due to anomalous transport, while the ion heat and momentum transport are primarily due to the neoclassical transport. The full-f treatment quantifies the non-Maxwellian energy distributions that describe a number of experimental observations in low-collisionallity pedestals on DIII-D, including intrinsic co-I{sub p} parallel flows in the pedestal, ion temperature anisotropy, and large impurity temperatures in the scrape-off layer.

  17. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  18. Chemical Kinetics in Support of Syngas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryer, Frederick

    2007-07-31

    This document is the final report on an overall program formulated to extend our prior work in developing and validating kinetic models for the CO/hydrogen/oxygen reaction by carefully analyzing the individual and interactive behavior of specific elementary and subsets of elementary reactions at conditions of interest to syngas combustion in gas turbines. A summary of the tasks performed under this work are: 1. Determine experimentally the third body efficiencies in H+O{sub 2}+M = HO{sub 2}+M (R1) for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. 2. Using published literature data and the results in this program, further develop the present H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent and CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mechanisms for dilution with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} through comparisons with new experimental validation targets for H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} reaction kinetics in the presence of significant diluent fractions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}O, at high pressures. (task amplified to especially address ignition delay issues, see below). 3. Analyze and demonstrate issues related to NOx interactions with syngas combustion chemistry (task amplified to include interactions of iron pentacarbonyl with syngas combustion chemistry, see below). 4. Publish results, including updated syngas kinetic model. Results are summarized in this document and its appendices. Three archival papers which contain a majority of the research results have appeared. Those results not published elsewhere are highlighted here, and will appear as part of future publications. Portions of the work appearing in the above publications were also supported in part by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER-13503. As a result of and during the research under the present contract, we became aware of other reported results that revealed substantial differences between experimental characterizations of ignition delays for syngas mixtures and ignition delay predictions based upon homogenous kinetic modeling. We adjusted emphasis of Task 2 to understand the source of these noted disparities because of their key importance to developing lean premixed combustion technologies of syngas turbine applications. In performing Task 3, we also suggest for the first time the very significant effect that metal carbonyls may have on syngas combustion properties. This work is fully detailed. The work on metal carbonyl effects is entirely computational in nature. Pursuit of experimental verification of these interactions was beyond the scope of the present work.

  19. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Ding, H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2013-07-15

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 15 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  20. The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to W plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to...

  1. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model...

  2. The emerging roles of energy storage in a competitive power market: Summary of a DOE Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, S.P.; Falcone, P.K.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the workshop, {open_quotes}The Emerging Roles of Energy Storage in a Competitive Power Market,{close_quotes} which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories and was held in Pleasanton, California on December 6-7, 1994. More than 70 people attended, representing government agencies, national laboratories, equipment vendors, electric utilities and other energy providers, venture capital interests, and consultants. Many types of energy storage were discussed, including electrical (batteries and superconducting magnets), mechanical (flywheels and pumped hydro), hydrogen, compressed air, and thermal energy storage. The objectives of the workshop were to communicate within the energy storage community regarding the costs, benefits, and technical status of various technology options; to explore and elucidate the evolving roles of energy storage in a more dynamic and competitive power and energy marketplace; and to discuss the optimum federal role in this area. The goals of the workshop were fully realized through knowledgeable and insightful presentations and vigorous discussion, which are summarized.

  3. STEPHENTOWN SPINDLE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STEPHENTOWN SPINDLE STEPHENTOWN SPINDLE PDF icon DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_STOR-TRSM_Stephentown-Spindle.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1631: Finding of No Significant Impact ONE NEVADA LINE Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013)

  4. Iron oxidation kinetics for H-2 and CO production via chemical looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stehle, RC; Bobek, MM; Hahn, DW

    2015-01-30

    Solar driven production of fuels by means of an intermediate reactive metal for species splitting has provided a practical and potentially efficient pathway for disassociating molecules at significantly lower thermal energies. The fuels of interest are of or derive from the separation of oxygen from H2O and CO2 to form hydrogen and carbon monoxide, respectively. The following study focuses on iron oxidation through water and CO2 splitting to explore the fundamental reaction kinetics and kinetic rates that are relevant to these processes. In order to properly characterize the reactive metal potential and to optimize a scaled-up solar reactor system, a monolith-based laboratory reactor was implemented to investigate reaction temperatures over a range from 990 to 1400 K. The presence of a single, solid monolith as a reacting surface allowed for a limitation in mass transport effects in order to monitor kinetically driven reaction steps. The formation of oxide layers on the iron monoliths followed Cabrera-Mott models for oxidation of metals with kinetic rates being measured using real-time mass spectrometry to calculate kinetic constants and estimate oxide layer thicknesses. Activation energies of 47.3 kJ/mol and 32.8 kJ/mol were found for water-splitting and CO2 splitting, respectively, and the conclusions of the independent oxidation reactions where applied to experimental results for syngas (H-2-CO) production to explore ideal process characteristics. Copyright (C) 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Videos Energy

  6. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; et al

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method describedmore » here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.« less

  7. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  8. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  9. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  10. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  11. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  12. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  13. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  14. Business Talks at the Technology Showcase | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Business Talks at the Technology Showcase Business Talks at the Technology Showcase February 27, 2013 - 3:26pm Addthis The Technology Showcase: AC Kinetics 1 of 11 The Technology Showcase: AC Kinetics The Technology Showcase at the 2013 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit presents America's next generation of transformational energy technologies. In this photo, motor control company AC Kinetics, Inc. highlighted its next-generation motor control technology on the showcase floor. Image: Sarah

  15. Nitrogen effects on crystallization kinetics of amorphous TiOxNy thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hukari, Kyle; Dannenberg, Rand; Stach, E.A.

    2001-03-30

    The crystallization behavior of amorphous TiOxNy (x>>y) thin films was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kozolog (JMAK) theory is used to determine the Avrami exponent, activation energy, and the phase velocity pre-exponent. Addition of nitrogen inhibits diffusion, increasing the nucleation temperature, while decreasing the growth activation energy. Kinetic variables extracted from individual crystallites are compared to JMAK analysis of the fraction transformed and a change of 6 percent in the activation energy gives agreement between the methods. From diffraction patterns and index of refraction the crystallized phase was found to be predominantly anatase.

  16. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geothermal Energy Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

  17. Kinetics of coal combustion: Part 2, Mechanisms and kinetics of coal volatiles combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essenhigh, R.H.; Bailey, E.G.; Shaw, D.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Values of global kinetic constants for the combustion of coal volatiles have been determined for the first time for volatiles from three coals (two bituminous coals and a Texas lignite). Global kinetic constants for methane and propane were also measured in the same apparatus to allow comparison with reference gases. Comparisons have also been made with values of global kinetics for pure hydrocarbons from a range of experiments as found in the literature. The volatiles were pyrolyzed from crushed coal drawn on weighed trays through a gas-fired muffle furnace, and they were burned at the top of a tube in an intense back-mix volume treated theoretically as a stirred reactor. Two types of experiment were carried out: partial combustion measurements near the stoichiometric for all coals from which the global kinetics were determined; and extinction limits for the Pittsburgh {number sign}8 coal volatiles to determine the extinction loop. The near stoichiometric generated kinetic data were used to predict the extinction limits with substantial agreement. Extinction loops for methane, propane and carbon monoxide were also measured for comparison.

  18. Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

  19. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace022_daw_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps

  20. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, H.L.; Wey, Mingjyh.

    1990-01-01

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  1. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  2. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

  3. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-09-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl [U(VI)] desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments.

  4. Weakly Ionized Plasmas in Hypersonics: Fundamental Kinetics and Flight Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macheret, Sergey

    2005-05-16

    The paper reviews some of the recent studies of applications of weakly ionized plasmas to supersonic/hypersonic flight. Plasmas can be used simply as means of delivering energy (heating) to the flow, and also for electromagnetic flow control and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation. Plasma and MHD control can be especially effective in transient off-design flight regimes. In cold air flow, nonequilibrium plasmas must be created, and the ionization power budget determines design, performance envelope, and the very practicality of plasma/MHD devices. The minimum power budget is provided by electron beams and repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulses, and the paper describes theoretical and computational modeling of plasmas created by the beams and repetitive pulses. The models include coupled equations for non-local and unsteady electron energy distribution function (modeled in forward-back approximation), plasma kinetics, and electric field. Recent experimental studies at Princeton University have successfully demonstrated stable diffuse plasmas sustained by repetitive nanosecond pulses in supersonic air flow, and for the first time have demonstrated the existence of MHD effects in such plasmas. Cold-air hypersonic MHD devices are shown to permit optimization of scramjet inlets at Mach numbers higher than the design value, while operating in self-powered regime. Plasma energy addition upstream of the inlet throat can increase the thrust by capturing more air (Virtual Cowl), or it can reduce the flow Mach number and thus eliminate the need for an isolator duct. In the latter two cases, the power that needs to be supplied to the plasma would be generated by an MHD generator downstream of the combustor, thus forming the 'reverse energy bypass' scheme. MHD power generation on board reentry vehicles is also discussed.

  5. Oxidation kinetics of calcium-doped palladium powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, S.; Kodas, T.T.; Hampden-Smith, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The oxidation kinetics of submicron Ca-containing Pd powders produced by spray pyrolysis were studied in the temperature range 600 to 675 C using thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation of pure Pd powder had an activation energy of {approximately}230 kJ/mol in the region 27% < oxidation < 70% and 65 kJ/mol for oxidation > 70%. The activation energies for Pd particles containing 0.01 weight percent (w/o) and 0.4 w/o Ca in the region 27% < oxidation < 70% were {approximately}230 kJ/mol and {approximately}50 kJ/mol, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that the conversion of Pd to Pd{sup II}O (stoichiometric PdO) proceeds from the particle surface into the interior and not homogeneously throughout the particle. The predictions of a variety of models and rate laws (shrinking core, parabolic, cubic, logarithmic, and inverse logarithmic) were compared with the data. The comparison suggested a mechanism in which oxidation of pure Pd proceeds by chemisorption and diffusion of oxygen to form a substoichiometric oxide, followed by the conversion of substoichiometric PdO to Pd{sup II}O. Oxidation of pure Pd is then probably limited by the diffusion of oxygen through the substoichiometric PdO and/or Pd{sup II}O. The addition of Ca increased the oxidation resistance of Pd most likely by inhibiting oxygen diffusion through the metal oxide layers surrounding the Pd.

  6. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE)

  7. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  8. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations become the slow and entropy modes of the conventional MHD). In the "dissipation range" below ion gyroscale, there are again two cascades: the kinetic-Alfven-wave (KAW) cascade governed by two fluid-like Electron Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (ERMHD) equations and a passive cascade of ion entropy fluctuations both in space and velocity. The latter cascade brings the energy of the inertial-range fluctuations that was Landau-damped at the ion gyroscale to collisional scales in the phase space and leads to ion heating. The KAWenergy is similarly damped at the electron gyroscale and converted into electron heat. Kolmogorov-style scaling relations are derived for all of these cascades. The relationship between the theoretical models proposed in this paper and astrophysical applications and observations is discussed in detail.

  9. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 19, 2016 Title: Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions "Reduced" (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in

  10. Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and...

  11. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACCELERATION; DIAMONDS; KINETICS;...

  12. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock compression in an oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to shock compression in an oxygen-balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock ...

  13. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an ...

  14. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications track 3: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined...

  15. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra. Authors: Smith, R. Scott ; Matthiesen, Jesper ; Kay, Bruce D. Publication Date: 2014-09-18 OSTI...

  16. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB ...

  17. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  18. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock compression in an oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    subsequent to shock compression in an oxygen-balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to...

  19. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR...

  20. Simulations of Kinetic Events at the Atomic Scale

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on the Simulations of Kinetic Events at the Atomic Scale given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  1. Microsoft Word - Amber Kinetics - Final Technical Report (30...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    December 30, 2015 ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Amber Kinetics would like ... or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or ... inputs such as current electricity prices, geographic ...

  2. Kinetic Theory of Turbulent Multiphase Flow | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetic Theory of Turbulent Multiphase Flow FWPProject Description: Project Leader(s): Rodney Fox It is proposed to further the present understanding of turbulent gas-solid...

  3. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetic models of fuels are needed to allow the simulation of engine performance for research, design, or verification purposes. PDF icon deer09bunting.pdf More Documents &...

  4. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto; Palodichuk, Michael; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, James; Chime, Arshiya; Malte, Philip

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  5. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems Part 1: Systems and Topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, W.; Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes power electronic interfaces for DE applications and the topologies needed for advanced power electronic interfaces. It focuses on photovoltaic, wind, microturbine, fuel cell, internal combustion engine, battery storage, and flywheel storage systems.

  6. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  7. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  8. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  9. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  10. Secretary Chu Announces $620 Million for Smart Grid Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The selected projects include advanced battery systems (including flow batteries), flywheels, and compressed air energy systems. View the full list of selected projects. Media ...

  11. Beacon Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Design, build, test, commission, and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage frequency regulation plant in Chicago, Illinois, and provide frequency regulation...

  12. Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, R.J.; McConnell, B.W.

    1993-06-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

  13. Women @ Energy: Nancy Brown | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nancy Jeanne Brown is a Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Nancy Jeanne Brown is a Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Dr. Nancy Jeanne Brown is a Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her research interests are atmospheric science, chemical kinetics, air quality and climate modeling, high performance computing, and

  14. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  15. Sandia Energy - Energy Surety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering,...

  16. Sandia Energy - Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering,...

  17. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Teng

    2007-12-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

  18. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states « Prev Next » Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding

  19. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a

  20. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated

  1. Nonlinear generation of kinetic-scale waves by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvn waves and nonlocal spectral transport in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-04-20

    We study the nonlocal nonlinear coupling and generation of kinetic Alfvn waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvn waves (MHD AWs) in conditions typical for the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. This cross-scale process provides an alternative to the turbulent energy cascade passing through many intermediate scales. The nonlinearities we study are proportional to the scalar products of wave vectors and hence are called 'scalar' ones. Despite the strong Landau damping of kinetic waves, we found fast growing KAWs and KSWs at perpendicular wavelengths close to the ion gyroradius. Using the parametric decay formalism, we investigate two independent decay channels for the pump AW: forward decay (involving co-propagating product waves) and backward decay (involving counter-propagating product waves). The growth rate of the forward decay is typically 0.05 but can exceed 0.1 of the pump wave frequency. The resulting spectral transport is nonlocal and anisotropic, sharply increasing perpendicular wavenumbers but not parallel ones. AWs and KAWs propagating against the pump AW grow with about the same rate and contribute to the sunward wave flux in the solar wind. Our results suggest that the nonlocal decay of MHD AWs into KAWs and KSWs is a robust mechanism for the cross-scale spectral transport of the wave energy from MHD to dissipative kinetic scales in the solar wind and similar media.

  2. Kinetic model for anaerobic digestion of biogas biological sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlostathis, S.G.; Gossett, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The principal objective of this study was the development and evaluation of a comprehensive kinetic model capable of predicting digester performance when fed biological sludge. Preliminary conversion mechanisms such as cell deaths, lysis, and hydrolysis responsible for rendering viable biological sludge organisms to available substrate were studied in depth. The results of this study indicate that hydrolysis of the dead, particulate biomass - primarily consisting of protein - is the slowest step, and therefore kinetically controls the overall process of an anaerobic digestion of biological sludge. A kinetic model was developed which could accurately describe digester performance and predict effluent quality.

  3. Isothermal Solid-State Transformation Kinetics Applied to Pd/Cu Alloy Membrane Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, Natalie L; Payzant, E Andrew; Ma, Yi Hua

    2010-01-01

    In this work, time-resolved, in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) was used to study the solid-state transformation kinetics of the formation of the fcc Pd/Cu alloy from Pd/Cu bi-layers for the purpose of fabricating sulfur tolerant Pd/Cu membranes for H2 separation. Thin layers of Pd and Cu (total ~15 wt% Cu) were deposited on porous stainless steel (PSS) with the electroless deposition method and annealed in H2 at 500, 550 and 600 C. The kinetics of the annealing process were successfully described by the Avrami nucleation and growth model showing that the annealing process was diffusion controlled and one dimensional. The activation energy for the solid-state transformation was 175 kJ/mol, which was similar to the activation energy of Pd-Cu bulk interdiffusion. Furthermore, the Avrami model was able to successfully describe the changes in permeance and activation energy observed in Pd/Cu alloy membranes during characterization as they were annealed at high temperatures.

  4. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  5. Kinetics of visible light photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals:Theory and in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yuan, C.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Ager III, J.W.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-11-14

    Photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals illuminated with visible laser light under ambient conditions was investigated. The photo-oxidation kinetics were monitored by in situ measurement of the crystalline Ge volume fraction by Raman spectroscopy. The effects of laser power and energy on the extent of oxidation were measured using both in situ and ex situ Raman scattering techniques. A mechanistic model in which the tunneling of photo-excited carriers to the oxide surface for electron activated molecular oxygen dissociation is proposed. This quantitative model successfully describes all experimental photo-oxidation observations using physical parameters.

  6. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  7. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry and polarimetry in high temperature fusion plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vvmirnov IP Address: 128.104.165.118 This content was downloaded on 09/07/2014 at 19:52 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry and polarimetry in high temperature fusion plasmas View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 113005 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/53/11/113005) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY

  8. Kinetic information from detonation front curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-15

    The time constants for time-dependent modeling may be estimated from reaction zone lengths, which are obtained from two sources One is detonation front curvature, where the edge lag is close to being a direct measure The other is the Size Effect, where the detonation velocity decreases with decreasing radius as energy is lost to the cylinder edge A simple theory that interlocks the two effects is given A differential equation for energy flow in the front is used, the front is described by quadratic and sixth-power radius terms The quadratic curvature comes from a constant power source of energy moving sideways to the walls Near the walls, the this energy rises to the total energy of detonation and produces the sixth-power term The presence of defects acting on a short reaction zone can eliminate the quadratic part while leaving the wall portion of the cuvature A collection of TNT data shows that the reaction zone increases with both the radius and the void fraction

  9. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kinetics of the Energetic Material HMX up to 3.6 GPa The effect of pressure on the thermal decomposition rate of the energetic material HMX was studied. HMX was...

  10. Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon acep01larson.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx ...

  11. Elucidating Hydrogen Oxidation/Evolution Kinetics in Base and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elucidating Hydrogen OxidationEvolution Kinetics in Base and Acid by Enhanced Activities at the Optimized Pt Shell Thickness on the Ru Core Citation Details In-Document Search...

  12. The kinetics of the [omega] to [alpha] phase transformation in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The kinetics of the omega to alpha phase transformation in Zr, Ti: Analysis of data from shock-recovered samples and atomistic simulations Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  13. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University Lviv Polytechnic, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  14. Moisture desorption rates from TATB-formulations: experiments and kinetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    models (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Moisture desorption rates from TATB-formulations: experiments and kinetic models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Moisture desorption rates from TATB-formulations: experiments and kinetic models Authors: Glascoe, E A ; Dinh, L N ; Small, W ; Overturf, G E Publication Date: 2012-01-19 OSTI Identifier: 1093909 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-528991 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name:

  15. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion

  16. Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations. Abstract not provided. Authors: Sparks, Elizabeth Schares ; Manginell, Ronald Paul Publication Date: 2011-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1106575 Report Number(s): SAND2011-7607C 464923 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: MSEC 105

  17. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Membraneless Fuel Cells (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Our work is focused on membraneless laminar flow fuel cells, an unconventional fuel cell technology, intended to create a system that not only avoids most typical fuel cell drawbacks, but also achieves the

  18. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide (Conference) | SciTech Connect kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Authors: Armstrong, M R ; Zaug, J M ; Grant, C D ; Crowhurst, J C ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-06-24 OSTI Identifier: 1149544 Report Number(s):

  19. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Parameters for Pyrolysis of Coal/Corn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of Coal/Corn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of Coal/Corn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis Authors:

  20. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Membraneless Fuel Cells (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Our work is focused on membraneless laminar flow fuel cells, an unconventional fuel cell technology, intended to create a system that not only avoids most

  1. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide (Conference) | SciTech Connect kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Authors: Armstrong, M R ; Zaug, J M ; Grant, C D ; Crowhurst, J C ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-06-24 OSTI Identifier: 1149544 Report Number(s):

  2. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  3. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(140) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(140) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(140) fibril formation. ? At high A?(140) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (140) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(140) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleationpolymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(140) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  4. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  5. Sandia Energy - Energy Surety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SMART...

  6. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  7. Combustion Energy Research Fellows - Combustion Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Combustion Energy Research Fellows Combustion Energy Research Fellows Enoch Dames Co-sponsored by Professor William H. Green, MIT, Professor Ronald K. Hanson, Stanford University, and Professor Hai Wang, University of Southern California. Dr. Dames will apply recently advanced uncertainty quantification/minimization tools and determination of multi-species time histories behind reflected shock waves towards the development of high-fidelity kinetic models for combustion applications.

  8. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-12-15

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  9. Sandia Energy Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity http:energy.sandia.govdoe-international-energy-stora...

  10. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  11. The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to W plasmas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to W plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to W plasmas This is the work of the LANL group on atomic kinetics modelling. There are various levels of detail in the LANL suite of atomic physics codes: (1) Non-relativistic configuration average kinetics (nl{sup w}) + UTA spectra, (2) Relativistic configuration average kinetics

  12. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comi?el, H.; Institute for Space Sciences, Atomi?tilor 409, P.O. Box MG-23, Bucharest-M?gurele RO-077125 ; Verscharen, D.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U.; Deutsches Zentrum fr Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fr Planetenforschung, Rutherfordstr. 2, D-12489 Berlin

    2013-09-15

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfvn/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  13. Generation kinetics of color centers in irradiated poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, J. S.; Li, C. L.; Lee, Sanboh; Chou, K. F.

    2011-09-15

    The transient absorbance of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (PMP) irradiated with gamma rays at elevated temperatures has been investigated. The absorbance in the ultraviolet and visible range increases with gamma ray dose. A bathochromic shift in transmission spectra emerges significantly upon irradiation. A first-order generation model is proposed to analyze the kinetics of color centers during annealing. The activation energy of the color center increases with increasing gamma ray dose. The equilibrium behavior of color centers in PMP is similar to that of vacancies in metals, and the formation energy of color centers in PMP decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. However, annealable color centers are not observed in this study.

  14. Kinetics of high-conversion hydrocracking of bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaishi, H.; Gray, M.R.; Chan, E.W.; Sanford, E.C.

    1995-12-31

    Residues are complex mixtures of thousands of components. This mixture will change during hydrocracking, so that high conversion may result in a residue material with different characteristics from the starting material. Our objective is to determine the kinetics of residue conversion and yields of distillates at high conversions, and to relate these observations to the underlying chemical reactions. Athabasca bitumen was reacted in a 1-L CSTR in a multipass operation. Product from the first pass was collected, then run through the reactor again and so on, giving kinetic data under conditions that simulated a multi-reactor or packed-bed operation. Experiments were run both with hydrocracking catalyst and without added catalyst. Products were analyzed by distillation, elemental analysis, NMR, and GPC. These data will be used to derive a kinetic model for hydrocracking of bitumen residue covering a wide range of conversion (from 30% to 95%+), based on the underlying chemistry.

  15. Performance of non-conventional factorization approaches for neutron kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulla, S.; Nervo, M.

    2013-07-01

    The use of factorization techniques provides a interesting option for the simulation of the time-dependent behavior of nuclear systems with a reduced computational effort. While point kinetics neglects all spatial and spectral effects, quasi-statics and multipoint kinetics allow to produce results with a higher accuracy for transients involving relevant modifications of the neutron distribution. However, in some conditions these methods can not work efficiently. In this paper, we discuss some possible alternative formulations for the factorization process for neutron kinetics, leading to mathematical models of reduced complications that can allow an accurate simulation of transients involving spatial and spectral effects. The performance of these innovative approaches are compared to standard techniques for some test cases, showing the benefits and shortcomings of the method proposed. (authors)

  16. Kinetic Alfvn wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Modi, K. V.; Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001

    2013-08-15

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvn wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvn wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvn wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  17. Computer-Aided Construction of Chemical Kinetic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, William H.

    2014-12-31

    The combustion chemistry of even simple fuels can be extremely complex, involving hundreds or thousands of kinetically significant species. The most reasonable way to deal with this complexity is to use a computer not only to numerically solve the kinetic model, but also to construct the kinetic model in the first place. Because these large models contain so many numerical parameters (e.g. rate coefficients, thermochemistry) one never has sufficient data to uniquely determine them all experimentally. Instead one must work in predictive mode, using theoretical rather than experimental values for many of the numbers in the model, and as appropriate refining the most sensitive numbers through experiments. Predictive chemical kinetics is exactly what is needed for computer-aided design of combustion systems based on proposed alternative fuels, particularly for early assessment of the value and viability of proposed new fuels before those fuels are commercially available. This project was aimed at making accurate predictive chemical kinetics practical; this is a challenging goal which requires a range of science advances. The project spanned a wide range from quantum chemical calculations on individual molecules and elementary-step reactions, through the development of improved rate/thermo calculation procedures, the creation of algorithms and software for constructing and solving kinetic simulations, the invention of methods for model-reduction while maintaining error control, and finally comparisons with experiment. Many of the parameters in the models were derived from quantum chemistry calculations, and the models were compared with experimental data measured in our lab or in collaboration with others.

  18. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Tanioka, Seiichi

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  19. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T.

    1993-12-01

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  20. Kinetic studies of protein L aggregation and disaggregation (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Kinetic studies of protein L aggregation and disaggregation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Kinetic studies of protein L aggregation and disaggregation No abstract prepared. Authors: Cellmer, Troy ; Douma, Rutger ; Huebner, Ansgar ; Prausnitz, John ; Blanch, Harvey Publication Date: 2006-09-30 OSTI Identifier: 927250 Report Number(s): LBNL--62337 Journal ID: ISSN 0301-4622; BICIAZ; R&D Project: 402201; BnR: KC0302040; TRN: US200811%%72 DOE Contract

  1. Recent advances in the kinetics of oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, R.

    1996-07-01

    Oxygen reduction is considered an important electrocatalytic reaction; the most notable need remains improvement of the catalytic activity of existing metal electrocatalysts and development of new ones. A review is given of new advances in the understanding of reaction kinetics and improvements of the electrocatalytic properties of some surfaces, with focus on recent studies of relationship of the surface properties to its activity and reaction kinetics. The urgent need is to improve catalytic activity of Pt and synthesize new, possibly non- noble metal catalysts. New experimental techniques for obtaining new level of information include various {ital in situ} spectroscopies and scanning probes, some involving synchrotron radiation. 138 refs, 18 figs, 2 tabs.

  2. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Totalmore » recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.« less

  3. Doppler-resolved kinetics of saturation recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forthomme, Damien; Hause, Michael L.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Sears, Trevor J.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-04-08

    Frequency modulated laser transient absorption has been used to monitor the ground state rotational energy transfer rates of CN radicals in a double-resonance, depletion recovery experiment. When a pulsed laser is used to burn a hole in the equilibrium ground state population of one rotational state without velocity selection, the population recovery rate is found to depend strongly on the Doppler detuning of a narrow-band probe laser. Similar effects should be apparent for any relaxation rate process that competes effectively with velocity randomization. Alternative methods of extracting thermal rate constants in the presence of these non-thermal conditions are evaluated. Total recovery rate constants, analogous to total removal rate constants in an experiment preparing a single initial rotational level, are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations, but are slower than previously reported experiments and show qualitatively different rotational state dependence between Ar and He collision partners. As a result, quasi-classical trajectory studies confirm that the differing rotational state dependence is primarily a kinematic effect.

  4. Ion Exchange Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site contains more than 53 million gallons of legacy waste generated as a byproduct of plutonium production and reprocessing operations. The wastes are a complex mixture composed mostly of NaNO3, NaNO2, NaOH, NaAlO2, Na3PO4, and Na2SO4, with a number of minor and trace metals, organics, and radionuclides stored in underground waste tanks. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) to build a pretreatment facility, the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP), that will separate long-lived transuranics (TRU) and highly radioactive components (specifically 137Cs and, in selected cases, 90Sr) from the bulk (non-radioactive) constituents and immobilize the wastes by vitrification. The plant is designed to produce two waste streams: a high-volume low-activity waste (LAW) and a low-volume high-activity waste (HLW).

  5. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small Nuclear Reactor Efficiency Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Sandia's Brayton-Cycle Turbine Boosts Small...

  6. Sandia Energy Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Energy Program Wins Two Federal Laboratory Consortium 2015 Awards http:energy.sandia.govsandias-energy-program-wins-two-federal-laboratory-consortium-2015-awards...

  7. Sandia Energy Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Participates in Preparation of New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Report http:energy.sandia.govsandia-participates-in-preparation-of-new-mexico-renewable-energy-storage-...

  8. Sandia Energy - Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Surety, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Grid Integration, Mesa del Sol, Microgrid, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Solar Mesa del Sol Unveils First...

  9. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  10. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  11. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2008-08-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran and co-workers for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet-stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels. (author)

  12. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  13. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-07

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS{sub 2} shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS{sub 2} surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS{sub 2} surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS{sub 2} monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  14. Extension of the quantum-kinetic model to lunar and Mars return physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liechty, D. S.; Lewis, M. J.

    2014-02-15

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high-mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. A recently introduced molecular-level chemistry model, the quantum-kinetic, or Q-K, model that predicts reaction rates for gases in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties, is extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. Like the Q-K procedures for neutral species chemical reactions, these new models are phenomenological procedures that aim to reproduce the reaction/transition rates but do not necessarily capture the exact physics. These engineering models are necessarily efficient due to the requirement to compute billions of simulated collisions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations. The new models are shown to generally agree within the spread of reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near equilibrium conditions.

  15. KINETIC MODELING OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN A SOLAR NULL-POINT RECONNECTION REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, G.; Haugbolle, T.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-07-10

    The primary focus of this paper is on the particle acceleration mechanism in solar coronal three-dimensional reconnection null-point regions. Starting from a potential field extrapolation of a Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) magnetogram taken on 2002 November 16, we first performed magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with horizontal motions observed by SOHO applied to the photospheric boundary of the computational box. After a build-up of electric current in the fan plane of the null point, a sub-section of the evolved MHD data was used as initial and boundary conditions for a kinetic particle-in-cell model of the plasma. We find that sub-relativistic electron acceleration is mainly driven by a systematic electric field in the current sheet. A non-thermal population of electrons with a power-law distribution in energy forms in the simulated pre-flare phase, featuring a power-law index of about -1.78. This work provides a first step toward bridging the gap between macroscopic scales on the order of hundreds of Mm and kinetic scales on the order of centimeter in the solar corona, and explains how to achieve such a cross-scale coupling by utilizing either physical modifications or (equivalent) modifications of the constants of nature. With their exceptionally high resolution-up to 135 billion particles and 3.5 billion grid cells of size 17.5 km-these simulations offer a new opportunity to study particle acceleration in solar-like settings.

  16. Kinetic features of xylan de-polymerization in production of xylose monomer and furfural during acid pretreatment for kenaf, forage sorghums and sunn hemp feedstocks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kamireddy, Srinivas Reddy; Kozliak, Evguenii I.; Tucker, Melvin; Ji, Yun

    2014-08-01

    A kinetic study of acid pretreatment was conducted for sorghum non-brown mid rib (SNBMR) (Sorghum bicolor L Moench), sorghum-brown mid rib (SBMR), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L) and kenaf (Gossypiumhirsutum L), focusing on rates of xylose monomer and furfural formation. The kinetics was investigated using two independent variables, reaction temperature (150 and 160°C) and acid concentration (1 and 2 wt%), with a constant dry biomass loading of 10 wt% and a treatment time up to 20 min while sampling the mixture every 2 min. The experimental data were fitted using a two-step kinetic model based on irreversible pseudo first ordermore » kinetics at each step. Varied kinetic orders on the acid concentration, ranging from 0.2 to >3, were observed for both xylose and furfural formation, the values depending on the feedstock. The crystallinity index of raw biomass was shown to be a major factor influencing the rate of both xylose and furfural formation. As a result, a positive correlation was observed between the activation energy and biomass crystallinity index for xylose formation.« less

  17. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 1.0 and 16.6 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics for the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Lee, Won Suk

    2014-05-14

    A commercially viable technology for producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs remains elusive. Short-term depressurization field tests have demonstrated the potential for producing natural gas via dissociation of the clathrate structure, but the long-term performance of the depressurization technology ultimately requires a heat source to sustain the dissociation. A decade of laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have demonstrated the exchange of pure CO2 and N2-CO2 mixtures with CH4 in sI gas hydrates, yielding critical information about molecular mechanisms, recoveries, and exchange kinetics. Findings indicated the potential for producing natural gas with little to no production of water and rapid exchange kinetics, generating sufficient interest in the guest-molecule exchange technology for a field test. In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after an extensive quality check. These data included continuous temperature and pressure logs, injected and recovered fluid compositions and volumes. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This investigation is directed at using numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the collected data. A numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was recently completed that solves conservation equations for energy, water, mobile fluid guest molecules, and hydrate guest molecules, for up to three gas hydrate guest molecules: CH4, CO2, and N2. The independent tracking of mobile fluid and hydrate guest molecules allows for the kinetic exchange of guest molecules between the mobile fluids and hydrate. The particular interest of this numerical investigation is to determine whether kinetic exchange parameters, determined from laboratory-scale experiments, are directly applicable to interpreting the Ignik Sikumi #1 data.

  19. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Over Five Years Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Systems Analysis Consortium for Advanced Simulation of...

  20. Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense...

  1. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS PART i: VOID KINETICS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    METALS PART i: VOID KINETICS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS PART i: VOID KINETICS We present a phase-field model of void ...

  2. Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea; Toops, Todd J; Daw, C Stuart

    2011-01-01

    We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

  3. (Competitive ion kinetics in director mass spectrometric organic speciation). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sieck, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    Essentially all of the completed/in progress studies during the last reporting period have involved the NBS pulsed electron beam high pressure mass spectrometer. Three distinct areas of research are recognizable; (1) determinations of binding energies and entropies for association and cluster ions, which is accomplished by measuring the temperature dependence of the equilibrium A/sup +/ or A/sup -/ + B in equilibrium A/sup +/.B or A/sup -/.B, (2) measurement of unimolecular rate constants for the thermal decomposition (pyrolysis of protonated organic molecules, and (3) evaluation of proton affinities and gas phase acidities via measurement of variable-temperature equilibria of the type AH/sup +/ + B in equilibrium BH/sup +/ + A and A/sup -/ + BH in equilibrium AH + B/sup -/. The various systems and classes of molecules chosen for study were those deemed most likely to provide fundamental new information on ion kinetics, ionic stabilities and ionic reaction mechanisms.

  4. Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom

    2012-01-01

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

  5. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Shuhuai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bakajin, Olgica [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  6. Fundamental and semi-global kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon combustion. Final report, March 1977-October 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryer, F L; Glassman, I; Brezinsky, K

    1981-03-01

    Over the past three and one half years, substantial research efforts of the Princeton Fuels Research Group have been directed towards the development of simplified mechanisms which would accurately describe the oxidation of hydrocarbons fuels. The objectives of this combustion research included the study of semi-empirical modeling (that is an overall description) of the chemical kinetic mechanisms of simple hydrocarbon fuels. Such fuels include the alkanes: ethane, propane, butane, hexane and octane as well as the critically important alkenes: ethene, propene and butene. As an extension to this work, the study of the detailed radical species characteristics of combustion systems was initiated as another major aspect of the program, with emphasis on the role of the OH and HO/sub 2/ radicals. Finally, the studies of important alternative fuel problems linked the program to longer range approaches to the energy supply question. Studies of alternative fuels composed the major elements of this area of the program. The efforts on methanol research were completed, and while the aromatics aspects of the DOE work have been a direct extension of efforts supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, they represented a significant part of the overall research effort. The emphasis in the proposed program is to provide further fundamental understanding of the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels which will be useful in guiding engineering approaches. Although the scope of program ranges from the fundamentals of chemical kinetics to that of alternative fuel combustion, the objective in mind is to provide insight and guidance to the understanding of practical combustion environments. The key to our approach has been our understanding of the fundamental combustion chemistry and its relation to the important practical combustion problems which exist in implementing energy efficient, alternate fuels technologies.

  7. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  8. On consistent kinetic and derivative interactions for gravitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noller, Johannes

    2015-04-17

    The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new candidate family of kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field — analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the ‘Jordan’ and ‘Einstein’ frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

  9. Isotope exchange kinetics in metal hydrides I : TPLUG model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Rich; James, Scott Carlton; Nilson, Robert H.

    2011-05-01

    A one-dimensional isobaric reactor model is used to simulate hydrogen isotope exchange processes taking place during flow through a powdered palladium bed. This simple model is designed to serve primarily as a platform for the initial development of detailed chemical mechanisms that can then be refined with the aid of more complex reactor descriptions. The one-dimensional model is based on the Sandia in-house code TPLUG, which solves a transient set of governing equations including an overall mass balance for the gas phase, material balances for all of the gas-phase and surface species, and an ideal gas equation of state. An energy equation can also be solved if thermodynamic properties for all of the species involved are known. The code is coupled with the Chemkin package to facilitate the incorporation of arbitrary multistep reaction mechanisms into the simulations. This capability is used here to test and optimize a basic mechanism describing the surface chemistry at or near the interface between the gas phase and a palladium particle. The mechanism includes reversible dissociative adsorptions of the three gas-phase species on the particle surface as well as atomic migrations between the surface and the bulk. The migration steps are more general than those used previously in that they do not require simultaneous movement of two atoms in opposite directions; this makes possible the creation and destruction of bulk vacancies and thus allows the model to account for variations in the bulk stoichiometry with isotopic composition. The optimization code APPSPACK is used to adjust the mass-action rate constants so as to achieve the best possible fit to a given set of experimental data, subject to a set of rigorous thermodynamic constraints. When data for nearly isothermal and isobaric deuterium-to-hydrogen (D {yields} H) and hydrogen-to-deuterium (H {yields} D) exchanges are fitted simultaneously, results for the former are excellent, while those for the latter show pronounced deviations at long times. These discrepancies can be overcome by postulating the presence of a surface poison such as carbon monoxide, but this explanation is highly speculative. When the method is applied to D {yields} H exchanges intentionally poisoned by known amounts of CO, the fitting results are noticeably degraded from those for the nominally CO-free system but are still tolerable. When TPLUG is used to simulate a blowdown-type experiment, which is characterized by large and rapid changes in both pressure and temperature, discrepancies are even more apparent. Thus, it can be concluded that the best use of TPLUG is not in simulating realistic exchange scenarios, but in extracting preliminary estimates for the kinetic parameters from experiments in which variations in temperature and pressure are intentionally minimized.

  10. A Pore Scale Evaluation of the Kinetics of Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation Reactions (EMSI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl I.

    2006-06-01

    The chief goals for CEKA are to (1) collect and synthesize molecular-level kinetic data into a coherent framework that can be used to predict time evolution of environmental processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales; (2) train a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on kinetic problems at multiple scales; (3) develop and promote the use of new experimental techniques in environmental kinetics; (4) develop and promote the use of new modeling tools to conceptualize reaction kinetics in environmental systems; and (5) communicate our understanding of issues related to environmental kinetics and issues of scale to the broader scientific community and to the public.

  11. Modeling the Kinetics of Deactivation of Catalysts during the Upgrading of Bio-Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Robert S.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Wang, Huamin

    2015-01-25

    The fouling of catalysts for the upgrading of bio-oils appears to be very different from the fouling of catalysts for the hydroprocessing of petroleum-derived streams. There are two reasons for the differences: a) bio-oil contains polarizable components and phases that can stabilize reaction intermediates exhibiting charge separation and b) bio-oil components contain functional groups that contain O, notably carbonyls (>C=O). Aldol condensation of carbonyls affords very different pathways for the production of oligomeric, refractory deposits than does dehydrogenation/polymerization of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons. Colloquially, we refer to the bio-oil derived deposits as gunk to discriminate them from coke, the carbonaceous deposits encountered in petroleum refining. Classical gelation, appears to be a suitable model for the gunking reaction. Our work has helped explain the temperature range at which bio-oil should be pre-processed (stabilized) to confer longer lifetimes on the catalysts used for more severe processing. Stochastic modeling (kinetic Monte Carlo simulations) appears suitable to capture the rates of oligomerization of bio-oil. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  12. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A. Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-28

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or ?-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10300?K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  13. Department of Energy - Energy Tomorrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 en Indian Energy Blog Archive http:energy.govindianenergylistingsindian-energy-blog-archive energy-blog-archive"...

  14. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and...

  15. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Be Featured on Upcoming Cover of Journal of Physical Chemistry B Analysis, Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, Fuel Options, Highlights - Energy Research,...

  16. Sandia Energy - Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Energy, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy Computer Power Clicks with Geochemistry Sandia is developing computer models that show how...

  17. Wind Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  18. Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  19. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ?¢) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  20. Vision Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vision Energy Place: Cincinnati, Ohio Zip: 45227 Sector: Wind energy Product: Vision Energy focuses on wind energy development and...

  1. Helium Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Helium Energy Place: Spain Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Spain-based renewable energy development company. References: Helium Energy1...

  2. Semplice Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Semplice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Semplice Energy Place: Reading, United Kingdom Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: Semplice Energy is an energy...

  3. Best Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Best Energy Place: Italy Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Italy-based energy company engaged in the development of renewable energy projects. References: Best Energy1 This...

  4. A kinetic approach to modeling the manufacture of high density strucutral foam: Foaming and polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Rekha R.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Noble, David R.; Brunini, Victor; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Celina, Mathias C.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Thompson, Kyle R.; Tinsley, James

    2015-09-01

    We are studying PMDI polyurethane with a fast catalyst, such that filling and polymerization occur simultaneously. The foam is over-packed to tw ice or more of its free rise density to reach the density of interest. Our approach is to co mbine model development closely with experiments to discover new physics, to parameterize models and to validate the models once they have been developed. The model must be able to repres ent the expansion, filling, curing, and final foam properties. PMDI is chemically blown foam, wh ere carbon dioxide is pr oduced via the reaction of water and isocyanate. The isocyanate also re acts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. A new kinetic model is developed and implemented, which follows a simplified mathematical formalism that decouple s these two reactions. The model predicts the polymerization reaction via condensation chemis try, where vitrification and glass transition temperature evolution must be included to correctly predict this quantity. The foam gas generation kinetics are determined by tracking the molar concentration of both water and carbon dioxide. Understanding the therma l history and loads on the foam due to exothermicity and oven heating is very important to the results, since the kinetics and ma terial properties are all very sensitive to temperature. The conservation eq uations, including the e quations of motion, an energy balance, and thr ee rate equations are solved via a stabilized finite element method. We assume generalized-Newtonian rheology that is dependent on the cure, gas fraction, and temperature. The conservation equations are comb ined with a level set method to determine the location of the free surface over time. Results from the model are compared to experimental flow visualization data and post-te st CT data for the density. Seve ral geometries are investigated including a mock encapsulation part, two configur ations of a mock stru ctural part, and a bar geometry to specifically test the density model. We have found that the model predicts both average density and filling profiles well. However, it under predicts density gradients, especially in the gravity direction. Thoughts on m odel improvements are also discussed.

  5. Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankar; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Aul, Christopher; Peterson, Eric

    2011-09-30

    This progress report documents the first year of the project, from October 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011. Laminar flame speeds and ignition delay times have been measured for hydrogen and various compositions of H2/CO (syngas) at elevated pressures and elevated temperatures. Two constant-volume cylindrical vessels were used to visualize the spherical growth of the flame through the use of a schlieren optical setup to measure the laminar flame speed of the mixture. Hydrogen experiments were performed at initial pressures up to 10 atm and initial temperatures up to 443 K. A syngas composition of 50/50 was chosen to demonstrate the effect of carbon monoxide on H2-O2 chemical kinetics at standard temperature and pressures up to 10 atm. All atmospheric mixtures were diluted with standard air, while all elevated-pressure experiments were diluted with a He:O2 of 7:1 to minimize hydrodynamic instabilities. The laminar flame speed measurements of hydrogen and syngas are compared to available literature data over a wide range of equivalence ratios where good agreement can be seen with several data sets. Additionally, an improved chemical kinetics model is shown for all conditions within the current study. The model and the data presented herein agree well, which demonstrates the continual, improved accuracy of the chemical kinetics model. A high-pressure shock tube was used to measure ignition delay times for several baseline compositions of syngas at three pressures across a wide range of temperatures. The compositions of syngas (H2/CO) presented in this study include 80/20, 50/50, 40/60, 20/80, and 10/90, all of which are compared to previously published ignition delay times from a hydrogen-oxygen mixture to demonstrate the effect of carbon monoxide addition. Generally, an increase in carbon monoxide increases the ignition delay time, but there does seem to be a pressure dependency. At low temperatures and pressures higher than about 12 atm, the ignition delay times appear to be indistinguishable with an increase in carbon monoxide. However, at high temperatures the composition of H2 and CO has a strong influence on ignition delay times. Model agreement is good across the range of the study, particularly at the elevated pressures. Also an increase in carbon monoxide causes the activation energy of the mixture to decrease.

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  7. Evaluation of kinetic phosphorescence analysis for the determination of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croatto, P.V.; Frank, I.W.; Johnson, K.D.; Mason, P.B.; Smith, M.M.

    1997-12-01

    In the past, New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has used a fluorometric method for the determination of sub-microgram quantities of uranium. In its continuing effort to upgrade and improve measurement technology, NBL has evaluated the commercially-available KPA-11 kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (Chemchek, Richland, WA). The Chemchek KPA-11 is a bench-top instrument which performs single-measurement, quench-corrected analyses for trace uranium. It incorporates patented kinetic phosphorimetry techniques to measure and analyze sample phosphorescence as a function of time. With laser excitation and time-corrected photon counting, the KPA-11 has a lower detection limit than conventional fluorometric methods. Operated with a personal computer, the state-of-the-art KPA-11 offers extensive time resolution and phosphorescence lifetime capabilities for additional specificity. Interferences are thereby avoided while obtaining precise measurements. Routine analyses can be easily and effectively accomplished, with the accuracy and precision equivalent to the pulsed-laser fluorometric method presently performed at NBL, without the need for internal standards. Applications of kinetic phosphorimetry at NBL include the measurement of trace level uranium in retention tank, waste samples, and low-level samples. It has also been used to support other experimental activities at NBL by the measuring of nanogram amounts of uranium contamination (in blanks) in isotopic sample preparations, and the determining of elution curves of different ion exchange resins used for uranium purification. In many cases, no pretreatment of samples was necessary except to fume them with nitric acid, and then to redissolve and dilute them to an appropriate concentration with 1 M HNO{sub 3} before measurement. Concentrations were determined on a mass basis ({micro}g U/g of solution), but no density corrections were needed since all the samples (including the samples used for calibration) were in the same density matrix (1 M HNO{sub 3}). A statistical evaluation of the determination of uranium using kinetic phosphorimetry is described in this report, along with a discussion of the method, and an evaluation of the use of plastic versus quartz cuvettes. Measurement with a precision of {+-} 3--4% relative standard deviation (RSD) and an accuracy of better than {+-} 2% relative difference (RD) are obtained in the 0.0006 to 5 {micro}g U/g-solution range. The instrument detection limit is 0.04 ppb (4 x 10{sup {minus}5} {micro}g U/g solution) using quartz cells, and 0.11 ppb (11 x 10{sup {minus}5} {micro}g U/g solution) using disposable methacrylate cuvettes.

  8. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  9. Convergent synthesis of proteins by kinetically controlled ligation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, Stephen (Chicago, IL); Pentelute, Brad (Chicago, IL); Bang, Duhee (Boston, MA); Johnson, Erik (Chicago, IL); Durek, Thomas (Chicago, IL)

    2010-03-09

    The present invention concerns methods and compositions for synthesizing a polypeptide using kinetically controlled reactions involving fragments of the polypeptide for a fully convergent process. In more specific embodiments, a ligation involves reacting a first peptide having a protected cysteyl group at its N-terminal and a phenylthioester at its C-terminal with a second peptide having a cysteine residue at its N-termini and a thioester at its C-termini to form a ligation product. Subsequent reactions may involve deprotecting the cysteyl group of the resulting ligation product and/or converting the thioester into a thiophenylester.

  10. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Silica | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A) washed, unreacted mesoporous silica (insert: cross section of a particle exhibiting the regular channel array structure), and mesoporous silica reacted with (B) 10 µM Sr, (C) 10 µM U at pH 4.0 with no carbonate and no calcium present, and (D) 10 µM U at pH 9.8 with

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic control of the lateral Si wire growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedyulin, Sergey N. Goncharova, Lyudmila V.

    2014-03-24

    Reproducible lateral Si wire growth has been realized on the Si (100) surface. In this paper, we present experimental evidence showing the unique role that carbon plays in initiating lateral growth of Si wires on a Si (100) substrate. Once initiated in the presence of ?5 ML of C, lateral growth can be achieved in the range of temperatures, T?=?450650?C, and further controlled by the interplay of the flux of incoming Si atoms with the size and areal density of Au droplets. Critical thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the growth are discussed in detail.

  12. Cascade annealing simulations of bcc iron using object kinetic Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Haixuan; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of displacement cascade annealing were carried out using object kinetic Monte Carlo based on an extensive MD database including various primary knock-on atom energies and directions. The sensitivity of the results to a broad range of material and model parameters was examined. The diffusion mechanism of interstitial clusters has been identified to have the most significant impact on the fraction of stable interstitials that escape the cascade region. The maximum level of recombination was observed for the limiting case in which all interstitial clusters exhibit 3D random walk diffusion. The OKMC model was parameterized using two alternative sets of defect migration and binding energies, one from ab initio calculations and the second from an empirical potential. The two sets of data predict essentially the same fraction of surviving defects but different times associated with the defect escape processes. This study provides a comprehensive picture of the first phase of long-term defect evolution in bcc iron and generates information that can be used as input data for mean field rate theory (MFRT) to predict the microstructure evolution of materials under irradiation. In addition, the limitations of the current OKMC model are discussed and a potential way to overcome these limitations is outlined.

  13. Understanding composite explosive energetics: 3, Reactive flow modeling of aluminum reaction kinetics in PETN and TNT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, W.C.; Tarver, C.M.; Ornellas, D.L.

    1991-12-06

    Using Fabry-Perot interferometry techniques, we have determined that early time rate of energy release from detonating PETN and TNT explosives filled with 5 and 10 wt % of either 5 {mu}m of 18 {mu}m spherical aluminum (Al) particles. From the measured particle velocity data, we are able to infer the reaction rate of aluminum with the detonation products, and calculate the extent of reaction 1--3 {mu}s after the detonation. We observed that a substantional portion of the aluminum metal in all of the PETN and TNE formulations reacted within the timeframe of the one-dimensional experiment. In the PETN formulation filed with 5 wt % of 5 {mu}m aluminum, all of the metal reacted within 1.5 {mu}s, resulting in an increase of 22% in energy compared to pure PETN. A reactive-flow hydrodynamic model based on the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) description of the reaction zone and subsequent reaction produce expansion (Taylor wave) is used to interpret the reaction rate of the aluminum particles with detonation product gases. The diffusion-controlled reaction mechanism for aluminum and the global kinetic parameters used in the model have been found to be consistent for all the PETN and TNT formulations.

  14. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Herein, we demonstrate physical/mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515. SLAC-PUB-16300 2 lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high performance Li-ion batteries.

  15. Shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma in a kinetic theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    One of the main results of heavy ions collision (HIC) at relativistic energy experiments is the very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, close to the conjectured lower bound ?/s=1/4? for systems in the infinite coupling limit. Transport coefficients like shear viscosity are responsible of non-equilibrium properties of a system: Green-Kubo relations give us an exact expression to compute these coefficients. We compute shear viscosity numerically using Green-Kubo relation in the framework of Kinetic Theory solving the relativistic transport Boltzmann equation in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. We investigate a system of particles interacting via anisotropic and energy dependent cross-section in the range of temperature of interest for HIC. Green-Kubo results are in agreement with Chapman-Enskog approximation while Relaxation Time approximation can underestimates the viscosity of a factor 2. The correct analytic formula for shear viscosity can be used to develop a transport theory with a fixed ?/s and have a comparison with physical observables like elliptic flow.

  16. Changes in the Zero-Point Energy of the Protons as the Source of the Binding Energy of Water to A-Phase DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiter, G. F.; Senesi, R.; Mayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6 water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Angst .

  17. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

  18. Solar kinetics` photovoltaic concentrator module and tracker development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.L.; Howell, B. [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc., has been developing a point-focus concentrating photovoltaic module and tracker system under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The primary focus of the contract was to achieve a module design that was manufacturable and passed Sandia`s environmental testing. Nine modules of two variations were assembled, tested, and characterized in Phase 1, and results of these tests were promising, with module efficiency approaching the theoretical limit achievable with the components used. The module efficiency was 11.9% at a solar irradiance of 850 W/m{sup 2} and an extrapolated cell temperature of 25{degrees}C. Improvements in module performance are anticipated as cell efficiencies meet their expectations. A 2-kW tracker and controller accommodating 20 modules was designed, built, installed, and operated at Solar Kinetics` test site. The drive used many commercially available components in an innovative arrangement to reduce cost and increase reliability. Backlash and bearing play were controlled by use of preloaded, low slip-stick, synthetic slide bearings. The controller design used a standard industrial programmable logic controller to perform ephemeris calculations, operate the actuators, and monitor encoders.

  19. Kinetics and deactivation of sulfated zirconia catalysts for butane isomerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogash, K.B.; Larson, R.B.; Gonzalez, M.R.

    1996-09-15

    Reaction kinetics studies were conducted of n-butane and isobutane isomerization over sulfated zirconia at 423 K. The kinetic data can be described well by a rate expression based on a reversible, bimolecular surface reaction between two adsorbed n-C{sub 4} species, probably through a C{sub 8} intermediate, to produce one i-C{sub 4} species, as well as surface reaction between two adsorbed i-C{sub 4} species to produce one n-C{sub 4} species. This reaction sequence also describes well the rates of C{sub 4}-disproportionation reactions to produce C{sub 3} and C{sub 5} species. The initial rate of catalyst deactivation is faster during n-butane isomerization than during isobutane isomerization, and the longer-term rate of deactivation during n-butane isomerization increases with the pressures of n-butane. The more rapid catalyst deactivation during n-butane isomerization may be related to the formation of n-C{sub 4}-diene species. 25 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Adding kinetics and hydrodynamics to the CHEETAH thermochemical code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fried, L.E., Howard, W.M., Souers, P.C.

    1997-01-15

    In FY96 we released CHEETAH 1.40, which made extensive improvements on the stability and user friendliness of the code. CHEETAH now has over 175 users in government, academia, and industry. Efforts have also been focused on adding new advanced features to CHEETAH 2.0, which is scheduled for release in FY97. We have added a new chemical kinetics capability to CHEETAH. In the past, CHEETAH assumed complete thermodynamic equilibrium and independence of time. The addition of a chemical kinetic framework will allow for modeling of time-dependent phenomena, such as partial combustion and detonation in composite explosives with large reaction zones. We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood detonation framework in CHEETAH, which allows for the treatment of nonideal detonations and explosive failure. A second major effort in the project this year has been linking CHEETAH to hydrodynamic codes to yield an improved HE product equation of state. We have linked CHEETAH to 1- and 2-D hydrodynamic codes, and have compared the code to experimental data. 15 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. CX-004960: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boeing Research and Technology -Low-Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage GridCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/13/2010Location(s): Kent, WashingtonOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  2. CX-004504: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Beacon Power 20 Megawatt Flywheel Frequency Regulation PlantCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11Date: 11/19/2010Location(s): Tyngsboro, MassachusettsOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-004955: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beacon Power -Development of a 100 Kilowatt Hour/1100 Kilowatt Flywheel Energy Storage ModuleCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/09/2010Location(s): Tyngsboro, MassachusettsOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  4. Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Hydrogen Infrastructure Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells ...

  5. KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROPERTIES, AND SOURCES (Conference) | SciTech Connect KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY, PROPERTIES, AND SOURCES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY, PROPERTIES, AND SOURCES Kinetic modeling is an important tool for engine design and can also be used for engine tuning and to study response to fuel chemistry and properties before an engine configuration is physically built and tested.

  6. Sandia Energy Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    c-liquids-create-more-sustainable-processesfeed 0 DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute Joins Elite '100500 Club' http:energy.sandia.govdoe-joint-bioenergy-institute-joins-elite-1005...

  7. Sandia Energy Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    c-liquids-create-more-sustainable-processesfeed 0 DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute Joins Elite '100500 Club' http:energy.sandia.govdoe-joint-bioenergy-institute-joins-elite-1005...

  8. Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  9. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Energy 101: Geothermal Energy Addthis Description See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity. Topic Geothermal Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Geothermal Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Geothermal Energy"

  10. Hydrolysis of late-washed, irradiated tetraphenylborate slurry simulants I: Phenylboric acid hydrolysis kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, J.C.

    2000-02-10

    The attached report details the kinetics of phenylboric acid reaction at 90 degrees C during precipitate hydrolysis processing of late-washed, irradiated tetraphenylborate slurry simulants.

  11. Photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN thin films: kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    films: kinetics and nanostructuring. Abstract not provided. Authors: Xiao, Xiaoyin ; Fischer, Arthur J. ; Coltrin, Michael E. ; Lu, Ping ; Koleske, Daniel ; Wang, George T. ;...

  12. KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY, PROPERTIES, AND SOURCES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY, PROPERTIES, AND ...

  13. Shaping the composition profiles in heteroepitaxial quantum dots: Interplay of thermodynamic and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgiou, C.; Leontiou, T.; Kelires, P. C.

    2014-07-15

    Atomistic Monte Carlo simulations, coupling thermodynamic and kinetic effects, resolve a longstanding controversy regarding the origin of composition profiles in heteroepitaxial SiGe quantum dots. It is shown that profiles with cores rich in the unstrained (Si) component derive from near-equilibrium processes and intraisland diffusion. Profiles with cores rich in the strained (Ge) component are of nonequilibrium nature, i.e., they are strain driven but kinetically limited. They are shaped by the distribution of kinetic barriers of atomic diffusion in the islands. The diffusion pathways are clearly revealed for the first time. Geometrical kinetics play a minor role.

  14. Gasdynamics in a coal seam. Part I: Mathematical description of the desorption kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2009-01-15

    The authors consider the gas desorption kinetics in the frame of a diffusion model, present alternative models and estimate their compatibility with the traditional.

  15. DOE/EA-1753 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BEACON POWER CORPORATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BEACON POWER CORPORATION FLYWHEEL FREQUENCY REGULATION PLANT, CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILLINOIS (SITE 1), AND HAZLE TOWNSHIP, PENNSYLVANIA (SITE 2) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Arpil 2011 DOE/EA-1753 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BEACON POWER CORPORATION FLYWHEEL FREQUENCY REGULATION PLANT, CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILLINOIS (SITE 1), AND HAZLE TOWNSHIP, PENNSYLVANIA (SITE 2) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology

  16. Isopiestic Kinetics of Powdered Pd/C/DPB Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinh, L; Saab, A

    2008-05-30

    In a 2006 LLNL internal report, a study of DEB and DPB based hydrogen getter materials was described. The materials, consisting of DEB or DPB physically blended with amorphous carbon on which palladium nanoparticle catalyst was supported, were studied during the course of reaction with fixed aliquots of hydrogen gas in order to observe their hydrogen consumption capacities as a function of ambient hydrogen pressure. The experiments demonstrated that the getter capacity was directly proportional to hydrogen fugacity: the lower the initial hydrogen pressure, the lower the resultant capacity at correspondingly low steady-state pressures. In the course of these experiments, further interesting observations were made of DEB and DPB reduction by hydrogen gas that painted a picture of a complicated reaction mechanism. To summarize, it was determined that reaction rate was controlled partly by diffusion of the organic diacetylene toward the catalyst surface. The results indicated this diffusion was in turn enhanced by phase changes in the course of the reaction that result in a liquid phase of the getter, and also by the heat of reaction, itself being proportional to initial reaction rate. However, these same two terms were speculated to have negative impacts on the net reaction kinetics, as well. It was suggested the liquid phase served to block gas access, and that excessively fast initial rates limited rate and capacity at later times by creating a depletion zone of reactant around the catalyst. Because of the nature of the experiments, whereby both hydrogen pressure and getter activity were changing in time, actual kinetic information could not be gathered. Knowledge of the reaction rate characteristics of these materials as a function of pressure and temperature is crucial to understanding the overall behavior of this material in service. Further, direct observation of the reaction rate can permit estimates of the diffusion of the reactive species. The present work centers on the development of an understanding of the kinetics for the hydrogenation of DPB and DEB as a function of temperature and pressure.

  17. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, Brian P

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and foreign ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer growth mechanism was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, -Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction. Extended time studies out to 45 days confirmed the epitaxial relationship of the overgrowth layer with the substrate. Under NSW conditions, overgrowths were found to have ~0.4 to 0.8 nm / hr growth rates and accommodating 4 at% Mg, resulting in a highly strained overgrowth layer. Following the initial layer by layer growth mechanism, the growth changes to Stranski-Krastanov type after a critical thickness of approximately 100 nm.

  18. Surface segregation effects in electrocatalysis: Kinetics ofoxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline Pt3Ni alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stamenkovic, V.; Schmidt, T.J.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-11-01

    Effects of surface segregation on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied on a polycrystalline Pt3Ni alloy in acid electrolyte using ultra high vacuum (UHV) surface sensitive probes and the rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) method. Preparation, modification and characterization of alloy surfaces were done in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Depending on the preparation method, two different surface compositions of the Pt3Ni alloy are produced: a sputtered surface with 75 % Pt and an annealed surface (950 K ) with 100 % Pt. The latter surface is designated as the 'Pt-skin' structure, and is a consequence of surface segregation, i.e., replacement of Ni with Pt atoms in the first few atomic layers. Definitive surface compositions were established by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS). The cyclic voltammetry of the 'Pt-skin' surface as well as the pseudocapacitance in the hydrogen adsorption/desorption potential region is similar to a polycrystalline Pt electrode. Activities of ORR on Pt3Ni alloy surfaces were compared to polycrystalline Pt in 0.1M HClO4 electrolyte for the observed temperature range of 293 < T < 333 K. The order of activities at 333 K was: 'Pt-skin' > Pt3Ni (75% Pt) > Pt with the maximum catalytic enhancement obtained for the 'Pt-skin' being 4 times that for pure Pt. Catalytic improvement of the ORR on Pt3Ni and 'Pt-skin' surfaces was assigned to the inhibition of Pt-OHad formation (on Pt sites) versus polycrystalline Pt. Production of H2O2 on both surfaces were similar compared to the pure Pt. Kinetic analyses of RRDE data confirmed that kinetic parameters for the ORR on the Pt3Ni and 'Pt-skin' surfaces are the same as on pure Pt: reaction order, m=1, two identical Tafel slopes, activation energy, {approx} 21-25 kJ/mol. Therefore the reaction mechanism on both Pt3Ni and 'Pt-skin' surfaces is the same as one proposed for pure Pt i.e. 4e{sup -} reduction pathway.

  19. Land Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Land Energy Place: North Yorkshire, United Kingdom Zip: YO62 5DQ Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: A renewable-energy company...

  20. Leonardo Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Transportation Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.leonardo-energy.org References: Leonardo Energy 1 "Leonardo...

  1. Energy News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Energy Department Announces Six Clean Energy Projects through Partnership with Israel U.S. Department of Energy and Israel's Ministry of National Infrastructure, Energy and...

  2. Conexia Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conexia Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Conexia Energy Place: Aix-en-Provence, France Zip: 13857 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: French renewable energy consulting and...

  3. Raz Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Raz Energy Place: Carolles, France Zip: 50740 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Carolles-based renewable energy consultancy and project...

  4. JMB Energie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: JMB Energie Place: Marseilles, France Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: JMB Energie is producer of green energy primarily through the...

  5. Solgal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Solgal Energy Name: Solgal Energy Address: Israel Place: Alon Hagalil Zip: 17920 Product: Renewable energy solutions Year Founded: 2008...

  6. Energy Insight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Insight Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Insight AgencyCompany Organization: Tendril Connect Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency...

  7. Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Below are resources for Tribes on energy efficiency. ... Source: Northwest SEED. Home and Building Technologies Basics Learn about energy ...

  8. Nature Energie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nature Energie Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nature Energie Place: France Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: French developer of wind and solar energy projects. References:...

  9. EVZA Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: EVZA Energy Place: Germany Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Waste disposal comapany involved with renewable energy in the form of...

  10. Simple Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Simple Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User...

  11. Also Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Also Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Also Energy Name: Also Energy Address: PO Box 17877 Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80308 Region: Rockies Area Product: Renewable Energy...

  12. Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Silicon Beams of Different Kinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keszenman D. J.; Keszenman, D.J.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Humans may b exposed to highly energetic charged particle radiation as a result of medical treatments, occupational activitie or accidental events. In recent years, our increasing presence and burgeoning interest in space exploration beyond low Earth orbit has led to a large increase in the research of the biological effects ofcharged particle radiation typical of that encountered in the space radiation environment. The study of the effects of these types of radiation qualities in terms ofDNA damage induction and repair is fundamental to understand mechanisms both underlying their greater biological effectiveness as we)) as the short and long term risks of health effects such as carcinogenesis, degen rative diseases and premature aging. Charged particle radiation induces a variety of DNA alterations, notably bistranded clustered damages, defined as two or more closely-opposed strand break , oxidized bases or abasic sites within a few helical turns. The induction of such highly complex DNA damage enhances the probability of incorrect or incomplete repair and thus constitutes greater potential for genomic instability, cell death and transformation.

  14. On the nature of kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-03-15

    An analytical theory is proposed for the kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves originally found in simulations by Afeyan et al. [arXiv:1210.8105]. We suggest that KEEN waves represent saturated states of the negative mass instability (NMI) reported recently by Dodin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)]. Due to the NMI, trapped electrons form macroparticles that produce field oscillations at harmonics of the bounce frequency. At large enough amplitudes, these harmonics can phase-lock to the main wave and form stable nonlinear dissipationless structures that are nonstationary but otherwise similar to Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. The theory explains why the formation of KEEN modes is sensitive to the excitation scenario and yields estimates that agree with the numerical results of Afeyan et al. A new type of KEEN wave may be possible at even larger amplitudes of the driving field than those used in simulations so far.

  15. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  16. On the kinetic barriers of graphene homo-epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xinke; Xie, Ya-Hong; Cahyadi, Erica; Ratsch, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The diffusion processes and kinetic barriers of individual carbon adatoms and clusters on graphene surfaces are investigated to provide fundamental understanding of the physics governing epitaxial growth of multilayer graphene. It is found that individual carbon adatoms form bonds with the underlying graphene whereas the interaction between graphene and carbon clusters, consisting of 6 atoms or more, is very weak being van der Waals in nature. Therefore, small carbon clusters are quite mobile on the graphene surfaces and the diffusion barrier is negligibly small (?6?meV). This suggests the feasibility of high-quality graphene epitaxial growth at very low growth temperatures with small carbon clusters (e.g., hexagons) as carbon source. We propose that the growth mode is totally different from 3-dimensional bulk materials with the surface mobility of carbon hexagons being the highest over graphene surfaces that gradually decreases with further increase in cluster size.

  17. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L.

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  18. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-02-13

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  19. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  20. Temperature estimates from zircaloy oxidation kinetics and microstructures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    This report reviews state-of-the-art capability to determine peak zircaloy fuel rod cladding temperatures following an abnormal temperature excursion in a nuclear reactor, based on postirradiation metallographic analysis of zircaloy microstructural and oxidation characteristics. Results of a comprehensive literature search are presented to evaluate the suitability of available zircaloy microstructural and oxidation data for estimating anticipated reactor fuel rod cladding temperatures. Additional oxidation experiments were conducted to evaluate low-temperature zircaloy oxidation characteristics for postirradiation estimation of cladding temperature by metallographic examination. Results of these experiments were used to calculate peak cladding temperatures of electrical heater rods and nuclear fuel rods that had been subjected to reactor temperature transients. Comparison of the calculated and measured peak cladding temperatures for these rods indicates that oxidation kinetics is a viable technique for estimating peak cladding temperatures over a broad temperature range. However, further improvement in zircaloy microstructure technology is necessary for precise estimation of peak cladding temperatures by microstructural examination.

  1. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbook, C K; Mehl, M

    2008-10-30

    Hydrocarbon fuels for advanced combustion engines consist of complex mixtures of hundreds or even thousands of different components. These components can be grouped into a number of chemically distinct classes, consisting of n-paraffins, branched paraffins, cyclic paraffins, olefins, oxygenates, and aromatics. Biodiesel contains its own unique chemical class called methyl esters. The fractional amounts of these chemical classes are quite different in gasoline, diesel fuel, oil-sand derived fuels and bio-derived fuels, which contributes to the very different combustion characteristics of each of these types of combustion systems. The objectives of this project are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  2. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  3. An efficient method for unfolding kinetic pressure driven VISAR data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James

    2015-08-18

    Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) [Barker and Hollenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 43, 4669 (1972)] is a well-known diagnostic that is employed on many shock physics and pulsed-power experiments. With the VISAR diagnostic, the velocity on the surface of any metal flyer can be found. For most experiments employing VISAR, either a kinetic pressure [Grady, Mech. Mater. 29, 181 (1998)] or a magnetic pressure [Lemke et al., Intl J. Impact Eng. 38, 480 (2011)] drives the motion of the flyer. Moreover, reliable prediction of the time-dependent pressure is often a critical component to understanding the physics of these experiments. Although VISAR can provide a precise measurement of a flyers surface velocity, the real challenge of this diagnostic implementation is using this velocity to unfold the time-dependent pressure. The purpose of this study is to elucidate a new method for quickly and reliably unfolding VISAR data.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B4.6 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B4.6 Existing Regulations B4.6: Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities within a previously disturbed or developed facility area. Covered activities include, but are not limited to, switchyard rock grounding upgrades, secondary containment projects, paving projects, seismic upgrading, tower modifications, load shaping projects (such as the installation and use of flywheels

  6. EA-1631: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1631: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation Frequency Regulation Facility in Stephentown, N.Y. The environmental assessment examines the potential environmental impacts associated with issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Beacon Power Corporation for construction and operation of a flywheel-based frequency regulation facility at an undeveloped seven acre site in Stephentown, New York. PDF icon Environmental Assessment

  7. Wind Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  8. Aquion Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aquion Energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  9. Renewable Energy

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    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  10. Renewable Energy

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    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  11. Energy Efficiency

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    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  12. Energy Research

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    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  13. Energy Research

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    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  14. Energy Staff

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    Staff - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  15. Energy Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events, SMART Grid DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity Berkeley, California, USA, (October 21, 2013) - /PRNewswire-USNewswire/

  16. Energy Efficiency

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    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  17. Energy Efficiency

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  18. Energy Efficiency

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    4 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  19. Energy Efficiency

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    5 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  20. Energy Research

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    4 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  1. Energy Research

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  2. Energy Storage

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  3. Energy Storage

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  4. Energy Storage

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  5. Energy Storage

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  6. Energy Surety

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  7. Energy Research

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  8. Sandia Energy Nuclear Energy

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    afety-expert-elected-to-national-academy-of-engineeringfeed 0 Sandia Teaches Nuclear Safety Course http:energy.sandia.govsandia-teaches-nuclear-safety-course http:...

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    Sandian's Receive Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program Achievement Award http:energy.sandia.govsandians-receive-hydrogen-and-fuel-cell-program-achievement-award-2 http:...

  12. Sandia Energy - Energy Assurance

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    of Energy's Fuel Cell Technology Office, cut the ribbon to initiate the Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell project to test a hydrogen-fuel-cell-powered generator at Young...

  13. Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open...

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  14. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  15. Energy conversion & storage program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program investigates state-of-the-art electrochemistry, chemistry, and materials science technologies for: (1) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (2) development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; (3) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; (4) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  16. Kinetic study of the oxidation of n-butane on vanadium oxide supported on Al/Mg mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dejoz, A.; Vazquez, I.; Nieto, J.M.L.; Melo, F.

    1997-07-01

    The reaction kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of n-butane over vanadia supported on a heat-treated Mg/Al hydrotalcite (37.3 wt % of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) was investigated by both linear and nonlinear regression techniques. A reaction network including the formation of butenes (1-, 2-cis-, and 2-trans-butene), butadiene, and carbon oxides by parallel and consecutive reactions, at low and high n-butane conversions, has been proposed. Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) models can be used as suitable models which allows reproduction of the global kinetic behavior, although differences between oxydehydrogenation and deep oxidation reactions have been observed. Thus, the formation of oxydehydrogenation products can be described by a LH equation considering a dissociative adsorption of oxygen while the formation of carbon oxides is described by a LH equation with a nondissociative adsorption of oxygen. Two different mechanisms operate on the catalyst: (i) a redox mechanism responsible of the formation of olefins and diolefins and associated to vanadium species, which is initiated by a hydrogen abstraction; (ii) a radical mechanism responsible of the formation of carbon oxides from n-butane and butenes and associated to vanadium-free sites of the support. On the other hand, the selectivity to oxydehydrogenation products increases with the reaction temperature. This catalytic performance can be explained taking into account the low reducibility of V{sup 5+}-sites and the higher apparent activation energies of the oxydehydrogenation reactions with respect to deep oxidation reactions.

  17. Isothermal kinetic of phase transformation and mixed electrical conductivity in Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.P.; Corbel, G.; Kodjikian, S.; Fang, Q.F.; Lacorre, P. . E-mail: Philippe.Lacorre@univ-lemans.fr

    2006-11-15

    Bismuth niobate (Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}) exists under two crystallographic modifications, a tetragonal (type-III) phase between 800 and 900 deg. C, and a pseudocubic (type-II) phase above and below this thermal range. The quenching at room temperature of pseudocubic type-II phase made it possible to carry out a detailed study of the transformation kinetics of this metastable type-II phase to the stable type-III phase, using isothermal in situ X-ray diffraction. The obtained Avrami exponent and activation energy for the transition are around 2.5 and 3.25 eV, respectively. The value of the Avrami exponent is consistent with a three-dimensional diffusion-controlled transformation with constant nucleation rate. Investigations of electrical properties using AC impedance spectroscopy and Wagner polarization method show that the tetragonal phase exhibits higher ionic and electronic conductivities than those of the pseudocubic form. Such a deviation is likely to originate from different distributions of cations/electronic-lone-pairs and oxygen vacancies. - Graphical abstract: The metastable type-II form of Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, whose phase transformation kinetics to type-III form is studied in isothermal conditions, is shown to have a larger volume and a lower anionic (and electronic) conductivity than the type-III form of thisorite-type bismuth niobate.

  18. Canonical and kinetic forms of the electromagnetic momentum in an ad hoc quantization scheme for a dispersive dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.C.; Chiao, R.Y.

    2004-11-01

    An ad hoc quantization scheme for the electromagnetic field in a weakly dispersive, transparent dielectric leads to the definition of canonical and kinetic forms for the momentum of the electromagnetic field in a dispersive medium. The canonical momentum is uniquely defined as the operator that generates spatial translations in a uniform medium, but the quantization scheme suggests two possible choices for the kinetic momentum operator, corresponding to the Abraham or the Minkowski momentum in classical electrodynamics. Another implication of this procedure is that a wave packet containing a single dressed photon travels at the group velocity through the medium. The physical significance of the canonical momentum has already been established by considerations of energy and momentum conservation in the atomic recoil due to spontaneous emission, the Cerenkov effect, the Doppler effect, and phase matching in nonlinear optical processes. In addition, the data of the Jones and Leslie radiation pressure experiment is consistent with the assignment of one ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k unit of canonical momentum to each dressed photon. By contrast, experiments in which the dielectric is rigidly accelerated by unbalanced electromagnetic forces require the use of the Abraham momentum.

  19. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange in ?-phase Pd-H-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Weifang; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen isotope gas exchange within palladium powders is examined using a batch-type reactor coupled to a residual gas analyzer (RGA). Furthermore, the exchange rates in both directions (H2 + PdD and D2 + PdH) are measured in the temperature range 178323 K for the samples with different particle sizes. The results show this batch-type exchange is closely approximated as a first-order kinetic process with a rate directly proportional to the surface area of the powder particles. An exchange rate constant of 1.40 0.24 ?mol H2/atm cm2 s is found for H2 + PdD at 298 K, 1.4 times higher than that for D2 + PdH, with an activation energy of 25.0 3.2 kJ/mol H for both exchange directions. Finally, a comparison of exchange measurement techniques shows these coefficients, and the fundamental exchange probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by NMR and flow techniques.

  20. Kinetics of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange in ?-phase Pd-H-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Weifang; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen isotope gas exchange within palladium powders is examined using a batch-type reactor coupled to a residual gas analyzer (RGA). Furthermore, the exchange rates in both directions (H2 + PdD and D2 + PdH) are measured in the temperature range 178323 K for the samples with different particle sizes. The results show this batch-type exchange is closely approximated as a first-order kinetic process with a rate directly proportional to the surface area of the powder particles. An exchange rate constant of 1.40 0.24 ?mol H2/atm cm2 s is found for H2 + PdD at 298 K, 1.4 times higher than that for D2 + PdH, with an activation energy of 25.0 3.2 kJ/mol H for both exchange directions. Finally, a comparison of exchange measurement techniques shows these coefficients, and the fundamental exchange probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by NMR and flow techniques.